DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Friday, 11 January, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1813-

White Horse

Open 2019+

The Cross

Bilsington

01233 721487

http://thewhitehorse-bilsington.co.uk/

White Horse 2009

Above photo 2009 by Nick Smith Creative Commons Licence.

White Horse 2015

Above photo by Paul Skelton, 27 June 2015.

White Horse sign 1991White Horse sign 2015

Above sign left, July 1991, sign right 2015.

With thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com.

White Horse sign 2015White Horse sign

Above signs 2015. Taken by Paul Skelton, 27 June 2015.

 

The property dates from the late 18th century and is a Grade II listed building. I am informed that the pub was trading as a free house in 2015.

 

The 1861 census referred to this as the "Cross Inn" as the address is The Cross, so I assume this was an error on the part of the census.

 

Kentish Weekly Post or Canterbury Journal, Friday 02 April 1813.

OAK TIMBER.

To be sold by auction, at the "White Horse," Bilsington Cross, on Saturday the 10th day of April, at one o'clock.

Sundry Lots of Oak Timber, now marked and standing in Golden Wood, in the parish of Aldington, subject to the conditions then produced.

March 13, 1813.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 03 June 1933.

Youth association with widow. Leads to fight with brother.

Bilsington man in assault case.

Details of a 20 year old youth association with a 30 year old widow, the mother of three children, contrary to his parents wishes, and a fight with his 24 year old brother, were told during the hearing of an assault case at Elham Petty Sessions on Thursday.

Don Newman, of the "White Horse," Bilsington, Miller, was charged with assaulting Lily Agnes Talana Ridgwell, of St Martin's Cottage, Aldington, on May 18th, at Aldington.

He was found guilty and fined 2 7s. including costs, and was bound over for 12 months.

The Magistrates were Colonel E. R. Wayland (in the chair), Mr. Charles Sheath, Mr. J. J. Clayson, Major J. G. Welch and Councillor J. S. Clarke.

Mr. J. Mowll appeared for Newman, who pleaded not guilty.

Mrs. Redgwell, in evidence, said she was returning home from Dymchurch on May 18th with defendants brother, Sydney Newman, both of them riding bicycles, when the defendant came along on a motorcycle from behind them. He jumped off his machine whilst it was still going, and it ran into the hedge. He came up to his brother and struck him, and when his brother turned around to speak to her, defendant struck her on the face. He punched her on the right side of jaw, and knocked her down. Next she remembered seeing the two brothers fighting, and she got up and went between them to stop them. Defendant afterwards picked up his machine and rode off calling out names to her. Witness wrote the names on a piece of paper, which was handed to the Magistrates. Knew of parents objection.

She had no previous quarrel with John Newman. He had not raised any objections to her going out with his brother, but his people had. She sought a doctor on the following day.

Cross examined by Mr. Mowll, Mrs. Ridgewell said she knew Sydney Newman was 20 years of age. It was a fact that his parents objected to his going out with her. She was 30 years of age, and had three children.

On the morning after the alleged assault she was able to cycle to work.

Mr. Mowll:- Was not this trouble due to the fact that you interviewed between the two brothers?

I did not interfere.

Did you hear the defendant sat to his brother "Isn't it nearly time this game finished?

No, all he said was that he was to go home as his mother was lying very ill.

Did Sydney Newman say: "So this is what you are doing, chasing about after me?"

No.

Dr. A. E. MacMillan, New Romney, said he saw Mrs. Redgwell on May 19th, and she was suffering from a contusion on the right side of the lower jaw, bruising on the surface of the lip, and two lose teeth on the right side of the jaw. The injuries were consistent with the possibility of her having been struck, it would have been a fairly heavy blow.

The Chairman:- Could it have been caused by her falling off a bicycle?

Yes, it could, but I think it is more likely that it was caused by a blow.

Cross examined by Mr. Mowll, witness said the injuries could not be serious, but it was possible for injuries caused by a blow to turn serious.

Turned out of home.

Sydney Newman was then called, and gave corroborative evidence regarding the alleged incident.

Mr. Miller:- Do you know your parents have a strong objection to your association with Mrs. Redgwell, and have done their best to keep you from meeting her?

Yes.

Do you live at home with your parents?

I have been.

You have been out of work?

Yes.

And they have been keeping you?

Yes.

As far as Mrs. Redgwell is concerned you have had no regard for your parents?

I was turned out of home.

When?

The day before this happened.

Because you have been associated with Mrs. Redgwell?

Yes.

This concluded the evidence for the prosecution.

Mr. Mowll, addressing the Bench, said he could call his client to make a complete denial of assault. He would say that is struck Mrs. Redgwell, purely by accident, when she attempted to separate him from his brother when they were fighting. He was very sorry for having struck a woman, but it was an accident, and he thought, when the Bench had before them the reason for that, their sympathies would be very much with the Newmans' parents. There was a young man, not yet of age, going out with a woman considerably older than himself; his parents doing all they could to stop what they considered an association which should not be. It had all come about through Mrs. Redgwell. The brother was only acting for his parents in trying to get the youth away. It was not surprising that they came to blows.

Without discipline.

He hoped, for the future piece of the family, if such a thing could be, that the Bench would caution all parties in the case, and leave it at that, because it was a disgraceful thing that a boy out of work, his parents looking after him, a boy without any sort of discipline in his life except the discipline his brother was trying to exercise, could be taken away by Mrs. Redgwell.

The Clerk:- You are not suggesting that there is anything criminal in a boy going out with a woman on bicycles?

Well, the boy is under age, and it is not right.

The Magistrates retired, and upon their return, the Chairman said Newman was found guilty of assaulting Mrs. Redgwell, and would be fined 20s., with one 1 and 7s. costs, and would be bound over for 12 months in the sum of 5.

Newman asked for time to pay, and was allowed one month.

 

I am informed that of August 2018 the pub was under sale for an asking price of 599,950.

 

LICENSEE LIST

RANSLEY William 1828+ Pigot's Directory 1828-29

EPPS James 1832+ Pigot's Directory 1832-34

STOKES John 1851+ (also grocer age 32 in 1851Census)

PARSONS George 1861+ (age 35 in 1861Census)

BALES Michael 1871+ Census

BATES Rebekah 1891+ (widow age 66 in 1891Census)

HOWLAND George T 1901+ (age 35 in 1901Census)

http://pubshistory.com/WhiteHorseInn.shtml

https://www.whatpub.com/white-horse

 

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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