DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Dover, July, 2020.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 22 July, 2020.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Barry Smith and Paul Skelton

Earliest 1840-

Hen and Chickens

Latest 1841+

Charlton

Dover

 

A beerhouse of Sarah Ann Clark in 1841.

 

From the Dover Telegraph, 26 December 1840.

CORONER'S INQUEST.

On Monday last an inquest was held, before G. T. Thompson Esq., Coroner for the borough, and a respectable Jury, at the "Hen and Chickens," Charlton, on the body of Mary Fowler, aged 29, wife of Mr. Fowler, glazier, Charlton. She died on 18th inst. A report having gone abroad that the death of the deceased was accelerated by starvation, the inquest excited considerable interest.

Sarah Ann Windar, wife of William Windar, brickmaker, Buckland, on being sworn, deposed that she knew deceased, who with her husband had lodged with witness's mother for five weeks. Deceased was taken very ill on the Saturday before her death, and kept her bed till she expired. She complained of her stomach. Witness went to see the deceased several times during the week, and sat up with her on the night of her death, at her request. Anything deceased wishing for during her illness she got, but she took very little. She had medical attendance of Mr. Walter, surgeon. Deceased husband was in the house when she died. Witness used to see deceased occasionally, when she came to see her mother. Deceased, on the day of her death, ate a small piece of orange, and took her medicine regularly. Deceased husband had not been in steady employment since he came to witness's mother's lodge, he only having a small job to do now and then.

By a Juryman- Could not say on what terms deceased and her husband stood. Deceased was sensible to the last.

Mrs. Sarah Ann Clarke, wife of John Clark, labourer, and mother of last witness, deposed that deceased and her husband had lodged with her for five weeks, and occupied a sitting and bed room, for which they paid 1s. 6d. a week. Deceased was poorly for three weeks before she took so very ill, but kept about till that day fortnight, when she turned very ill. She complained of pain in her inside very often. She took a little coffee and cocoa, which witness made for her, but did not eat anything with it; and Mr. Walter, surgeon, who attended her, ordered her to take some brandy and water, and wine and water, and a little arrowroot, which she took. Mr. Walter for the first time came to see heron the Sunday before her death, and continued to visit her till then daily. Every thing that was offered deceased to eat she refused, saying that her stomach was quite gone. While deceased lived with witness she had very little to eat, and most of what she got was giver her by her friends. Some days deceased lived on a few potatoes: at times she brought home a little food, which she said she got from her father. Deceased husband brought very little home, and complained of want of work. He said he some days put in one pane of glass, and on others he had not earned a halfpenny. His hours were not that of a working man. Witness applied to Mr. Pain, the relieving officer, on behalf of the deceased, who called the same day, and brought some things, such as a few candles, a quart loaf, and some tea. Witness heard her have words with her husband once - about a fortnight ago. Witness never knew deceased's husband to strike her. If they had quarrelled they would have heard them.

By a Juryman - As soon as she took tea and coffee she vomited her medicine, but did not vomit the brandy and water or wine and water.

Witness, in reply to questions from Jacob Robbins, brother of deceased, who attended the enquiry at the request of she other relatives, stated that she had not got a paper of deceased's hand-writing, concerning her husband's conduct towards her during the time she had lived with him. She visited her father's twice a week at the least, and never returned without bringing enough provisions for herself and children for the following day. Deceased's husband always took more than half of the eatables deceased brought home from her father's, and went out in the morning, and did not come home till all the hours in the night, leaving deceased destitute of food. Deceased generally paid witness her rent herself. Deceased, on the Sunday morning after her death, called her husband to procure her medical aid, but he would not hear her. Witness advised him to go in the evening, which he did. Witness, during deceased's illness, took care of the eatables which deceased received from her friends, and did not let her husband get at them. Mr. Snowden gave witness a half-crown for the deceased.

Mr. Walter, surgeon, deposed that on Sunday before her death he saw deceased between six and seven o'clock in the evening, on her husband coming for him. He found her very ill, and had attended her up to her time of death. Her complaint was irritation of the stomach, the effects of improper diet taken on a weak stomach, added to her suckling her child up to the time he first saw her; and her death appeared to have been caused by exhaustion arising thereof. Witness order arrowroot and brandy and water for deceased, which she had. Witness examined the matter deceased had vomited, which did not contain food.

The Jury, after consulting together a few minutes returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

At the conclusion Fowler was brought into the Jury room, and received a severe reprimand from the Coroner for the treatment he had given the deceased. He told him that he might thank leniency of the Jury that he did not stand in a different position.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

CLARK Mrs Sarah Ann 1841

 

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