DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Dover, August, 2020.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 12 August, 2020.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Barry Smith and Paul Skelton

Earliest 1841-

Green Man

Latest Sept 1967

22 Erith Street Kelly's Directory 1950 and 45 George Street

Chapel Hill Post Office Directory 1874

Dover

Green Man
Green May day trip

Above photo date unknown, showing a day trip from the pub.

 

Another with like sign was once the property of Kingsford (click here) but there is evidence also, of another in the 1860's, in Adrian Street or Adrian Row (click here). The Erith Street is dated 1839 and the earliest account of the pub found so far is from 1841.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 27 February, 1841. Price 5d.

CORONER'S INQUEST

An inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the "Green Man" beer-shop, Buckland, before G. T. Thompson, Esq. the Borough Coroner, to enquire into the cause of death of a child belonging to a poor man named Griggs, a bricklayer.

From the depositions of the witnesses, it appeared that the deceased, who was about nine years of age, was left at home with an elder sister, about eleven o'clock on Monday last, while their mother came down to Dover. The elder sister was engaged in the washhouse, and, as is supposed, the deceased employed herself in putting some sticks on the fire when her clothes became ignited. She then ran screaming into the street, which, with the barking of some dogs, alarmed the neighbours, who ran and wrapped a carpet round her, and succeeded in extinguishing the flames ; but not till she had been burned in a most dreadful manner. A surgeon was immediately sent for, but the fire had taken so great an effect upon her frame, that she died in the most excruciating pain at about half-past ten o'clock that evening.

Verdict - "Accidental death."

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 3 January, 1863.

DASTARDLY ASSAULT

John Revell was charged with assaulting Emma Fagg, a married woman, at the "Green Man" public house, Buckland, on the day following Christmas Day. It appeared hat the parties were merry-making at the public-house in question on the day named, the complainant being in the company of her husband, when the defendant, in the absence of Mr. Fagg, caught hold of Mrs. F. in too amorous a manner. She threatened to scratch his face, if he did it again, but the defendant disregarded this warning, and ultimately was, as Mrs. F. Herself stated, slightly brushed across the face with her hand. He thereupon addresses her in foul terms and struck her in the face, leaving marks upon her eyes which were still visible. Witnesses were called, and the Magistrates decided that the assault, which they considered a very dastardly one, was proved. Defendant was fined 1, including costs, which he paid.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 12 April, 1872. Price 1d.

STEALING FOWL AT RIVER

George Stanwood, labourer, was indicted for stealing seven fowls, belonging to Filmer Phipps, at River, near Dover, on the 24th March.

Mr. Marsham, who prosecuted, said prisoner was seen lurking about the premises near the hen roost, and he also took a fowl into a public house in payment of some money which he owed the landlady.

Stephen Hobbs, waggoner, living at Mr. Phipp's Old Park, River, said that on Saturday the 23rd he left the hen roost at ten, and next morning he found the roost had been broken open and seven or eight of the fowls were gone. They were all safe when he fed them at five o'clock on Saturday. The fowl produced was the only one of the sort which he had. He was prisoner on the 22nd March, near the hen roost.

By Prisoner: Did not know it was a public thoroughfare through the Park. It was not Thursday but Friday when he saw prisoner.

Elizer, wife of John Pelham, landlord, of the “Green Man,” Buckland, said prisoner came to her house on the 25th March and asked for four penny worth of food, and he said he would give a fowl which he had, in payment of this and previous debt of 9d. he asked her to allow him 4d. as well. She did receive the fowl.

A woman named Mitchell deposed to receiving the fowl from Mrs. Pelham.

Police Constable Foster went after the prisoner on the 25th, and on finding the fowl in Mrs. Mitchell's possession he took the prisoner in custody. He found the knife produced in the roost, which had been broken open.

Police Sergeant Bevan went with the last witness, and on charging the prisoner he said he knew nothing. When he went to prisoner's house on a previous occasion he noticed a knife in a hamper similar to the one produced.

The Jury returned a verdict of guilty, and having been previously convicted in 1862, and at other times, he was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude, and three years' Police supervision.

The Court then adjourned.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 28 July, 1876. Price 1d.

ENDORSING A LICENSE

John Pelham was charged with having his house open for the sale of liquor during prohibited hours at the “Green Man,” Buckland. Isaac Gilley was charged with being on the premises.

The case having been proved, the bench fined the landlord 1 12s. 6d., and endorsed his license, and the man Gilley was fined 12s. 6d., including costs.

Mr. Worsfold Mowll appealed to the Bench to withdraw their decision as to endorsing the license, as the owners of the house intended to part with his tenant at once.

The Bench said they could not alter their decision.

 

Dover Express, Friday 9 June 1950.

The Green Man raid. Manager and customers in court.

Policeman peep through curtains.

In the bar of the "Green Man" public house, in Erith Street, nine people sat laughing and talking. Four of them were drinking, and a number of empty and near empty glasses stood around on the counter and window ledges.

A pleasant enough scene in any bar on any night, particularly in Dover, where, according to the statisticians "there isn't the money about" and licensees have to pump hard and long to pay their increased rates.

On this particular night, however, that of Saturday, April 29th, and at that particular time, approximately 11:30 p.m., it was not the sort of scene on which two police officers expected to focus their eyes as they peeped through a gap in the curtains.

As a results, the four people who were seen to be drinking, appeared before Dover magistrates on Friday charged was consuming intoxicating liquor in other than permitted hours. Fines of 30s., with 10s. costs, were imposed on Frank Thomas Luke Booth (24), of 200, Union Road; James Thomas Brice, (53), fishmonger, 38, East Cliff; Jessie May Harris (40), fishmonger, 1, Last Lane, and Riley Keats (24), labourer, 13, Tower Hill. The manager, Arthur Clifford Moody (34), who has since had to vacate the premises, and who was summoned for aiding and abetting the first four defendants, was fined 5, with costs of 2 2s.

Everyone pleaded not guilty, including Moody and Harris, who were represented by Mr. P. A. G. Aldington. Mr. G. W. Hardman conducted the prosecution.

Sergeant W. E. Court told how he saw lights coming from the "Green Man" while on duty in George Street with Inspector Haydon. There was a 3 inch gap in the curtains over the corner of the window, so they went up to it and looked in. In the bar there were 9 people talking together. Facing the window from the far end was Harris holding a half pint glass of beer, from which he drank, while seated beside her was a woman in a green coat and Brice. At the counter stood Keates and Booth, both drinking from pint glasses. After keeping watch for about 5-minutes Inspector Hayden went round to the door and entered the bar from the far end, and witness joint in. None of the people in the bar had moved, and he started taking their names and addresses. As he did so, Moody called out, "There's no beer about, what are you going to do?" so Inspector Haydon showed him a pint glass three quarters full of beer, one containing stout, and one empty. Brice took a drink from a pint glass, said the Sergeant, and the following conversation ensued:-

Sergeant Court:- What is in that glass?

Brice:- A.B.

Sergeant Court:- And what is A.B.?

Brice:- Ale and Beer.

There were a number of glasses on the counter, continued the sergeant, and five persons who were not seen to commit any offence were allowed to go.

Remarks by one of the defendants included:-

Harris:- "I was waiting for a taxi"

Keates:- "We never had any intoxicating liquor."

Brice:- "There it is, we were all being caught, you can wangle it."

Moody:- "O.K., well I plead not guilty."

Moody also asked him if he could have the names and addresses of the people who are allowed to leave but this was refused. At midnight, concluded the Sergeant, a taxi arrived.

Corroborative evidence was given by Inspector H. Haydon, who said that as he went through the door of the bar Moody looked out from inside and tried to close it before witness forced it open, walked past the curtain and into the bar. Following a question by the Chairman (Mr. D. Bradley) about "the geography of the place," a Police-drawn diagram of the bar, showing such obstacles as "pint glass, half full of beer" which the officers had had to negotiate, was handed in for members of the Bench the study.

Giving evidence on his own behalf, Moody, now living at 62, Union Road, and working as a minor at Snowdown Colliery, said he called "Time" at 10:30 p.m., and got most of the customers out of the house by 10:40. The only people left behind were a few who were waiting for taxis. He collected up the empty glasses and spent 10 minutes straining the beer back into the barrels before going out to take his dog for a run. When he got back shortly after 11 p.m. he saw no one with drink, and saw no one drinking. He maintained that when the Inspector came into the bar it was more like 11:10, and not half past.
Booth, who had been said by the others to have been drinking from a pint glass, said he never drank more than a half pint of anything at any time, and in any case he was only talking.

Keates on oath, put forward a similar defence, and said he only drank brown ales in half pints, and on that evening he was only talking to Harris.

Asked by Mr. Harden and if he knew the difference between half pints and pints, Keates exclaimed vigorously. "I hope so sir!"

After a retirement, the Chairman announce that the Bench had decided the prosecution's case was proved.

On Mr. Aldington's application, Moody, who, he said, had been forcibly removed from the house, was allowed 14 days to pay.

 

The compulsory purchase order for this street and George Street was confirmed in November 1966 and the pub closed on 11 September 1967. With a few exceptions, the area was then rebuilt and a car park for residents now occupies this site.

 

LICENSEE LIST

PAY William 1851+ (Census labourer at Brewery and Beer Shop Keeper)

PAY Mary 1861+ (More Info)

PELHAM John July/1871-July/76 Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1874

AMOS William 1876-1881+ (age 32 in 1881Census)

MARBROOK Mrs Ann Mary 1895

YATES William 1899-1901+ Kelly's Directory 1899Post Office Directory 1903

STORY/STAREY John Apr/1905 Dover Express

HUNTLEY E 1905 end

WISE T H June/1906 Dover Express

ROBERTSON James T H June/1906-Aug/06 (Ex-constable of Metropolitan Police) Dover Express

ROWDEN Horace W Aug/1906-Apr/08 Dover Express

CHAMBERS Albert William Apr/1908-Sept/09 Dover ExpressPikes 1909

Last pub licensee had LITTLE Charles Sept/1909-13+ Post Office Directory 1913

HOWLING Robert 1922-June/34 Post Office Directory 1922Pikes 1924Post Office Directory 1930Pikes 1932-33

GUNN George Edward June/1934 (late of the "Brunswick," Hove, Sussex.)

THOMPSON John Frederick 1937-Jan/49 Post Office Directory 1938Pikes 1938-39Dover Express (Granted a music and singling license on 13 Jan 1939. Dover Express.) Pikes 48-49

MOODY Arthur Seymour Jan/1949-50 Dover ExpressKelly's Directory 1950

MOODY Arthur Clifford June/1950 only (probably same as above)

BESSANT William T 1953-55 end Next pub licensee had Kelly's Directory 1953

HARDY Cecil Robert 1955-56 end Kelly's Directory 1956

CAMPBELL Donald Farquhar 1956

WALLER Enos 1958-67 Sept 11

 

Albert William Chambers was a Marden farmer and fly proprietor before taking on the Green Man.

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Kelly's Directory 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1901

Pikes 1909From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1909

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Pikes 1924From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1924

Post Office Directory 1930From the Post Office Directory 1930

Pikes 1932-33From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1932-33

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Pikes 1938-39From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1938-39

Pikes 48-49From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1948-49

Kelly's Directory 1950From the Kelly's Directory 1950

Kelly's Directory 1953From the Kelly's Directory 1953

Kelly's Directory 1956From the Kelly's Directory 1956

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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