DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 18 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1869

Honest Lawyer

Latest 2004

3 Belle View Street

Folkestone

Honest Lawyer 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Honest Lawyer sign date unknownHonest Laywer sign 1989

Honest Lawyer sign left, date unknown, sign right, August 1989.

Above with thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com

Honest Lawyer sign

Above photo date unknown.

Honest Lawyer 2012 Honest Lawyer 2012

Above photos kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

Honest Lawyer

Above photo date unknown.

 

From an email received 22 January 2014

Please find attached photos of Ernest Jeffrey, Landlord of the "Honest Lawyer" 1932-49 and also a picture of his family showing Ernest George Jeffrey aged about 9.

Regards

Brenda Gilbert, Grand Daughter of Ernest Jeffrey

Ernest Jeffrey

Above photo showing Ernest Jeffrey Landlord, Honest Lawyer Publican 1932-49.

Jeffrey family photo

Above photo showing:- Top Great Granny Hubbard, bottom Ernest Jeffrey, right Grandad Jeffrey, Left Grandma Jeffrey.

 

I have only recently added Folkestone to this site. The information gathered so far is from "Old Folkestone Pubs" by C H Bishop M.A. Ph.D. and Kevan of http://deadpubs.co.uk/

Any further information or indeed photographs would be appreciated. Please email me at the address below.

 

Folkestone Observer 11 September 1869.

Beerhouse Licenses.

Wednesday, September 8th: Before Capt. Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, A.M. Leith and W. Bateman Esqs.

License was granted to Thomas Edwards, Bellevue Fields.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 October 1873.

Adjourned Licensing Day.

Wednesday, October 1st: Before The Mayor, J. Clarke and J. Tolputt Esqs.

The following house was qualified by rating according to the Wine and Beerhouse Act:

Thomas Edwards, The Honest Lawyer.

 

Folkestone Express 4 October 1873.

Adjourned Licensing Meeting.

The Honest Lawyer.

Tuesday, September 30th: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

Thomas Edwards renewed his application for a license to the Honest Lawyer beerhouse, Bellevue Fields. The application was adjourned from the annual meeting in consequence of a question as to the annual value of the premises.

Mr. Banks said the annual value of the house was 19 10s.

Mr. Till opposed on behalf of Mr. Dickenson, and said he did not think the Bench had any power to grant the license, as the Act required that in a town of not less than ten thousand inhabitants the annual value must be 20.

The Clerk remarked that the Superintendent opposed it at the annual meeting.

Mr. Banks said applicant occupied the house next door to the beerhouse, and the total value would be 34. If notice had been given of the opposition a solicitor would have been employed to support the application.

Mr. Till said the opposition was made on principle. He claimed the right to make the application and argue upon it. With reference to the adjoining house, the Bench must be satisfied that it was to be used for the purposes of a public house. Applicant could not knock a hole through and then say “I occupy the whole”.

The Clerk said applicant could have said he had no notice of the opposition and the Bench would have had power to adjourn the application.

Mr. Till said he was sorry, he must entirely disagree with the clerk. If the next house were worth a thousand pounds the Act would not allow the Bench to grant the license.

Application granted.

 

Folkestone Express 4 September 1875.

Saturday, August 28th: Before J. Tolputt Esq., and Captain Crowe.

George Deronor, a private in the 41st Regiment of Foot, stationed at Shorncliffe, was charged with stealing nineteen plated forks, value 3, the property of Mr. Alfred Cosley, lodging house keeper, of 10, Langhorne Gardens, on the 26th August.

Thomas Edwards, landlord of the Honest Lawyer beerhouse, Bellevue Street, deposed that on the previous Thursday evening the prisoner came to his house about a quarter to eleven and asked for a glass of beer. Witness drew one, when prisoner said he had no money. He drew some forks from under his jacket and asked witness to take them in payment for the beer as he had no money. When the prisoner laid them on the counter, witness saw they were plated forks, but did not count them. Prisoner took them up again and left the house, when witness gave information to the police.

P.C. Abraham Keeler said that on Thursday night about a quarter to eleven he saw the prisoner standing in front of the Honest Lawyer beerhouse in Bellevue Street. Just before witness came up, prisoner turned away and walked up the street. Witness noticed that he was putting something under his tunic and asked him what it was. Prisoner replied “It's all right. These are mine”. Witness then saw some forks sticking out of prisoner's tunic and asked him how he came by them. He replied “It was all through that cook”. Witness asked what cook he meant, when prisoner replied that he did not know where she lived. Witness then took the soldier into custody and removed from the breast of his tunic the nineteen plated forks produced. On Friday morning witness took the forks to No. 10, Langhorne Gardens, and showed them to Mrs. Cowley, who identified the forks as her property.

Mary Nash, cook at prosecutor's, deposed that on Thursday evening about a quarter past nine she was standing at the top of the steps leading to the area of No. 10, Langhorne Gardens. Prisoner spoke to her, saying “Good evening”, and afterwards asked if she would give him her address. She replied that she would not. Prisoner said he should not go away till she had given him her address. She then said her name was Nash, but he answered that that was not enough. Witness went indoors, leaving the door open and prisoner at the top of the steps. Witness heard the prisoner come down the steps after her and went into the breakfast room. Witness looked back through the window and saw prisoner at the back door. She asked him if he was going as she wanted to lock the back door. He then went up the steps and witness fastened the door and saw no more of him. Witness afterwards missed the forks, which had been that evening lying in the plate basket in the kitchen.

Prisoner elected to be tried by the Magistrates and was sentenced to three calendar months' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 17 March 1877.

Wednesday, March 14th: Before Dr. Bateman, R.W. Boarer Esq., and Alderman Caister.

Alfred Foreman was summoned by Herbert Grinstead for assaulting him on Sunday night. The defendant pleaded Guilty.

The complainant stated that while he was in the Honest Lawyer public house on Sunday night, the defendant, who was drunk, came up to him and challenged him to fight. The complainant refused, and the defendant struck him in the face. He had known the defendant for some time, and never had had “words” with him.

The Bench fined the defendant 5s. and 8s. costs, or in default seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 December 1888.

Saturday, December 22nd: Before The Mayor, Alderman Sherwood, J. Fitness, E.T. Ward, J. Hoad, and J. Holden Esqs.

Richard Back, landlord of the New Inn, Dover Road, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly in Belle Vue Street on the night of the 15th December.

Mr. Minter appeared for the defendant and pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Wm. Knott said he was on duty in Belle Vue Street on Saturday night, a few minutes before eleven. He saw the defendant there. He was very drunk and using bad language. When he saw witness he said “I don't want to show any of you ---- up, and I don't want you to round on me, because I've got all you ---- under my thumb”. Witness walked away. About ten minutes past eleven witness was at the other end of Belle Vue Street and heard the landlord of the Honest Lawyer public house ask the company to leave. Witness looked in and told them that the time was up. They all came out, the defendant being the last one to leave. He said to witness “I want you to take all these ---- names”, and continued to shout about. Defendant had a glass of beer in his hand. He threw it down on the pavement and said “Take my name first”. Witness asked him to go away, but he refused. A few minutes afterwards two of his friends took him away.

By Mr. Minter: There were about fifteen men in the street at the time. Most of them came out of the Honest Lawyer. Witness supposed the defendant wanted him to take the names of those who left the house because it was beyond the time. The defendant kept a public house a little lower down. Witness had spoken to him once about keeping his house open a little beyond time. Witness had been in the police force about four months.

Mr. Minter: The defendant was angry, was he not?

Witness: He was very drunk. I can't say whether he was angry or not. I don't know his disposition.

What time was it when you first saw him?

A few minutes before eleven.

He has got two bars close there, hasn't he?

Yes. When I first saw him he was going from one to the other.

Chas. Prior, living at 5, Belle Vue Street, was then called in support of the charge. He stated that he was standing in the street last Saturday night about eleven o'clock when he saw the defendant come up the street from his house. He was rather the worse for drink. He went into the Honest Lawyer and called for a glass of beer. When he got outside he dropped the glass on the pavement. Witness did not hear him make use of bad language, nor was he disorderly in the street.

Mr. Minter, in addressing the Bench for the defence, remarked that he had thought of charging the constable with making a false statement. The witness Prior whom he had called to support him had not rendered him any assistance, but, on the other hand, had stated that the defendant was not disorderly, that he did not hear him make use of bad language, and that he was a little the worse for drink. That, he considered, put an end to the disorderly conduct, and the legal adviser of the Bench would tell that they could not convict upon one portion of the charge alone, viz., drunkenness. He thought the Bench would clearly see that the police had been rather severe upon the defendant about closing his house, whilst they were not particular about his neighbours. Mr. Back felt that he was not being dealt with fairly, and no doubt on the night in question he felt angry and went into the Honest Lawyer after eleven and wanted the constable to take the names of those people in the house. The defendant had instructed him to say that he had never been drunk in his life, and challenged anyone to deny it. He had kept the New Inn, where nightly concerts were held, for fifteen years, and had never had a conviction or a complaint against him. He would call some witnesses who would prove that the defendant was not drunk, and would ask the Bench to dismiss the case.

Mrs. Hogan, whose professional name was Nellie Mackney, said she was a singer, and had been engaged at the New Inn for a fortnight. She sang at the house nightly. On the night in question the house was closed about two minutes to eleven. Witness was at the house from about a quarter to seven until five and twenty minutes to eleven, and saw the landlord from time to time during the evening. He was quite sober and serving in the bar upstairs.

John Hogan, husband of the last witness, and a music hall artist, said he had been engaged at the New Inn for the past fortnight. He had had previous engagements there. Had never seen the defendant drunk. Witness saw him in the upper bar from seven until about eleven. He was quite sober then.

Mr. Minter said he could call six other witnesses of the Bench thought it necessary to call them.

The Mayor said the Bench did not consider the charge proved, and dismissed the case.

 

Folkestone Express 29 December 1888.

Saturday, December 22nd: Before The Mayor, J. Hoad, J. Fitness, J. Holden, J. Sherwood and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Richard Back, landlord of the New Inn, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly in Belle Vue Street on the 15th Dec.

P.C. Knott said on Saturday the 15th inst. he saw defendant in Belle Vue Street, very drunk and using bad language. When he saw witness he said “I have got everything all right tonight. I don't want to show any of you ---- up” and used other bad language. Witness was in the Honest Lawyer at five minutes past eleven, and heard the landlord ask the company to leave. He went in and told them the time was up. Defendant was the last to leave, and when he came out he said he wanted witness to take all their names, and again used very bad language. He asked defendant to go away, and he refused. Two friends took him home.

Mr. Minter cross-examined the witness, who said he did not know whether defendant was angry or not. He was very drunk.

Charles Prior, a plasterer, living in Belle Vue Street, said he saw the defendant on Saturday night, rather the worse for drink. He went into Mr. Edwards' and called for a glass of beer. He brought the glass out and dropped it. He heard him use no bad language.

In reply to the Clerk, the Superintendent said “That is the case”.

Mr. Minter: And a very pretty case it is. (Laughter) He contended that the cause of all the disturbance was a quarrel between defendant and the policeman, because the latter had not dealt out fair play to himself and the landlord of the Honest Lawyer. He further alleged that the defendant had never been drunk in his life. He had carried on the business for 15 years, and during all that time there had been no charge against him by the police.

Nellie Hogan, a music hall singer, engaged at the New Inn Music Hall, said she had sung at the music hall at the New Inn for a fortnight. She left the house on Saturday evening at twenty five minutes to eleven. She saw the landlord frequently during the evening and he was quite sober and serving in the bar.

John Hogan, “a music hall artist”, engaged at the New Inn, said he saw the defendant the evening in question from seven till eleven. He was sober when he closed the house. Witness had never seen him drunk.

Mr. Minter said he had half a dozen more witnesses to prove the same thing.

The Bench dismissed the case.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 July 1889.

Wednesday, July 10th: Before J. Pledge and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Thomas Marples was granted temporary authority to sell beer at the Honest Lawyer, Bellevue Street.

 

Folkestone Express 13 July 1889.

Wednesday, July 10th: Before J. Pledge and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Thomas Marples was granted temporary authority to sell beer at the Honest Lawyer, Bellevue Street.

 

Folkestone Express 26 December 1891.

Wednesday, December 23rd: Before Aldermen Sherwood, Pledge and Dunk, J. Fitness and E. Ward Esqs.

Iden Pritchard, gardener, was summoned for stealing two heath plants, value 2s., from a greenhouse belonging to George Pilcher. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Prosecutor, a florist, having premises in Dover Road, said defendant had been in his employment as working gardener for more than 18 months. He left a week ago last Saturday. Since defendant left he had missed plants from his premises, and among them were three heaths of the kind produced, from a greenhouse. He missed the heaths on Friday, 18th. Defendant was in the house on the Wednesday or Thursday previous, saying he wanted to buy some shrubs, but he went away without buying anything. When he missed the plants he gave information to the police. There were nine plants of this sort in the greenhouse. He could swear positively to one of those produced, as it was peculiar in it's appearance, and he had tried to sell it to a customer a few days ago. They were also of an uncommon size to be flowering so freely. The value was 1s. each.

By defendant: I bought twelve plants of a nurseryman, and sold three. The nurseryman had plenty more of the same sort, and he served the trade. The greenhouses were not kept locked. I have had reasons to suspect you have taken goods. You were formerly a very useful man, but latterly you have given way to drink and been careless. I do not remember having given you a good recommendation lately.

Alice Maud Mary Jordan, of the Red Cow Inn, said the defendant went to her mother's house on Thursday with Christmas Trees and two plants. She recognised one of the heaths. Defendant asked her to buy it, and she did, paying 9d. for it. She knew defendant as a customer.

Mary Ann Maple, wife of Thomas Maple, of the Honest Lawyer, Belle Vue Street, said the defendant went to that house with one plant on Thursday evening. He asked 1s. for it, and she bought it of him for 6d. She knew him as a customer.

William Jenner, a lad in the service of the prosecutor, said he saw the defendant on Wednesday evening at ten minutes to ten, outside the garden gate in Dover Road, walking to and from.

Thomas Alfred Tutt, another lad in the prosecutor's employ, said he saw the defendant about ten o'clock on Wednesday evening go into the Belle Vue with a Christmas tree in his hand. Witness saw him again on Thursday evening near St. John Street with a plant like those produced in his hand.

Prosecutor was re-called, and said the garden was approached by gates. The larger one was locked, but not the smaller one. Mr. Wilson had a right of way to his premises there. The greenhouse was not fastened in any way.

Defendant said he bought the plants from a hawker, but did not know his name.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined defendant 10s., 2s. the value of the plants, and 18s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour, telling him he was liable to be imprisoned for six months.

The Bench recommended Mr. Pilcher to keep his premises locked in future.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 February 1898.

Felix.

I was strolling through St. Peter's Street recently, and I noticed that a certain inn in that locality is called the Honest Lawyer. Why is this? This particular Honest Lawyer appears to be a well conducted place, but it occurred to me “What could have induced the owners of the hostelry to fix on this peculiar title?” Again, I say, why the Honest Lawyer? Why not the honest doctor, baker, clothier, butcher, printer, and so on?

Are not all lawyers honest? Why should the inference be thrown out, as it is in this case, that the great quality is scarce in the ranks of legal profession? At any rate in Folkestone we look upon our solicitors as the very acme of probity and honour. Whoever heard of one of their number ever having their bill of costs before the Taxing Master? I pause for a reply.

I suppose there is a reason why this particular house should be dubbed the Honest Lawyer, but I am not in a position to supply it. We know hard things have been said against the great profession, and that even the singer of the old comic song asked the question “Can a monkey climb a tree? Can a lawyer take his fee?”

Of course he can take his fee, and why on Earth shouldn't he as well as a workman, or any member of the other great professions?

Here, then, is a suggestion. We know genial Mr. Frederic Hall is always open for a diversion. Then, why not let him call his legal brethren together, and suggest that a lawyers' smoking concert or a leg of mutton banquet should be held up at that old fashioned house in St. Peter's Street? The assembled gentlemen could then and there interview Boniface and suggest to him that henceforward the sign should be altered to that of “The Honest Lawyers”. Then the legal profession would be saved from a slur, and fashionable Folkestone relieved from a smutch on her escutcheon.

 

Folkestone Express 7 December 1901.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before J. Stainer, G. Peden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Col. W.K. Westropp.

A special licensing sessions was held, when Mr. Harry Johnson was granted transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 April 1902.

We Hear.

That ex-Capt. Johnston, of the “Cyprus”, has gone into a new vocation, having taken over the Honest Lawyer, where the local salts nightly sail their voyages o'er again.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 May 1904.

Felix.

The Honest Lawyer.

Why honest lawyer. Why should the legal profession be singled out in this manner? Yet so it is, and even the title is applied to a small public house in this town. I understand there are several “Honest Lawyers” in various parts of the country, but so far as I can gather this is the only one in Kent. This particular “Lawyer” is looked after by Captain Johnson – a gentleman who has sailed round the world no less than eight times. He is a genial soul, and not given to spinning yarns. Mr. Johnson is also a ship owner, and what he does not know about sailing a vessel is not worth knowing. But now in a sense the captain has turned his head from the sea, although he instinctively “sniffs the briny”. His “Lawyer” now takes up nearly all his time, and he has no difficulty in keeping him “Honest”. This sign tickles the fancy of many visitors, who all ask “Why the Honest Lawyer?” To many people it almost appears to be a slur on the legal profession. Why not the “Honest Butcher”, or the “Honest Milkman” and so on? This consideration opens up an interesting study. Meanwhile the “Lawyer” I have alluded to is honestly conducted by Captain Johnson, who is thought a heap of by all those who do their “business in great waters”.

 

Folkestone Express 22 October 1904.

Wednesday, October 19th: Before Aldermen Banks and Salter, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Alfred Holloway was summoned for using obscene language in St. John's Road on October 13th.

P.C. Kettle said he heard the defendant making use of very bad language outside the Honest Lawyer public house at 11.15 p.m.

Defendant denied the offence, and he called Alfred Hatfield and William Whitehead, both of whom said Holloway did not use bad language.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had decided to give the defendant the benefit of the doubt, and therefore the case would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 December 1904.

Wednesday December 28th:

Harry Edward Linton, a tailor, who had to be removed from the Honest Lawyer, threatened to knock out the brains of P.C. Leonard Johnston, and also threatened the constable (who had done all in his power to get the man away quietly) with a shovel and a poker.

The Chairman said the Bench looked upon it as a bad case, and fined defendant 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days'.

 

Folkestone Express 31 December 1904.

Wednesday, December 28th: Before Col. Penfold and G. Peden Esq.

Henry Edward Lenton was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Peter Street. He admitted that he was drunk, but not disorderly.

P.C. Johnson said the defendant was very drunk, and had his coat off. Two men were trying to get him home. He also refused to leave the Honest Lawyer, and had to be ejected. He went to 24, Peter Street, and came out again with a shovel, and afterwards a poker, and made use of threats to the constable.

The defendant protested that he did not say a single word to the constable, but went quietly with him to the station.

He was fined 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days', the Bench considering it was a bad case.

A woman in Court asked the Bench if it was not time the Honest Lawyer was put a stop to.

Mrs. Lenton, the woman who made the remark to the Bench about the conduct of the Honest Lawyer, was called to the front and asked what she had to say. Speaking in a low tone, she said she had a grievance against the house. She did not think it was right to allow people to stay in the house and get drunk, and then get the police to turn them out.

Superintendent Reeve: But the landlord told me last night he had not served your husband.

Mrs. Lenton: Oh, he did, sir. He was in the house before. He was very drunk at four o'clock, and went back again. (Her other remarks were not audible at the reporters' table.)

Col. Penfold told her to give all the information she could to the Chief Constable.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 December 1904.

Wednesday, December 28th: Before Alderman S. Penfold and Councillor G. Peden.

Henry Edward Lenton was charged with being drunk in Peter Street.

P.C. Johnson said that at 8.40 p.m. on the previous day he went to Peter Street, where he saw the prisoner with some men trying to get him away. Later witness was called to eject him from the Honest Lawyer. Prisoner then went to a house in Peter Street and came out with a shovel, threatening to knock witness' ---- head off. Accused went inside, but came out later with a poker and again threatened witness.

Prisoner denied speaking to the constable at all.

The Bench imposed a fine of 10s and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment.

Before the rising of the Court, Mrs. Lenton, wife of Henry Edward Lenton, came forward and said that she had a strong grievance. She declared that when her husband had had too much to drink he went to the Honest Lawyer, and they would serve him. She did not think that was right.

The Chief Constable: The landlord told me last night that he did not serve him.

Mrs. Lenton: He did. My husband was very drunk at 4 o'clock, and he went up there and got served. There is gambling and everything else going on up there.

The Clerk: All right. Give all the information you can to the Chief Constable.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Maj. Leggatt, and Mr. Linton.

Mr. Loftus Banks applied for the transfer of the Honest Lawyer from Mr. H. Johnston to Mr. Robert Spratt.

The valuation being made late in the week, the clear seven days' notice had not been given.

The Chairman said that the applicant must comply with the regulations, and adjourned the hearing of the application for one week.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 9 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 9th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggatt, W.G. Herbert and J. Linton Esqs.

The transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer to Mr. R. Spratt was adjourned until next Wednesday.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggatt, and Mr. T. Ames.

The consideration of the transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer was adjourned until next Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Daily News 13 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, R. Ames, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Major Leggett.

Mr. Spratt was granted the transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer.

Note: Date at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, Alderman Herbert, Liuet. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggatt, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. Linton, and Mr. C. Ames.

The licence of the Honest Lawyer was transferred from Mr. Johnston to Mr. Spratt.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 16 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, Major Leggatt, J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, T. Ames, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

Temporary authority was given to Mr. Spratt to sell at the Honest Lawyer beerhouse.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Mr. T. Ames, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. J. Stainer, and Major Leggatt.

The licence of the Honest Lawyer was transferred from Mr. Johnson to Mr. Spratt.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Daily News 24 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. E.T. Ward, R.J. Linton, T.J. Vaughan, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, and Major Leggett.

Mr. Robert Spratt obtained the transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor Carpenter, Aldermen T.J. Vaughan and W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggatt and Mr. Linton.

The following licensed premises were transferred:- The Honest Lawyer, to Mr. Robert Spratt.

 

Folkestone Express 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, E.T. Ward, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

The following licences were transferred by the Magistrates: The Honest Lawyer beerhouse, from Mr. Harry Johnson to Mr. Robert Spratt.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Major Leggett, Mr. E.T. Ward, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Honest Lawyer was transferred from Harry Johnson to Robert Spratt.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1907.

Saturday, January 5th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggett, and J. Stainer and R.J. Linton Esqs.

The Magistrates granted temporary authority to Richard Godden Taylor to sell at the Honest Lawyer, in place of Robert Spratt.

 

Folkestone Express 26 January 1907.

Wednesday, January 23rd: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Hamilton, Major Leggett, and W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames Esqs.

The following licence was transferred: The Honest Lawyer, from Robert Spratt to Richard Godden Taylor.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 January 1907.

Wednesday, January 23rd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Colonel Hamilton, and Messrs. T. Ames, R.J. Linton, and R.J. Fynmore.

The licence of the Honest Lawyer was transferred from Robert Spratt to R.G. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Daily News 31 January 1910.

Monday, January 31st: Before Messrs. Herbert, Swoffer, Linton, Stainer, and Leggett.

Sydney Arthur Smith, a tall young fellow, was charged with committing an indecent assault on Ellen Staples on Saturday night.

Prosecutrix deposed that she was the wife of Edward Staples, an engine fitter, residing at 7, Garden Road. On Saturday night at 11.30 she was going home through Bradstone Road, and when near the Viaduct she saw the prisoner coming in front of her. As he passed her he said “Goodnight” and she replied “Goodnight”. She looked round to see who it was. Prisoner was a stranger to her, and she had never seen him before. He commenced to follow her, and overtook her just through the arch. He took hold of her by the shoulder and spoke to her. She replied that it would pay him better to go about his business as she was a married woman. He then dragged her across the road towards the passage in Kent Road, near Bradstone Avenue. She resisted him, and said she was not going along there. Finding he was getting the best of her she commenced to scream and threatened to give him in charge. He then put his hand over her mouth to prevent her from screaming, but she bit his hand, and he threatened to choke her. He then put a cap, or bag, or something in her mouth. At this time prisoner had got her near the back gates of the second house in the passage. Her clothes were disarranged. She screamed “Murder” and “Police”, and he pushed the cap further into her mouth so that she could not holler. He lifted her clothes and assaulted her. Someone then called from a house in Bradstone Avenue, asking what was the matter, and prisoner then ran away in the direction of Foord Road. Constable Waters came up, to whom she complained of what had taken place. She then saw P.C. Butler near Kain's shop in Foord Road, and asked him if he had seen a tall man about. Prisoner came up and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. She then gave him into custody. She had been down the town shopping with her husband, whom she left at 8.30 in the High Street. From that time she had been in the company of two girls who worked in the laundry with her. She left them in South Street at ten minutes to eleven, when she went to look for her husband. The whole affair of the assault lasted about ten minutes. Nobody passed along during that time.

In reply to prisoner: She did not see him in the Brewery Tap. She had never been in the Brewery Tap in her life. She denied speaking to him in Bradstone Road. She did not ask him for a shilling, and did not say she would tell his wife.

P.C. Waters deposed that he was in his bed at his lodgings, 5, Bradstone Avenue, at 11.30 on Saturday night, when he heard screaming shouts of “Murder” and Police” from the passage mentioned leading into Kent Road. He opened his window and asked what was the matter. He then heard someone run away. He also heard a woman's voice saying “Won't someone come to help me?” He dressed and went down into the passage and saw the prosecutrix, who was excited and bleeding from the lips. She complained to him of the assault, saying she did not know the man, but he had gone in the direction of Foord Road, where he accompanied her. They met P.C. Butler, whom the prosecutrix asked if he had seen a tall man go that way. Just then prisoner crossed the road and said he was the tall man they were looking for. Prosecutrix replied “That's the man”. Witness and Butler brought prisoner to the police station and charged him. He made no reply at that time. He was taken below by Butler, and on his way down he said he gave the woman a shilling to go up the passage with him. He also said he had been in the Guildhall Vaults with her during the evening.

P.C. Butler corroborated the previous witness, also testified as to the evidence of a struggle having taken place in the passage, where he found a bag belonging to prisoner. On being charged at the police station prisoner said he went out with the bag to get some coal. Prisoner's hand was bleeding. Both prosecutrix and prisoner appeared to be perfectly sober.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 5 February 1910.

Monday, January 31st: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and R.J. Linton, and Major Legget.

A young man named Sidney Alfred Smith, married and living at Folkestone, was charged with indecently assaulting Ellen Staple on Saturday evening. The court was cleared and the case was heard in camera.

Ellen Staple said she was the wife of Edward Staple, an engine fitter, and lived at 7, Garden Road. On Saturday evening, about 11.30, she was in Bradstone Road. She was returning home alone. She was near the Viaduct, when she saw the prisoner walking towards her. As he was passing he said “Goodnight”. Witness answered “Goodnight” and looked round to see who it was. Prisoner was a stranger to her. As she looked round, prisoner also looked round, and then turned and followed her. She continued to walk on. Prisoner overtook her near the Corporation gate, just through the Viaduct, and caught hold of her by the shoulder. He said something to her, and she replied “It would pay you better to go about your business. I am a married woman”. The prisoner then dragged her across the road towards Kent Road, in the direction of the passage which runs at the rear of Bradstone Avenue. Witness resisted him, and said she was not going along there. Finding he was getting the better of her, she screamed and told prisoner if he did not let her go she would give him in charge. Prisoner then put his hand over her mouth and she bit his hand, which caused him to remove it. Prisoner then said that if she screamed he would choke her, and he placed some soft substance in her mouth. He was carrying a bag under his arm. Prisoner and witness at that time were in the passage at the rear of the second house in Bradstone Avenue. Witness screamed “Murder” and “Police”, and prisoner then pushed the soft substance further into her mouth. He then indecently assaulted her. Someone called from one of the windows of the houses in Bradstone Avenue “What's the matter over there?” and prisoner ran away in the direction of Foord Road. Witness walked to the top of the passage, where she met P.C. Waters. She made a complaint to him as to what had happened. P.C. Butler was at the corner of Kent Road and Foord Road, and witness went across to him and said “Have you seen a tall man about?” Prisoner immediately came from the direction of the Viaduct, in Foord Road, and said “I'm the tall man you're looking for”. Witness then gave him into custody. Witness had been in the town with her husband shopping, and met two young women who worked in the same laundry. She left her husband at 8.30 in High Street, and from that time until ten minutes to eleven she was in company with the two women. She left them in South Street, and then went to look for her husband, but she did not find him. The affair with the prisoner lasted about ten minutes. Nobody passed during that time.

Cross-examined by prisoner, witness said she did not see him in the Brewery Tap in the early part of the evening, and she did not ask him to treat her. She did not see him outside of his house in Bradstone Road and ask him for a shilling.

P.C. Waters said at about 11.30 on Saturday evening he was in bed at his lodgings, 5, Bradstone Avenue, when he heard screaming and shouting coming from the passage at the rear of Bradstone Avenue. He got up and opened the back window and shouted out “What's the matter out there?” He then heard footsteps running away up the passage into Kent Road. He also heard a woman's voice say “Oh, won't someone come to help me?” Witness partly dressed and ran down into the passage, and as he did so he tripped over the sack produced. He saw the last witness at the top of the passage. She was very excited and bleeding from the lips. She told him a man had dragged her up the passage and had assaulted her. Witness asked her if she knew the man, and she replied “No”. He asked her in what direction he had gone, and she replied “Out in the Foord Road”. Witness accompanied her to the Foord Road end of Kent Road, where they met P.C. Butler at the corner of Kent Road. The last witness ran across the road and asked Butler if he had seen a tall man run along that way. Almost immediately, just across Foord Road, prisoner came up to them and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. Mrs. Staple said “That's the man”, and P.C. Butler then took him into custody on the charge of indecently assaulting Staple. Prisoner made no reply. On the way to the police station prisoner said he gave the prosecutrix a shilling to go up the passage with him. He further said he had been in the Guildhall Vaults with her during the evening, and also in the Honest Lawyer public house.

P.C. Butler corroborated. He gave evidence of finding the bag, and spoke of seeing marks of a struggle in the passage in Kent Road. In reply to the charge at the police station, prisoner said he went out with his bag to get some coals. Witness noticed prisoner's clothing was disarranged, and that he had a slight cut on the knuckle of his right hand, which was covered with blood. Prosecutrix and prisoner both appeared to be perfectly sober.

The Chairman advised Smith to reserve his defence, which he did.

Prisoner asked for bail, as he had a wife and three little children. He was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions. Bail was allowed, himself in 20 and one surety in 20, or two in 10.

The Chairman commended P.C. Waters on his prompt action in the matter.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1910.

Monday, January 31st: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

Sidney Arthur Smith was charged with indecently assaulting Emily Ellen Staple, a married woman. The Chairman ordered the Court to be cleared.

Mrs. Staple stated that she was the wife of Edward Staple, and she lived at 17, Garden Road. Last Saturday, at about 11.30, in Bradstone Road, as she was returning home alone, prisoner, who was a stranger to her, spoke to her, caught hold of her by the shoulder, and dragged her across the road towards the passage in Kent Road. She resisted him, and finding he was getting the better of her, she commenced to scream. She said “If you don't let me go, I'll give you in charge”. He then held his hand over her mouth and tried to stop her from screaming. She bit his hand, which caused him to remove it. He said “If you scream, I'll choke you”. He then placed some soft substance in her mouth, either his bag or cap. She screamed “Murder” and “Police”. He tightened the substance which was in her mouth so that she could not scream. Prosecutrix deposed to the nature of the assault alleged, and, proceeding, said someone shouted out of a window at the back “What's the matter over there?”, which caused accused to run away. She only had time to get to the passage before P.C. Waters saw her. She then told him what had occurred, and accompanied him to the corner of Kent Road and Foord Road, where they met P.C. Butler. She said to him “Have you seen a tall man about?” Prisoner then came from the direction of Foord Road, and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. She then gave him into custody. She had been out shopping. She met two young women that worked with her in the laundry. She left her husband at 8.30 p.m. in the High Street, and she was with her companions until 10.50. She left them in South Street, and then she looked for her husband, but missed him.

In answer to the accused, Mrs. Staples said she had never seen him before. She did not ask accused to “treat” her, and she did not see him at the Brewery Tap. She did not ask accused for a shilling.

P.C. Waters stated that at about 11.30 p.m. on Saturday evening he was in bed at his lodgings, at 5, Bradstone Avenue, when he heard someone screaming “Murder”, “Help”, and “Police”. The sound came from the passage at the rear of Bradstone Avenue, at the beginning of the Kent Road. He opened his window and shouted “What is the matter out there?” He heard a woman shouting “Oh, won't someone come to help me?”, and he heard someone running away. He then partly dressed and ran down into the passage. He tripped over something which was lying there. He then saw complainant at the Kent Road end of the passage. She appeared to be very excited and was bleeding from the lips. She told him that a man had assaulted her. He asked her if she knew the man, and she replied “No”. He then asked in which direction he had gone. She replied “Out into Foord Road”. She then accompanied him to the corner of Kent Road and Foord Road, and he there met P.C. Butler. The prosecutrix asked “Have you seen a tall man run along this way?”. Almost immediately the prisoner crossed the Foord Road. He came right up to them, and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. He was then told by P.C. Butler that he would be brought to the police station and charged with indecently assaulting Mrs. Staples. Prosecutrix, when she saw the prisoner, said “That's the man”. Prisoner made no reply at the time.

Prisoner: I said I was innocent.

Witness, continuing, said that P.C. Butler took accused away, and he (witness) accompanied him. Prisoner said on the way that he gave prosecutrix a shilling. He also said that he had been in the Guildhall Vaults with complainant during the evening, and also in the Honest Lawyer public house.

Prisoner: If I was Guilty, why did I come back again? She asked me for 1s.

P.C. Butler also gave evidence. He said he went to the passage and saw evidence of a struggle. He found the bag owned by accused. In reply to the charge, accused said “I went out with my old bag to get some coal”. He noticed a slight cut on the right knuckle of prisoner's hand. His hand was covered in blood.

Prisoner, who protested his innocence, was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions for the borough, and was allowed bail, himself in 20, and one surety of 20, or two of 10.

The Chairman said the Bench complimented the constables on their very smart conduct.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1910.

Local News.

In reference to the charge of assault heard before the Folkestone Magistrates last week, we are requested to state that Mrs. Staple, the prosecutrix, does not live at 17, Garden Road, but at another house in the road.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 April 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Sidney Alfred Smith was charged on the 31st January with indecently assaulting Mrs. Ellen Staple, a married woman. He was also charged with a common assault.

Mr. Dickens, who prosecuted, elected not to proceed with the serious charge.

Mr. Pitman advised accused to plead Guilty to the common assault, which he did, and was bound over to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Express 9 April 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Sidney Alfred Smith, 23, a labourer, was charged with indecently assaulting Ellen Staple on January 20th. He pleaded Guilty to a charge of common assault.

Mr. Dickens prosecuted, and Mr. Pitman (instructed by Mr. G.W. Haines) defended.

Mr. Dickens said no doubt the Recorder had read the depositions, and he was going to suggest that owing to the various circumstances, as well as certain information above suspicion, which the Chief Constable had received from other persons, that the man and woman were seen talking quietly together before the assault, it would be advisable for him not now to press the charge of indecency against the man, for he felt it would be practically impossible under the circumstances to obtain a conviction. The prisoner, however, did assault the woman in such a way that she bit his hand enough to make it bleed. He would be satisfied with the plea that the prisoner had made, and take a verdict of Guilty of the common assault.

Mr. Pitman said, having regard to what Mr. Dickens had said, and also to certain circumstances which had impressed themselves very much on his mind, it would have resulted in a verdict which would amount to guilty of a common assault. Mr. Dickens was satisfied that the additional information the defence could bring forward could not be doubted for one moment, and that the two were seen talking together and walking quietly along to the place into which the woman alleged she was dragged could not be doubted. The case he was instructed to put forward was entirely consistent with the story told by independent witnesses, and that the suggestion of indecency came not from the man, but from the woman, he being a married man, living with his wife quite close to the spot. The prisoner absolutely denied the suggestion that he put anything into her mouth, but he pushed her away with the sack which he was carrying. He would like to point out that Smith had been four or five weeks in prison, he not being bailed out until March 7th, and he should ask the Recorder, having regard to the whole circumstances of the case, and the undoubted unreliability of the woman's story, to take a lenient course. The woman, according to his instructions, made a demand for money, and threatened to cry if he did not accede to his request. He then lost his temper.

The Recorder said at the Police Court the prisoner said he reserved his defence.

Mr. Pitman said the prisoner outlined his defence in cross-examining the witnesses, and he was beginning to make a statement, when, at the Magistrates' suggestion, he reserved his defence.

The Recorder, addressing Smith, said he had heard what both counsel had said, and he had already formed his own opinion. He did not think it desirable to go into details. The less said about the case the better. He advised him to be careful in the future. He would be bound over to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 April 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Sidney Alfred Smith, e23, a labourer, was indicted first for an indecent assault, and secondly for a common assault, on Ellen Staple, on January 29th, at Folkestone. He was committed for trial on the first count only on January 31st, and was not bailed out till March 7th. Mr. Dicken prosecuted on behalf of the Crown, and Mr. Pitman defended.

Acting on the advice of his counsel, prisoner pleaded Guilty to a common assault, but Not Guilty to an indecent assault.

Mr. Dickens intimated that he would accept the plea of Guilty to a common assault, and not proceed with the other charge. He said that the prisoner and the woman were seen talking quietly together before the assault, by a witness who did not appear at the Police Court, and he thought it would be inadvisable for him to press the charge of indecency against the man; indeed, he might also say that it would be impossible to obtain a conviction for indecent assault. That there was a common assault there was no doubt. The prisoner put something into the woman's mouth, and as a result she bit his hand till the blood came.

The Recorder said that having regard to what Mr. Dickens had said, and to certain circumstances which had impressed themselves very much on his mind in connection with the deposition as to the time and the hours that the woman appeared to have been about the town, he thought that Mr. Dickens had taken a very proper course.

Mr. Pitman, for the defendant, said that his story was that the prisoner and the woman met, that they walked and conversed together, and that the suggestion came not from the man, but from the woman. They all knew the story of Potiphar's wife. Prisoner had been recently married, and his wife lived near. Being indignant with the woman, prisoner did push her back, and she, according to a threat she had made before, cried out for the police, and so on. Prisoner absolutely denied the suggestion that he put anything into her mouth. He was carrying a sack at the time, having been picking up coal, and that might have accidentally struck her. Prisoner had already been in prison for four or five weeks, since he was committed on January 31st, and not bailed out till March 7th. In conclusion, counsel referred to the “undoubted unreliability of the woman's story”, and said that it was a little difficult to know what a man was to do under the circumstances.

The Recorder said that in such cases he always desired to see what answer the prisoner made at the time when he was first charged. He saw that at the Police Court this man said “I reserve my defence”. Why was that?

Mr. Pitman said that the prisoner's remark was one that was often made. At the Police Court he had put a good many questions to the woman, and as those questions disclosed his defence, the Magistrates' Clerk afterwards advised him to reserve the defence.

The Recorder said that that cleared up his doubt on the point, but he always did feel himself that it was very desirable to know what the answer of the man was at the time. He thought that the less said about that case the better. He would advise prisoner to be careful in the future. He would now bind him over to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 April 1911.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Justices Ward, Jenner, Fynmore and Vaughan.

The licence of the Honest Lawyer was transferred from Mr. Godden Taylor to Mr. T.G. Saunders of Margate.

Mr. G.W. Haines appeared and stated that Mr. Taylor had gone to Norway and did not intend to come back. He had taken the licence with him, and the agreement between the brewers and the tenant could not be found.

Mr. Twyman, of Flint and Co., produced a duplicate copy which he had attested giving the brewers power to apply for the transfer of the duplicate licence.

Mr. Bax (sic), managing director, corroborated.

 

Folkestone Express 15 April 1911.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

Mr. Haines said he applied for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer public house. The licensee was Richard Godden Taylor, and the applicant for the transfer was Mr. J. Adams, of Margate. Mr. Taylor left Folkestone some three weeks or so ago suddenly for Norway, but one could hardly understand why he did so, because that house was doing a very good business. Mr. Taylor withheld his licence, therefore, he had to allow the Magistrates to allow him to have a duplicate, so that he could proceed further.

Mr. Twyman and Mr. Battiscombe, the manager of Messrs. Flint and Co., the owners of the house, gave evidence, and the Magistrates granted temporary authority, while they also agreed to give Mr. Haines a duplicate of the licence obtained by Mr. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 April 1911.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Aldermen T.J. Vaughan and C. Jenner, and Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore.

Mr. G.W. Haines, on behalf of Mr. T.J. Adams, applied for a transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer public house from Mr. T.R. Taylor.

Mr. Haines said that the applicant's references had been sent in to the Chief Constable. The present holder of the licence could not appear, as he had left the town some time ago for Norway. Mr. Haines, however, produced a copy of the original agreement that had been made between the tenant and the brewers, Messrs. Flint and Co. Ltd., which contained a clause empowering the brewers to transfer the licence in the absence of the tenant.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 20 May 1911.

Wednesday, May 17th: Before W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Hamilton, Major Leggett, and J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, G.I. Swoffer, and G. Boyd Esqs.

Mr. G.W. Haines appeared on behalf of Mr. T.J. Adams and applied for the transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer to his client. He stated that temporary authority had been granted, and that the outgoing tenant was Mr. R.G. Taylor.

The transfer was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 May 1911.

Wednesday, May 17th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, Messrs. J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

Mr. G.W. Haines applied for a transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer public house to Mr. J. Adams. The former tenant was Mr. R.G. Taylor. Temporary authority had already been given.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 17 February 1912.

Local News.

An application was made on Wednesday at the police court for a protection order in respect to the transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer, St. John's Street, from Mr. Adams to Mr. George Hubbard, Sittingbourne. The licence was transferred to Adams on the 17th May last, and he applied for protection. The Clerk said the regulations had not been complied with. A licence could not be transferred before the expiration of twelve months from the date of the transfer. The application was refused.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 February 1912.

Wednesday, February 14th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward and Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore.

Mr. Twining applied for a protection order in respect of the Honest Lawyer beerhouse, St. John's Street. The present tenant was a man named Adams, who obtained a transfer of the licence on the 17th May last. He applied for a protection order for Mr. Geo. Hubbard, of Sittingbourne. Mr. Twining said it would be advantageous to both parties if the order was granted by the Magistrates that day.

The Magistrates' Clerk said it was the practice of the justices not to grant a transfer within a year of the previous transfer. He did not think they could do it.

Mr. Twining remarked that should the application not be granted, the present applicant would remain in occupation until such time as the transfer could be effected. Should the Magistrates see their way clear to concur, Mr. Hubbard would take over the occupation that day. He pointed out the inconvenience that would be caused to Mr. Hubbard, whose furniture was being removed.

The Magistrates refused the application, the Chairman remarking that by doing so they would be departing from their usual practice, and would be creating a precedent.

 

Folkestone Daily News 28 February 1912.

Wednesday, February 28th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Leggett, Swoffer, Fynmore, Boyd, and Stainer.

An application was made to transfer the licence of the Honest Lawyer in St. John's Street.

It had only been transferred in May last, when the former tenant had left the country and taken the licence with him. Now, the Licensing Act lays it down very clearly that no licence shall be transferred more than once a year, but the Bench waived this objection, it being explained that there were domestic circumstances which rendered the transfer necessary. Consequently the transfer was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 2 March 1912.

Wednesday, February 28th: Before W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer and G. Boyd Esqs., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Major Leggett.

Mr. Twyman applied for the transfer of the Honest Lawyer from Mr. Thomas James Adams to Mr. George Hubbard.

The Clerk said there had been no protection order granted, for the reason that there were certain difficulties in the way, and it was left to them (the Magistrates) to deal with the transfer. It was only right to mention that the licence was transferred to the present holder in May last, within the twelve months, and the regulations provided that no second transfer should be made within twelve calendar months. The Magistrates had the power to waive the regulation.

The Chairman asked the Chief Constable whether he had any objection.

The Chief Constable said the incoming tenant kept a house near Sittingbourne for nearly eight years and in a very satisfactory manner. He thought it was desirable that the change should take place.

The Chairman asked what was the reason the transfer was asked for.

Mr. Twyman said it was on account of domestic circumstances which had arisen, and it was desirable that the present tenant should move out of the licensed premises.

The Chairman said the Bench agreed to waive the regulation, and the transfer would be granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 March 1912.

Wednesday, February 28th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, Messrs. J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer and G. Boyd.

With regard to an application for the transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer from Mr. T.J. Adams to Mr. Geo. Hubbard, the Magistrates' Clerk explained that no protection order had been granted because of certain difficulties. The transfer had been made to the holder in May last, within twelve months of the present transfer. The regulations provided that no second transfer should be made within twelve calendar months, but if the Magistrates felt so disposed, they could waive the regulations.

The Chief Constable said there was no objection. The applicant had had a licence at Bourne, near Sittingbourne, for eight years, and he thought it desirable for the change to take place.

Mr. Twyman, who made the application on behalf of the tenant, said the transfer was asked for by the present tenant on account of domestic circumstances, which made it desirable for him to live off licensed premises.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 9 March 1912.

Local News.

The adjourned licensing sessions for the borough of Folkestone were held at the police court on Wednesday morning. The Magistrates were E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd Esqs., Major Leggett, and Lieut. Colonels Fynmore and Hamilton. Only one licence had been deferred – that of the Rendezvous Hotel.

Honest Lawyer.

The licence of the Honest Lawyer, which had been transferred to Mr. Hubbard, was renewed.

Mr. Andrews said plans had been deposited with respect to certain alterations at the Guildhall Vaults. The alterations were in the billiard room.

The Magistrates gave their consent to the application.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 March 1912.

Wednesday, March 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lt. Col. Hamilton, Lt. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

The licence of the Honest Lawyer, which was transferred to Mr. Hubbard on the previous Wednesday, was renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 3 July 1915.

Wednesday, June 30th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Spurgen, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Jenner. Col. Owen, J.J. Giles, and H. Kirke Esqs.

The Magistrates transferred the licence of the Honest Lawyer, Bellevue Street, from the late Mr. Hubbard to his widow.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 July 1915.

Wednesday, June 30th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman G. Spurgen, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Alderman C. Jenner, Mr. J.J. Giles, and Mr. H.C. Kirke.

An application was made for the transfer of the licence of the Honest Lawyer, Bellevue Street, from the late Mr. Hubbard to his widow, Mrs. Hubbard. The request was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 13 May 1916.

Local News.

On Monday evening a serious stabbing affray took place in Tontine Street, as a result of which Private George McKenzie, a Canadian soldier, had his life gravely endangered by a nasty wound in the throat. He was conveyed to the Shorncliffe Hospital, where he is now an inmate. He was too ill to be present at the Police Court on Wednesday morning, when Pte. Christopher Clarke, another Canadian soldier, was charged with unlawfully and maliciously wounding him by stabbing him with a knife. The Magistrates on the Bench were G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, E.T. Morrison and A. Stace Esqs., and the Rev. Epworth Thompson.

George Ellison, a private in the 50th Canadian Infantry, said on Monday evening he was in the Honest Lawyer beerhouse at 7.40, in company with Pte. McKenzie, ot the 8th Battalion, and the prisoner. At eight o'clock the house closed, and the three of them left together. They remained outside talking for about five minutes in a friendly manner. He left them for about three minutes, and on returning the other two had started fighting with their fists. They continued to fight for about ten minutes. McKenzie was on top of prisoner, who was on the ground. He tried to separate them, and when he got hold of McKenzie to get him off the prisoner, he found his hands were covered with blood. He pulled McKenzie up, and then saw Clarke had an open knife in his hand. As soon as he got McKenzie up prisoner got up and ran away. Witness, followed by McKenzie, followed after Clarke, and caught him 80 or 90 yards away in Tontine Street. He caught hold of the prisoner, who had the knife in his right hand. Clarke struck at him with the knife, so he knocked him over to try and get the knife from him.. Prisoner struggled hard, and he struck McKenzie in the side with the knife. McKenzie had fallen down, and he was on the ground when he was struck. McKenzie was at that time bleeding from the neck. Prisoner got up and attacked McKenzie with the knife. Clarke was on top of him and witness tried to pull him away. Prisoner kicked him on the side, and he was knocked down. Clarke jumped up and got on a passing bus. McKenzie was still lying on the ground, and had to be carried to the guard room in Rendezvous Street. Later the injured man was taken by motor ambulance to Moore Barracks Hospital, Shorncliffe. The two men seemed to be sober enough. Previous to going to the Honest Lawyer he had not been in the company of the two men.

Cross-examined by the prisoner, witness had not asked him (prisoner) to go into the Honest Lawyer and have a drink with him. He did not know where Clarke got the knife. He did not get it out of witness's hand, for he never had a knife at all.

In reply to the Clerk, witness said he had seen the prisoner once previous to that night, but did not know him to speak to. He had not known McKenzie before that night.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said the injured man was in hospital and unable to attend the Court.

The Bench remanded the prisoner until next Thursday.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 May 1916.

Wednesday, May 10th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Christopher Clarke, a Private in the Canadian expeditionary Force, was charged with stabbing Private George MacKenzie, another Canadian. Prisoner appeared in the dock with some plaster strapping on his left cheek. MacKenzie was not present.

Private George Eiilison, of the 50th Canadian Infantry Battalion, stationed at Shorncliffe, stated that on Monday evening last he was in the Honest Lawyer beerhouse, in Bellevue Street, in company with Private MacKenzie and the prisoner. They all had drinks. Witness had two small glasses of beer. At eight o'clock the house closed, and they all left together. Witness left the other two, who were then talking in a friendly way, for a few minutes. Just as he returned Mackenzie and Clarke started fighting with their fists. They went on fighting for about ten minutes. MacKenzie was on the top of prisoner, who was beneath him on the ground. Witness tried to separate them, and when he got hold of MacKenzie he found his hands were covered with blood. He pulled MacKenzie off the other man, and then he saw that the accused had an open knife in his hand. Prisoner ran away, but witness pursued him, MacKenzie following. Witness overtook the accused in Tontine Street, and saw that he had the knife, still open, in his right hand. Accused attempted to strike him with the knife, but witness knocked him down, and tried to get the knife from him. Some women standing there shouted “Murder!” MacKenzie had fallen down, and accused struck him whilest he was on the ground. Mackenzie was bleeding from the legs. Prisoner got on top of MacKenzie, and again struck at him, also kicking witness in the side. Accused then jumped on a public bus and got away. Witness could not follow him; he “had had enough”. Mackenzie was still lying on the ground. Witness and other soldiers carried him to the guard room in Rendezvous Street, and he was later taken on a motor ambulance to the Moore Barracks Hospital. Witness was sober, and the other two seemed quite sober. MacKenzie and the prisoner were in the Honest Lawyer when he entered the house at 7 p.m. He had not been in their company previously.

In reply to prisoner, witness said he had not asked accused to go into the house and have a drink with him. Prisoner had the knife in his hand. Witness did not know where he got it from. Accused did not get it out of witness's hands. Witness never had a knife at all.

In reply to the Magistrates' Clerk, witness said he had seen the prisoner once or twice before Monday night, but had not known him to speak to. Clarke was in the same battalion. He had not known MacKenzie till he met him that night. Witness had no knife in his possession; he never carried one.

The Chief Constable stated that the injured man was still in hospital, and quite unable to attend Court. Mr. Reeve asked for a remand for eight days.

Accused was accordingly remanded till next Thursday.

 

Folkestone Express 20 May 1916.

Local News.

Thursday, May 18th: Before Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, E.T. Morrison, A. Stace, and the Rev. Epworth Thompson.

Christopher Clarke, a private in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, was brought up on remand charged with unlawfully and maliciously wounding Private McKenzie, by stabbing him on Monday evening, May 8th. The prisoner was before the Magistrates on Wednesday in last week, when he was remanded because Private McKenzie was then unable to attend.

George Young McKenzie, a private attached to the Director of Supply and Transport, C.E.F., said on Monday, May 8th, he went into the Honest Lawyer beerhouse alone about half past seven. When he went into the bar he called for a drink, and entered into conversation with some civilians in the bar. After he had been in the house for a time he saw the prisoner in the next bar. He had seen Clarke once before, but had not spoken to him. He remained in the house until closing time, eight o'clock. During the time he was in the house he only had two pints of beer. He left the house by the door of the centre bar. Up to that time he had not spoken to the prisoner. Private Ellison entered the centre bar about a quarter or ten minutes to eight. He was a stranger to him, but he and witness had some conversation together. Ellison left the bar with him, and they stood together at the corner on the opposite side of the street for ten or fifteen minutes. Just as Ellison and he were going to part he saw the prisoner, who stood alone in the middle of the street. Prisoner took his tunic off and threw it on the ground and then challenged them to fight. He said “I want to fight; if any of you are men at all, come out and fight”. Witness said he did not want to fight, as he had all the fighting taken out of him in France. Ellison went away, and witness asked the prisoner if he wanted to fight, and he told him if he went over to France he would get all he wanted. In the meantime prisoner had walked to the sidewalk, and as he (witness) was lighting a cigarette, Clarke struck him under the chin with his fist, knocking him down. He got up and knocked the prisoner down. He got up and they came to clinches, and both went down to the ground together, he (witness) being on top. Immediately they were down he felt something sharp on the right side of his neck. He kept on struggling and he was doing the best he could with his fists, until shortly after he felt something sharp hit him on the right ribs. Prisoner was still underneath him. He called out that the prisoner was using a knife, although he did not see a knife. Ellison pulled him off the top of the prisoner, who got up at once and ran down the street. Ellison and he ran after him, and caught up the prisoner in Tontine Street, right opposite the Church. Witness hit the prisoner with his fist, knocking him down, and he also fell. That was all he remembered until he woke up in the Moore Barracks Hospital, where he had remained under treatment. He had a wound in the neck, two in the ribs on the right side, two in the right arm, and one in his left hand, all of which were occasioned in the struggle with prisoner. Clarke did not appear to him to be drunk at all.

Prisoner, when asked if he had any questions to ask, said he could not ask any questions because he did not know what happened.

Captain McMurrick, C.A.M.C., said he received Pte. McKenzie at the Moore Barracks Hospital about 10.30 p.m. on Monday, May 8th. He was fairly sensible, but was in a weak condition owing to the loss of blood. He discovered one large wound on the right side of the neck, extending for a distance of about two inches, and nearly severing the muscle from the ear to the collar-bone. There was also a wound at the back of the right ear, cutting a “V” shape through the lobe of the ear. There were two small puncture wounds on the right arm, one on the left arm, and two on the right side near the ribs. He removed the first aid dressing which had been applied, and put on medicinal gauze and bandage. The patient then went to sleep. McKenzie had remained in hospital under treatment ever since. The wound in the neck below the ear was decidedly dangerous. It was of a serrated character. The others were minor wounds. It would be possible to occasion the wounds by the knife (produced) on the blade of which there were stains. He could not say whether they were bloodstains or not. If a clot of blood had not formed in the serrated wound, McKenzie would have lost his life. McKenzie was now practically out of danger.

P.S. Prebble said about 9.40 p.m. on May 8th, in answer to a telephone message, he went to the Canadian Guard Room, where he saw Pte. McKenzie lying on a bed, bleeding from a wound on the right part of the neck. First aid was being rendered. Later he was removed on a motor ambulance to Moore Barracks. At 3.30 on the 9th he went to the Camp where he saw the prisoner detained in the 9th Battalion's guard room. He told him he was making inquiries about a soldier who had been stabbed in Folkestone the previous evening. He cautioned him and told him he should charge him with unlawfully and maliciously stabbing Pte. McKenzie the previous night, and prisoner replied “I do not know anything about it”. He searched Clarke and found the two knives (produced) upon him. One of them had stains upon the blade. He also found bloodstains on the tunic and trousers the prisoner was wearing at the time. He was wearing no cap at the time. He brought him to the Folkestone police station, where he formally charged him, but prisoner made no reply.

This completed the case for the prosecution, but as Pte. Ellison, who gave evidence last week, was not present his depositions could not be read over, therefore the prisoner was remanded until half past three in the afternoon for his attendance.

The prisoner was in the afternoon again placed in the dock, and then was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

Captain McMurrick said before leaving the Court he would like to say a few words in connection with the first aid work which had been performed on the man. If it had not been for the first aid rendered, the case would have been most serious. A very large artery had been severed in the neck, but the first aid was the means of stopping the haemorrhage. He doubted very much if it had not been for that whether McKenzie's life would have been saved.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said he was very pleased to hear what the doctor had said. The work was done by Special Constable W. Banks, who had done very good service in the past. Mr. Banks would be very glad to know that his services were so very much appreciated.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 May 1916.

Thursday, May 18th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Mr. A. Stace, and the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson.

Pte. Christopher Clarke, No. 22721, of the 9th Reserve Battalion, C.E.F., was charged with unlawfully wounding Pte. George Young MacKenzie, of the 8th Battalion, C.E.F.

Prosecutor now appeared with bandages round his head and throat, and also on his left hand. He has been to the Front twice, and returned home wounded on each occasion. His home is in Brandon, Manitoba.

Having been sworn, Pte. Mackenzie said he was attached to the staff of Director of Supplies and Transport, Sandgate. On the evening of May 8th, about 7.30, he went into the Honest Lawyer beerhouse alone. He called for a drink, and entered into conversation with some civilians in the bar. He saw prisoner in the adjoining bar. He had seen Clarke only once before, and he had never spoken to him. He remained in the house till closing tim (8 o'clock), and had two pints of beer. He left by the middle door bar. Up to that time he had not spoken to prisoner. Pte. Ellison entered the central bar about 7.45. Ellison was also a stranger to him. They conversed together for a time, and when he left at 8 o'clock, Pte. Ellison accompanied him. When they got outside they stood talking on the opposite side of the street for about 10 or 15 minutes. Just as Ellison and he were going to part, he saw the prisoner, who stood in the middle of the street, alone, opposite to witness. Accused took his tunic off, threw it on the ground, and challenged witness and Ellison to fight. He said “I want to fight. If any of you are men at all, come out and fight”. Witness told him he did not want to fight; he had all the fighting taken out of him when in France. Ellison went away. Prosecutor then asked prisoner if he still wanted to fight, and Clarke replied “Yes”. Witness told him to go over to France, and he would get all; he wanted. As he (Pte. Mackenzie) was lighting a cigarette Clarke struck him right under the chin with his fist, knocking him down. Prosecutor got up and hit prisoner with his fist, and it came to clinches. They both fell to the ground together, witness being on top. When on the ground he felt something sharp on the right side of his neck, and thought prisoner had scratched him with his nails. He next felt something sharp hit him in the ribs on the right, and he called out to Ellison that prisoner was using a knife. He did not see a knife. Ellison pulled witness off the prisoner, who got up and ran down the street. Witness ran after him, and Ellison followed. He caught the prisoner up in Tontine Street right opposite a church. When he caught him he hit him with his fist, and prisoner fell, prosecutor falling also. That was all he remembered. The next he remembered was waking up in the Moore Barracks Hospital. He had remained there till now for treatment. He had two wounds in the ribs on the right side, two in the right arm, one in the neck, and one in the left hand. They were all received in the struggle with the prisoner.

Prisoner, when being asked if he wished to put any questions, said he did not remember what happened.

The Magistrates' Clerk: Was the prisoner drunk or not?

Prosecutor: He did not appear to be drunk.

Captain John McMurrick, of the C.A.M.C., said he received MacKenzie at the Moore Barrack Hosptal on May 8th, at about 10.30 p.m. He found there was an enormous loss of blood, but prosecutor was sensible, and could answer questions. He was in a very wak condition from the loss of blood. They discovered one large wound on the right side of the neck, extending about two inches, and nearly severing the muscle, reaching from the ear to the collar bone. There was also a wound at the back of the right ear extending about 3 inches, cutting “V” shape through the lobe of the right ear, and there were two punctured wounds on the right arm. There was also one on the left of the arm, and there were two on the right side of his body, near the ribs. The patient had remained in hospital under treatment ever since. The wound in the neck under the ear was decidedly dangerous, and most dangerous of all the wounds. The other wounds in the neck were minor wounds. It would be possible to produce these wounds by the knife produced (a pocket knife). There were some stains of a dark colour on the knife, but he could not say whether they were bloodstains. A clot of blood had formed in the region of the serrated wound. If that had not formed, witness doubted if MacKenzie would have “pulled through”. It practically saved his life. He was now, witness thought, practically out of danger.

Sergt. Prebble stated that at 9.40 p.m. on May 8th, in answer to a message, he went to the Canadian guard room in Rendezvous Street. He there saw Pte. MacKenzie lying on a bed bleeding from a wound in the right side of the neck. First aid was being rendered to him. Later he was removed on a motor ambulance to the Moore Barracks Hospital, Shorncliffe. On the following day, about 3.30 p.m., he arrested prisoner, who was detained at the guard room of the 9th Reserve Battalion. Witness cautioned him, and told him he would charge him with wounding Pte. G.Y. MacKenzie, of Grosvernor House, Sandgate, on May 8th, at Folkestone. He replied “I don't know anything about it”. Witness searched him, and found the two knives, produced, in his possession. One had bloodstains on the blade. There were bloodstains on the tunic and trousers which prisoner was wearing. Witness brought him to the Folkestone police station, where he formally charged accused, who made no reply.

Captain McMurrick said he would like to mention the good work done by those who rendered first aid. If the appliances had not been administered, MacKenzie would have died. Several large arteries in the neck were severed, and the administration given helped the clot to form and stopped the haemorrhage.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said he was very pleased to hear what was said. It was Special constable Banks and Fireman Kingsmill who gave first aid. He was sure both of them would be pleased to hear what had been said.

Prisoner, who said he had nothing to say, was committed for trial at the next Borough Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 8 July 1916.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, July 30th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Christopher Clarke, a private in the Canadian E.F., pleaded Guilty to maliciously wounding Private G.Y. McKenzie on May 8th. Mr. W.A. Wardley (instructed by Mr. A.F. Kidson) appeared for the Crown, and Mr. Thesiger (instructed by Mr. Gardner, Canterbury) was for the defence.

Mr. Wardley outlined the facts, which were that the men had been in the Honest Lawyer public house, and after turning-out time they they subsequently came to blows owing to the prisoner striking prosecutor. They struggled together, and eventually McKenzie was found to be seriously stabbed in several places. The most serious element in the case was the evidence of the doctor, who told the Magistrates that had it not been for a clot of blood which formed in the most serious wound in the throat, McKenzie would certainly not have survived. It was stated that all the men who were present at the time were sober.

Mr. Thesiger said he quite admitted that it was an extremely serious case, and he hoped to be able to satisfy the Court that it was a very sad case, which was the outcome of the War. The prisoner was a married man with four children. He was born in St. Vincent, West Indies, and at the outbreak of the War was a cattle dealer in Canada. He immediately enlisted and he came to England with the first contingent, and early in 1915 he went to France. He was such a fine shot that he was put on sniping. At the battle of Festubert his unit was ordered to take some trenches, and they did so. The telephone wires were severed, so that they were cut off from communication, and the result was that they were heavily shelled. The prisoner was buried when the parapet of the trench was blown in, but his comrades succeeded in getting him out in time. They were out for 24 hours, and no food or water could be got to them. When he returned he was found to be slightly wounded and also suffering from shock. He had since been in several hospitals, including one in Tooting for mental cases. On February 16th he was sent back to a battalion, but he was not able to do the duties, he voluntarily assisting in the Officers' Mess, and sometimes sitting outside a tent where infectious disease cases were kept, to warn people away. If he got the least drink, or even with the least excitement, he was affected.

The Recorder, in giving judgement, said that was a very serious crime. He believed the prisoner was sorry for what he had done. They thanked him for the battle he had fought for them, but they were sorry that he could have done what he had. He hoped he would shake hands with the man whom he had injured. He (the Recorder) felt that to some extent he was not responsible for his actions at the time, and therefore he proposed to bind him over to be of good behaviour for a period of twelve months.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 July 1916.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, July 3rd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Pte. Christopher Clarke, aged 30, of the 9th Canadians, was indicted for wounding Pte. George Young MacKenzie, of the 8th Batt., with intent to do grievous bodily harm, and on a second count for inflicting certain grievous bodily harm with a knife. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty on the first count, and Guilty on the second.

Mr. W.A. Wardley, who appeared for the Crown, said he would accept the plea on the second count, and the Recorder agreed.

Mr. Wardley briefly outlined the case. Prisoner and prosecutor met in a public house, and subsequently, outside, had a fight, during which MacKenzie was wounded. A serious point was that the doctor stated that if a clot of blood had not formed prosecutor would probably not have lived.

Mr. Thesiger, who appeared for prisoner, said the case was a very sad one indeed, and an outcome of the War. Accused was a married man with four children, living in Canada. At the outbreak of War he joined up, and he came to England with the first contingent. On arriving in France he was found to be a very fine sniper, and was selected for that duty. On the 24th May, 1915, they were instructed to take some trenches, and in doing so they were cut off and shelled by their own and the enemy artillery. Prisoner was buried, but was dug out by his few comrades. After 24 hours without water or food, they were got out of the trenches. Prisoner was slightly wounded. He was taken to a hospital, where he stayed for a short while, and then sent back to the Front. He was found unfit for this, and sent eventually to England suffering from shell shock. He was admitted to a hospital for mental cases at the beginning of August, and he was there for 98 days. After being at two other hospitals, he was sent at the beginning of this year to the Moore Barracks. On the 16th February he was thought to be all right, and sent back to the lines. But he did not stay there, and returned. He did only light work, and at the time of this affair he was awaiting his discharge. He had no control in his conversation with his comrades, and any little thing irritated him. He had been in Canterbury Hospital for eight weeks.

Dr. Zachariah Prentice, of H.M. Prison, Canterbury, bore out the latter part of counsel's statement, and said he believed prisoner did not know what he was doing at times.

Lieut. Thos Kirkman, of the 6th Reserve Batt., was called as to character. He said he had no papers concerning the man, and did not know anything about him.

The Recorder said this was the usual way the Canadians treated that Court. He directed the lieutenant to go and get the papers.

Upon returning in the afternoon, Lieut. Kirkman said all his papers had gone to Canterbury. He had seen a book kept by the Coy. Sergt. Major, which specified three offences.

The Recorder: Have you got the book? – No, I did not think it was necessary.

Lieut. Kirkman said he remembered these three offences, They were only very minor ones, such as shaving upper lip, not shaving upper lip, etc. (Laughter)

The Recorder said what he had heard put a different complexion on the matter. The officers seemed to treat the Court with indifference with regard to the character of prisoners. He hoped prisoner would shake hands with Pte. MacKenzie. He had not been responsible for his actions, and he therefore would merely be bound over for twelve months to be of good behaviour.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 June 1924.

Friday, June 20th: Before Colonel G.P. Owen and other Magistrates.

Frederick Green was summoned for assaulting Rosina Eleanor Lenton. Mr. H.W. Watts appeared for defendant and pleaded Not Guilty.

Prosecutrix said she lived at 24, Peter Street. Defendant, who had a shop, lived opposite. On Saturday, June 14th, about 9 p.m., she came out of her house with some bottles. Defendant's wife and she “had words” and blows were struck. Defendant came out of the Honest Lawyer and struck her five or six blows about the head.

Mrs. L. Mockridge and complainant's daughter also gave evidence.

Defendant, on oath, said he had been in the Army for twenty one years, being discharged four years ago with an exemplary character. He had a general store in Peter Street. On Saturday night he got a message and went towards his house. He saw Mrs. Lenton and his wife fighting. He separated them, and went into the shop with his wife. He did not strike Mrs. Lenton.

Defendant's wife, Mr. Edward Severn, and Mr. Harrington also gave evidence for the defence.

The Magistrates dismissed the case.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 July 1924.

Felix.

On the occasion of the recent visit of the Oddfellows, I conducted a small company of the brethren through the town, including some portions of “Old Folkestone”. One of the company noticed a public house sign in St. John Street painted with the designation “The Honest Lawyer”. There followed some comments, including the question “Why pick out the Honest Lawyer? Why not apply it to any other trade or profession?” My Yorkshire friend suggested that the lawyer in whose memory the sign was painted did no more or less than charge the legal fees. But why single him out as being honest? Perhaps some of those who have the time can search out from past records why this particular man of the law was immortalised in this manner. The present “lawyer” does not administer the law, but dispenses a beverage “guaranteed to be brewed from Kentish hops and malt”.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 March 1931.

Felix.

Now don't, kind reader, put the blame on my humble self, but rather accord it to my Selsted correspondent. He has opened up a wide and interesting subject. However, there are so many other matters that need my attention that necessity calls here for brevity. In Folkestone we have little novelty to note in regard to signs, except it be The Honest Lawyer. This is associated with a small inn situate in Bellevue Street. Modern Folkestone knows it not, but amongst the elder inhabitants the unpretentious establishment is known. How it came by the designation Honest Lawyer is somewhat of a puzzle. Indeed it is very much so. Why single out the lawyer more than members of any other profession? Why not, for example, the Honest Dairyman, who shudders at the sight of water? Why not Honest Butcher, who keeps a strict eye on the justice of his scales, and who is careful to apportion the right quantity of bone or fat with the family joint? Why not the Honest Greengrocer, who, if he could, would offer cherries without stones, or apples without pips? Why not the Honest Fishmonger, who is always endeavouring to supply fish fresh from the Channel, together with those “dried haddocks” that have no relation to a codfish? Why not the Honest Tailor, who knows not shoddy? Why not the Honest Baker, who provides us with our unadulterated daily bread? How many years have passed since the Honest Lawyer appeared in steep Bellevue Street I know not, but from all I can gather the sign did not, or does not, have any local application. It is to be met with in other parts of England. However this may be, I repeat it is a somewhat remarkable thing to single out the lawyer as being honest. Why, even if his inclination was not that way, he is bound round with the red tape he uses so freely himself. Are not all or nearly all his actions governed by the Law Society? Are not his fees legally fixed for him? And even then, if there should be a dispute, his customers, or rather clients, are protected by the Taxing Master. Why, of course lawyers are honest. They cannot help themselves.

 

Folkestone Express 2 April 1932.

Inquest.

A verdict of “Suicide while of unsound mind” was returned at an inquest held at the Town Hall on Tuesday on Sidney Spencer Reid, aged 71, who was found dead in a sitting room at the Honest Lawyer on Saturday, where he lodged. A cardigan enveloped his head and he held a length of gas tubing in his hand, the other end of which was fixed to a gas tap.

P.C. Pay said that on Saturday at 8 a.m. he went to the Honest Lawyer, and in the sitting room he saw a man sitting in a chair. The doctor had just left and the man was dead. He was fully dressed and a gas piping was fixed to the main gas tap on the floor and the other end was in the dead man's hand. There was a note on the floor.

Dr. H. Dodgson said he visited the house at 7.50 a.m. In the sitting room on the first floor the deceased was sitting in an armchair, and it was obvious to him that the man had been dead for three or four hours. His head was enveloped in a cardigan. The cause of death was due to gas poisoning.

Mrs. Charlotte Hubbard, a widow residing at the Honest Lawyer, Belle Vue Street, said the deceased was formerly employed at the Folkestone Gas Works. He was 71 years of age. He left work in November last and seemed rather depressed since. Deceased occupied two rooms. On Friday evening when he retired he seemed quite normal. Recently he had complained of pains in the head and he had said that he felt as if he might fall down. Ernest Edward Jeffrey, her son-in-law, had lived at the house for 27 years. She had always understood that the deceased and her son-in-law were the best of friends. On Saturday morning between 7 and 8 a.m. her son-in-law came into her bedroom, and as a result of what he told her she went into the sitting room and saw the deceased sitting in a chair with a cardigan round his head.

Winifred Fry, employed at the Honest Lawyer, said that about 7.30 a.m. on Saturday she went to deceased's bedroom to take him a cup of tea. She found that he was not in his room and she went to the sitting room. She saw the deceased sitting in a chair. There was only a slight smell of gas in the room.

Ernest Spencer Jeffrey said he had resided with his mother-in-law at the Honest Lawyer for 27 years. He had known deceased for eleven years. He was friendly with deceased.

The Coroner: You have read the note which was found at his side?

Witness: Yes.

The contents of the note do not seem to be friendly? – He had led Mrs. Hubbard to believe that he had a lot of money and I did not believe him and told him so.

He paid his rent? – Oh, yes. Since he left he Gas Works he had been living on the old age pension. When I left him on Friday night we were the best of friends.

The Coroner said he did not intend to read the note in full. It commenced “Just a note to say goodbye to all. I shall go out and away”. The note ended “Goodbye, my dear old Lottie. God bless you”. The note also contained a request that Mrs. Hubbard should be given his case and box.

Witness added that he had read the note and there was no truth in the assertions it contained.

The Coroner: It scandalises you a lot. Has the deceased ever tried to do this before?

Witness: No, sir.

The Coroner said that the note also stated “This is all through Jeffrey because of my pension”. The making of such statements showed that deceased was deranged. Death, there was no doubt, had been brought about by gas poisoning, self administered, during temporary insanity.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 April 1932.

Inquest.

The death occurred on Saturday morning under tragic circumstances of Mr. Sidney Spencer Reid, aged 71, a former employee at the Folkestone Gas Works, who was found dead in a gas filled room at his lodgings at the Honest Lawyer, Bellevue Street. A length of gas piping was in his hand.

The Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines) conducted the inquest at the Town Hall on Tuesday morning, and returned a verdict of “Suicide during temporary insanity”.

P.C. Pay said on Saturday at 8 a.m. he went to the Honest Lawyer, and in the sitting room on the first floor he saw a man sitting in a chair. He was informed that the doctor had just left. The man was fully dressed. A length of gas piping was held in one hand, and the other end was fixed to a tap of a gas main in the floor. There was a note on the floor by his left side.

Dr. H. Dodgson said on Saturday morning at about 7.40 he went to the Honest Lawyer and saw the deceased. He thought he had been dead for three or four hours. His head was enveloped in a cardigan. Death was due to coal gas poisoning.

Mrs. Charlotte Hubbard, landlady of the Honest Lawyer, said the deceased was a lodger at her house. He was formerly employed at the Folkestone Gas Works. He was 71 years of age. He left work about November last, and had been depressed since then. He occupied two rooms, a bedroom and a sitting room. On Friday night when he went to bed he seemed quite normal. He had complained of pains in the head and had said he felt as if he might fall down. Ernest Edward Jeffrey, her son-in-law, had lived with her for about 27 years. She had always thought they were the best of friends.

Winifred Fry, employed at the Honest Lawyer, said on Saturday morning at about 7.30 she went to deceased's room with his morning tea. The door was ajar, and she saw deceased was not in his bedroom. She went into his sitting room, the door of which was slightly ajar, and there was a faint smell of gas. The windows were shut. She saw deceased sitting in a chair. She went to Mr. Jeffrey, who came at once.

Ernest Edward Jeffrey said he had lived at the Honest Lawyer with his mother-in-law for 27 years. He was a stoker at the Folkestone Electricity Works. He had known deceased since the War. They had been good friends to a certain extent.

The Coroner: What do you mean by that? – Well, he had led Mrs. Hubbard to think he had a lot of money, and she had had confidence in him. I told him he had no money.

Continuing, Jeffrey said that had been going on for some time. It was not a sudden occurrence. Deceased had always paid his rent regularly, but when he finished working at the Gas Works his only income was his old age pension. He became depressed. Whilst working he had paid 25s. a week for board and lodging, but afterwards he could not pay it. Witness told deceased he had no money. Apart from that they were the best of friends. They were quite friendly when witness left him at 8.30 on Friday night. When he went to the room on Saturday morning the gas tap was on, and he turned it off. The slot meter was on the ground floor. It was a penny meter. The smell of gas was very faint. There was a note on the floor. Witness was the first person to read it, and he put it back again.

The Coroner said he would not read all the note. He read the following extract: “Just a note to say goodbye to all. I will go out of the way. This is the end. Goodbye, my dear old Lottie. God bless you. Send all my clothes and box to Mrs. Hubbard of Holmewood”. The Coroner added that the rest of the letter showed that deceased was not in his right mind.

Jeffrey said he did not wish it to be published. It was of a personal nature, but his conscience did not prick him. If he had been guilty of anything he would have burnt the letter. The whole world could read the letter.

The Coroner said he had no hesitation in saying that deceased had poisoned himself during temporary insanity. The letter said “It is all through Jeffrey”, but it went into language which showed that his mind was deranged.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 November 1932.

Local News.

There was an amusing incident at the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Friday last week, when Mrs. Hubbard, licensee of the Honest Lawyer Inn, Bellevue Street, Folkestone, applied for a protection order, pending a transfer of the licence at the next transfer sessions, to Mr. Jeffrey.

When the application was made, the Mayor, who presided, asked “Is the Honest Lawyer there?”

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley): I do not think so, sir.

Mr. Rutley Mowll, of Dover, and Mr. B.H. Bonniface, who were seated at the solicitors' table, joined in the laughter which ensued.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 January 1949.

Notice.

IN THE BOROUGH OF FOLKESTONE.

To: The Clerk of the Rating Authority for the Borough of Folkestone,

The Clerk of the Licensing Justices of the Borough of Folkestone,

The Superintendent of Police for the Borough of Folkestone,

And to all whom it may concern.

I, Ernest Edward Jeffrey, now residing at the Honest Lawyer, Bellevue Street, in the Borough of Folkestone, in the Licensing District of the Borough of Folkestone, in the County of Kent, Licensed Victualler, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the said Borough, to be holden at the Town Hall, Folkestone aforesaid, on the ninth day of February next, for the grant to me of a Justices' Licence authorising me to apply for and hold an Excise Licence to sell by retail intoxicating liquor, viz. Wine by retail for consumption either on or off the premises situate at Folkestone aforesaid and known by the sign of The Honest Lawyer and of which premises Messrs. Fremlins of Maidstone in the said County of Kent are the owners of whom I rent them and which premises are now occupied by me as an Inn under the sign of The Honest Lawyer.

Given under my hand this fifth day of January 1949.

E. JEFFREY.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1949.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Magistrates granted an application for a wine licence at the Honest Lawyer, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 August 1957.

Obituary.

Landlord of the Honest Lawyer public house, Belle Vue Street, Folkestone, for 15 years until he retired in 1948, Mr. Ernest Edward Jeffrey, of Chapel Street, Ullesthorpe, near Rugby, died in Leicester Hospital recently. He was 76. After serving in the Royal Navy for several years, Mr. Jeffrey was discharged with the rank of Chief Petty Officer. In 1933 he became landlord of the Honest Lawyer, and was there until he retired to live with his daughter at Ullesthorpe. He handed the business over to his son, who is now in Toronto, Canada. The Honest Lawyer was in the family's hands for 43 years. Mr. Jeffrey's wife died in 1930; he is survived by his four children.

Cremation was at Leicester on Wednesday last week.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 February 1959.

Local News.

One of Folkestone's oldest public houses ceased to exist this week – the war-damaged Pavilion Shades, in Tram Road.

At the Brewster Sessions on Wednesday, the Justices made an order for the removal of the full licence to the Honest Lawyer, in Bellevue Street, which hitherto had only a beer and wine licence. The licence was transferred from Mr. D.D. Casball, Secretary of Fremlins and Co., to Mr. George S. Rayner, licensee of the Honest Lawyer. The beer and wine licence of the Honest Lawyer was surrendered.

Mr. J.W. Girling, appearing for Flint and Co. and Fremlins and Co., said the Pavilion Shades was unfit for use as the result of enemy action during the last war. At the Honest Lawyer there was a beer and wine licence which, if an order was made for the removal, would be surrendered. It had been agreed that no monopoly value should be payable so there would be no pecuniary gain either way. The up-grading of the Honest Lawyer to a fully licensed house would reduce the number of licences in the area by one. The Licensing Planning Committee had no objections and had issued a certificate. “It has been suggested”, went on Mr. Girling, “that in view of the proposed improvements, the name Honest Lawyer should be changed to Improved Lawyer. I might add that all good lawyers are honest, although I would not like to say that all honest lawyers are good lawyers. In any event the beer will be good – it is Fremlins”, he added.

“I thought all beer was good”, commented the Chairman (Ald. N.O. Baker).

 

Folkestone Herald 10 January 1970.

Local News.

Twenty-two old age pensioners got a Christmas bonus from their local pub, the Honest Lawyer in Belle Vue Street, Folkestone. They each received a 3 share of 66 raised at the pub for the senior citizen regulars.

Landlady, Mrs. Mick Rayner, said “I thought it would be a good idea to give the pensioners who use the pub a Christmas bonus. One of my customers, Mr. Fred Barton, set to and managed to raise 66 from customers at the pub. We sent the money to the pensioners, with a Christmas card”.

 

Folkestone Gazette 8 October 1975.

Local News.

The Honest Lawyer was the absent witness in a case at Folkestone court on Friday. Taxi proprietor Ernest Gosling, of Dawson Road, Folkestone, denied that his cab had collided with a parked car near the Folkestone pub. But he was convicted on a charge of driving without due care and attention in Clarence Street and fined 25. He was fined a further 30 for failing to stop after an accident and ordered to pay 44.60 costs. He was disqualified from driving for six months under the totting-up procedure.

Mr. James McMorran said that after leaving the pub he heard a small bang. He drove down into Clarence Street and saw a taxi in contact with a car. It backed away and stalled. The driver got out and eventually drove away. He took the taxi's number.

Replying to Miss Diane Wray, defending, Mr. McMorran said he was only in the pub for five minutes.

Mr. Gosling told the court that he did not collide with the car, nor did he stall or reverse. His fare jumped in and he drove off. Later, he heard allegations that his vehicle had been involved in a collision and he drove to the police station the following morning, he said. Damage referred to in evidence occurred to the vehicle a fortnight earlier when one of his drivers had been in collision with a Post Office van.

 

Folkestone Gazette 14 January 1976.

Local News.

Generous patrons at a Folkestone public house raised almost double the target of 180 set for a special fund. The money was collected for nurses at Folkestone’s Royal Victoria Hospital. The sum of 276 was presented to Sister Jean West on behalf of the nurses by landlord of the Honest Lawyer Mr. George Rayner. “We were very pleased by the response to the fund which we have run for two years now”, said Mr. Rayner. “The money will pay for medical books in the wards which were greatly needed”. Mr. Rayner thanked locals Mr. Dennis Butler and Mr. Bert Lamerton who had helped co-ordinate the year's effort. A letter has been received from Sister Margaret Thomas thanking the pub for its support.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 September 1979.

Local News.

Regular customers of the Honest Lawyer pub in Bellevue Street, Folkestone, once again raised their glasses, only this time it was to toast retiring landlord George Rayner. After 24 years behind the bar Mr. Rayner and his wife Amelia (better known to the locals as “Mick”) are handing over the care of the pub to two Londoners, David and Margaret Haines.

On behalf of the old friends and customers of the pub, Mr. Bert Lamerton presented Mr. Rayner with a silver tray, two silver decanters, two silver goblets and spirits at a celebration on Monday. Mrs. Maude Lewis presented the Rayners with a bouquet of 24 roses.

A former vice-chairman of the Folkestone, Hythe and District Licensed Victuallers' Association, Mr. Rayner said that he and his wife will be staying in Folkestone. “There have been many changes in the town over the past 24 years”, he said, and some are a bit of a mess, but we hope to have many more years here”.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 December 1981.

Local News.

Burglars who broke into the Honest Lawyer pub in Bellevue Street, Folkestone, last Friday night, smashed open fruit machines and stole about 190.

 

South Kent Gazette 17 February 1982.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Publicans' applications for transfer agreed by the Bench include: The Black Bull, Folkestone (music and dancing); Bouverie Arms, Folkestone; Honest Lawyer, Folkestone; Old Harbour Crab and Oyster House (extension to cover restaurant area); Royal George, Folkestone. Approval of plans to alter Folkestone's Pullman Wine Bar was given.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1983.

Local News.

An old pub has re-opened under a new brewery. The former Whitbread pub the Honest Lawyer in Belle Vue Street, Folkestone, has been bought by the Watney Mann and Truman group. Before Beal Ale fans groan “Oh no, not more Watney’s Red Barrel,” they will be glad to know that Webster’s Pennine Bitter will be served by handpump. And as part of the massive combine’s attempt to get rid of the corporate image it built up last decade it will be called a Phoenix Brewery pub, after the name of Watney's southern headquarters in Brighton.

The new host of the Honest Lawyer is a familiar face in the town, Mr. Malcolm Hannan, who will be running it with his Guyanese-born wife Hermia. Mr. Hannan first came to the town in 1959 and has worked behind bars locally on and off since then.

The Honest Lawyer closed in December 1981 but it re-opened on Wednesday and Mr. Hannan wants to take down names to re-start the old darts and pool league teams. Meanwhile he is polishing up the new fittings and working out his lunch menus.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 April 1988.

Local News.

The Honest Lawyer, Bellevue Street, Folkestone, has been bought by Shepherd Neame. The pub will remain with existing tenants.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 December 1996.

Local News.

These cheery brain-boxes are celebrating being top of the pops after winning a pub music quiz. The team and their supporters, from the Honest Lawyer, in Bellevue Street, Folkestone, won the quiz after battling their way to the final from a total of 62 other pubs.

Pub landlord and team member Dave Harryman said “It was a very enjoyable day, and I can remember when we got there but I can't remember when we left! We had a few drinks before to calm the nerves and then a few after as a celebration”.

The team of three also starred pub regulars Steve Lloyd and Keith Cloke. Mr. Harryman said the only training the lads did was testing each other's knowledge in the bar.

The Shepway team beat contestants from The Charles Dickens pub, Broadstairs, by 49 points to 27 in the quiz final, held at the Seven Stars pub, at Preston, near Wingham.

Mr. Harryfield added “I think our bells must have been working better than their buttons! We won a trophy and also the prestige of being the brainiest pub in Britain when it comes to music, and we will win again next year”.

The quiz was broadcast by Invicta FM's sister radio station, Invicta SuperGold.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

Last pub licensee had EDWARDS Thomas 1869-89 (age 48 in 1871Census) Bastions

MARPLES Thomas 1889-1901 Bastions

JOHNSON Harry 1901-06 Bastions

SPRATT Robert 1906-07 Bastions

TAYLOR Richard Godden 1907-11 Bastions

ADAMS Thomas 1911-12 Bastions

HUBBARD George 1912-15 Bastions

HUBBARD Charlotte 1915-32 Bastions

JEFFREY Ernest 1932-49 BastionsKelly's 1934

JEFFREY Ernest George 1949-53 Bastions

TAYLOR Sidney 1953-55 Bastions

RAYNOR George 1955-79 Bastions

HAINES David 1979-81 Bastions

Licence Suspended 1981-83

HANNON Malcolm 1983-89 Bastions (Also "Clarendon")

WORRELL Albert 1989-94 Bastions

Last pub licensee had RICHARDS Stanley & RAMSDEN Leandre 1994-95 Bastions

HARRYMAN David & RICHARDS Stanley 1995-96 Bastions

HARRYMAN David & Carole 1996-98 Bastions

SULLY Jacqueline 1999+ Bastions

Closed Permanently 2004

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/honestlawyer.html

 

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

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