DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2023.

Page Updated Folkestone:- Thursday, 13 July, 2023.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1855

Alma Tavern

Latest 1864

 86 Cheriton Road

Folkestone

 

Situated on the corner of Claremont Road and functioned between 1855 and 1864. Originally the Folkestone Laundry run by William Venables.

After closure at the end of 1864 the premises became a private house and then was converted into a doctor's surgery.

 

Southeastern Gazette 4 December 1855.

The Folkestone Laundry has been converted into a public house, called the Alma Tavern; it is to be fitted up with a shooting gallery, bowl and quoit grounds. &c., and will no doubt prove very attractive, being a half way house to the camp.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 December 1855.

The Folkestone Laundry having been converted into a public house, called the Alma Tavern, is to be fitted up with a shooting gallery, bowl and quoit grounds. &c., and will no doubt prove very attractive, being a half way house to the camp.

 

Kentish Gazette 11 December 1855.

The Folkestone laundry has been converted into a public-house, called the Alma Tavern; it is to be fitted up with a shooting gallery, bowl and quoit grounds, &c., and it will no doubt prove very attractive, being a half-way house to the camp.

 

Dover Telegraph 17 May 1856.

Petty Sessions: August Winchler, a soldier in the Cavalry British German Legion, was charged with stabbing another cavalry soldier on Saturday night last, at a beer-house called the Alma, in the Cheriton Road. A certificate was handed in, stating the inability of the injured man’s attendance. Sufficient evidence having been given to justify a remand, the prisoner was retained till Wednesday, the 14th inst. for the attendance of the man, the certificate stating that the wound was not mortal.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 May 1856.

Monday May 12th : - Before James Tolputt esq., Samuel Mackie esq., William Major esq., and Gilbert Kennicott esq.

August Whichler was charged with cutting and wounding Henry Ducroo of the British German Legion.

Charles Ovenden, police constable – On Saturday night last about 9 or a little after, I went to the Alma beer house in Cheriton Road. The landlord said he had a man locked up. The picket came up. I saw that a man had been wounded. I afterwards saw him go home. I afterwards saw the prisoner at the Alma. This might be half past 10 when I saw him. I searched him and found a knife in his pocket, and I saw some blood on the knife. I told him I should take him to the picket. I told him but he escaped.

Richard Boorn deposed – I keep the Alma. A man who was stabbed and another cavalry soldier of the legion came into my house the Alma. The man who was stabbed was very tipsy, and his comrade seemed ill. Afterwards the prisoner came in and they began talking. The man who was stabbed and the prisoner had a scuffle. The prisoner ran out of the room and the other man followed him. Afterwards the prisoner was found downstairs in a cupboard. I think the prisoner is the man. The stabbing was not discovered till an hour and a half afterwards. The man who was stabbed was in bed when it was discovered. I never heard of it until the policeman came. I did not see the stabbing.

Henry Ducroo deposed – I belong to the German Legion. I was near the railway at a public house last Saturday. The prisoner came in afterwards as I was sitting with a comrade. I was talking to another man and the prisoner came in and said somebody was his wife. I said she was not my wife. I told the prisoner not to pick up a row in the house or I should let him know he had no business. Prisoner went back a few paces and then came at me and struck me near the shoulder. I did not see that he had a knife in his hand or I did not know then that I was stabbed. Prisoner then ran away down in the cellar and I followed him. There was no light in the room. I sat in a corner. There were several more people there. I found out 5 minutes afterwards that I was stabbed. No-one else had struck me but him. Prisoner was not drunk. I afterwards went upstairs to bed. I had drunk a little too much but I knew what I was doing. There was some disturbance about the wife. It was a long room but there was no light in the corner where I was. Prisoner wore a moustache and small beard at the time, he has not now.

Remanded until Thursday May 15th and was then committed for trial at the next Kent Assizes.

 

Southeastern Gazette 20 May 1856.

Petty Sessions, Wednesday: Before James Tolputt Esq., Mayor, S. Mackie, G. Kennicott, J. Kelcey, T. Golder, S. Godden and W. Bateman Esqs.

Auguste Winchler, a soldier in the British German Legion Cavalry, was finally examined, charged with stabbing Henry Decroo, another soldier, in the left shoulder, at the Alma Tavern, Cheriton Road. Complainant swore that prisoner stabbed him in the collar with a knife.

Superintendent Steer produced the knife, a clasp one, and the jacket which was cut through.

Another soldier saw a clasp knife taken from the prisoner, and it had blood upon it. The prisoner had shaved off his beard and moustache to prevent being identified.

Committed for trial.

Auction advertisement extract: To be sold by Mr. T. Macleod, at the Auction Mart, opposite the Bank of England, on Friday, June the 13th, at twelve o’clock at noon.

The Martello Tavern, possessing every requirement for an extensive business, and is now in full trade.

 

Dover Chronicle 24 May 1856.

Petty Sessions: Before James Tolputt Esq., Mayor, S. Mackie, G. Kennicott, J. Kelcey, T. Golder, S. Godden and W. Bateman Esqs.

Auguste Winchler, a soldier in the British German Legion Cavalry, was finally examined, charged with stabbing Henry Ducree, another soldier, in the left shoulder, at the Alma Tavern, Cheriton Road. Complainant swore that prisoner stabbed him in the collar with a knife.

Superintendent Steer produced the knife, a clasp one, and the jacket which was cut through.

Another soldier saw a clasp knife taken from the prisoner, and it had blood upon it. The prisoner had shaved off his beard and moustache to prevent being identified.

Committed for trial.

 

Canterbury Weekly Journal 26 July 1856.

Assizes, Wednesday, before Mr. Justice Erle.

Auguste Winchler, 23, soldier, was indicted for stabbing, wounding and cutting Henry Dervo, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm, at Folkestone, on 10th July, 1856. Mr. Biron prosecuted.

The facts in this case were exceedingly short and simple. It appeared that prosecutor and prisoner were together at the Alma Tavern, Folkestone, when a dispute arose between them, and the prisoner stabbed the prosecutor in the shoulder, but the wound was not very deep.

The jury found the prisoner Guilty of unlawfully wounding. He was sentenced to six weeks’ imprisonment.

 

Kentish Express 26 July 1856.

Assizes, before Mr. Justice Erle.

Augustus Winchler, a private in the German Legion, was indicted for stabbing, cutting and wounding Henry Decroo, with intent to do him some grievous harm, at Folkestone, on the 10th of May. The prisoner was proved guilty of unlawfully wounding, and sentenced to six weeks’ hard labour.

 

Dover Chronicle 26 July 1856.

Assizes, Wednesday: Before Mr. Justice Erle.

Auguste Winchler, 23, soldier, was indicted for stabbing, wounding and cutting Henry Dervo, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm, at Folkestone, on 10th July, 1856. Mr. Biron prosecuted.

The facts in this case were exceedingly short and simple. It appeared that prosecutor and prisoner were together at the Alma Tavern, Folkestone, when a dispute arose between them, and the prisoner stabbed the prosecutor in the shoulder, but the wound was not very deep.

The jury found the prisoner Guilty of unlawfully wounding. He was sentenced to six weeks’ imprisonment.

Advertisement extract: Folkestone, in the county of Kent. To brewers, capitalists and others. Notice of auction sale of a capital, well-built freehold beer-house, known as the Mechanics Arms, Bellevue Fields.

Mr. Banks is favoured with instructions from the mortgagee, under power of sale, to submit the above property to auction, at the Clarendon Hotel, Folkestone, on Tuesday, August 5th, 1856, at two for three o’clock in the afternoon:

Lot 1is the capital freehold beer-house, known as the Mechanics Arms, Bellevue Fields, let to Mr. A. Williamson, at a yearly rent of 25, containing four sleeping rooms, two club rooms, sitting room, bar, beer cellar, kitchen, scullery, two water closets, and a very large skittle alley.

The Auctioneer begs to call the attention of persons requiring good property for investment.

For particulars and conditions of sale apply to the Auctioneer, Tontine Street, or to Mr. Ralph Thomas Brockman, solicitor, Folkestone.

 

Kentish Mercury 26 July 1856.

Assizes, July 23: Before Mr. Justice Erle.

Auguste Winchler, one of the German Legion, was indicted for feloniously cutting and wounding Henry Decroo, one of his comrades, with intent to do him grievous bodily harm. It appeared that on the 10th of May last the prisoner, the prosecutor, and another foreign soldier were at a public house called the Alma Tavern, at Folkestone, when some altercation took place between them, and the prosecutor laid hold of the prisoner, and pushed him away from him. The prisoner upon this retreated two or three paces, drew a knife from his pocket, and rushed at the prosecutor and stabbed him on the shoulder, and then ran out of the house. The prosecutor was not at first aware that he had been wounded, but shortly afterwards he found that he was bleeding, and upon examining his clothes he found that they had been completely stabbed through. The actual injury inflicted upon his person appeared, however, to be of a very trifling character. The prisoner was found Guilty of unlawfully wounding, and sentenced to six weeks’ hard labour.

 

Maidstone Journal 26 July 1856.

Assizes, Tuesday: Before Mr. Justice Erle.

Auguste Winchler, soldier, was charged with stabbing Henry Decroo, with intent to do some grievous bodily harm, at Folkestone, on the 10th May. Mr. Biron prosecuted.

From the statement of Henry Decroo, it appeared that he was a private in the 1st Regiment of Cavalry, German Legion. He was in a public house in Folkestone on the evening of the 10th May, of which he did not know the name. The prisoner came into the house while he was there. They quarrelled, and they had a slight scuffle. The prisoner gave him a severe blow between the shoulders, but he did not know he was hurt until he undressed to go to bed. The knife or instrument had gone through all his clothes. There was a great deal of blood. The wound was on the shoulder. He knew the prisoner, and he was the man who struck him.

Richard Bourn, landlord of the Alma Tavern, said he recollected the prosecutor coming to his house on the 10th May last, and also the prisoner. He heard them talking together, but it was only when he saw the scuffle that he knew they were quarrelling. He did not see the prisoner strike him.

Huffenden, a police constable at Folkestone, proved that he found Henry Decroo lying wounded at the Alma Tavern. He searched the prisoner, and found a knife on him, which he gave to the officer of the picket.

The clothes of the prosecutor were produced and the cut on the jacket shoulder was seen.

Ferdinand Albert Younker said that he was the assistant surgeon of the regiment to which the prosecutor belonged, and that on the morning after the quarrel Decroo was brought to him wounded. The wound was about an inch and a half on the surface, but not at all a dangerous one.

The prisoner declined to say anything in defence. The Judge, therefore, summed up the evidence, and the jury returned a verdict of misdemeanour, and he was sentenced to six weeks’ hard labour.

 

Canterbury Weekly Journal 26 July 1856.

Assizes, Wednesday, before Mr. Justice Erle.

Auguste Winchler, 23, soldier, was indicted for stabbing, wounding and cutting Henry Dervo, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm, at Folkestone, on 10th July, 1856. Mr. Biron prosecuted.

The facts in this case were exceedingly short and simple. It appeared that prosecutor and prisoner were together at the Alma Tavern, Folkestone, when a dispute arose between them, and the prisoner stabbed the prosecutor in the shoulder, but the wound was not very deep.

The jury found the prisoner Guilty of unlawfully wounding. He was sentenced to six weeks’ imprisonment.

 

Dover Telegraph 26 July 1856.

Assizes, before Mr. Justice Erle.

Auguste Winchler, 23, soldier, was indicted for stabbing, wounding and cutting Henry Dervo, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm, at Folkestone, on 10th July, 1856. Mr. Biron prosecuted.

The facts in this case were exceedingly short and simple. It appeared that prosecutor and prisoner were together at the Alma Tavern, Folkestone, when a dispute arose between them, and the prisoner stabbed the prosecutor in the shoulder, but the wound was not deep.

The jury found the prisoner Guilty of unlawfully wounding. He was sentenced to six weeks’ imprisonment.

 

Southeastern Gazette 29 July 1856.

Assizes, Tuesday: Before Mr. Justice Erle.

August Winchler, 23, private in the British German Legion, was charged with stabbing, and cutting and wounding Henry Decroo, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm, at Folkestone, on the 10th May.

Prosecutor and prisoner were together at the Alma Tavern, Folkestone, when a dispute arose between them, and the prisoner stabbed the prosecutor in the shoulder; the wound, however, was not of a dangerous character.

Six weeks’ hard labour.

 

Dover Chronicle 15 November 1856.

Petty Sessions, Saturday:

Henry Allen, a private soldier of the 44th Regiment at Shorncliffe, was charged by police constable Nichols with being drunk and disorderly on the day previous, and assaulting him in the execution of his duty.

From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the prisoner was in a mad state from drink, and was flourishing a large stick, with which he was endeavouring to break the windows of Mr. Maycock, of the Globe, in the Bail. Another soldier of the 41st prevented him doing it, and the constable coming up requested him to leave, but he refused, when it was found necessary to remove him to the station, which was done after some difficulty, the prisoner resisting all in his power.

Sentenced to fourteen days’ hard labour for the assault on the constable.

Andrew Kelly, a private soldier of the 41st Regiment of Foot, Shorncliffe, was brought up by Superintendent Steer for stealing a shirt from the Alma beer-house that morning.

The prisoner was taken by the Superintendent in a marine-store shop with the shirt concealed in his brevet.

He was remanded till the 13th inst., to be dealt with under the Criminal Justice Act.

 

Dover Telegraph 15 November 1856.

Petty Sessions: Andrew Kelly, a private of the 41st Regiment, charged by Superintendent Steer with stealing a shirt from the Alma beer-house, was remanded to the 12th instant when he was sentenced to a month’s imprisonment, with hard labour.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 November 1856.

Petty Sessions: Before The Mayor, W. Major, W. Bateman, J. Kingsnorth, S. Mackie, J. Tolputt, J. Kelcey, and G. Kennicott, Esqs.

Andrew Felly, a private in the 41st regiment, stationed at Shorncliffe, was charged with stealing a shirt, value 2s. 6d., the property of William Richard Boorn, at the Alma tavern, Cheriton Road.

Caroline Maria Boom, wife of the prosecutor, stated that she placed a quantity of linen in a basket in the tap-room overnight, and early in the morning two soldiers came in and had a pot of beer, and afterwards gave a bundle to a boy to get 1s. on to pay for the beer. Mrs. Boorn refused to do so, and they left the bundle, promising to return in an hour. When she looked over the basket she missed the shirt produced.

Superintendent Steer said that he received information that a soldier had stolen a shirt, and he caught the prisoner coming out of a marine store shop, with the shirt in the breast of his coat. The prisoner claimed the shirt as his own.

The prisoner was sentenced to one month's hard labour. Prisoner said he had been in the regiment eight years, and was never in custody for theft before; he repeated that he did not steal the shirt.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 March 1861.

County Court.

Friday March 22nd:- Before C. Harwood Esq.

Richard Boorn, an insolvent, appeared to pass his first examination, supported by Mr. Bedford. He was opposed by Mr. John Minter, on behalf of Mr. George Conley, for a debt of 16 11s. 9d. Insolvent was examined by Mr. Minter, who failed to elicit that he had any effects. Debts 225. He passed his first examination.

Note: Boorn had been landlord of the Packet Boat, Radnor Street 1851-57. Strangely, it seems that he carries on with the Alma, Cheriton Road (1855-64) and returns to the Packet Boat (1861-69) despite this insolvency.

 

Folkestone Observer 23 March 1861.

County Court. Insolvent Case.

Friday March 22nd:- Before C. Harwood Esq.

Richard Boorn came up for his first examination. Mr. Bedford appeared in support, and Mr. Minter for Mr. George Conley, who was entered for 16 11s. 9d. Insolvent had keot an inn in Radnor Street, but his uncle dying and leaving him a legacy of 1,500, he had paid 991 19s. 8d. to old creditors, and bought the schooner Mary for 500, afterwards selling her for 110. The present total amount of debts was 255 17s. 0 1/2d; no assets. He had been for the last four years out of business. The insolvent passed.

Note: Boorn had been landlord of the Packet Boat, Radnor Street. Also listed at Alma, Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 April 1861.

County Court.

Wednesday April 24th:- Before Charles Harwood Esq., Judge.

Richard Boorn. This insolvent came up for his final examination. Mr. Minter withdrew his opposition upon His Honour allowing the insolvent to amend his schedule, by inserting a reversionary interest he was entitled to; which having been done, he passed.

Note: Boorn had interests in both the Packet Boat, Radnor Street, and the Alma, Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 December 1864.

Monday December 19th:- Before G. Kennicott and J. Tolputt Esqs.

James Memphis, aged 15, and Henry Memphis, aged 13, brothers, were brought up in custody charged with stealing, on the 22nd instant, a glass case containing wax flowers, a vest, a portrait, and a surgical instrument, of the value of half a crown, from the dwelling house of Richard Coleman, late the Alma tavern in the Cheriton Road. The prisoners were tried under the Juvenile Offenders Act, and being convicted were sentenced, the oldest to two months' imprisonment with hard labour, and the other to 1 month's imprisonment with hard labour; each to be privately whipped with a birch rod, and to receive 12 strokes.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 24 December, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

STEALING

Thursday December 22nd:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt, Esq.

James Memphis, 15, and Henry Memphis, 13, pleaded guilty to a charge of stealing a glass case containing a model, a basket of wall flowers, one vest, one portrait and one surgical instrument from the dwelling house of Richard Coleman, and were sentenced, the elder brother to two months' imprisonment with hard labour, and the younger prisoner to one month's imprisonment with hard labour, and to have twelve strokes with a birch rod.

 

Note: This burglary took place at the former "Alma Tavern." Jan Pedersen.

 

Southeastern Gazette 27 December 1864.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Thursday, James Memphis, 15, and Henry Memphis, 13, were charged with stealing, on the 26th inst., a glass case containing wax flowers, a vest, a portrait, and a surgical instrument, of the value of half-a-crown, from the dwelling- house of Richard Coleman, late of the “Alma” Tavern, in the Cheriton Road.

The oldest was sentenced to two months’ and the other to one month's hard labour; each to be once privately whipped.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 24 December, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

BOYS BIRCHED

Monday December 19th:- Before G. Kennicott and J. Tolputt, Esqs.

James Memphis, aged 15, and Henry Memphis, aged 13, brothers, were brought up in custody charged with stealing, on the 22nd instant, a glass case containing wax flowers, a vest, a portrait, and a surgical instrument, of the value of half a crown, from the dwelling house of Richard Coleman, late the "Alma Tavern" in the Cheriton Road. The prisoners were tried under the Juvenile Offenders Act, and being convicted were sentenced, the oldest to two months' imprisonment with hard labour, and the other to 1 month's imprisonment with hard labour; each to be privately whipped with a birch rod, and to receive 12 strokes.

 

 

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BOORN Richard 1855-64 Bastions (Also "Packet Boat.")

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