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Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2021.

Page Updated Folkestone:- Wednesday, 29 September, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1892

Albion House

Open 2014+

135 (125) Cheriton High Street

Folkestone

Former Albion House

Above picture taken fro Google Maps 2010.

 

Information about this establishment was kindly sent to me by Jan Pedersen, who tells me the premises dates from 1892 to the present day, but at one time it was known as "Cheriton Wine" and today 2011) is known as the "Premier Express Cheriton food and Wine," and is referred to as a Wines, Spirits and Beer retailer.

 

Southeastern Gazette 10 September 1861.

Hythe County Petty Sessions.

Thursday: Before The Rev. E. Biron, T. Denne, J. Kirkpatrick, G. Gidley, and W.F. Browell Esqs.

Alfred Bartter, beerhouse keeper, Cheriton, for having false weights and measures in his possession, was fined 10s., and 8s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 September 1896.

About the Neighbourhood.

I understand Mr. Bartter, of Cheriton, who is applying for a licence for a new hotel at Cheriton, is receiving an abundance of support, and a petition is in course of signature, which is being signed by nearly the whole of the inhabitants of Cheriton. Folkestone .

 

Herald 26 September 1896.

Hythe Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions for the division of Elham took place at Hythe on Thursday last, the following Justices constituting the Court: Mr. J. DuBoulay, Mr. J. Porter, Capt. Baldwin, Commander Mansell R.N., and Mr. A.S. Jones.

Mr. John Bartter, grocer, butcher, and off licence holder, applied for a full licence in respect of his premises, known as Albion House, Cheriton Street. Mr. Goldie, solicitor, of Rochester, appeared in support of the application. Mr. Mowll appeared for the brewers who lease the White Lion; Mr. A.H. Gardner, of Folkestone, appeared on behalf of the Earl of Radnor, owner of the freehold of the White Lion; Mr. Bannon, of Romney, appeared for Mr. Baldock, the tenant of the White Lion, and also for the Folkestone District Licensed Victuallers' Association; Mr. Bradley, of Dover, appeared on behalf of local Temperance Societies and other residents; the Rev. R.E. Johnston appeared in person as Vicar of the Parish of All Souls; and Mr. Superintendent Waghorn also opposed the application on behalf of the police authorities.

The case opened for the applicant was that since the year 1872, when the White Lion sufficed for the needs of that portion of Cheriton, there had been a considerable number of new houses erected there, the increase being upwards of 300 new houses, representing a population of about 1,500, for whose accommodation the White Lion was the only fully licensed house. In addition to an off licence granted some years ago, there was the Unity public house about 1,000 yards from applicant's premises, which were situated about 80 yards from the White Lion. The premises are well adopted for the purposes of a fully licensed house, as there would be plenty of rooms for visitors, and bedrooms if necessary, while there would be a large bar 14 feet square, and a large space in front of the house where people could find accommodation without interfering with the public footpath. As showing that such a licence was needed by the inhabitants, there was a memorial now submitted in favour of granting it, signed by some 280 persons, including the Chairman and four other members of the Parish Council.

The applicant, on being called, stated that he is a Churchwarden of All Souls; that he carries on the trade of a butcher, and that of a grocer; that he has a grocer's licence to sell wine, beer, and spirits; that if he got a full licence he would give up the grocer's licence; and that his rateable value is 48. As to the petition, he could only speak to his brother having got the signature of Mr. Greenstreet, the Chairman of the Parish Council.

In cross-examination by Mr. Bannon, he said that he lives next door to the grocery shop in a different house; that he had held the grocer's licence for about five years; that of course there was a reasonable trade to be done there; that the demand for beer, wine and spirits was such as to induce him to apply for a full licence; that the trade he did was reasonably good, according to the population, but that it was not everybody who could afford to buy bottled beer; that his off licence trade was extended to visitors; and as to Mr. Dunster, he believed that that gentleman signed adversely to the applicant.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll, he admitted the existence in that district of the White Lion (70 yards from applicant's house); Mr. Quested's off licence, some distance away; the Working Men's Institute, in which beer is supplied; the Unity, in Risborough Lane; the Britannia, in Horn Street; the Fountain, at Seabrook; the Star, at Newington; the Refreshment Bar at the Railway Station; and the Railway Arms, at Shorncliffe Railway Station. He further stated, in reply to questions, that he is the postmaster; that he sells coal; that he is a greengrocer; that he is agent for a firm of dyers and cleaners; that he is agent for several brewers; that he carries on business as a glass and earthenware dealer; and that, if this full licence was granted, he would continue to carry on all these businesses.

In reply to Mr. Bradley, he added that he is a Universal Provider, and would supply anything from an elephant to a pin – anything reasonable. He made his application on account of the needs of the people living in Cheriton.

Mr. Ernest Wilks, architect, Hythe, proved a plan of the district which he had prepared for the occasion, and in addition to giving a variety of statistics, spoke to the suitability of the applicant's premises.

Richard Pilcher, builder, Cheriton, deposed that he had built upwards of 100 houses there within the last 14 years. As a member of the Parish Council, he was of opinion that it was necessary that another full licence should be granted, and the applicant's house he regarded as a good site for it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: You are a friend of Mr. Bartter's? – I have known him all my life.

It would be a little job, would it not? (Laughter) – Oh, yes, sir. If we had not jobs like this we should not want solicitors.

Frederick Rolfe, builder, Cheriton, gave corroborative evidence. He said he had been frequently at the White Lion to get a glass of beer, and had found great difficulty in getting what he required, in consequence of the crowd of people at the bar. This was especially the case at holiday times, or when anything special was going on at the Camp.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: You describe yourself as a builder. Are you not a bricklayer? – A bricklayer.

Don't you work for Mr. Pilcher? – I do some work.

Don't you do the practical work of his bricklaying at so much a rod? – Yes.

Then you and Mr. Pilcher are one and the same individual. (Laughter)

William Biscoe, one of those who had got signatures to the memorial, said he obtained 100, and in his opinion, as a teetotaller, another fully licensed house was required in Cheriton. Asked why, he said that the population is increasing, and that when passing along the street he had seen a group of people standing outside the White Lion drinking. As far as he could tell, when passing by, the house seemed crowded inside.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: Are you known in Cheriton as a teetotaller? – Well, I am not a strict teetotaller belonging to a Temperance Society. (Laughter)

Don't you think it was a little ungracious for you to go round to get signatures? – No, sir. I am not a bigoted teetotaller.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bradley: Are you a teetotaller on principle? Do you believe in being a teetotaller? – I do.

Did you think it in accordance with your principle to get signatures to a memorial for another licensed house? – I don't belong to any society.

You believe in people being teetotal? – No, sir, I don't. I believe in it for myself.

You don't think what is good for you is good for others? – I allow everybody to please themselves. I know what is good for me.

Instead of that you want to get a licence? – I am not a teetotaller as you are. I like a glass of whisky if I have a cold.

Rev. R.E. Johnston: It was stated that five Parish Councillors signed the memorial. Did any of them sign at your request? – No, sir.

Mr. Bannon: I should like to ask to what degree you are a teetotaller? – I have never taken any beer, except when I was at the Working Men's Club, and took up a glass of ale in mistake for ginger beer.

Do you drink whisky? – Yes, I drink whisky. (Laughter)

I thought we should get at it. Perhaps a little rum shrub? – I never tasted it.

May I suggest a little peppermint? – No, sir.

The beer you mean is a little Scotch? – No, sir, not Scotch.

Irish, perhaps? (Laughter)

Arthur Jordan, carpenter, Cheriton, said that he helped to get signatures, 100 or more.

Are you also a teetotaller? – I am, up to a certain extent. (Laughter) The existing house is not sufficient for the people who require drink, and seems to be nearly always overcrowded.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: How many members of the Parish Council are there? Are there not 15? – I don't know exactly.

You have been going round getting this petition signed. What induced you? – In the first place, Mr. Bartter is a friend of mine, and any practical person will say that there are in Cheriton who require stimulants, or think they do.

By Mr. Bannon: I should like to know what your weakness is – beer, or whisky? – Neither.

You said you were not a strict teetotaller? – If stimulants were recommended to me, I would not refuse to drink them.

This concluded the applicant's case. The Court was then addressed, in opposition to the grant of a licence, by Mr. Mowll, who made a strong point of the fact that only one third of the Parish Council had signed the memorial.

Mr. A.H. Gardner: I appear of behalf of the Earl of Radnor, and I have His Lordship's sanction to attend here and express the hope that the Bench will refuse the application. His Lordship is owner of the freehold of the White Lion, and we contend that there is ample accommodation within the parish. My friends have enumerated many houses within half a mile, and we contend that there is no need for a further licence being granted. Overcrowding has been alluded to. It has occurred mostly on holidays, but it is under His Lordship's consideration to have an extension of this building, by arrangement with the lessees, and I can unhesitatingly state that, if it is found requisite, the premises will be altered and expanded.

Mr. Mowll: There is no difficulty whatever in making the White Lion suitable for any trade in that locality.

Rev. R.E. Johnston: It will be scarcely necessary for me to add any remarks to those that have fallen from the lawyers concerned in the case. My presence here today – I hope I shall not be disrespectful if I venture to say – is extremely distasteful to myself, and is produced by one consideration. It is this, that as Vicar of All Souls, Cheriton Street, I know by daily and most painful continual experience that one of our greatest evils, the monstrous thing that is dragging down so many of our people, is overindulgence in strong drink, and I know that an increase of the facilities of obtaining strong drink brought into the midst of a parish where they cannot produce any additional convenience to any person whatsoever who requires a legitimate further convenience, but where they can only be used as an engine to increase the general consumption of intoxicating liquors, is such an evil that one cannot fail to oppose the proposal, and therefore I am here. I hold in my hand a memorial that has been signed in the exactly opposite sense by some 68 ratepayers and adult inhabitants, and other memorials have been circulated in the parish. I put this in for what it may be worth. Memorials, as it appears to me, are valuable if they are absolutely unanimous on one side or the other, but if they are pretty fairly balanced on one side and another the sole purpose accomplished is that they display to the Bench the fact that there is a division of opinion in the parish. There is a strong division of opinion, undoubtedly, and the case has to ne looked upon on its merits. Do we need another licensed house in my parish of All Souls, Cheriton Street? I cannot help expressing my strong conviction that no such need has been established or can be established, because no such need exists. It has been stated that a certain amount of crowding takes place in connection with the White Lion. I speak in the presence of the tenant of the White Lion and others connected with it that know I hold no brief for them, but although it is true that there have been crowds, and disorderly ones, there, I further say that they have occurred, for I have seen them myself, on such occasions as Bank Holidays and occasions of great military reviews. Last Whit Monday, it is perfectly true, I did witness a disgraceful scene. I absolve Mr. Baldock entirely from responsibility, for if there had been half a dozen White Lions on that day there would have been people who wanted to drink. The overcrowding is a totally exceptional case, and could undoubtedly be met, if one ay venture to make the suggestion, by having a considerably larger force of police on the spot than we ever do get at Cheriton on such occasions. So far as Mr. Bartter is concerned, I expect and hope he will be disappointed over this application. I most heartily wish I could spare him that disappointment. He is a friend of mine; as Churchwarden he has co-operated with me in many works, and I hold him in very high esteem, and had I found it possible, without dereliction of duty in a question like this that affects my parish, I should not, I tell you frankly, be here today. But I am here to oppose him, because I find myself in this position, that if my own brother came and proposed to set up a new fully licensed house in this parish – a parish where the evils of drink are accentuated and displayed in every direction; if it were proposed that in the midst of such a parish as that there should be put down another large, active, and vigorous concern for the sale of intoxicating liquors to the people – then, even if it were my own brother, and not a churchwarden only, I myself would do what I could to prevent such a calamity coming upon the parish. (Applause in Court)

Supt. Waghorn, addressing the Bench, said that if greater facilities were given there would be a proportionate increase in the number of cases to be dealt with by the police, and he felt it his duty to oppose the application.

The application was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 3 October 1896.

Hythe Brewster Sessions.

The annual Brewster sessions were held at the Sessions Hall on Thursday morning, before J.C. DuBoulay, Captain Baldwin, Commander Mansell R.N., E.S. Thompson, F. Porter, and A.S. Jones Esqs.

Mr. John Bartter, grocer and butcher, of Cheriton, applied for a full licence in respect of premises known as Albion House, Cheriton Street. Applicant was represented by Mr. Goulden, of Rochester, and already holds an off licence.

The application was opposed by Mr. Martin Mowll, of Dover, on behalf of the brewers who lease the White Lion, by Mr. A.H. Gardner, of Folkestone, on behalf of the Earl Of Radnor, the owner of the freehold of the White Lion, by Mr. Bradley, of Dover, on behalf of the local Temperance Society and several residents, by Mr. Bannon, on behalf of Mr. Baldock, the tenant of the White Lion, and also the Folkestone and District Licensed Victallers' Society, by the Rev. R.E. Johnson, as Vicar of the Parish, and by Superintendent Waghorn, on behalf of the police.

Mr. Golden, in his opening remarks, alluded to the great increase in the number of houses and population since 1872, and said the White Lion was the only fully licensed house in the locality of Cheriton Street. He submitted plans showing the alterations proposed to be made in the event of the licence being granted, and presented a memorial signed by some 280 persons, in favour of the licence being granted.

Applicant said he considered the White Lion was not sufficient to supply the needs of the district. In answer to Mr. Bannon, he said that he did a reasonable trade in connection with the off licence, but it was not everyone who could afford to buy bottled beer. In reply to Mr. Bradley, applicant stated that he was a universal provider, and could supply anything from an elephant down to a pin – anything reasonable. He made this application on account of the needs of the people of Cheriton.

Mr. E.S. Wilks, architect, proved the plans submitted by applicant's solicitor, and gave evidence as to the suitability of the premises known as Albion House.

Evidence in support of the application was given by Mr. R. Pilcher, builder, Mr. F. Rolfe, builder, William Driscoe, and Arthur Jordan, the two last named being teetotallers. All considered that a fully licensed house was needed for Cheriton, and endorsed every remark made previously as to the suitability of applicant's premises.

Mr. Mowll strongly opposed the granting of the licence, on the ground that the applicant had failed to show the necessity for another fully licensed house, and Mr. A.H. Gardner, on behalf of the Earl of Radnor, contended that the present accommodation in Cheriton was sufficient. He further added that it was under the consideration of his Lordship to have an extension of the White Lion by arrangement with the lessees, and he unhesitatingly stated that if it was found to be required the premises would be altered and expanded.

Mr. Bradley contended that the present premises were sufficient for present needs, and Mr. Bannon argued against the granting of the licence from a Local Veto point of view, pointing out that the establishment of another vested interested in the parish would increase the compensation to be paid by the ratepayers when the legislature took the matter in hand.

The Rev. R.E. Johnson, as Vicar of All Souls Parish, protested against the increase of the facilities for obtaining strong drink in a parish where they could not produce any additional convenience to anyone, but where they could only be used as an engine to increase the general consumption of intoxicating liquors. He submitted a memorial in opposition to the granting of the licence, and said that as there undoubtedly was a strong division of opinion in the parish the case must be dealt with upon its merits. He contended strongly that there was no necessity for another licensed house in the parish, neither could any need be established, because no such need existed. With regard to the overcrowding which has been alluded to, he totally absolved Mr. Baldock, for he was quite powerless to cope with it, and the difficulty could only be met by the presence of a large force of police. With regard to Mr. Bartter, he was a friend of his, he held him in high esteem, and as Churchwarden had co-operated with him in many works, and had it been possible without dereliction of duty in a question like that, which affected his parish, he would not have been there to oppose him. But he was there because he felt that if his own brother came and proposed to set up a new fully licensed house in his parish – a parish where the evils of drink were accentuated, and displayed in every direction; if it were proposed that in the midst of such a parish as that, there should be put down another large, active and vigorous concern for the sale of intoxicating liquors to the people – then even if it were his own brother, and not a Churchwarden only, he himself would do what he could to prevent such a calamity coming upon the parish.

Superintendent Waghorn said if greater facilities were given there would be a proportionate increase in the number of evils to be dealt with by the police, and he felt it his duty to oppose the application.

The Bench refused the application.

 

Folkestone Express 25 September 1897.

Hythe Brewster Sessions.

The Licensing Justices were Captain Baldwin, Commander Mansell R.N., and A.S. Jones Esq.

Superintendent Waghorn reported that the licensed houses in the district had been generally well conducted. There had been 34 convictions for drunkenness in the year.

Mr. John Bartter applied for an on licence for Albion House, Cheriton.

An objection by Mr. Mowll to the notices was held to be fatal.

 

Sandgate Weekly News 25 September 1897.

Local News.

The annual Brewster Sessions for the Elham Division was held at Hythe on Thursday. Superintendent Waghorn's report stated that the houses in the district had been generally well conducted. There had been 34 convictions for drunkenness during the year.

All the licences were renewed.

Three applications for new licences, viz.: Mr. Quested, of the Imperial Inn, Cheriton, for a full instead of an off licence; Mr. John Bartter for an on-licence for Albion House, Cheriton; and Mr. R. Lonergan for a provisional licence for a house to be built on the Oaks Estate, Cheriton, were all refused.

 

Folkestone Express 23 May 1903.

Cheriton News.

At a meeting of creditors in connection with the affairs of J. Bartter, grocer, of Albion Terrace, Cheriton, the following was the list of creditors to the estate:- Edith Mary Bartter, Cheriton (balance of loan on promissory notes) 734 11s. 11d.; H.M. Baker and Son, Canterbury 184 15s. 4d.; R. Dickenson and Co., Limited, Dover 170 0s. 11d.; H.M. Baker, Canterbury (loan on I.O.U.) 100; R. Foord Thorpe, Smeeth, Ashford 95 15s.; J.E. Quested, Cheriton (estimated at) 50; C. Heritage, Coolinge, Folkestone 31 11s.; Emmerson and Co., Sandwich 31; Fremlin Brothers, Maidstone 29 12s.; Alfred Leney and Co. (Limited), Dover 29 4s.; Arckoll and Co., Chatham 29 4s.; D.P.W. Jones and Co., Folkestone 26 10s. 4d.; S. Baldock, Cheriton 23 7s. 9d.; Mackeson and Co. (Limited), Hythe 20 15s. 9d.; S. Allsopp and Sons (Limited), Burton-on-Trent 19 4s.; W. Martin, Cheriton 18 18s. 4d.; E.P. Hogben, Ospringe, Newington 16 10s.; Tower Tea (Limited), London 14 2s. 6d.; Folkestone Gas Company, Folkestone 12 2s. 8d.; R. Twining and Co., London 11 4s. 2d.; Worthington Brothers, Hythe 11 17s. 6d.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 March 1942.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The “off” licence of Albion House, Cheriton High Street, was transferred from Mr. A. Scott to Mr. W. Martin, Secretary of Messrs. George Beer and Rigden Ltd.

Alderman W. Hollands presided with Mr. S.B. Corser and Alderman J.W. Stainer.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

http://evenmoretales.blogspot.co.uk/Albion-House

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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