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Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2021.

Page Updated Folkestone:- Wednesday, 29 September, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton & Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1879

Alexandra Tavern

Latest 1940

 66 Bridge Street

Folkestone

 

Not to be confused with the "Alexandra Hotel" this was an off licence in 1881 and lasted till 1931.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 August 1879.

Notice.

To the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I, THOMAS WILLIAM COBB, Job Master, now residing at Brockman Road, in the Parish of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, hereby give you notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the Borough of Folkestone, to be holden at the Town Hall, in the said Borough, on the Twentieth day of August next ensuing, for a license for the sale of Spirits, Wine, Beer, Porter, Cider, Perry, and other intoxicating liquors, to be drunk or consumed in a certain house and in the premises thereunto belonging, about to be constructed for the purpose of being used as a house for the sale of intoxicating liquors, to be consumed on such premises, situate at Alexandra Road, near Dover Road, in the Borough aforesaid, which I intend to keep as an inn, alehouse, and victualling house, and I hereby give you further notice that in the event of my said application being refused it is my intention to apply at the said meeting for a license for the sale of Beer, Cider, and Wine, NOT to be drunk or consumed on the said house or premises.

Given under my hands this Sixteenth day of July, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy Nine.

T.W. COBB

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 August 1879.

The Annual Licensing Session was held at the Town Hall on Wednesday, the magistrates on the Bench being Dr. Bateman (in the chair), Capt. Crowe, J. Jeffreason Esq., and Alds. Hoad and Caister.

Mr. Minter applied for a license for T.W. Cobb to sell ale and spirits in a house in the course of erection in the Canterbury Road, and urged as the chief ground for granting the same the number of houses lately erected in the locality.

Mr. Mowll opposed on behalf of Mr. Langton, and Mr. Cobb admitted, in examination, that he did not intend to reside in the house himself.

Application refused.

Mr. Cobb asked for leave to sell off the premises, which was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 23 August 1879.

Annual Licensing Session.

Application For New License:

Wednesday, August 20th: Before W. Bateman Esq., Aldermen Caister and Hoad, Captain Crowe, M. Bell, W.J. Jeffreason, and J. Clark Esqs.

Mr. Minter applied on behalf of Mr. T.W. Cobb for an ale and spirit license for a house in course of erection by Mr. T.W. Cobb in the Canterbury Road. He urged that there were a number of houses being built in the locality, of many of which Mr. Cobb is the owner or lessee, and the house for which he applied for a license is at the corner of a new road recently laid out. There was, Mr. Minter said, a great want of a licensed house there, and as there were many more houses to be erected the want would become greater. He put in a plan showing the buildings.

Mr. Mowll, who opposed on behalf of Mr. Langton and others, asked if the existing public houses were marked upon it, to which Alderman Caister replied that he did not think they were.

Mr. Minter said the only public houses near were the Wheatsheaf and the Three Bells (sic), and these were not in the immediate neighbourhood of the house for which he was asking for a license, nor were they of a character to afford the accommodation which was required.

Mr. Cobb was called, and said he was the owner of a large quantity of land in the neighbourhood, on which there were about 70 houses built opposite to the house for which they were applying for a license. There were 110 plots altogether, and only ten remained unsold. The house for which he asked for a license would be completed in a month. The plans had been approved by the Corporation, it had cost a thousand pounds, and would be of the annual value of fifty pounds. It would have a public bar and club rooms.

In cross-examination by Mr. Mowll, witness said he carried on several businesses already. The Wheatsheaf was a long distance off – not in sight; and the Railway Bell also. The Royal standard he did not know, and the Two Bells was not near. He had a memorial, but did not think it was of a great weight. He intended to occupy the premises himself and carry on the business, but not to reside in the house. One of his men would conduct the business.

Mr. Mowll urged that it was against the practice of the Bench to grant a license to an applicant who was not personally intending to hold it, or when it was not shown there was an actual want of accommodation, which there certainly was not in that case.

The Bench retired to consider the application, and on their return the chairman announced that they had decided to refuse the application.

Mr. Cobb then applied for a license to sell off the premises, which was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 June 1881.

Auction Sale Extract.

Lot 1: All the well built corner Freehold and Free Public House, situate and being No. 98, New Bridge Street, and known as the Alexandra Tavern, in the occupation of Thomas Parks, at the estimated annual rental of 35. Containing in Basement – Large Kitchen and Beer Cellar. Ground Floor – Large Entrance Hall, double-fronted Bar, large Smoking Room, and Offices. First Floor – Three large and good airy Bedrooms. Having a frontage to New Bridge Street of about 63 ft.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 June 1881.

Mr. James Pledge, on Wednesday evening last, submitted for sale at the King's Arms Hotel a large number of freehold and leasehold properties.

The freehold corner public house, the Alexandra Tavern, which has an off license, and two houses adjoining, were sold for 1,080.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Day.

The Annual Licensing Day was on Wednesday last, the Magistrates on the Bench being The Mayor, A.M. Watkin, F. Boykett, and J. Clarke Esqs., and Ald. Caister.

An indoor license was refused to the Alexandra Tavern, New Bridge Street.

 

Folkestone Express 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Day.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, W. Bateman, A.m. Watkin, J. Boykett and J. Clark Esqs.

Thomas Henry Parks applied for an indoor license for the Alexandra Tavern, New Bridge Street. Mr. Minter supported the application. The rent was said to be 30 a year.

Mr. Mowll opposed on behalf of the owner of the Wheatsheaf, and said there were four houses in the immediate neighbourhood.

Application refused.

 

Southeastern Gazette 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

On Wednesday the annual licensing meeting for the borough of Folkestone was held at the Town Hall. The Mayor presided, and there were also present: Alderman Caister, Dr. Bateman, and F. Boykett, A. M. Watkin, and J. Clark, Esqs.

Thomas Henry Parks applied for and was refused a full licence for the Alexandra Tavern, New Bridge Street. Mr. Minter supported the application, and Mr. Mowll opposed it on behalf of the owners of the Wheatsheaf.

The adjourned meeting was fixed for September 28th.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 September 1882.

Notice.

To the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police of the said Borough.

I, THOMAS HENRY PARKS, Beerhouse keeper now residing at the Alexandra Tavern, New Bridge Street, in the Town of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the adjournment of the General Annual Licensing Meeting, to be holden at the Town Hall in the said Borough, on the twenty-seventh day of September next, for a License to hold any Excise License or Licenses to sell by retail under The Intoxicating Liquor Act, 1828, all intoxicating liquors to be consumed on or off the house and premises thereunto belonging, situate at New Bridge Street, in the Borough aforesaid, of which premises I am the owner. And I hereby give you further notice that in the event of my said application being refused, it is my intention to apply at the said meeting for a License to hold an Excise License to sell by retail Beer to be consumed on the premises.

Given under my hand this Thirty-first day of August, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eighty Two.

THOMAS H. PARKS.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 September 1882.

Wednesday, September 27th: Before W. Bateman Esq., Ald. Caister, F. Boykett, J. Clarke and J. Holden Esqs.

Mr. Mowll applied for a license for Abraham Huntley, the Agnes Inn, Garden Terrace, and Mr. Ward applied for a license for Harvey Parks, Alexandra Tavern, New Bridge Street, which Mr. Mowll opposed.

The Bench refused the applicants.

 

Folkestone Express 30 September 1882.

 

Adjourned Licensing Meeting.

Application For New Licence.

Wednesday, September 27th: Before W. Bateman, F. Boykett, J. Clark and J. Holden Esqs., and Alderman Caister.

Thomas Harvey Parks, owner and occupier of the Alexandra Tavern, New Bridge Street, applied for a full license. Mr. Ward supported the application. He said the premises were very commodious and suitable for the business, and also put in a memorial in favour of it.

Mr. Mowll, who opposed, said there were half a dozen other licensed houses in the neighbourhood.

The Chairman said the Bench were unanimously of opinion that there were already too many licenses, and it was only under very exceptional circumstances that they would be inclined to grant another. The application would be refused.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 September 1882.

Licensing Meeting.

An adjourned licensing meeting was held at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Wednesday morning, the magistrates present being Dr. Bateman, Alderman Caister, Messrs. J. Clark, F. Boykett, and J. Holden.

Abraham Huntley, of the Agnes Inn, 15, Broadmead Road, applied for a licence to sell beer and porter on his premises, he already having an off licence. Mr. Mowll and Mr. Ward appeared on behalf of Huntley, and the former gentleman, in supporting the application, explained that he did not think there was any opposition to the granting of the licence, as it was a fair and proper case for their decision. It was not an application for a new licence, as Huntley already had an off licence. The applicant’s premises were situated close to three or four brickfields, the gasworks, and a large market garden, as well as close to a road from the hills.

Thomas Henry Parks, of the Alexandra Tavern, New Bridge Street, also applied for a licence to sell beer and porter to be consumed on the premises. Mr. Ward, who appeared on behalf of the applicant, said Parks had resided for some time in New Bridge Street at the bottom of Alexandra Street, and had every accommodation for an indoor licence.

Mr. Mowll, who opposed the application, said there were about half-a-dozen public-houses within 200 yards of the Alexandra.

The Bench were of a unanimous opinion that there was no reason for granting either of the applications. They considered that there were already too many licensed houses, and only under exceptional circumstances would they grant another. They, however, regretted not being able to grant the applications because both applicants were very respectable men.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 July 1886.

Saturday, June 26th: Before J. Clark Esq., Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs.

William Linnell, 17, giving the address of 9, Baldwin Street, City Road, London, George Walker, 13, Grove Lane, Canterbury, and Frederick William Lawrence, 11, belonging to Folkestone, were charged with stealing two asses, two carts, two sets of harness, a bridle &c., the property of Thomas Parkes, Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street.

The prisoners were remanded from Saturday, and according to the evidence elicited the property in question was safe in prosecutor's stable on Wednesday evening week, but on going to the stable, which is situated at East Cliff apart from any building, on the following Friday, he found that they had been taken away. He knew the prisoner Lawrence, who had been in the habit of riding the donkeys to his stables with other boys. Information having been given to the police, the stolen property was traced to Playden Rye, and Richard Hills, machinist of that place, stated that he sent the two prisoners, Walker and Lawrence, there with the property, and they offered him the best cart, harness, and donkey for 2, saying that they came from Gravesend.

William Ralph, dealer, Rye, stated that the two prisoners offered him the same for 25s., and he was about to buy when he saw the harness was new, declining the purchase, and thinking something was wrong, gave information to the police. A constable of the Kent County Police went in search of the boys and found them with the donkey &c., and in answer to a question Walker said they belonged to their father. Then the prisoner Linnell appeared on the scene, and said prisoners had stolen the donkeys that morning from Folkestone at 3 o'clock. Williams replied “You put us up to the dodge to steal them and helped put on the harness”.

P.C. Gosby deposed to seeing Linnell riding with the other prisoners in the cart along Sandgate at 4 a.m. in the morning.

Linnell and Walker made statements to the Bench, but as neither of them pleaded Guilty they were committed for trial to the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone News 3 July 1886.

Friday, June 25th: Before J. Clark Esq., Aldermen Caister and Sherwood.

William Linnell, 17, giving the address of 9, Baldwin Street, City Road, London, George Walker, 13, of Grove Lane, Westgate, Canterbury, and Frederick William Lawrence, 11, belonging to Folkestone, were severally charged with stealing two asses, two carts, two sets of harness, a bridle &c., the property of Mr. Thomas Parkes, of the value of 15.

Thomas Parkes, of Alexandra Tavern, said: I have a stable on East Cliff, Folkestone, standing in a field apart from other buildings. I had there on Wednesday evening two donkeys. I saw them there in the stable about nine o'clock when I left. There were also two carts, two sets of harness and a bridle there. I returned to the stable yesterday morning just before six o'clock. I then missed the property, and gave information to the police of my loss. The stable was not locked. There is no public path there. I leave the lower door open so that cattle may walk in if there is bad weather. It is my custom to do so. The value of the property is about 15. I know the younger prisoner. He has been in the habit of riding the donkeys to the stables with my boys. The other prisoners are strangers.

Sergeant Butcher said: I received information of this robbery yesterday morning, and went in search of the prisoners. I traced them to the police station at Rye, where they were in the custody of the police. I did not see the donkeys and other things. I charged them with stealing the property, and subsequently Walker said, pointing to Linnell, “He told us to take them, and told us that they belonged to his incle, and that he was going to take them to Hastings and sell them”. The property is now at Playden, near Rye.

Superintendent Taylor asked for a remand to the next day as the donkeys could not travel back last night.

Prisoners were remanded to Saturday.

Saturday, June 26th: Before J. Clark Esq., Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs.

The three boys charged with stealing two donkeys &c., were placed in the dock.

Thomas Parkes said: I went to Rye yesterday. I took a lad with me to a place called Playden. I saw my donkeys and carts there at a public house. I received possession of them from a police constable in the presence of Sergeant Butcher.

Henry Hills, sworn, said: I live at Playden, near Rye, and am a machinist. At four o'clock on Thursday afternoon the two prisoners, Walker and Lawrence, stopped opposite my place with the donkeys and carts. I asked them where they came from, and Walker said “Gravesend”. I asked if anyone was going to meet them and they said “No”. They offered me a collar which they had in one of the carts for 2d., and the best cart, donkey and harness for 2. I asked where they were going, and afterwards saw them going towards Rye.

Walker cross-examined witness as to whether it was not a little girl who said the donkey and cart was 2.

Witness said that Walker offered to sell it for that amount.

In cross-examination witness said they took the donkeys out on the green, and afterwards harnessed them again and went to Rye.

William Ralph, dealer, living at Rye, said: On Thursday afternoon I saw the two prisoners, Walker and Lawrence, opposite the house of the last witness, with the donkeys and carts. Walker offered to sell a collar for fourpence, and he afterwards offered one of the donkeys and cart for 25s. I took out my money to buy it, and asked him where he got it from. They said they belonged to Hastings, where they sold wood. Walker said the donkey belonged to his brother, Jem. When I saw the harness was new I was afraid to buy it, and went and gave information to the police. The smallest prisoner had possession of one donkey and cart.

A constable of the East Sussex County Police Force said: I am stationed at Playden, in the borough of Rye. From information I received I went in search of the boys, and found Walker and Lawrence, each with a donkey and cart outside the borough, on the road. I asked them how they came in possession of the property, and Walker said they belonged to his father. I asked who his father was. He said he was going to meet him at Rye, outside a shop. Lawrence said he had no father or mother, but that Walker's father had taken compassion on him and was keeping him, and that they were going to Hastings to let the donkeys out for hire. The prisoner Linnell then came along the road, and I thought he looked at them as if he knew them, and I asked if he was acquainted with the other boys. He said they stole the donkeys from Folkestone that morning at half past three o'clock. Walker then said to Linnell “You put us up to the dodge, and helped put on the harness”. Linnell said “Don't you believe them, sir”. I took the three of them into custody at Rye, and detained them in the lock-up. A few minutes afterwards a telegram came to Rye from Superintendent Taylor stating that the property was stolen. I afterwards handed the prisoners over to the custody of Sergeant Butcher.

P.C. Gosby said: I was on duty on Thursday morning about 4.30, and saw the prisoners come up Earl's Avenue with the donkeys and carts, and they went towards Sandgate. I recognise prisoners Linnell and Lawrence. Linnell was driving the first cart.

William Linnell was then charged by himself, and pleaded Not Guilty.

The Magistrates' Clerk asked him if he understood that he would have to go to the Quarter Sessions for trial, when he said he wanted to say something against the others.

All three prisoners were then charged together, when Linnell said that he had met Walker on Monday morning, and found that he had slept out. He also said that he did not drive the donkeys at all – the other prisoners drove them – and when they got past the schools he got out of the cart because Walker swore, and he had walked right down to Rye, and there saw the other two talking to the policeman.

Walker said that Linnell did drive the donkeys, but not very far.

Lawrence said nothing.

Prisoners were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions on the 9th July.

 

Southeastern Gazette 5 July 1886.

Local News.

At the borough police court last week, William Linnell, 17, who said he belonged to London, George Walker, 13, of Grove Lane, Westgate, Canterbury, and Frederick William Lawrence, 13, Folkestone, were charged with stealing two asses, two carts, two sets of harness, bridle, &c„ value 15, the property of Thomas Parkes, Alexander Tavern.

Prosecutor recognised the younger prisoner as a boy who had been in the habit of riding to the stable with his boys. The other two prisoners were strangers.

Sergeant Butcher deposed to tracing the prisoners to the police-station at Rye, where he found them in custody. The prisoner Walker stated that Sinnell told them that they belonged to his uncle, and that he was going to take them to Hastings to sell them. The sergeant said that the property was at Playden, near Rye. Prisoners were remanded.

On the following day the prisoners were again brought up, and further evidence was adduced against them.

Prosecutor said that he had seen his donkeys and cart at Playden, and had received possession of them.

Henry Hills, a machinist, living at Playden, said that on Thursday afternoon the two prisoners, Walker and Lawrence, stopped opposite his place with the donkeys and carts, and offered to sell one of the collars for 2d., and the best cart, donkey, and harness for 2.

William Ralph, a dealer, living at Rye, said that one of the collars was offered him for 4d., and one of the donkeys and carts for 25s. He gave information to the police.

Prisoners were committed for trial.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 July 1886.

Quarter Sessions.

Before B. Forbes Moss Esq.

William Linnell, 17, labourer, George Walker, 13, and Frederick William Lawrence, 11, were charged with stealing 2 asses, 2 carts, 2 sets of harness, a collar, and a bridle, value 15, the property of Thomas Parks, at Folkestone.

The prisoners pleaded Guilty, and previous convictions being proved against the eldest, he was sentenced to four months imprisonment, and Lawrence to two, and the latter afterwards to five years at a reformatory.

 

Folkestone Express 10 July 1886.

Quarter Sessions.

Friday, July 9th: Before B. Forbes Moss Esq.

William Linnell, George Walker, and Frederick William Lawrence were indicted for stealing two asses, two carts, two sets of harness, a collar and a bridle, to the value of 14, the property of Thomas Parks, of Folkestone. Walker and Lawrence pleaded Guilty. Linnell, who appeared to be incapable of understanding the charge, said he did not drive the donkeys. He admitted that he stood by when the donkeys were put into the carts.

Superintendent Taylor stated that the prisoner Linnell had been convicted in 1880 of vagrancy. Lawrence had been convicted and received six strokes with a birch rod. Linnell was sent to a Reformatory at Birkenhead, and since his release he had been four times since convicted for various offences, but not for larceny.

Linnell was sentenced to four months' hard labour; Lawrence to 14 days' imprisonment, and at the expiration of that to five years in a reformatory. Walker, against whom there was no previous conviction, was sentenced to one month's hard labour.

 

Southeastern Gazette 12 July 1886.

Quarter Sessions.

On Friday at these sessions, in a case, which attracted considerable interest, owing to the youthfulness of the offenders, whose ages were between 14 and 17, three boys, named Linnell, Walker, and Lawrence, of London, Folkestone, and Canterbury respectively, were charged with stealing two donkeys and carts, with sets of harness, to the value of 15. They were found guilty, and Linnell was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment, Lawrence to six weeks’, and Walker to 14 days’, to be followed by five years in a reformatory.

 

Folkestone News 17 July 1886.

Quarter Sessions.

Friday, July 9th: Before B. Forbes Moss Esq.

William Linnell, 17. George Walker, 13, and Frederick William Lawrence pleaded Guilty to stealing two asses, two carts, two sets of harness, a collar and a bridle, value 5, the property of Thomas Parkes, at Folkestone, on the 26th June.

Superintendent Taylor said that prisoner Linnell had been to a reformatory for five years and had received sentences for wilful damage and for misconduct in a workhouse.

The Deputy Recorder sentenced Linnell to four months' imprisonment, Walker to one month, and Lawrence, as it was his second conviction, to six weeks' imprisonment. The latter sentence, however, after consultation with the magistrates, was altered to fourteen days' imprisonment with five years in a reformatory to follow.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 April 1897.

Saturday, April 3rd: Before The Mayor, General Gwyn, and Messrs. W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert.

Mr. George Floyd was granted the temporary transfer of the Alexandra Tavern.

 

Folkestone Express 10 April 1897.

Saturday, April 3rd: Before The Mayor, General Gwyn, and W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

The off licence of the Alexandra Tavern was temporarily transferred from Henry Parks to George Floyd.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 December 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Saturday Mr. John Marsh made an application for a temporary off beer and wine licence to sell at the Alexandra Tavern. It appeared that the applicant had been already selling.

Chief Constable Reeve protested against this sort of thing. He did not think it right that these houses should change hands and not come to his knowledge. He had never heard of such a thing elsewhere. He did not object to the applicant personally, but to the system introduced.

Applicant said that the agent told him that he might go on selling.

The Chairman of the Bench said that Mr. Marsh had given no notice and had been selling without a licence. He had laid himself open to a penalty. He had better renew his application on Wednesday. The applicant was also told not to sell in the meantime.

On Wednesday Mr. John Marsh renewed his application for a temporary off licence of the Alexandra Tavern.

Chief Constable Reeve explained that the representative of the brewers had called upon him, explaining that it was quite his fault, and promised that in future no person should be put in unless permission was obtained to do so. He had no objection to the applicant.

The licence was granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 30 December 1899.

Wednesday, December 27th: Before the Justices.

John Marsh renewed his application for an off licence to sell liquor at the Alexandra Tavern.

The Chief Constable explained that this was the case in which, in consequence of his not being advised that the applicant had been selling before applying for the licence, he had opposed on Saturday last. In the meantime, the brewer's agent had called and assured him he alone was responsible for the irregularity. The fault was his, and not that of the applicant.

Mr. Marsh had excellent testimonials, and the licence was granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 January 1900.

Wednesday, January 17th: Before Mr. Fitness.

A licence to sell until the annual transfer day was granted to George Huish, for the Alexandra, Bridge Street.

Note: No mention of Huish in More Bastions. Is this a mishearing of Marsh?

 

Folkestone Herald 20 January 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday the following transfer was granted: Alexandra Tavern, to Mr. John Marsh from Mr. George Floyd.

 

Folkestone Express 14 September 1901.

Wednesday, September 11th: Before T.J. Vaughan, G. Peden, and J. Stainer Esqs., Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Mrs. Marsh, widow of John Marsh, was granted a transfer of the licence of the Alexandra, Bridge Street.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 September 1901.

Wednesday, September 11th: Before Councillors T.J. Vaughan and G. Peden, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. W. Wightwick, and Lieut. Colonels Westropp and Hamilton.

The licence of the Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street, was transferred to Mary Ann Marsh, widow of the former holder.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 February 1902.

Monday, February 10th: Before W. Wightwick, W. Salter, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Edward Stephen Gould was charged with stealing a truss of fodder, value 3s. 3d., the property of Mr. F.T. Bricknell, and Arthur Jones, with receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen.

Albert Victor Marsh, of the Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street, employed by Mr. F.T. Bricknell, corn and coal dealer, said that about 5.30 on Saturday he took a truss of fodder to Fredk. Grinstead's stable in a yard at the bottom of Denmark Street. He left the fodder outside as the stable door was locked. He subsequently missed the fodder, and traced it to the top of the street.

F.T. Bricknell identified the fodder as his property, and valued it at 3s. 3d.

Inspector Lilley spoke to having traced the route which had been taken by someone carrying fodder to a stable near the Black Bull Inn, in the occupation of the prisoner Jones and his brother, who were in partnership as carters. In a stall he found the fodder produced.

Gould pleaded Guilty and Jones Not Guilty.

Jones said Gould went to his house on Saturday evening and said he had found the truss of fodder in Canterbury Road. He didn't offer it for sale. He said “All right – somebody may claim it – here's an allowance for you”. He knew the man was out of work, and did it for charity.

Gould was fined 40s., or one month's imprisonment, and Jones 5 or two months.

The Chairman said he hoped it would be a warning to others not to buy stolen property.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 May 1903.

Wednesday, May 27th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Col. Westropp, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Colonel Fynmore, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert, G.I. Swoffer, E.T. Ward, and T.J. Vaughan.

The licence of the Alexandra Tap was transferred from Mrs. Marsh to Alfred Chittenden.

 

Folkestone Express 30 May 1903.

Wednesday, May 27th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonels Westropp, Fynmore and Hamilton, G.I. Swoffer, W. Wightwick, E.T. Ward, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

The following transfer was granted: The Alexandra Tavern to Alfred Chittenden.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 May 1903.

Wednesday, May 27th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonels Westropp, Hamilton, and Fynmore, Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Pledge, and G.I. Swoffer.

The following temporary transfer was confirmed by the Bench: Alexandra Tavern, from Mrs. Marsh to Mr. A. Chittenden.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 September 1903.

Wednesday, September 16th: Before The Mayor and other Magistrates.

Mr. Haines applied for the temporary transfer of the Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street from Wm. Chittenden to Thos. Wm. Mercer. He said that under Section 4 of the Act relating to beer houses a second transfer could not take place within twelve months except under exceptional circumstances, viz., the death of the licensee or the licensee's bankruptcy. In this case the applicant's wife was suffering from a very grave disease, and she had been advised to get out of the house at once.

Mr. Haines was about to quote a number of cases in support of his application when he was reminded that the usual notice in writing had not been given, and the present application could not proceed.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 September 1903.

Wednesday, September 16th: Before The Mayor, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. W.G. Herbert.

The Bench refused the application for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street, from Wm. Chittenden to Thos. Wm. Mercer, on the ground that proper notice had not been given.

 

Folkestone Express 3 October 1903.

Saturday, September 26th: Before W.G. Herbert and J. Stainer Esqs.

On the application of Mr. G.W. Haines (solicitor), the licence of the Alexandra Tavern was temporarily transferred from Henry Chittenden to Thomas William Mercer.

Mr. Haines intimated to the Bench that though this was the second application within twelve months and that it was against the regulations of the Act, the Magistrates had discretionary powers to grant it provided they were satisfied. The wife of the present holder of the licence had, unfortunately, contracted an illness, which made it necessary for her to leave the premises as soon as possible, and under the circumstances he hoped the Bench would grant the application.

The Chairman said they were willing to grant a temporary authority, but pointed out that it would be subject to the Bench confirming the transfer at the proper time.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 October 1903.

Saturday, September 26th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert and Mr. J. Stainer.

On the application of Mr. G.W. Haines the licence of the Alexandra Tavern was temporarily transferred from Henry Chittenden to Thomas William Mercer.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 14th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Mr. C.J. Pursey and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Application for the transfer of licences of licensed premises was granted for the Alexandra Tavern.

 

Folkestone Express 17 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 14th: Before Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W. Wightwick, G.I. Swoffer and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following licence was transferred: - The Alexandra Tavern, from Henry Chittenden to Thomas William Mercer.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 14th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, G.I. Swoffer, C.J. Pursey, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Licence was transferred as follows: the Alexandra Tavern, from Henry Chittenden to Thomas Wm. Mercer.

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Messrs. Spurgen, Carpenter and Fynmore.

The Alexandra Tavern was transferred from Mr. Mercer to Mr. Fordred.

 

Folkestone Express 15 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and W.C. Carpenter Esq.

The Bench considered several applications for the transfer of licences, and granted the following: The Alexandra Tavern from Mr. J.W. Mercer to Mr. J. Fordred.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 11th: Before Mr. W.C. Carpenter and Councillor R.J. Fynmore.

A special licensing session was held, when the licence of the Alexandra Tavern was transferred from Mr. F.W. Mercer to Mr. James Fordred.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 December 1906.

Wednesday, December 5th: Before Messrs. W.J. Herbert, Fymore, Hamilton, Linton, Leggett, Ames, Stainer, and Pursey.

Alexandra Tavern, Alexandra Street.

The licence of these premises was transferred to Mr. Marsh, the former landlord of the Wellington.

Note: This is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 8 December 1906.

Wednesday, December 5th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Colonels Hamilton and Fynmore, J. Stainer, C.J. Pursey, T. Ames, and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Major Leggett.

The following licence was transferred: The Alexandra Tavern, from Mr. J. Fordred to Mr. Marsh.

Note: This is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 December 1906.

Wednesday, December 5th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, and Messrs. T. Ames, J. Stainer, C.J. Pursey, and R.J. Linton.

Mr. John Marsh applied to have the off-licence of the Alexandra Tavern, Alexandra Street, temporarily transferred to him from Mr. James Fordred. Granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Daily News 8 December 1906.

Saturday, December 8th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Herbert, Linton, Stainer, Leggett, and Ames.

James Fordred was summoned for serving a child with beer in an unsealed vessel.

P.C. Minter deposed that at 8.30 a.m. on the 30th November he saw the little boy leave carrying a bottle containing porter. He took the lad back into the tavern, and asked defendant and his wife if they thought the child was 14. Defendant's wife said she served it in her husband's absence and was entirely to blame.

Defendant said he was ill and his wife was in charge.

Fined 10s. and 9s. costs, or 14 days'.

He had no money, and was taken down below.

Susan Baker was charged with sending the boy for the beer, but the Chief Constable said she was a cripple and had not been out of door for eight years, and asked leave to withdraw the summons, which was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 15 December 1906.

Saturday, December 8th: Before The Mayor, Major Leggett, and J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames Esqs.

James Fordred, the holder of the Alexandra Tavern off licence, was summoned for selling beer in an unsealed vessel to a child named James Baker, who was under 14 years of age. Defendant, in answer to the charge, said he knew nothing about it.

The Chief Constable explained that the licence had been transferred from the defendant since the date of the offence.

P.C. Minter said at 8.30 in the evening of the 30th November he was near the Alexandra Tavern, where he saw a little boy carrying a bottle in his arms. The cork was loosely put in. The bottle contained one pint of porter. Witness asked the boy his name, when he commenced to cry. He then took him to the Alexandra Tavern, where he saw defendant and also his wife. Witness asked them if they thought the child was old enough to be served with a pint of intoxicating liquor in a bottle not properly corked and sealed. Mrs. Fordred replied “No”, and also said she had served the boy in her husband's absence. She was very sorry, but being busy she forgot to seal it. She was to blame. Witness told defendant he should report him. He made no reply.

Defendant persisted in saying that he knew nothing about the offence.

The Mayor said defendant was responsible for the actions of his wife, and he would be fined 10s. and 9s. costs, or 14 days'.

Defendant said he had got no money and was taken below.

Susan Baker was summoned for sending her son, John Baker, to fetch one pint of porter in an unsealed vessel. Defendant did not appear.

The Chief Constable said they saw the condition of the bottle produced, and he had proceeded against defendant. He had since learned that she was a cripple, and had been so for some considerable time. Her husband was away on board one of the colliers, and she had written him (the Chief Constable) a letter. If the Bench agreed after seeing the letter, he would ask for the case to be withdrawn.

The Bench agreed, and hoped it would be made generally known it was an offence to send a child under fourteen for beer in an unsealed bottle.

The Chief Constable said there was one point that was not generally known – that the sending of a child under fourteen for any quantity under an imperial pint was an offence. He hoped the Act would be strictly enforced in the town.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 December 1906.

Saturday, December 8th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, Messrs. J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames.

James Fordred was summoned for selling beer in an unsealed bottle to a child under 14 years of age. He pleaded Not Guilty.

The Chief Constable produced the register, showing that at the time of the alleged offence defendant was a licence holder.

P.C. Smith deposed that on the 13th inst. he was near the Alexandra Tavern, Alexandra Street, when he saw the child with the bottle (produced) in his arms. The cork was loosely stuck in, and he saw that the bottle contained about a pint of porter. He asked the lad his name, and he at once commenced to cry. Witness took him back into the Tavern, where he saw defendant and his wife, Ellen Fordred. He asked them whether they thought the child was old enough to be served with a pint of intoxicating liquor without its being properly corked or sealed. Mrs. Fordred replied “No, sir; I served him in my husband's absence. I am very sorry, but being busy I forgot to seal it. I am entirely to blame”. He told Fordred he should report him for serving a boy under the age of 14 with a pint of porter in a bottle not properly corked.

Fined 10s. and 9s. costs, or in default 14 days'.

Susan Baker, mother of the boy, was summoned for unlawfully sending her boy, under 14 years of age, for beer in an unsealed bottle.

The Chief Constable said defendant lived at 61, Bridge Street. She was a cripple, and had been so for a considerable time. Her husband was away, and she had written a letter to him (Mr. Reeve). If the Bench agreed he would ask them to allow the case to be withdrawn.

The Bench agreed, and the summons was therefore withdrawn.

The Chief Constable hoped the public would note the case. It was not generally known, too, that it was an offence to send a child under 14 years of age for any quantity of liquor less than one pint, whether the vessel be sealed or unsealed. He hoped the Act would be strictly enforced in the town.

 

Folkestone Express 26 January 1907.

Wednesday, January 23rd: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Hamilton, Major Leggett, and W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames Esqs.

The following licence was transferred: The Alexandra Tavern, from James Fordred to John Marsh.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 January 1907.

Wednesday, January 23rd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Colonel Hamilton, and Messrs. T. Ames, R.J. Linton, and R.J. Fynmore.

The licence of the Alexandra Tavern was transferred from R. Fordred to J. Marsh.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Tuesday, February 5th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Linton, Fynmore, Herbert, Pursey, and Carpenter. Mr. Stainer, Mr. Wells, and Mr. Boyd, the two latter being the new Magistrates, occupied seats on the Bench, but did not adjudicate.

The Chief Constable read his report as to the number of houses and convictions, which showed a decrease last year. He recommended that the Bench should still continue to take advantage of the Act and refer some of the licences to the Compensation Committee at the Canterbury Quarter Sessions. He then went on to say that although he did not oppose the renewal of any licences on the ground of misconduct, there had been five convictions during the last year, and he had had to warn one licence holder against allowing betting and taking in slips. He also wished to caution all licence holders that these practices would not be allowed on any occasion, and after giving this public warning he should take steps to detect and prosecute for any such offences.

The Chairman, before commencing, stated that the Licensing Bench had visited a large number of houses, and they had seen in various places automatic machines, into which people put pennies, and in some instances got their penny back or a cigar, &c. The having of these machines was practically permitting gambling, and it had been decided that they were illegal. Every licence holder must understand that they were to be immediately removed, otherwise they would be prosecuted for having them. As regards the automatic musical boxes, gramophones, &c., if licensed victuallers had them on their premises, they were to be used in such a way as not to be a nuisance to the neighbourhood, and if complaints were made they would have to be removed.

The renewal licences for the Black Bull Hotel, the Railway Inn, the Chequers, Queen's Head, Channel Inn, Alexandra Tavern, Perseverance, and Railway Hotel at Shorncliffe, were adjourned till the 4th March, some on account of convictions, and some for the consideration of closing them under the Licensing Act. The other applications were granted, a full report of which will appear in our next issue.

 

Folkestone Express 9 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, C.J. Pursey and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The Chief Constable read his report as follows:

Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 6th February, 1907.

Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 128 places licensed for the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz.:- Full licences, 80; beer “on”, 9; beer “off”, 6; beer and spirit dealers, 14; grocers, 12; chemists, 4; confectioners, 3; total 128. This gives an average, according to the census of 1901, of one licence to every 239 persons, or one “on” licence to every 344 persons. This is a reduction of 8 licences as compared with the return presented to you last year, as the renewal of 3 “off” licences was not applied for at the last annual licensing meeting, and at the adjourned licensing meeting the renewal of one full licence was refused on the ground that the premises had been ill-conducted, and four other full licences were referred to the Compensation Committee for East Kent on the ground of redundancy. These four licences were subsequently refused by the Compensation Committee, and after payment of compensation, the premises were closed on 31st December last. Since the last annual licensing meeting 22 of the licences have been transferred, viz:- Full licences, 15; beer “on”, 5; off licences, 2; total 22. During the year three occasional licences have been granted by the justices for the sale of intoxicating liquors on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and thirty extensions of the ordinary time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises. During the year ended 31st December last, 131 persons (106 males and 25 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 114 were convicted and 17 discharged. This, it is most satisfactory to find, is a decrease of no less than 52 persons proceeded against as compared with the preceding year, when 164 were convicted and 19 discharged. Six of the licence holders have been proceeded against, and five of them convicted, for the following offences: Selling adulterated whiskey, 1; permitting drunkenness, 1; delivering beer to a child in unsealed vessels, 2; supplying drink to a constable when on duty, 1; total, 5. In the latter case notice of appeal against the conviction has been given by the licensee. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. I offer no objection to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct, the houses generally having been conducted during the past year in a satisfactory manner, but on one occasion one of the licence holders was cautioned (as the evidence was insufficient to justify a prosecution) for receiving slips and money relating to betting, which practice he immediately discontinued, bit I desire to intimate to all the licence holders that if in future any such practice is allowed, or any illegal gaming whatever is permitted on their premises, I shall take such steps as may be necessary to detect and prosecute the offenders. I beg to submit a plan showing the situation of all “on” licensed premises within the congested area, which I have marked on the plan, and would respectfully suggest that the Committee again avail themselves of the powers given by the Licensing Act, 1904, and refer the renewal of some of the licences within this area to the Compensation Committee to deal with under the Act. Within this area there are 920 houses, with a population approximately of 4,600, with 37 “on” licensed houses and 8 other licences, giving a proportion of one licence to every 20 houses or every 102 persons, and one “on” licence to every 24 houses or every 124 persons. This number of licences I consider excessive for the requirements of the neighbourhood. I have received notices from eight persons of their intention to apply at these sessions for the following new licences, viz.,:- Full licence 1; beer off 1; cider and sweets off 1; wine off 3; music, etc., 2; total 8.

I am, Gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve, Chief Constable.

The Chairman said the report seemed to be highly satisfactory. The Magistrates were very pleased to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report he wanted to make a remark upon, and that was the prevalence of gaming in public houses. In several houses the Committee visited they saw automatic machines, in which customers placed pennies and pulled a trigger. Occasionally they got something out for their pennies. That was gaming. It had been decided to be illegal, and they warned all licence holders that they would be watched, and that the machines would not be allowed, and proceedings would be taken against the offending publicans, whose licences would be jeopardised next year. There was one other point of a similar nature with regard to musical instruments, which were reported to be a great nuisance. They warned all licence holders to be careful not to create a nuisance with those pianos and other instruments, which were now very common indeed in public houses.

The following houses were ordered to be opposed as not required: The Channel Inn, High Street; the Queen's Head, Beach Street; the Railway Tavern (sic), Beach Street; the Chequers, Seagate Street; and the Perseverance, Dover Street.

Adjourned: The Black Bull Hotel, the Alexandra Tavern, the Imperial Hotel, Black Bull Road, and the Railway Hotel, Coollinge.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, R.J. Linton, and C.J. Pursey.

The Chief Constable presented his annual report (for details see Folkestone Express report).

The Chairman: The report seems to be very satisfactory, and we are very glad to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report I should like to make a remark upon, and that is about gambling in public houses. In every house we have visited we saw automatic machines in which you put a penny, pulled a trigger, and occasionally you get something out, either your penny back, or a card for a cigar. That is gaming, and it has been decided as illegal, and we warn all licence holders who have these machines that they must be removed or otherwise proceedings will be taken against them for gaming, and their licences may be in jeopardy next year. There is another thing. In the same way, with regard to these musical instruments, which have been reported to the Bench as a great nuisance, we warn all the licence holders to be careful, and not create nuisances with these machines.

The licences of the Channel, High Street, the Queen's Head, Beach Street, the Railway Inn, Beach Street, the Chequers, Seagate Street, and the Perseverance, Dover Street, were not renewed, notice of opposition being given on the ground of redundancy.

The renewals of the licences of the Black Bull Hotel, Alexandra Tavern, Imperial, and Railway Hotel were all adjourned till the adjourned sessions for reasons not given.

The Justices fixed the 4th March as the date of the adjourned licensing meeting.

 

Folkestone Express 9 March 1907.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned licensing sessions were held on Monday at the Police Court, when the principal business to be considered was whether or not the five licences should be referred to the East Kent Licensing Committee for compensation. The Licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., while other justices present were Major Leggett, Mr. G. Boyd, and Mr. J. Stainer.

Alexandra Tavern.

The licence of the Alexandra Tavern was renewed, the Chief Constable explaining that the licence was withheld at the annual meeting owing to a conviction having been recorded against the previous tenant. He had, however, no objection to make to the renewal.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 March 1907.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and G. Boyd, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer.

Alexandra Tavern.

The renewal of this licence was adjourned from the last Council owing to a conviction against a previous tenant. It was now renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 September 1930.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death of Mr. John Marsh, aged 71, for 25 years the licensee of the Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street, which occurred at his residence on Sunday after a painful illness patiently borne. Mr. Marsh was a Folkestonian, having lived in the town practically all his life. Previous to taking the Alexandra Tavern, he held a licence at The Wellington, Harbour Street and at Alkham. He was a blacksmith by trade and had been employed in that capacity by the Earl of Radnor for about 30 years. Mr. Marsh was very well-known in the town although of a quiet disposition.

He leaves a widow, three sons, seven daughters, and 23 grandchildren. Early next year Mr. and Mrs. Marsh would have celebrated their golden wedding. Much sympathy will be felt for the relatives in their sad bereavement.

The funeral took place very quietly at the Folkestone Cemetery (Hawkinge).

 

Folkestone Express 11 October 1930.

Wednesday 8th October: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Miss A.M. Hunt, Mr. F. Seager, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. W. Smith.

Richard Horace Marsh applied for the transfer of the licence of the Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street, held by John Marsh, now deceased.

The Magistrates' Clerk said it was quite a small house.

Applicant said he had a wife, who would be living there, and would manage it. He would be carrying on his work of omnibus driver.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 October 1930.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Miss A.M. Hunt, Mr. F. Seager, and Mr. W. Smith.

Richard Horace Marsh applied for the transfer of the licence of the Alexandra Tavern, Bridge Street, Folkestone, which held an off licence, from his father, John Marsh, deceased, to himself. The late licensee had recently died, and the widow was protected in respect of the house. The applicant was an omnibus driver.

The application was granted.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

Last pub licensee had COBB Thomas 1879-80 Bastions

Last pub licensee had PARKS Thomas 1880-97 Bastions

FLOYD George 1897-1900 Bastions

MARSH John 1900-01 Next pub licensee had Bastions

ANN Mary Marsh 1901-03 Bastions

CHITTENDEN Harry 1903 Bastions

MERCER Thomas 1903-05 Bastions

FORDRED James 1905-07 Bastions

MARSH John 1907-21 (beer retailer) Bastions

Last pub licensee had TAYLOR William 1921-22 Next pub licensee had Bastions

MARSH John 1922-30 Bastions

MARSH Richard 1930-40 Bastions

http://evenmoretales.blogspot.co.uk/Alexandria-Tavern

 

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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