DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 12 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1810

Hope

Latest 1906

63 Fenchurch Street Post Office Directory 1874

3 Francis Street Pigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1840

Folkestone

 

Originally titled the "Hope and Anchor" the name changed in 1810.

As shown below the house was put up for auction half way through 1860 while under the rule of Sarah Ellis, but she obviously remained at the house after this date as she remained there till 1865.

The house was eventually closed on Christmas Eve 1906 and continued as a private house till the majority of Fenchurch Street accept the "George III Inn" was demolished as a slum clearance of 1937.

 

Dover Telegraph 4 July 1840.

Inquest: An inquest was held on Tuesday at the "Hope," Folkestone, on the body of Joseph Reynolds, labourer. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased was one of the labourers employed on the works of the South Eastern Railway, and that he was much injured by a fall of chalk on the Warren excavations, which caused his death in about three hours. Verdict: Accidental Death.

 

Dover Chronicle 4 July 1840.

On Tuesday and inquest was held at the "Hope" on the body of a man named Joseph Reynolds, a labourer on the South Eastern Railway, who was much injured by a fall of chalk, and died about three hours afterwards.

Verdict: Accidental Death.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 21 July, 1860.

ADVERT

Extract from an advertisement for an auction to be held at The "Rose Inn" on 31st July, 1860:-

Lot 4. A Freehold and Free Public House, situate in Little Fancy Street, in the tenure of Mrs. Sarah Ellis.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 November 1861.

Town Council Meeting Extract:

Business: To make an order as to removal of urinal and nuisance in front of Hope Tavern, Fancy Street.

The question of the removal of a urinal in Fancy Street was settled by the surveyor reporting that it had been removed.

But Mr. Boorn moved, seconded by Mr. John Banks, that the corner be bricked up, at the expense of the town. Carried by 11 votes.

 

Folkestone Observer 9 January 1869.

Wednesday, January 4th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

John French applied for a transfer of the license granted to Arthur Ayliff to sell excisable liquors at the Hope Inn, Fancy Street.

Application granted.

 

Folkestone Express 9 January 1869.

Transfer of License.

Wednesday, January 6th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

The Hope, Fancy Street transferred from Mr. Ayliffe to John French.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 25 October, 1871. Price 1d.

IMPUDENT ROBBERY

Patrick Brady, a gunner in the Royal Artillery, aged 35 years, was charged with stealing a ring, valued at 35s., the property of George Baker, at the South-Easter Railway Terminus, on Monday evening last.

George Baker deposed: I am the landlord of the “Hope Inn” at Folkestone. Last Monday evening I was going to Folkestone by the 7 o'clock train. I was in a third-class carriage, and just as the train was about to start the prisoner came up and shook hands with me, and took the ring off my finger. The prisoner does not know me, nor I him. I have not met him before. This is the ring produced. It is worth 30s., but I would not take 10 for it. I followed him along the platform.

Major Crookes: Was he running?

Witness: Yes, sir. The train was on the start, and I was told to get in, which I did. I saw the ring yesterday morning in the possession of the detective.

Major Crookes: Where did the prisoner shake hands with you?

Witness: I was leaning out of the carriage.

Mr. Mowll: Then I suppose that, instead of shaking hands, he took hold of your hand and wrung the ring off?

Witness: Yes, sir.

Major Crookes: Your hand was hanging out of the window, and was visible to everybody on the platform?

Witness: Yes, sir.

Major Crookes: Did he say anything?

Witness: yes, sir. He said, “Helloa, old chum,” or something to that effect.

Major Crookes: As soon as you lost it you jumped out of the carriage?

Witness: Yes, sir.

Charles Hemmings deposed: I am a detective police-constable. About 7 p.m. on the 16th inst., I was on duty at the South-Eastern Railway Station, and just a minute or two before the train started, I saw the prisoner running down the platform, and the prosecutor followed him. I heard the prosecutor say, “He has got my ring.” I stopped the prisoner and asked him what he was running for, and he said he did not know. Prosecutor ran back and got in the carriage just as the train was starting. A few minutes after, I saw the ring in the possession of police-constable Davis, one of the company's men. From information I received from the prosecutor yesterday morning, I apprehended the prisoner at the Hospital at the Dover Castle, and charged him with stealing the ring. In answer to the charge, he said he knew nothing about it, and had not taken the ring. I then took him to the police station, and on the charge being read over to him there, he made the same reply.

Morris Davis, one of the constable's constables, corroborated the evidence of the previous witnesses and added – About 10 minutes after the train had started, I found the ring produced, about 20 yards from the place where Hemmings had stopped the prisoner.

Major Crookes: Was he running towards the “Lord Warden Hotel.”

Witness: No, sir; towards the bookstall. I took the ring to the lost property office, where it was claimed by Hemmings. I delivered it myself.

Prisoner, in answer to the clerk, said he was guilty of the charge.

An officer in attendance gave the prisoner a very good character, and stated that he had been in the service two years and six months.

The Bench told the prisoner, that in consequence of the good character given him by the officer, the sentence would be but six weeks' imprisonment with hard labour in the Dover Gaol.

The ring was then returned.

 

Folkestone Express 10 January 1874.

Monday, January 5th: Before W. Wightwick, J. Kelcey, R.W. Boarer, J. Clark, and J. Hoad Esqs.

William Boorn applied for temporary authority to sell excisable liquors at the Hope, Fancy Street, under the license granted to George Baker. Application granted.

Note: Date is at variance with information in More Bastions.

 

Southeastern Gazette 12 January 1874.

Local News.

At the Borough Bench on Monday, William Boorn applied for and obtained a temporary authority to sell excisable liquors at the Hope, Fancy Street, under the license originally granted to George Baker.

 

Folkestone Express 31 January 1874.

Transfer:

Wednesday, January 28th: Before Col. De Crespigny, J. Tolputt and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

The following transfer of public house was granted:

Hope Inn – to William Boorn.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1874.

Monday, February 9th: Before The Mayor, J. Kelcey, J. Hoad and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Catherine Wood, alias Kate Murray (23), whose career appears to be one of delinquency, having been three years in a reformatory, and against whom was registered some half-score convictions, was brought up on remand from Saturday, charged with stealing sundry books of the value of 1s. 6d., from the shop of Mr. Edward Dale, bookseller, Dover Street.

Annie Dale, prosecutor's daughter, deposed: I was in my father's shop on Wednesday afternoon, when prisoner came in and asked for a ticket for the Servants' Home. I told her to go to Mr. Birch's. She then left the shop and came back in a quarter of an hour and said she had been to Mr. Birch's and found she was too old to go into a Servants' Home. I then told her to go to Mr. Pope's and she went away. She had a bonnet or shawl on.

Prisoner to witness: I told you I could not find Mr. Birch's.

Elizabeth Dale, prosecutor's wife, deposed: Prisoner came to our shop on Wednesday evening between seven and eight o'clock, and said she wanted to get into the Servants' Home. I told her my husband had no means of getting her into such an institution and that it was of no use her calling again. She left the shop, and after she was gone I looked round and missed about a dozen “Churchman's Almanack” and “Dover and Deal Guide”s. The books now produced correspond with those I missed.

Hannah Carter, wife of John Carter, Oddfellows Arms, Radnor Street, said: Prisoner has lodged at my house. She came on Wednesday and called for a glass of beer and porter and paid a penny for it. She had a yellow covered book in her hand and asked if I liked reading, and I replied that I could not read and she then gave the book to my little girl. Prisoner went out after she had drank her beer. I gave the book to P.C. Keeler.

Harriett Hall, wife of William Hall, fishmonger, said: I saw prisoner come out of the fishmarket about half past three on Wednesday afternoon. She went through the arch in front of the Royal George, and was tossing up a number of books. She said “I am going to put these up for a pint of beer”. I said “You may as well give me one for my little girl”, and she gave me one and then went away.

Charlotte, wife of William Bourne, Hope, Fancy Street said prisoner came into her house in company with a tall man on Wednesday, and he paid for a pint of beer. Prisoner had several books in her hand and offered to give witness them, and as she said she did not want them, she gave her a “Churchman's Almanack”, and said if she kept the books she would only make away with them. Witness threw the book prisoner gave her on the tap room fire.

P.C. Keeler said: On Thursday morning, from information received, I went to the Oddfellows Arms and received the book I now produce from Mrs. Carter. I then went in search of prisoner and apprehended her in Tontine Street about noon. After being cautioned she said she was drunk and went into a shop, but she would not have done it if it had not been for a young man who was standing outside, and she gave him a portion of the books. She said she did not know his name, but they called him “Charlie”. Prisoner was searched by the female searcher, but nothing was found upon her. I have been to Dover and Hythe in search of the man, but could not find him.

Prisoner, after being duly cautioned, said: I came to Folkestone on Monday with a young man named Mackson, whose father keeps a farm. We went to the Dew Drop and got a bed there; we went into the tap room and had a pot of beer. I had just come out of prison and got a little beer, which upset me. If you will be so kind as to forgive me I will go into a Home: I could go in one today. I have lost my mother. I will go down on my hands and knees if you will forgive me. I don't want to go to prison again.

The Mayor said the Bench had no alternative but to commit prisoner for trial, and she was accordingly committed to the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 2 May 1874.

Quarter Sessions.

Tuesday, April 28th: Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq.

Catherine Wood (22) was charged with stealing fourteen books, value of 1s. 4d., the property of Mr. Edward Dale, stationer, 1, Dover Street, on the 4th February. Mr. Minter for the prosecution.

Prisoner, on being called upon to plead, said she could not remember taking the books.

Mrs. Elizabeth Dale deposed: I am the wife of Edward Dale, carrying on business of stationer, 1, Dover Street. Prisoner came into the shop between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of Wednesday, 4th February last. She said she wanted to get into a servants' home. I told her Mr. Dale had no means of getting her into one, and it was no use her calling again. I missed some books after she was gone. I had a bundle of the “Dover and Deal Guide” on the counter between two and three o'clock. After she had gone I missed them. One contained “The Dover and Deal Guide”, and the other the “Churchman's Almanack”. The books now produced by P.C. Keeler correspond with those I lost.

By Prisoner: I did not see you take the books.

Annie Dale, ten years of age, deposed: On the 4th February I was in my father's shop in the afternoon between three and four o'clock . Prisoner came in and said she wanted to get into a home, and inquired if my father could get her in. I told her to go to Mr. Birch, the Relieving Officer. She then left and came back in about quarter of an hour, and said Mr. Birch could not get her into a home. I then told her to go to Mr. Pope's, Registry Office. She went away again. I was in the shop at half past seven, and heard mother tell her father had no means of getting her into a home.

By the Recorder: The books were on the counter, and prisoner stood near to them. I found her in the shop when I came downstairs. She was standing near the books.

Hannah Carter, Oddfellows Inn, Radnor Street, deposed: I have known prisoner some time. She came to my house on the 4th February between six and seven in the evening and asked for a glass of half-and-half. She had a book in her hand and asked if I would have the book. I said I could not read, and she gave me the book for my little girl. It had a yellow cover, and I believe it was a “Dover and Deal Guide”. I gave the book to P.C. Keeler on the following morning.

Harriett Hall deposed: I saw the prisoner on the 4th February between three and four o'clock. She came from the fish market, and had some books in her hand, which she was throwing up, and said “I am going to put them up for a pot of beer”. I said “You might as well give me one for my little boy”, and she did so. The book was put on the table by the side of my bed. P.C. Keeler came the next day and I gave the book to him, and at his request I put a mark upon it. The book now produced is the samen Charlotte Bourne deposed: I live at the Hope, Fancy Street. I remember prisoner coming to my house on the 4th February about five o'clock, with a man. She had several books in her hand, and offered to give them to me, and she gave me a “Churchman's Almanack”, which I afterwards put in the fire.

P.C. Keeler deposed: On the 5th February I went to Mrs. Carter's house and received a “Dover and Deal Guide”. I also went to Mrs. Hall's and received a “Churchman's Almanack”, and requested Mrs. Hall to make a mark upon it, which she did. I then went in search of prisoner and found her in Tontine Street, and took her into custody on the charge of stealing a number of books from Mr. Dale's shop. She said she would not have “tooken” them if it had not been for a man who was standing outside. I asked her who he was, and she said “Charlie”, which was all the name she knew, and she had given a portion of the books to him. She said she had been in Mr. Dale's shop.

This was the case for the prosecution.

The statement made by prisoner when before the Magistrates was read, to which she now added: I had done a long sentence in prison, and I took a glass of beer or two, which one and another gave me, and it upset me. I came to Folkestone with the intention of seeing a Sister of Mercy, and have not the slightest memory of taking the books. A Sister of Mercy was going to put me in a home. My mother was killed, and my father ran away, and I have not a friend in the world. I had not broken my fast after coming out of gaol till I got to Folkestone.

In answer to the Recorder, Mrs. Dale said she did not think prisoner was tipsy when she was in the shop, but she smelt strongly of what she thought was rum; she seemed to know what she was about.

Prisoner: If you will be merciful to me I will never take another drop of beer as long as I live. It has been the ruin of me.

The learned Recorder summed up the case as favourably as he could for the prisoner and remarked that if she did not know what she was about when she took the books there was no offence, but there was great inconsistency in her statements. A second count charged her with having been convicted at the Dover Quarter Sessions of felony on the 27th December.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty to the former conviction.

Mr. Minter remarked that His Honour ought to know that there were no less than thirteen previous convictions against prisoner.

The Recorder said that from a document before him he saw that prisoner began her evil course when she was only fourteen years of age by stealing a silver spoon; after that there were convictions for being in workhouses for an unlawful purpose, assaulting a child, absconding from a reformatory, four times drunk and disorderly, stealing boots,, and breaking fourteen panes of glass in Dover gaol. She was really a habitual criminal.

Mr. Minter remarked that the Visiting Justices offered to get her into a Home, but she refused to go, and the chaplain of the prison offered to get her into a workhouse in order to see if that would do her any good.

Prisoner: Since the death of my mother my father ran away, and I have seven little brothers in the workhouse, and I did not want to go to see them there. Mrs. Smith wanted to get me in a Home, but Mrs. Quilter, the Matron of the gaol, told her an untruth that I used bad language when I was coming out of chapel. Mr. Simmons put me in a dark cell three days on bread and water. If you will be merciful I will leave England.

The Recorder: I really don't know what to do with such a habitual criminal. I have power to send you to penal servitude, but I will not go to that length. I cannot pass a less sentence than twelve months' hard labour.

Prisoner destroyed all faith of her professions of contrition and amendment by threatening Mr. Simmons as she was removed from the dock.

 

Folkestone News 1 May 1886.

Wednesday, April 28th:

Transfer was granted as follows: Drayner, Hope.

 

Folkestone Express 31 May 1890.

Wednesday, May 28th: Before The Mayor, H.W. Poole Esq., Surgeon General Gilbourne, W.G. Herbert and W. Wightwick Esqs.

The licence of the Hope Inn was transferred to Mrs. Donaldson, widow of the landlord, who is supposed to have been lost at sea recently.

 

Folkestone Express 14 June 1890.

Wednesday, June 11th: before J. Clark, J. Hoad, J. Dunk, F. Boykett and E.T. Ward Esqs.

The licence of the Hope Inn was transferred to Mrs. Donaldson.

 

Folkestone Express 13 December 1890.

Transfer.

Wednesday, December 10th: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, Alderman Banks and W.G. Herbert Esq.

Temporary authority was granted to John Coghlan for the Hope Inn.

Note: Hope transfer is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 December 1895.

Felix.

Then we chatted about the Folkestone of Mr. Francis' young days. A mere hamlet was it then. Fishing and smuggling were the principal industries. “Things”, said my vivacious informant, “have altered, both in trade and custom. I can remember the time when there was not so much stand-offishness amongst the tradespeople as now. There was no cliqueism then. Why, we used to meet together in the evening and smoke our pipes – the lawyers, the doctors, and the banker, and the rest of the tradesmen. One of our principal hotels was in Fenchurch Street. It is now called the Hope. But we divided our custom. But we divided our custom. Sunday was left out. For six nights in the week one of six hotels was regularly visited. An innocent rubber of whist was always indulged in, but on no account was the game commenced until Doctor Bateman (an ancestor of the present doctor bearing that honoured name) had lighted the tallow candles. These good old people lived by the rule. A pint of good English ale and a “night cap” was the regulation refreshment. At ten p.m. the “Hotels” closed, and a quarter before that hour the company punctually separated to meet again on the morrow evening”. Who can cast a stone at those old times, when men looked upon each other as men? As Mr. Francis said “One by one my companions have died off, I am alone, and the old days to me are but a memory”.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 January 1900.

Wednesday, January 17th: Before Mr. Fitness.

A licence to sell until the annual transfer day was granted to Fredk. Hart in respect of the Hope, Fenchurch Street.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 January 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday a temporary authority to sell was granted to Mr. Frederick Hart for the Hope, in Fenchurch Street, Mr. G.W. Haines representing the applicant.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday, on the application of Mr. G.W. Haines, a transfer was granted to Mr. Hart for the Hope, Great Fenchurch Street.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 August 1901.

Saturday, July 27th: Before Alderman Banks, Messrs. Herbert, Wightwick, and Pursey, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Richard William Heritage was granted temporary authority to sell at the Hope Inn, Fenchurch Street.

 

Folkestone Express 10 August 1901.

Wednesday, August 7th: Before W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs., and Colonel Keily Westropp.

The following licence was transferred: Mr. William Richard Heritage was granted a temporary renewal in respect of the Hope.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 August 1901.

Wednesday, August 7th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Mr. Heritage was granted a temporary licence for the Hope Inn.

 

Folkestone Express 14 September 1901.

Wednesday, September 11th: Before T.J. Vaughan, G. Peden, and J. Stainer Esqs., Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Fredk. Hart was granted a transfer of the licence of the Hope Inn, Fenchurch Street.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 September 1901.

Wednesday, September 11th: Before Councillors T.J. Vaughan and G. Peden, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. W. Wightwick, and Lieut. Colonels Westropp and Hamilton.

The licence of the Hope Inn, Providence Street (sic), was transferred to Fredk. Hart.

Note: Transfer at the Hope is FROM Hart to Heritage.

 

Folkestone Express 26 April 1902.

Local News.

On Thursday the licence of the Hope Inn was temporarily transferred to Mr. William Finn.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 February 1904.

Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Cols. Fynmore, Westropp, and Hamilton, Messrs. C.J. Pursey and E.T. Ward.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) read his annual report, which contained interesting figures with regard to drunkenness, etc. No person in Folkestone had yet been convicted a sufficient number of times to be placed on the “black list”. The Chief Constable objected to the renewal of the licence of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and asked that the consideration of this licence might be deferred until the adjourned sessions.

The Chairman then read the Justices' Report, which stated that the number of licensed houses in Folkestone, and especially around the harbour, was out of all proportion to the population. The number of licences had not been reduced, owing to the fact that a Bill amending the Licensing Laws was shortly to be introduced in Parliament. Certain public houses – the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, the East Cliff Tavern, the Victoria, the Lifeboat Inn, the Duke Of Edinburgh, and the Channel Inn had been inspected by the Justices, and recommendations with regard to their sanitary improvement and closing of back entries were made.

Mr. John Minter said that water had been laid on at the Channel Inn since the report on the bad state of the sanitary arrangements. Mr. Minter also suggested with regard to the Imperial Brewery Tap that a public bar should be made with an entrance from Mill Bay.

The Bench decided, however, that the orders made in the report should be adhered to.

Licences were then granted to the lessees of public houses and licensed premises.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1904.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and W.G. Herbert, E.T. Ward, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following was the report of Supt. Reeve: Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 10th February, 1904. To the Chairman and Members of the Licensing Committee of the Borough of Folkestone. Gentlemen, I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 139 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, namely: Full licences 87; Beer on 11; Beer off 6; Beer and Spirits (dealers) 16; Grocers 12; Confectioners 3; Chemists 4; Total 139 – an average of one licence to every 220 persons, or one “on” licence to every 313. This is a decrease of one full licence as compared with last year's return, the licence of the Marquis Of Lorne having been refused at the adjourned meeting in March. Twenty of the licences have been transferred during the year, namely, 14 full licences, two beer on, two beer off, and two grocers. One beer off licence was transferred twice during the year. One licence holder has been convicted since the last annual meeting of committing drunkenness on his licensed premises. He has since transferred his licence and left the house. The alterations which the Justices at the adjourned meeting last year directed to be made to the Packet Boat, Castle, Tramway, Bricklayers' Arms, Granville, and Star Inns have all been carried out in a satisfactory manner, and none of the licensed houses are now used as common lodging houses. Ten occasional licences, and extensions of hours on 21 occasions, have been granted to licence holders during the year. There are 14 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold are registered in accordance with the Licensing Act of 1902. For the year ending 31st December last year, 154 persons (131 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 131 were convicted and 23 discharged. This is an increase of 65 persons proceeded against, and 51 convicted, as compared with 1902. The increase is chiefly due to the additional powers given to the police under the Licensing Act, 1902. Up to the present time no person within the Borough has been convicted the necessary number of times within the 12 months to be placed on the “black list” as provided by Section 6 of the Act of 1902. With very few exceptions the whole of the licensed houses have been conducted in a satisfactory manner. The only objection I have to make to the renewal of any of the present licences is that of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and I would ask that the renewal of this licence be deferred until the adjourned meeting. I have the honour to be, gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve (Chief Constable).

The Chairman: I think, gentlemen, you will agree that the report of the Superintendent is a satisfactory one – in fact, I may say very satisfactory – for the whole year. With your permission I well read the report we now make to you. At the adjournment of the last general licensing meeting we stated that in our opinion the number of licences for the sale of intoxicating liquor then existing in the borough of Folkestone, especially in the part of the immediate neighbourhood of the Harbour, was out of all proportion to the population, and that we proposed between then and the general annual licensing meeting of this year to obtain information on various matters, to enable us to determine what reduction would be made in the number of licences. We invited the owners of licensed houses in the meantime to meet and agree among themselves for the voluntary surrender at this general meeting of a substantial number of licences in the borough, and to submit the result of their united action to the Licensing Justices for acceptance. Failing any satisfactory proposal for reduction by the owners, the Licensing Justices last year intimated that in the exercise of their discretionary powers they would at this year's meeting decide in a fair and equitable spirit what reduction should be made. But at the opening of Parliament last week it was announced in the King's speech that the Government intended to introduce in the House of Commons during the present session a Bill to amend the Licensing Laws. In view of this legislation we are of opinion we ought not, pending the passage of this Bill through Parliament, exercise the discretionary powers vested in us, and take measures for effecting a further reduction in the number of licences within the borough on the ground that certain licensed premises are not required for the public accommodation. We have recently inspected certain houses known as the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, East Cliff Tavern, Victoria, Lifeboat, Duke Of Edinburgh, Railway Tavern, and Channel Inn.

As to the Hope, we direct that the holder of the licence of this house shall, within fourteen days from this date, close up the gateway forming the back entrance to the licensed premises from a yard leading out of Bennett's Yard into Dover Street, inasmuch as the existence of this gateway renders it more difficult for the police to exercise proper supervision over the licensed premises.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 April 1904.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Cols. Westropp and Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. J. Stainer.

A temporary transfer of the licence of the Hope Inn from Stephen J. Smith to Alfred Burbell (sic) was allowed.

 

Folkestone Express 16 April 1904.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Westropp, G.I. Swoffer and J. Stainer Esqs.

Alfred Geo. Burwell (sic) applied for the licence of the Hope Inn to be transferred to him from Stephen James Smith. Granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 April 1904.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before Ald. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Licence was transferred as follows:- The Hope Inn, from Stephen James Smith to Alfred George Burvill.

 

Folkestone Express 4 June 1904.

Wednesday, June 1st: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut Colonel Westropp, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, C.J. Pursey and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Special transfer sessions were held, when the licence of the Hope Inn was transferred from Stephen James Smith to Alfred G. Burvill.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 June 1904.

Wednesday, June 1st: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. C.J. Pursey, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

The licence of the Hope Inn was transferred from Stephen James Smith to Alfred George Burvill.

 

Folkestone Express 25 February 1905.

Monday, February 20th: Before The Mayor and Alderman Spurgen.

Fanny Moore was charged with being drunk and disorderly on Saturday night.

P.C. Fagg said at 8.20 on Saturday evening he was called to the Hope public house by the landlord, who said he had refused to serve the defendant. She was drunk, so witness asked her to leave, but as she refused he was obliged to eject her. When outside she commenced to swear and shout, causing a large crowd to assemble, so he took her into custody.

The Chief Constable said he heard a sample of the woman's language, and he had never heard anything like it from a woman.

Defendant was fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Messrs. Spurgen, Carpenter and Fynmore.

Temporary authority was granted to Mr. Boorman from Mr. Burvill of the Hope.

 

Folkestone Express 15 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and W.C. Carpenter Esq.

Temporary authority was granted to Mr. Boorman to sell at the Hope Inn.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 11th: Before Mr. W.C. Carpenter and Councillor R.J. Fynmore.

The licence of the Hope was temporarily transferred from Mr. Burvill to Mr. H. Boorman.

 

Folkestone Daily News 31 May 1905.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before Alderman Herbert, J. Stainer and C.J. Pursey.

The licence of the Hope was transferred to Mr. Boorman.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 June 1905.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

The licence of the Hope Inn, Fenchurch Street, was transferred from Mr. Alfred Burvill to Mr. Harry Geo. Boorman.

 

Folkestone Express 3 June 1905.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey and J. Stainer Esqs.

This was the day fixed as the special sessions for transferring licences, and the following temporary transfer of licences was confirmed: The Hope Inn, from Mr. A.G. Burvill to Mr. G. Boorman.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 June 1905.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before Aldermen W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

The licence of the Hope Inn was transferred from Mr. A.G. Burvill to Mr. H. Boorman.

 

Folkestone Express 4 November 1905.

Wednesday, November 1st: Before Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and W.C. Carpenter Esq.

Robert James Smart, Patrick Maloney, and Robert Richard Fitzgerald were charged with stealing a mackintosh, an overcoat, a woollen scarf, and a pair of woollen gloves, the property of General Jackson, from the hall of No. 6, Castle Hill Avenue, the previous Wednesday.

Kate Hunter, parlourmaid in the employ of General Jackson, of 6, Castle Hill Avenue, said she recognised Maloney as a man who went to the house on the previous Wednesday evening and asked for assistance. On Sunday she missed from the hall a mackintosh coat, and also a dark cloth overcoat. The cloth coat had silk facings, and had covered buttons. She also missed a white woollen knitted scarf, and also a pair of woollen gloves. The articles were missed from the lobby of the hall, the door of which was only closed at night. On Monday evening Det. Sergt. Burniston showed her the mackintosh, which she identified as the property of General Jackson.

In answer to Maloney, she said he went to the house about seven o'clock, and he was in the lobby.

Charles Dobbs, residing at 24, Athelstan Road, said he recognised the three men. At half past eight on Saturday night he saw Smart and Fitzgerald in Harbour Street. The former was wearing a dark overcoat and a white knitted scarf. The latter had the mackintosh produced on his arm, and was trying to sell it. Smart asked him if he could sell the mackintosh, but previous to that he asked witness to have a drink. He accepted the invitation, and they went into the Wellington public house, where he asked him to sell the overcoat. He said if witness sold it he would give him a shilling. Witness told him he would not, as he did not know where to sell it. They came out of the house together, and witness left him after directing him to the Pavilion Shades stables, where he said he might sell it. He remembered one day last week he saw Maloney and Smart going up Canterbury Road.

Frederick Charles Rigden, a licensed cab driver, residing at 5, East Cliff, said he recognised Smart and Fitzgerald. On Saturday night he was in the harness room at the Pavilion Shades when they came to him. Smart had the mackintosh, which he asked him to buy. He replied he did not want it, and the prisoner then said he could have it for 4s. Witness told him he did not want it, and he had better take it away. Prisoner then said he had been out of work several weeks and had got the coat from General Jackson, who had given it to him because he was going away. Witness eventually gave him 3s. for it. On Monday he handed the mackintosh to Sergt. Burniston.

In answer to Smart, witness said he told him that General Jackson had given him the overcoat.

Smart: It is a lie.

Fitzgerald then said that Smart did tell the witness General Jackson gave him the mackintosh, but as he was drunk at the time he could not remember what he said.

Det. Sergt. Burniston said on Monday, from information he received respecting an overcoat and mackintosh missing from 6, Castle Hill Avenue, he made enquiries, and at 7 p.m. he called on Rigden, who handed him the mackintosh produced. Witness continued the enquiry, and the previous evening he went to Canterbury. At 10.20 p.m. he saw Maloney and Fitzgerald together. He said to them “I shall charge you with being concerned with a man named Smart, who is detained at Canterbury police station, in stealing from the hall of No. 6, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone, a mackintosh, an overcoat, a woollen scarf, and a pair of woollen gloves, the property of General Jackson”. Neither made any reply. Witness took them to the Canterbury police station, where Smart was brought forward, and he then charged the prisoners with being concerned in the theft. Later on he brought them to the Folkestone police station, where they were formally charged. Maloney replied “About 10 a.m. last Sunday I went in the Tramway public house to look for Smart. I waited half an hour, when I saw Smart and Fitzgerald. Smart said “Can you sell an overcoat for me?” I told him I would try, and Smart then handed me a dark mixture overcoat, which was silk lined. I took the coat and tried to sell it. I could not sell it, and later on I took the coat back to Smart”. Smart said “Maloney and myself kept a look out while Fitzgerald went to the house and stole the coats. When he sold the coat on Sunday, Maloney had a share in the money”. Fitzgerald said “I am not going to get the old sergeant into trouble”, no doubt referring to Maloney as the “old sergeant”.

The Chief Constable said that was as far as he could take the case that morning, and he should like the Magistrates to grant a remand, so that he could endeavour to trace the other coat.

Prisoners were the remanded until Saturday.

 

Folkestone Express 11 November 1905.

Saturday, November 4th: Before Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and W.C. Carpenter Esq.

Robert James Smart, Patrick Maloney, and Robert Richard Fitzgerald, who were before the Magistrates on Wednesday, were brought up on remand and charged with stealing an overcoat, a mackintosh, a woollen scarf, and a pair of woollen gloves from the hall of No. 6, Castle Hill Avenue, the property of General Jackson.

The evidence given at the first appearance of the prisoners before the Magistrates was read over.

Miss Hunter, a parlourmaid in the employ of General Jackson, said she identified the overcoat produced as that of her employer.

Detective Sergeant Burniston further stated that at midday on Wednesday he called on Alfred Howard, who handed him the coat now produced, which was afterwards identified by Miss Hunter. The value of the coat and mackintosh was 30s.

Henry Boorman, the landlord of the Hope Inn, said he recognised Smart and Maloney. On Sunday, just before two o'clock, Maloney went to his private bar and asked him if he wanted to buy the coat produced. He said the man was “on the road” and stopping at the Radnor, and wanted 4s. for it. Witness told him he had no use for the coat, and prisoner replied if he had the money he would buy it. When Maloney got outside, he was joined by Smart and another man and went off towards Dover Street.

Alfred Howard, living at the Tramway Tavern, said on Sunday, about a quarter to two, he saw Smart in the Clarendon Hotel with a man with whom witness worked. Smart was wearing the coat, and he asked witness if he would buy the coat for 4s. Witness asked him if the coat belonged to him, and he said it did, but he had not had it long. He further said he was hard up and wanted to get to Canterbury and also wanted food. Witness told him he could only afford to give him 3s. for the coat, and also said that when the prisoner pulled himself round at Canterbury he could have the coat if he returned with the 3s. he gave for it. On Wednesday Detective Sergeant Burniston came to him and he handed the coat to him.

Smart pleaded Not Guilty to stealing the coat, but Guilty to selling it knowing it to have been stolen. Maloney did not steal the coat.

Maloney said he was Not Guilty. He met Smart on Sunday morning about ten o'clock, and he asked him if he could dispose of the coat. He (the speaker) took the coat, silly enough, because he thought the coat actually belonged to Smart.

Fitzgerald pleaded Guilty to stealing the coat.

Inspector Swift said he had not been able to find any convictions against Maloney and Smart. However, he identified Fitzgerald as William Murray, against whom there were nine convictions for larceny dating from 1887. One of the sentences was three years penal servitude for theft from a hall.

The prisoners were sentenced to six weeks' hard labour, and the Chairman said it would have been a serious thing for Fitzgerald if he had been sent to the Quarter Sessions with a record like he had.

Smart said that if the two others had spoken the truth they would have said that he did not steal the coat but that Maloney took it.

The Chairman further said that people ought to be more careful in buying anything from unknown men.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 November 1905.

Saturday, November 4th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel R.J. Fynmore, and Mr. W.C. Carpenter.

Robert Jas. Smart, Patrick Maloney, and Robt. Richd. Fitzgerald were charged, on remand, with stealing a mackintosh, a coat, a scarf, and a pair of gloves from the residence of Major General W. Jackson, at 6, Castle Hill Avenue. The evidence previously given was read over and confirmed.

Detective Sergeant Burniston stated that at midnight on Wednesday, the 1st inst., he called on Alfred Howard, who handed him the coat produced, which was afterwards identified by Miss Hutter. The value of the mackintosh and overcoat was 30s.

Henry Boorman, the licensee of the Hope Inn, Great Fenchurch Street, said he recognised all the men except Fitzgerald. Smart and Maloney came to his house on Sunday and asked him to buy the coat produced. Maloney said a “man on the road” stopped him at the Radnor and asked him 4s. for it; he (Maloney) refused, but said if he had had the money he would have bought it. He went down Fenchurch Street, and about a minute afterwards Smart and a short man joined him.

Alfred Howard stated that he lived at the Tramway Tavern. On the previous Sunday he saw the prisoner Smart in Tontine Street with a party with whom witness worked, opposite the Clarendon Hotel. He asked him to buy a coat which he was wearing, saying he could have it for 4s. On being asked if the coat belonged to him, he replied that it did, and that he had not had it long. He also said he was hard up, wanted to go to Canterbury, and wanted food. He (witness) said he would give him 3s. for it, but if, when the prisoner got to Canterbury, he could pull himself round, he could have the coat back for the same money. He (witness) felt pity for the man, seeing his two badges (meaning his medal ribbons), and the position he was in. On the 1st inst., he handed the coat to D.S. Burniston.

Prisoners elected to be dealt with summarily. Smart pleaded Guilty to helping to steal the articles. Maloney pleaded Not Guilty, stating that he met Smart, who asked him to sell a coat, and he requested witness Boorman to buy it. Fitzgerald pleaded Guilty.

Inspector Swift stated that nothing was known against Maloney and Smart, but Fitzgerald was believed to be a Wm. Murray, who had many previous convictions for larceny against him.

Prisoners were sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment with hard labour, Alderman Spurgen remarking that people should be more careful in buying articles offered them by strangers, as they might find themselves in a serious position. He cautioned the witness Howard.

 

Folkestone Daily News 7 February 1906.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Pursey, Ames, Herbert, Fynmore, and Leggett.

The Chief Constable presented his report (for details see Folkestone Chronicle).

Mr. Ward called attention to the increase of 12 cases of drunkenness, and asked the licensed victuallers to assist the police in carrying out their duties.

The Welcome public house was objected to on the ground of misconduct. The Hope, the Channel, the Providence, the Tramway and the Blue Anchor were objected to on the ground that they were not required. All the other licences were granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 February 1906.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Col. Fynmore, Lt. Col. Hamilton, Mr. C.J. Pursey, Mr. C. Carpenter, Mr. C. Ames, and Mr. Linton.

On the Court being opened the Chief Constable read his annual report, which was as follows:-

“Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 136 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, viz.:- Full licences 85, Beer “on” 9, Beer “off” 6, Beer and Spirit Dealers 16, Grocers 12, Chemists 5, Confectioners 3.

This gives an average, according to the Census of 1901, of one licence to every 225 persons, or one “on” licence to every 326 persons.

Three of the “off” licences (two held by spirit dealers and one by a chemist) will not be renewed, as the premises are no longer used for the sale of drink, thus reducing the number of licensed premises to 133, or one to every 230 persons.

At the Adjourned Licensing Meeting, held in March last, the renewal of six licences was referred to the Compensation Committee for East Kent on the ground of redundancy, with the result that four of the licences were refused and two renewed.

The licences which were refused were:- the Victoria Inn, South Street; Star Inn, Radnor Street; Duke of Edinburgh, Tontine Street; and Cinque Port Arms, Seagate Street. Compensation was paid in each case and the houses closed.

Since the last Annual Licensing Meeting 24 of the licences have been transferred, viz:- Full Licences 17, Beer “on” 2, Off licences 5.

During the year 13 occasional licences have been granted by the justices for the sale of intoxicating liquor on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 25 extensions of the ordinary time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises.

During the year ended 31st December last 183 persons (135 males and 48 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 164 were convicted and 19 discharged. This is an increase of 12 persons proceeded against, and eight convicted, as compared with the previous year.

Only one licence holder has been convicted during the year, viz., the licensee of the Welcome Inn, Dover Street, who was fined 5 and costs for permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises. He has since transferred the licence and left the house.

Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902.

There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and three for public billiard playing.

With very few exceptions, the licensed houses have been conducted in a satisfactory manner during the year. The only licence to which I offer objection on the ground of misconduct is that of the Welcome Inn, Dover Street, and I would ask that the consideration of the renewal of this licence be deferred until the Adjourned Licensing Meeting.

I would respectfully suggest that the Committee again avail themselves of the powers given by the Licensing Act, 1904, and refer the renewal of some of the licences in the congested area to the Compensation Committee for consideration, on the ground that there are within the area more licensed houses than are necessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

I beg to submit a plan on which I have marked out the congested area, also the public houses within the area.

Within this area there is a population approximately of 4,600, with 42 “on” licensed houses, giving a proportion of one licensed house to every 109 persons.

There are also situate within the area six premises licensed for sale off the premises, one confectioner with a licence to sell wine on the premises, and four registered clubs, with a total membership of 898”.

The Chairman said with regard to the report just read by Chief Constable Reeve the Bench were pleased to hear that the houses had been so well conducted, but he must point out that over the preceding year there had been 12 more cases of drunkenness. The Bench earnestly asked the licence holders to do their utmost to stop excessive drinking on their licensed premises. It was a curious circumstance that although there were many convictions there was no information where the drink was obtained.

The whole of the licences, with the exception of six, were then renewed. The six licences objected to were the Welcome, Dover Street, in which case the Chief Constable was instructed to serve notice of opposition on the ground of misconduct. In the five other instances the Chief Constable was instructed to serve notices of objection on the grounds that the licences were not required, the houses opposed being the Channel, High Street; Hope, Fenchurch Street; Blue Anchor, Beach Street; and Tramway, Radnor Street.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 10 March 1906.

The Hope Inn.

The Chief Constable said the Hope Inn was situated in Fenchurch Street, and the present licensee was Harry Boorman, who obtained a transfer of the licence on 21st May last year. The registered owners were Messrs. Ash and Co., Canterbury. The rateable value was 17 10s. The house had two entrances. The accommodation for the public consisted of a bar in the front and a tap room behind, with a serving window in the passage. The landlord's living room was in the basement, and approached by a dark flight of stair behind the bar. The licence had been transferred six times in six years. Within a radius of 100 yards there were 16 other on licensed houses; within a radius of 150 yards 27; and within a radius of 200 yards there were 35. He particularly drew the attention of the Bench to the rateable value and the number of transfers. The trade was small, and, in his opinion, the licence was unnecessary.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mercer (representing the owners): He had had no complaint against the tenant.

Mr. Mercer: The landlord says he does not reside in the basement?

The Chief Constable: The last tenant did when I was there. I withdraw that part so far as the landlord is concerned.

Mr. Mercer: Do you object to a house being licensed because it is not highly assessed?

The Chief Constable: No.

Mr. Mercer: You are jealous, Superintendent. (Laughter)

The Chief Constable: No. I am not.

Mr. Mercer said in this case they did a good trade. The sale was 155 barrels of beer and 54 gallons of spirits. That was the average for seven years. They had a good tenant and the house was well conducted. There were no other houses particularly close. With reference to the matter referred to by the Chief Constable, the owners would be willing to undertake any structural repairs that the Bench suggested.

The case was referred to Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 10 February 1906.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Major Leggett, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, W.C. Carpenter, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

The Chief Constable presented his annual report. (See Folkestone Chronicle for details).

The Chairman said they were pleased to see that the whole of the licensed houses had been well conducted. There had only been one conviction during the year. He wanted to point out that that year there was an increase of twelve cases of drunkenness in the borough. They earnestly asked the licence holders to help the police as much as possible to prevent drunkenness. It was always a curious thing where those people got their drink, and they must ask the licence holders to try and do their utmost to stop drunkenness on their premises.

All the licences were granted with the exception of six. The Chief Constable was instructed to serve notices upon the tenants and owners of the following public houses on the ground that they were not necessary; The Channel Inn, High Street; the Hope, Fenchurch Street; the Providence, Beach Street; Blue Anchor, Beach Street; and the Tramway, Radnor Street. He was also instructed to serve notices with regard to the Welcome Inn on the ground of misconduct.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 February 1906.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions were held on Wednesday morning. The Police Court was crowded with those interested in the trade and the general public. The Magistrates present were Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Mr. C.J. Pursey, Alderman W.G. Herbert, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The Chief Constable presented his report. (For details see Folkestone Chronicle).

It was intimated that at the adjourned licensing sessions the licences of the Blue Anchor, the Providence, the Welcome, the Tramway, the Channel, and the Hope would be opposed, on the ground that they were in excess of the requirements of the neighbourhood. The licence holders of those houses received this information as they stepped forward to ask for their renewals.

 

Southeastern Gazette 13 February 1906.

Local News.

The annual Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held on Wednesday, before E.T. Ward Esq., in the chair.

The Chief Constable reported that there were 136 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, viz., full licenses 85, beer “on” 9, beer “off” 6, beer and spirit dealers 16, grocers 12, chemists 5, and confectioners' 3. This gave an average, according to the census of 1901, of one license to every 225 persons, or one “on” license to every 326 persons. Three of the “off” licenses (two held by spirit dealers and one by a chemist), would not be renewed, as the premises were no longer used for the sale of drink, thus reducing the number of licensed premises to 133, or one to every 230 persons. During the year ended 31st December, 183 persons (135 males and 48 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 164 were, convicted and 19 discharged. This was an increase of 12 persons proceeded against, and 8, convicted as compared with the preceding year. Only one license holder had been convicted during the year. All the licenses were granted with the exception of six. The Chief Constable was instructed to serve notices upon the tenants and owners of the following houses on the ground that they were not necessary: The Channel Inn, High Street; the Hope, Fenchurch Street; the Providence, Beach Street; Blue Anchor Beach Street; and the Tramway, Radnor Street. He was also instructed to serve notice with regard to the Welcome Inn, on the ground of misconduct.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 March 1906.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Hope Inn.

Monday, March 5th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton, T. Ames, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

This licence was opposed on the grounds of its not being required, and the Bench decided to refer it to Quarter Sessions.

Mr. Mercer appeared in the above case for the owners.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 March 1906.

Adjourned Licensing Meeting.

The Adjourned Annual General Licensing Sessions were held at the Town Hall on Monday, when the Chief Constable opposed the renewal of five licences on the ground of redundancy, and one on the ground of misconduct. The evidence was of the usual technical order, where a whole host of police witnesses testified to an extraordinary state of things which had apparently gone on for years. The sitting lasted from 11 a.m. until 4.30 p.m., and was only relieved by one little light episode when Mr. Mercer on two occasions quoted the Folkestone Herald as bearing upon a case heard at the Court, and on each occasion the Chairman saying that the report was wrong, whereupon Mr. Mercer intimated that he should give up taking the Herald.

The Bench sitting on Monday morning were Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lt. Col. Fynmore, Lt. Col. Hamilton, Mr. C.J. Pursey, Mr. W. Linton, and Major Leggatt.

The Hope.

The Hope Inn, Fenchurch Street; tenant Mr. Harry Boorman; brewers Messrs. Ash and Co. Mr. Mercer for tenant and brewers.

The Chief Constable said the present tenant had obtained the transfer on the 31st of May last year. The registered owners of the house were Messrs. Ash and Co., of Canterbury. The rateable value was 17 10s. The house had two entrances, a bar in front and a tap room behind, with a serving bar in a passage leading to the tap room. The landlord's living room was in the basement, and approached by a very dark passage behind the bar, and all the rooms were very low-pitched. The licence had been transferred six times in six years. In a radius of 100 yards there were 16 licensed houses, 150 yards 27 licensed houses, and 200 yards 35 licensed houses. The trade was very small, and in his opinion the licence was not necessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

By Mr. Mercer: The house is in a quiet situation. There has been no complaint against the present tenant.

Mr. Mercer: Is the George III wanted?

The Chief Constable: If you ask my private opinion, I should say the George III might go as well as this.

Mr. Mercer said the trade done at the house over a seven years' average was 156 barrels of beer and 56 gallons of spirits.

The Chairman announced that the licence would be referred to the Compensation Court.

 

Folkestone Express 10 March 1906.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned licensing sessions were held on Monday, when the six licences which were adjourned from the Brewster Sessions were considered. On the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

The Hope Inn.

The licence of the Hope Inn was then taken. Mr. Mercer appeared on behalf of the owners and occupier.

The Chief Constable said the ground of objection was the same as in the previous case. The house was situate in Fenchurch Street, and the licensee was Harry Boorman, who obtained a transfer of the licence on May 31st last. The brewers were Messrs. Ash and Co. The rateable value was 17 10s. The accommodation for the public consisted of a bar in front and tap room behind, with a serving window in the passage leading to the tap room. The landlord lived in the basement, approached by a very dark flight of stairs behind the bar. The rooms were very low-pitched. The licence had been transferred six times in the past six years. Within a radius of 100 yards there were 16 other on licensed houses, within 150 yards there were 27, and within 200 yards there were 35. He wished particularly to call attention to the low rateable value and the number of transfers. The trade was very small, and the licence was unnecessary.

Mr. Mercer said there was a good tenant, and it was a quiet and well-conducted house. The landlord told him he did not live in the basement, but he did his cooking there and lived upstairs.

The Chief Constable: I will withdraw what I have said with regard to that.

Mr. Mercer: Is the George the Third required?

The Chief Constable: That is a very funny question. If you were to ask me my private opinion, I should say we could spare it very well.

Mr. Mercer said he would undertake to do any alterations the Magistrates might call upon him to do. He asked the Magistrates not to allow him to go away depressed. He appealed to them to allow it.

The Chairman: I am afraid you must go away depressed. The licence will be referred.

Mr. Mercer: Very well, I must take it as best I can.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1906.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 5th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. C.J. Pursey, and Mr. T. Ames.

The Hope Inn.

The Chief Constable said the Hope Inn was situated in Fenchurch Street, and the present licensee was Harry Boorman, who obtained a transfer of the licence on 21st May last year. The registered owners were Messrs. Ash and Co., Canterbury. The rateable value was 17 10s. The house had two entrances. The accommodation for the public consisted of a bar in the front and a tap room behind, with a serving window in the passage. The landlord's living room was in the basement, and approached by a dark flight of stair behind the bar. The licence had been transferred six times in six years. Within a radius of 100 yards there were 16 other on licensed houses; within a radius of 150 yards 27; and within a radius of 200 yards there were 35. He particularly drew the attention of the Bench to the rateable value and the number of transfers. The trade was small, and, in his opinion, the licence was unnecessary.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mercer (representing the owners): He had had no complaint against the tenant.

Mr. Mercer: The landlord says he does not reside in the basement?

The Chief Constable: The last tenant did when I was there. I withdraw that part so far as the landlord is concerned.

Mr. Mercer: Do you object to a house being licensed because it is not highly assessed?

The Chief Constable: No.

Mr. Mercer: You are jealous, Superintendent. (Laughter).

The Chief Constable: No. I am not.

Mr. Mercer said in this case they did a good trade. The sale was 155 barrels of beer and 54 gallons of spirits. That was the average for seven years. They had a good tenant and the house was well conducted. There were no other houses particularly close. With reference to the matter referred to by the Chief Constable, the owners would be willing to undertake any structural repairs that the Bench suggested.

The case was referred to Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Daily News 23 July 1906.

Monday, July 23rd: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Messrs. Linton, Herbert, Ames, and Stainer.

Harry Munns, a soldier, pleaded Guilty to being drunk and assaulting the police.

P.C. Minter stated that prisoner was fighting outside the Hope Inn, in Fenchurch Street, and he went to the landlord's assistance.

Prisoner was fined 11s. for being drunk, and was sentenced to 14 days' hard labour, without the option of a fine, for the assault.

 

Folkestone Daily News 25 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 25th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Swoffer, and Ames.

Herbert Ireland and John Dimsdale, two soldiers, were charged with assaulting Edward Boorman on the 21st July.

Dimsdale pleaded Guilty and Ireland Not Guilty. Mr. Haines prosecuted.

Edward Boorman, landlord of the Hope Inn, Fenchurch Street, said at 10.45 on Saturday last Ireland came into his house and called for two pints of beer. He then went out. After a little time several soldiers came in, including Ireland, who said he would fight the best man in the house. Witness ordered him out, when Ireland struck him and knocked him down. Ireland afterwards struck him with a stick, and knocked his head through a window.

Ireland: When did I strike you? – Inside.

P.C. Minter deposed that on Saturday last he saw Ireland. Both prisoners were outside the Hope Inn, and were knocking the landlord about. He pulled Ireland away several times, but he still attacked him.

An officer said both prisoners had good characters.

They were each fined 20s. and 10s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 28 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 25th: Before W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Herbert Ireland and John Dimsdale, two soldiers belonging to the East Yorks Regt., were summoned by Harry Boorman, the landlord of the Hope Inn, Fenchurch Street, for assaulting him on Saturday night. Dimsdale pleaded Guilty, but Ireland denied the assault. Mr. Haines appeared on behalf of the prosecutor.

Prosecutor said on Saturday at 10.45 p.m., Ireland came into his house and called for two pints of beer. He supplied him, as he was quite sober. A gang of soldiers came in, and, after having a drink, they went out, going to the bottom of the street. They returned, and a soldier and a sailor came into the house first, being followed by other soldiers. Ireland jumped on a form and said he would fight the best man in the house. He then struck a man belonging to his own regiment, and they commenced fighting. He (prosecutor) went and held him back, when Dimsdale came up and knocked him down. Ireland then struck him. The soldiers were got out of the house, and when he was standing on the step, close to the door, Ireland struck him on the forehead with his stick and pushed him through the window, which was broken.

P.C. Minter said he saw the two defendants belabouring the landlord outside his house. There were about nine soldiers there altogether. He pulled Ireland away from the landlord several times.

An officer from the regiment said both men had good characters. Dimsdale had six years' service and Ireland two years', and there were no civil convictions against either of them.

Neither of the defendants had anything to say.

The Chairman said licensed victuallers must be protected, and soldiers ought to be very careful and try to help them. As both men had good characters, they had decided to deal leniently with them. They would be fined 20s. and 10s. costs each, or 14 days' hard labour.

The defendants said they wished to pay, and the officer said he would send the money from the Camp.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 July 1906.

Monday, July 23rd: Before The Mayor, Aldermen J. Banks and W.G. Herbert, Messrs. J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames.

Harry Munds, a private in the East Yorks., was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and also wit assaulting a constable in the execution of his duty. Prisoner pleaded Guilty to both charges.

P.C. Minter said that at 10.45 on Saturday night he saw prisoner fighting with several other soldiers outside the Oak (sic), in Fenchurch Street. The landlord came out to get them to go away, and prisoner stuck him (the landlord). Witness then went up to arrest prisoner, who struck him a blow in the mouth and ran away. Witness chased him, and with the assistance of P.C. Styles, caught him.

There was one previous conviction against the prisoner in Folkestone. For being drunk and disorderly he was fined 7s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days', whilst for assaulting the constable he was sentenced to fourteen days' hard labour.

Wednesday, July 25th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

Herbert Ireland and John Dimsdale, privates of the East Yorks Regiment, were summoned for assaulting Harry Boorman, of the Hope Inn, 6, Great Fenchurch Street.

Harry Boorman gave evidence to the effect that on Saturday defendant came into the bar at 10.45 p.m. and asked for two pints of beer. He was, at that time, quite sober. A number of friends came in after – quite a gang of them. Two pots of beer were handed round, and they afterwards went out. Soon after a soldier and a sailor came, and then some more soldiers. Ireland came in again, and jumped on a form and struck him. He (complainant) landed out too. When he went out Ireland struck him with a whip. Dimsdale also struck him repeatedly.

P.C. Minter deposed that he was in Fenchurch Street on Saturday evening, where he saw Ireland belabouring the landlord. He tried to take him and Dimsdale outside.

An officer of the regiment said that both defendants had good characters. Dimsdale had six years' service, and Ireland two years' service.

The Bench said that as the defendants had good characters they would be dealt with leniently. Each would be fined 20s. and 10s. costs, or fourteen days'.

It was understood that the money would be paid.

 

Folkestone Daily News 1 October 1906.

Canterbury Licensing Sessions.

At the Canterbury Licensing Sessions today the question of the renewal of the licences of The Hope, The Tramway, The Providence, and The Blue Anchor came up for hearing. Lord Harris presided. The Folkestone Licensing Justices were represented by Mr. T. Matthew, instructed by Mr. H.B. Bradley.

The case occupied some time, and eventually the justices unanimously decided not to grant the renewal of either of the licences, but to uphold and confirm the decision of the Folkestone Licensing Bench.

The question of compensation will come up for consideration at a later date.

 

From the Canterbury Journal and Farmers' Gazette, Saturday 6 October, 1906.

THE HOPE INN, FENCHURCH STREET, FOLKESTONE.

Mr. Mercer applied for this licence, and Mr. Matthew represented the Justices.

Superintendent Reeve said the "Hope Inn" was a very old house and the customers were of a low class. Within a hundred yards there were 14 licensed houses, in 150 yards there were 24 licensed houses, and within 200 yards 32 houses.

Detective Sergeant Burniston stated that trade at the house was of a very low description.

Harry Boorman, the tenant, stated that the trade at the house was an increasing one, and in the past 12 months the barrelage was 167. The police had never made any complaint about the conduct of the house. Witness got a good living at the house and was very well satisfied with it.

Mr. Mercer ask the Committee to renew the licence, saying there was a good trade at the house.

The Committee refused to renew licence.

 

Folkestone Express 6 October 1906.

Local News.

On Monday last the East Kent Licensing Bench at Canterbury considered the question of renewing the licences of the Providence, the Hope, the Tramway Tavern, and the Blue Anchor, public houses referred to them by the Folkestone licensing justices. In each case they decided to refuse the granting of the licence, and the next matter for them to consider will be how much compensation is to be paid to the brewers and holders of the licences for the closing of the houses.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 October 1906.

Local News.

The Compensation Authority for East Kent sat at Canterbury on Monday and Tuesday last, Lord Harris presiding.

Amongst the 31 houses scheduled, there were four from Folkestone. These were; The Providence, Blue Anchor, the Hope, and the Tramway.

The owners of the Providence and the Hope sought for renewals.

In these cases Mr. H.B. Matthew appeared for the Licensing Justices of Folkestone in opposition to the renewals, and Mr. R.M. Mercer, of Canterbury, appeared for the owners and tenants.

In the case of the Hope, Mr. Reeve said the licence of this house had been transferred six times in six years, and the trade done was of a very low character. The customers were mostly hawkers and costers, and did not live in the neighbourhood. The rateable value was lower than any other house in the district. Within 100 yards there were 14 licensed houses, within 150 yards 24, and within 200 yards 32.

In reply to Mr. Mercer, witness said this house was in another street to the Welcome. He did not know about the latter having been given 22 years' bad character.

Mr. Mercer: Here it is, stated by your men in a police case. Yet this house was not objected to for years. My firm have had to give up two houses without compensation, and now this seems to be a case of Hope deferred. (Laughter).

Detective Sergeant Burniston said a low class frequented the house.

Mr. Mercer: Do you suggest that a low class of people are not to be allowed to have any refreshment. Whether they are criminals or not they are entitled to a drink. – There are a good many criminals at this house.

The tenant, Harry Boorman, said he took over the house in April, 1905, and the trade was an increasing one. When the Welcome was shut up he declined to serve its customers, and he did not want that class in his house.

Mr. Mercer complained that Messrs. Ash and Co. had lost three houses in three years, two without compensation, and h did seriously ask the Committee to renew the licence in this case.

The Committee declined to grant the application.

In the cases of the Providence, Blue Anchor and the Hope, the fixing of the compensation was adjourned to a subsequent meeting.

 

From an email received 27 April 2018.

I thought you might like a bit more background on George Barker, the landlord of the "Hope" (1871-73) whose ring was stolen, and a connexion with John Carter, landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" 1870-81.

George Barker was my great-great-great-grandfather. He was baptised in Buxton (a small village NE of Norwich) in Norfolk in 1822, married Mary Fabb in Norfolk in 1841, and they had a number of children in Norfolk including a daughter Hannah in 1844.

The family moved to Kent around 1864. George's wife Mary died either very late 1870 or early 1871 (death registered in Elham registration district in the first quarter of 1871), so George appeared on the 1871 census as George Barker, 49, widowed, publican, resident in the "Hope Inn," South Fancy Street, Folkestone.

George had been an agricultural labourer in Norfolk - not someone you'd expect to own many rings - so I'd guess the ring he had stolen on the station in 1871 (per the newspaper report on your website) was probably his wedding ring - and it was stolen only a matter of months after his wife had died. You can see why he "would not take 10 for it."

It looks like the licensed trade didn't suit him though: by 1881 he was a general labourer lodging in Hastings. He lived to 1904.

His daughter Hannah Barker, born in Norfolk in 1844, married John Major Carter in 1865 (registered in Elham in the second quarter of 1865), and they appeared together on the 1871 census as John Carter, 32, married, publican, and Hannah Carter, 27, married, his wife, living at "Oddfellows," Radnor Street, Folkestone.

So in 1871, the wife of the licensee of the "Oddfellows Arms" was the daughter of the licensee of the "Hope".

But the James Barker who was licensee of the "Oddfellows" before John Carter (in 1870) was not related to George or Hannah Barker. George did not have a brother James, and his son James was only 9 in 1870, so that surname seems to be just a coincidence.

I'm happy for you to use any of the above information on your website, if you wish (and please let me know if you ever find a picture of the "Hope!")

Regards,

George Barker's great-great-great-grandson!

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

SMITH Mary circa 1822-46 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyPigot's Directory 1828-29Pigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1839Pigot's Directory 1840

ELLIS Sarah 1846-65 (widow age 56 in 1851Census) More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBagshaw's Directory 1847 (4 Fancy Street)

DIXIE James 1865-68 Bastions

AYLIFFE Mr 1868-69 Bastions

FRENCH John 1869-71 Bastions

BARKER George 1871-73 Bastions

BOORN William 1873-80 BastionsPost Office Directory 1874

KNIGHT Edward 1880-86 Bastions

DRAYNOR Joseph 1886-87 Bastions

HUNT Frederick 1886-87 Bastions

WRATTEN William 1887 Bastions

DONALDSON Robert 1887-90 Bastions

DONALDSON Elizabeth 1890 Bastions

FRYER Absalom 1890-91 Bastions

COUGHLAN John 1891-1900 Bastions

HART Frederick 1900-01 Bastions

HERITAGE William 1901-02 Next pub licensee had Bastions

FINN Frederick 1902 Kelly's 1903Bastions

Last pub licensee had SMITH Stephen 1902-04 Bastions

BURVILL Alfred 1904-05 Bastions

BOORMAN Harry 1905-06 Bastions

 

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyMore Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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