DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 12 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1750

Cherry Garden Tavern

Latest March 1863

 

Folkestone

 

Also known as the "Thatched Tavern or Friend's Goodwill."

Continued to act as a "Tea Garden" after March 1863, but discontinued as a licensed house afterwards.

 

Dover Telegraph 4 July 1835.

East Kent Midsummer Sessions: These Sessions commenced at St. Augustine's, on Tuesday, before the Chairman, William Deedes Esq., and a full bench of Magistrates.

Henry Jeffry was indicted for stealing from Thomas Swain two sovereigns, two half-sovereigns and a purse, at the "Cherry Garden" public house, Folkestone, on the morning of Whit Tuesday. This case was rather curious from the strong conflicting evidence; the prosecutor producing several witnesses, who swore positively to the prisoner committing the robbery and an assault. On the other hand, the prisoner called as much evidence to rebut the testimony adduced against him. It appeared that all the parties had been holiday-making, which terminated in a general fight, on which this charge was grounded. The Chairman said it was always distressing to hear a case such as this – a case in which it was clear there must be, on one side or the other, wilful perjury. He was proceeding to read his notes of evidence, when the Jury intimated that they had watched the case sufficiently to save the Chairman that trouble. In a few minutes they brought in a verdict of Not Guilty.

 

Dover Chronicle 4 July 1835.

East Kent Quarter Sessions: Tuesday, 30th June, before W. Deedes Esq.

Henry Jeffery, charged with stealing from the person of Thomas Swaine, at Folkestone, two sovereigns, two half sovereigns, and a silk purse of the value of two pence. The prisoner was a respectable looking and well dressed young man who had been admitted to bail and surrendered himself to take his trial.

It appeared in evidence that on Whit Monday there was a dance at the "Cherry Orchard" (sic) public house, at Folkestone, that the prosecutor went there in the evening and met some of his acquaintances, they stopped all night, that there was was a quarrel and fight between the prosecutor and the prisoner in the morning, and that the former, by the testimony of himself and witnesses, lost the property stated in the indictment.

Mr. Walsh appeared for the prisoner and cross-examined the witnesses for the prosecution at great length, and called several witnesses for the prisoner, who gave direct contradictory evidence in several material points to which the prosecutor's witness had sworn.

The Chairman, after a few minutes observation on the evidence given on both sides, was about to sum up, when the Jury intimated that they would not trouble him to do so, as they had paid great attention to the evidence and were satisfied, and after a short consultation acquitted the prisoner.

The trial lasted between three and four hours. Mr. Bond, of Folkestone, was prisoner's attorney.

 

Kentish Chronicle 7 July 1835.

East Kent Quarter Sessions: These Sessions commenced on Tuesday last, 30th June, before Wm. Deedes Esq., Chairman.

Henry Jeffery, charged with stealing from the person of Thomas Swaine, at Folkestone, two sovereigns, two half sovereigns, and a silk purse of the value of two pence.

It appeared in evidence that on Whit Monday there was a dance at the "Cherry Orchard" (sic) public house, at Folkestone, that the prosecutor went there in the evening and met some of his acquaintances, they stopped all night, that there was was a quarrel and fight between the prosecutor and the prisoner in the morning, and that the former, by the testimony of himself and witnesses, lost the property stated in the indictment.

The Chairman, after a few minutes observation on the evidence given on both sides, was about to sum up, when the Jury intimated that they would not trouble him to do so, as they had paid great attention to the evidence and were satisfied, and after a short consultation acquitted the prisoner.

The trial lasted between three and four hours. Mr. Bond, of Folkestone, was prisoner's attorney.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 October 1855.

Tuesday October 9th :- Present W. Major Esq., G. Kennicott Esq., and J. Kelcey Esq.

The Adjourned General Licencing Meeting was held this day, when the following licence was granted: Henry Parks, Cherry Garden Tavern.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 29 March 1856.

CHERRY GARDENS

Now that this place is brought under the jurisdiction of the borough, we think that an occasional visit to the Tavern from our police on Sundays might not be unproductive of good, in checking some measure of the evil influence which seems to be extending itself to the juvenile portion of our population, who resort there in the afternoons. We were ourselves witness on Sunday afternoon last to a disgraceful exhibition of drunkenness in a boy of only about twelve years old, who was returning across the fields in a state of complete intoxication, and who, but for our interference, would have been subjected to gross ill-treatment from his companions, who had much difficulty to get him along – we being obliged to follow them into the town to see that he was safely got home.

 

March 26th, 1863.

H PARKS

Desires to return his sincere thanks to the public for past favours at the "Cherry Gardens," and solicits a continuance of their spare at the above place, as a Tea Garden. At the request of the Directors of the Folkestone Water Works Company, the business of a Tavern Keeper, carried on by him, at the above place, will be discontinued from this notice.

 

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 June 1856.

Local News. Cherry Gardens.

The band of the 5th regiment Light Infantry, British German Legion, of which we have before spoken, gave an open air performance at this place on Thursday afternoon. We were told they offered their services to the proprietor of the Tavern, with a view to attract visitors. Had it not been for the Cricket Match, most likely there would have been many persons present; as it was, however, there were very few. The programme consisted chiefly of English music, which was very creditably performed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 October 1857.

Wednesday September 30th:- Before the Mayor, and T. Golder, W. Major, J. Tolputt, G. Kennicott, and J. Kelcey esqs.

This being the adjourned general annual licencing meeting, the following licence was renewed, viz.:- Henry Parkes, for the house at the Cherry Garden.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 28 March, 1863.

ADVERTISEMENT

H. Parks desires to return his sincere thanks to the public for past favours at the "Cherry Gardens," and solicits a continuance of their support at the above place as a Tea Garden. At the request of the Directors of the Folkestone Water Works Company the business of a Tavern Keeper, carried on by him at the above place will be discontinued from this notice.

March 26th, 1863
 

Folkestone Express 24 December 1892.

Letter.

Dear Sir,

I do not know whether the following has been published before. I copied it some years ago from a manuscript very kindly lent to me by an old inhabitant, and as it relates to the source of the water supply prior to the water works, it may prove interesting: “2nd February, 1821 - Bail water. Anxious to know not only where is the head of this parent stream, but also to where it went, I went this morning to Broadmead and then to where I before found the junction with the bail water; then pursuing it to the end, I found a stream to come to it under a bridge on the road which runs at the north end of Broadmead wood, and that that stream appeared to come in a direction west of the Cherry Gardens, where a labouring man had just told me there was a lake from which this water flowed, and as on my right hand I saw another stream turn to the eastward, I followed that until I came to a stile over which we pass to the Cherry Gardens. Here I found a stream in a direct line from thence. I pursued the stream towards the Cherry Gardens, as near as I could, and at the Cherry Gardens (Castle Hill on my right hand), I found a large lake in shape almost triangular; not far from each other I found two springs, which issued from the mountains adjacent, which emptied themselves into the lake, at the N.W. corner of which I found another larger discharge into it, and from which the inhabitants of the Cherry Garden (it appears from the descending steps made into it) supply themselves with water. Here a reservoir has been scooped out, but probably finding it inconvenient, a wooden pipe, like those in use in London, has been inserted, so that there are two copious discharges of water, one above the other, so that the place here seems tapped, and on the whole an immense body of water gushes from this place into the lake. From hence went into the cherry grounds, where stands the crooked sign-post, with a board, on which is inscribed “The Thatched Tavern” or the “Friend’s Goodwill”. I can hardly take leave of my subject, without this reflection, “How happy is Folkestone with respect to water, having so many ample sources of supply”. Some long residents may have heard of “The Thatched Tavern”, in the Cherry Gardens, and the originall lake, and be able to confirm the above description.

Hardric Morphyn.

 

LICENSEE LIST

HOGBEN William Listed 1842+ Bastions

SMITH John Mentioned 1853+ Bastions

PARKS Henry Oct/1855-Mar/63 (age 72 in 1861Census) BastionsFolkestone Chronicle

 

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

CensusCensus

 

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