DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Sunday, 07 March, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1867

(Name from)

Kentish Rifleman

Open 2020+

Roughway Lane

Dunks Green

01732 810727

http://www.thekentishrifleman.co.uk/

https://whatpub.com/kentish-rifleman

Kentish Rifleman

Above photo, circa 1930.

Kentish Rifleman 1930s

Above photo, circa 1930.

Kentish Rifleman group 1949

Above photo showing unknown group circa 1949. Kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Kentish Rifleman

Above postcard, date unknown.

Above photo by Paul Bailey, 2012.

Kentish Rifleman inside 2012

Above photo by Paul Bailey, 2012.

Kentish Rifleman inside 2012

Above photo by Paul Bailey, 2012.

Kentish Rifleman sign 2012Kentish Rifleman sign pre 2015

Above sign left 2012 sign right, pre 2015.

Awaiting reverse picture of Whitbread sign.

Kentish Rifleman card 1955

Above card issued March 1955. Sign series 4 number 17.

 

Originally built in about 1550, the pub was called the "Red Lion" and by 1861 it was going under the name of the "Oxenhoath Yeoman" but by 1867 this had changed to the "Kentish Rifleman."

The "Kentish Rifleman" on their 1987 sign was actually an old Home Guard soldier.

 

Following information from their web site, accessed 1 May 2016.

Mr Dunk was a local merchant who made his money in the early 16th Century, building his family home, now called the Roses, in about 1550. When the hamlet became “Dunk’s Green" is not clear, but the pub was built just a few years later, and, unusually, has been an ale-house and tavern from the outset.

It was called the "Red Lion" (still today the most popular pub name in the country) until 1867 when it was changed to the "Kentish Rifleman," probably to boost its image as a militia recruitment post. Dunk’s Green is in the parish of Shipbourne, and both are classified as areas of outstanding beauty; the walks and the views are both plentiful and exceptional. The famous Battle of Dunk's Green... if you want to find out more, you'll have to visit the pub!

 

From the Kent and Sussex Courier, Friday 11 January 1878.

Shipbourne. Keeping open during prohibited hours.

At the Tonbridge Petty sessions on Tuesday last, Jonathan Jury, of the "Kentish Rifleman," Dunk's Green, was summoned for unlawfully keeping open his licensed premises for the sale of intoxicating liquors at Shipbourne, on the 22nd December last.

The defendant pleaded guilty.

Instructing Constable Spriggett, of Wrotham, said that on the night of 22nd December last at about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock, he visited the defendant's house, and their found three men in the bar named Hayes, Baker, and Barton, in front of a table, on which was a pint pot, about half full of beer. he drew the landlord's attention to the time, as he should have closed at 10 o'clock. The landlord said he thought that last pint would do it. Hayes said, "I have not had a drink yet, shall I drink this?" The landlord said "Oh yes, drink it up, it won't make it any worse than it is."

The Chairman. (Mr Hankey) Have you any complaint to make against Mr. Jury's house?

Superintendent Kewell said the witness was a constable of the adjoining division, and knew very little of the house. The defendant had admitted that he had allowed gambling in his house.

Sir. David Solomons:- Have you any proof of any?

Superintendent Kewell:- There was a boy, 14 years of age, who defendant admitted her gambled.

The Chairman:- The Bench are of opinion that this is really a very serious case. It is impossible that they can pass over it, and they determine that you should be fined 20s. and costs, and that your licence shall be indorsed. Had the licence not been indorsed, the fine would have been much heavier. You hold a position in the parish with which I am well acquainted, and it is a very serious evil, that you, who ought to know better, and ought to keep a respectable house, should allow anything of an improper character to go on. They hope it will be a warning to you, or your licence will certainly be refused on the next licensing day.

Defendant:- I was not aware that this thing they call "Honest Ben" was gambling.

Superintendent Keywell:- You are not charged with that to day.

The Chairman:- You are charged with keeping open your house at unlicensed hours for the sale of intoxicating liquors, and that you know is an offence against the law.

Defendant:- I know it was after ten o'clock, but I did not know it was so late.

The Chairman:- The Bench feel bound to take notice of it, as they mean to do in all cases where similar offences are committed.

George Hayes, George Baker, and George Barton pleaded guilty of being in the house at the time, and they were each fined 2s. 6d. and costs.

 

Kent & Sussex Courier 03 May 1878.

SHIPBOURNE. TEMPORARY AUTHORITY.

At the Tonbridge Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, temporary authority was granted to Joseph Daniels to carry on the "Kentish Rifleman" public-house, at Shipbourne, until next transfer day.

 

Kent & Sussex Courier, Friday 30 August 1878.

Our public houses.

The following report was laid before the Justice's on Tuesday by Superintendent Kewell:- Kent County Constabulary, Tunbridge division, 27th August, 1878.

The "Kentish Rifleman" Ale House, Shipbourne, which on 22nd December, 1877, was kept by Jonathan Jewry, who was fined 1 and costs, and conviction endorsed on licence. This licence has since been transferred to Joseph Daniel's, who has conducted it well.

 

Kent & Sussex Courier 15 August 1879.

SHIPBOURNE. TEMPORARY AUTHORITY.

At the Tonbridge Petty Sessions, on Tuesday last, temporary authority was granted to William Smith to carry on the business of the "Kentish Rifleman," at Shipbourne, till transfer day.

 

From the Kent and Sussex Courier, 11 January, 1878.

SHIPB0URNE.

Keeping open during Prohibited Hours.

At the Tonbridge Petty Sessions on Tuesday last, Jonathan Jury, of the "Kentish Rifleman," Dunk's Green, was summoned for unlawfully keeping open his licensed premises for the sale of intoxicating liquors at Shipbourne, on the 22nd December last.

The defendant pleaded guilty.

Instructing Constable Spriggett, of Wrotham, said that on the night of 22nd December last at about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock, he visited the defendant's house, and there found three men in the bar named Hayes, Baker, and Barton, in front of a table, on which was a pint pot, about half full of beer. He drew the landlords attention to the time, as he should have closed at ten o'clock. The landlord said he thought that last pint would do it. Hayes said, "I have not had a drink yet, Shall I drink this? The landlord said “ Oh yes. drink it up, it won't make it any the worse than it is.”

The Chairman: (Mr Hankey) Have you any complaint to make against Mr Jury's house?

Supt. Kewell said the witness was a constable of the adjoining division, and knew very little of the house. The defendant had admitted that he had allowed gambling in his house.

Sir. David Salomons: Have you proof of any?

Supt. Kewell: There was a boy, fourteen years of age, who defendant admitted had gambled.

The Chairman: The Bench are of opinion that this is really a very serious case. It is impossible that they can pass over it, and they determine that you should be fined 20s. and costs, and that your license shall be endorsed. Had the license not been endorsed, the fine would have been much heavier. You hold a position in the parish with which I am well acquainted, and it is a very serious evil, that you, who ought to know better, and ought to keep a respectable house, should allow anything of an improper character to go on. They hope it will be a warning to you, or your license will certainly be refused on the next licensing day.

Defendant: I was not aware that this thing they call “Honest Ben" was gambling.

Supt. Kewell: You are not charged with that to day.

The Chairman: You are charged with keeping open your house at unlicensed hours for the sale of intoxicating liquors, and that you know is an offence against the law.

Defendant: I know it was after ten o'clock, but I did not know it was so late.

The Chairman: The Bench feel bound to take notice of it, as they mean to do in all cases where similar offences are committed.

George Hayes, George Baker, and George Barton pleaded guilty to being in the house at the time, and they were each fined 2s. 6d. and costs.

 

From the Kent and Sussex Courier, 26 March, 1880.

REFUSING TO QUIT LICENSED PREMISES.

At the Tonbridge Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, George Baker, butcher, of Roughway, was summoned by David Banfield, landlord of the "Kentish Rifleman," Shipbourne for being riotous, disorderly, and refusing to quit the licensed premises when requested to do so, on the 16 th inst.

Defendant pleaded guilty.

The complainant said he did not want to press the charge harshly against the defendant. The defendant, who was drunk, became quarrelsome, and then he requested him to leave he became very abusive and used obscene language.

Supt. Barnes said he had no idea the complainant desired to withdraw the case or he should have summoned the man himself, as he was very drunk and riotous in the road, and wanted to fight the constable.

P.C. Burton said he saw the landlord put the defendant out into the road. He (witness) picked the defendant up, and to him home. On the way he pulled off his coat and wanted to fight him.

The Bench said the defendant had been guilty of most disgraceful conduct and he would be fined 10s. and costs.

 

Kent & Sussex Courier 20 July 1934.

TICEHURST. DEATH OF MRS. ELLEN BOOTH.

The death occurred on Monday, at the age of 74 years, of Mrs Ellen Booth, of Spring Cottages, Burner's Hill. Mrs Booth was a native of Petworth, but after her marriage to the late Mr. Samuel Booth they went to the "Vine Inn," Cousley Wood, (East Sussex) of which Mr. Booth was the licensee, later, they were tenants of the "Kentish Rifleman," Dunks Green, Shipbourne, for nine years, where her husband died about 14 years ago. Mrs. Booth left Dunks Green and went to live at Ticehurst. She leaves three daughters and one son, and the funeral will take place today (Friday).

 

Kent & Sussex Courier 06 October 1950.

TONBRIDGE Late Mr. W. J. BOREHAM.

The funeral took place at Tonbridge Cemetery on Saturday of Mr. William John Boreham, of 274, Shipbourne-road, whose death occurred at the Kent and Sussex Hospital on Wednesday. Mr. Boreham, aged 77, was proprietor of "The Kentish Rifleman," Dunks Green, for eleven years, until in 1938 he took over a grocery business in London. He came to Tonbridge in 1942.

 

LICENSEE LIST

MOORLEN Thomas 1851+ (also cooper age 32 in 1851Census)

JEWRY Jonathan to Dec/1877

DANIELS Joseph May/1878+ Kent and Sussex Courier

SMITH William to Aug/1879+

BANFIELD David Sept/1879+

TRICE John 1881-91+ (age 56 in 1881Census)

TRICE Jane 1901-03+ (widow age 56 in 1901Census)

BOOTH Samuel 1911-20 (age 58 in 1911Census)

READ William 1918+

HOOKER Frank 1922+

BOREHAM William John 1927-38 Kent and Sussex Courier

BOURTON Frederick John 1938+

https://pubwiki.co.uk/Rifleman.shtml

 

Kent and Sussex CourierKent and Sussex Courier

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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