DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Sunday, 21 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1879

(Name from)

Isle of Cyprus

Latest 1913

78 The Bayle

Folkestone

Former Isle of Cyprus

Above photo kindly sent by Jan Pedersen 25 June 2011 showing the former "Isle of Cyprus."

 

Formerly the "Druid's Arms" this house was rebuilt in 1879 and renamed by 1881.

Described as a small bay-windowed tavern, this was situated opposite the Herald newspaper offices and frequented by their staff.

1913 saw the end of this as a public house when the justices refused the renew the licence and according to C. H. Bishop, the premises became a religious bookshop.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1879.

Saturday, 30th August: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, General Cannon, Captain Carter, W.J. Jeffreason and J. Clark Esqs.

Richard Lyne was summoned for keeping open his house, the Druids' Arms, otherwise the Isle Of Cyprus Inn, on Saturday, the 23rd ult. during prohibited hours.

P.C. Montague Smith said on Saturday the 23rd he was on duty in Bayle Street at twenty minutes to six in the morning and saw the door of defendant's house open. He went inside and saw the landlord at the counter. A glass was standing there, three parts full of malt liquor. A man named Thomas Golder was in front of the bar. He said to the landlord “This won't do”, and told him he should report the occurrence.

Cross-examined: No-one told me to go to the house. I do not know if there is another door leading to the street. I do not know how many lodgers there were in the house, but several. I did not taste the liquor, but it looked like porter. The man Golder was standing about a yard from the glass.

Arthur Darrell, a visitor, lodging in the house, proved that on this morning another lodger went out at about 20 minutes to six to bathe.

Mr. Wightwick, who appeared for the defendant, said the facts were that the man Golder, referred to by the Constable, was an industrious man, who went to the defendant's house early every morning to scrub down the passage and outside premises, and had done so ever since Mr. Lyne had been in the house, upwards of a year. There was no liquor drawn, and the small quantity which the constable saw in the glass was left standing on the counter the night before.

The Magistrates consulted for a few minutes on the bench, and then retired. On their return the Mayor said they had decided to convict, and defendant would be fined 2 10s. and 10s. costs, or 21 days' imprisonment.

Mr. Wightwick said his client would appeal against the conviction.

Thomas Golder was then summoned for being found on the above premises on the same occasion.

P.C. Smith repeated his evidence. He said he saw Golder go into the house, and before he went in he asked witness if he would “have half a pint”, but he declined. Witness was standing outside a few minutes before he went in.

In cross-examination witness said he did not see the door opened, nor had he seen anyone go in or come out.

Mr. Wightwick said the man went there to do his work. He had always been employed by Mr. Lyne to clear up the premises, and did not go for the purpose of obtaining drink.

Mr. Lyne was called, and said he had several lodgers in the house, and that there was no way out except by the front door. About sixteen minutes to six he opened the house to let one of the lodgers out, and at the same time Golder came in for the purpose of doing his work. His duty was to call up the lodgers and to clear up the bar. He neither drew any beer nor sold any that morning. Defendant, he believed, worked for Mr. Tolputt, and had to be at his work at six o'clock. Witness paid defendant a shilling or eighteen pence a week, according to what he had done, and frequently gave him clothing and other articles.

The Magistrates consulted for some minutes as to this case, and on the Mayor announcing that the Bench had decided to convict, General Cannon interposed the remark “A majority of the Bench”.

Defendant was fined 5s. and 10s. costs, or seven days' imprisonment.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 April 1881.

Local News.

On Saturday Richard Lyne, landlord of the Cyprus Inn, on the Bayle, was summoned for having his house open for the sale of intoxicating liquors during prohibited hours, viz., at 8.30 a.m. on Sunday, April 10th.

The Bench, after hearing the evidence, dismissed the case.

Richard Jordan and William Stevenson were charged with being on licensed premises—the Cyprus—at the same time and place.

As the evidence in this case had been similar to that in the former, the superintendent, with the permission of the Bench, withdrew the charge.

 

Folkestone Express 23 April 1881.

Saturday, April 16th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, General Cannon, Colonel de Crespigny, J. Clark and J. Holden Esqs.

Richard Lyne was summoned for opening his house, the Druid's Arms (or Cyprus Inn), on the 10th inst. during prohibited hours. Mr. Wightwick appeared for the defence.

Superintendent Rutter said on Sunday the 10th, at 8.25 in the morning, in company with Sergeant Ovenden, he visited the defendant's house, the Cyprus Inn, on the Bayle. The front door was shut, but not locked. He saw two men standing in front of the bar; one had a pint glass in his hand, containing malt liquor, the other man was standing near him talking. He did not see defendant.

Cross-examined: I saw the defendant's wife. She came in whilst I was there. He asked why the men were there, and she said she didn't know.

Mr. Wightwick explained that one of the men, named Jordan, was called in by the landlord and asked to fetch some flour, for which he gave him a glass of beer. The other man, named Stevenson, went in to explain his neglect in not delivering some coal, and to ask if Monday would do for them.

The defendant was sworn, and said on Sunday, the 10th inst., he saw a man named Jordan and asked him to get some flour, for which he gave him a glass of beer. Another man named Stevenson went in to give a reason for not delivering some coals. He had nothing to drink. Jordan did not fetch the flour after the police came in, nor would witness allow Stevenson to bring the coal in.

Richard Jordan said Mr. Lyne opened the door of his house and asked him to fetch some flour. He said he would, and Mr. Lyne gave him a glass of beer. Stevenson followed witness in, and asked Mr. Lyne about some coals.

In reply to the Magistrates' Clerk, witness said he did not pay any money.

Stevenson said he heard defendant call Jordan. He followed him in and asked defendant if Monday would do for the coals he had ordered.

The Bench dismissed the case, considering there was a doubt as to whether an offence had actually been committed. They, however, cautioned the defendant.

Richard Jordan and William Stevenson were summoned for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours.

Superintendent Rutter asked permission to withdraw the summons in consequence of the former case having failed, and the Bench consented to the withdrawal.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 September 1881.

Death.

On the 16th inst., at the Cyprus Inn, Bayle Street, Folkestone, Richard Lyne, aged 61 years.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 December 1881.

Wednesday, December 21st: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, Capt. Carter, Alds. Caister and Sherwood, J. Holden esq., and Mr. Fitness.

The license of the Cyprus Inn was transferred to the widow of the late landlord.

 

Folkestone Express 24 December 1881.

Wednesday, December 21st: Before The Mayor, Colonel De Crespigny, Captain Carter, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

The license of the Cyprus Inn was transferred to the widow of the late landlord, Richard Lyne.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 September 1888.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, September 26th: Before The Mayor, J. Clarke Esq., Alderman Banks, F. Boykett Esq., and Major H.W. Poole.

The licence of the Cyprus Inn on the Bayle was transferred to James Brice.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 21 January 1891.

Saturday, January 17th: Before The Mayor, Colonel De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, H.W. Poole and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Thomas Smith was charged with being drunk and disorderly on The Bayle on the 16th of January.

P.C. Read said that about 10.42 the previous night he saw the defendant very drunk outside the Cyprus Inn. Asked to go away, Thomas said he should go when he liked, and enquired whether the constable thought his (adjective) clothes were going to frighten him. As he would not go away, Read took him into custody.

Defendant said he certainly got excited and had a little drop of drink, but denied having used any naughty words. He was very sorry and it should not occur again.

Fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, and allowed until Monday for payment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 August 1892.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before Mr. J. Holden and Mr. Fitness.

The licence of the Cyprus Inn, on The Bayle, was transferred from Mr. E.J. Price to Mr. E. Meppin, late manager to Mr. T.J. Vaughan, grocer.

 

Folkestone Express 9 December 1893.

Wednesday, December 6th: Before H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs., and Surgeon General Gilbourne.

A music licence was granted to Mr. Mepham of the Cyprus, Bayle.
 

Folkestone Visitors' List 13 December 1893.

Police Court Notes.

Harmony is to prevail at the Cyprus, on the Bayle. Mr. Mepham, the spirited proprietor has been granted a music licence for his house.

 

Folkestone Express 8 September 1894.

Saturday, September 1st: before The Mayor, Captain Carter, Aldermen Sherwood, Pledge, and Dunk, and J. Fitness, G. Spurgen, and J. Holden Esqs.

Mr. L. Mepham, of the Cyprus Inn, was granted an occasional licence for a smoking concert at the Town Hall, on Thursday, from seven till ten.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 7 June 1895.

Local News.

At the Borough Police Court on Wednesday a temporary licence was granted to Mr. Preece to sell at the Cyprus Inn.

 

Folkestone Express 8 June 1895.

Wednesday, June 5th: Before C.J. Pursey and W. Wightwick Esqs.

The licence of the Isle Of Cyprus was transferred to Mr. G. Priest.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 July 1897.

Police Court Report.

On Friday – the Mayor presiding – John Pearse pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly and using obscene language on The Bayle on the previous day.

P.C. Johnson saw him in the bar of the Cypress (sic) public house, and as he refused to go away arrested him. There were 30 or 40 people outside.

Fined 10s., 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 24 July 1897.

Friday, July 16th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Pledge, J. Fitness and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

John Pearce was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and using obscene language on The Bayle.

P.C. Johnson said he saw the defendant in the bar of the Isle Of Cyprus inn, very drunk and using obscene language. He called the landlord's attention to defendant, and he requested witness to remove him. He replied that he would assist the landlord.

Superintendent Taylor said the defendant was before the Bench on a similar charge on the 24th June, and was then discharged with a caution, as his arm was injured and he had been treated at the hospital.

Fined 10s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 August 1897.

Saturday, August 21st: Before The Mayor and other Magistrates.

Mr. George E. Winch was granted the transfer of the licence of the Isle Of Cyprus In, The Bayle.

Note: This transfer does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 August 1897.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Saturday last – the Mayor (Alderman Banks) presiding – a temporary authority was granted to Mr. George F. Winch for the Isle Of Cyprus on The Bayle. Mr. Haines appeared for the applicant.

This transfer does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 September 1897.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday – the Mayor presiding – transfer licence was granted to Mr. George Winch, Isle Of Cyprus.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 October 1897.

Police Court Report.

On Saturday a temporary authority was granted to Mr. Charles John Crist for the Isle Of Cyprus.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 June 1900.

Wednesday, June 13th: Before Messrs. Fitness, Pledge, Pursey, Wightwick, Vaughan, and Spurgen.

Mr. Frank Clayson, who takes over from Mr. C.T. Grist, applied for the transfer of the licence of the Isle Of Cyprus.

 

Folkestone Express 16 June 1900.

Wednesday, June 13th: Before J. Fitness, W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey, and J. Pledge Esqs.

The Bench granted the transfer of the licence of the Isle Of Cyprus, The Bayle, from Mr. Charles Grist to Mr. Frank Clayson.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 June 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday last licence was granted to Mr. Clayson, for the Isle Of Cyprus.

 

Folkestone Express 1 November 1902.

Trade Notes.

Squadron Quartermaster-Sergt. Halford, who has taken over the Isle Of Cyprus, is well-known and respected in Folkestone, Shorncliffe, and Sandgate. His connection with the Royal Dragoons (the German Emperor's Own) has extended since 1881. Starting as a private, he advanced to the position of Quartermaster-Sergt., and held this rank when he left the service. Upon the outbreak of the war he was left at home with the depot at Shorncliffe, and his duties there for over two years were very arduous indeed, the responsibility of feeding the fighting squadrons abroad being cast upon him. Now that his old regiment has come home, Mr. Holford has received very extensive patronage, and there is no doubt he will increase the business of this well-known hostelry to a very appreciable extent.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 February 1904.

Friday, February 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

Thomas Dean and James Henry Dorran were charged with wilfully breaking four squares of plate glass in the Isle Of Cyprus public house on the previous evening. The value of the damage done amounted to 4 15s.

The prisoners were sentenced to pay the damage, with a fine of 1 and costs, or one month's imprisonment in default.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 February 1904.

Friday, February 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.
Privates Thomas Dean and Jams Henry Dorran, of the South Lancashire Regiment, were charged with wilfully breaking four squares of plate glass at the Isle of Cyprus public house, and doing damage to the extent of 4 15s.

William Henry Holford, landlord of the Isle of Cyprus Inn, on The Bayle, stated that shortly after closing his house on Thursday night he heard a crash, as of broken glass. He went to the front, and saw Dean striking two of the windows. In his hand he had a regimental cane (produced), and with this he was delivering the blows. In the meantime a corporal of the military police rushed down the road, and took the prisoners to the police station. The amount of the damage was 4 15s.

Corpl. Anstey, of the Military Foot Police, said that on the previous evening, about 11 o'clock, he was on duty at the bottom of the Parade Steps. Prisoners were going up the steps, and witness followed them. When at the Cyprus Inn, Dean struck at three windows and the glass door with a cane. He could not say whether the other man struck at the windows, but he took them into custody and brought them to the Folkestone police station where they were charged. Both prisoners were sober.

Dean said they were both drunk at the time, and they could not have been sober, since they had been out since three that afternoon. (Laughter)

Dorran was given a fair character, and Dean an indifferent character, by an officer of the regiment.

Both prisoners pleaded Guilty, and the Bench decided that they would have to pay for the damage between them, together with a fine of 1 and 5s. 6d. costs each, or in default one month's imprisonment with hard labour. Both prisoners went below.

 

Folkestone Express 27 February 1904.

Friday, February 19th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

James Henry Dorran and Richard Dean, privates in the South Lancashire Regiment, were charged with maliciously damaging a front window of the public house, the Isle Of Cyprus.

William Henry Holford, the proprietor, said that soon after eleven o'clock the previous evening he heard a loud smash at the front window, and going out, saw the prisoner Dean striking the windows with a cane. Immediately a lance corporal of the police came over from the other side of the road, and arrested the prisoners and took them to the police station. He (witness) estimated the damage at 4 15s., four panes being broken.

Lance Corporal S. Anstey, of the military police, gave corroborative evidence.

The prisoner Dean said they were drunk, but Anstey denied this.

An officer of the regiment said that Dorran bore a very fair character, and Dean an indifferent one.

The Bench said they would have to pay for the damage done, 4 15s., and imposed a fine of 1 each, and costs 5s. 6d. each, or one month's hard labour.

They went to prison.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 5 November 1904.

On Monday morning, before Mr. E.T. Ward, Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. W.C. Carpenter, and Mr. J. Stainer, James Butcher made his 37th appearance in a Police Court, and was charged with breaking a plate glass window at the Isle Of Cyprus public house, valued at 5 15s.

Wm. Holford, landlord of the Isle Of Cyprus, said: At 10.15 on Sunday night I was in the bar with the barman, James Spicer. The house was closed. We heard a tapping at the door. Spicer opened the door and found Spicer there. He asked for some drink in a tin enamel can. Spicer told him that he could not have any, as the house was closed, and then shut the door. I then heard a crash of glass. Spicer ran out of the bar, and we then saw prisoner running towards the Eagle steps. We stopped him at the steps, and I asked him what he wanted to break the window for. Prisoner replied “Because I want to get locked up”. I then took him through to Rendezvous Street, and gave him in charge of Sergt. Dunster.

Prisoner: He brought it all on himself. He kicked me, not last night, but the other night. Look at him. He looks like a murderer. (Laughter) If I had not have defended myself he would have struck me all over the head.

Holford denied kicking or striking the prisoner.

James Spicer corroborated.

P.S. Dunster proved taking prisoner in charge. When charged, prisoner said “Serves him right, too”.

The Chairman: Do you wish to ask the Sergeant anything?

Prisoner: I want to make some speeches, but I do not wish to ask the Sergeant anything. He is a gentleman. (Laughter)

Upon the application of the Chief Constable, prisoner was committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions of the Borough (to be held in January).

 

Folkestone Express 5 November 1904.

Monday, October 31st: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, Liuet. Col. Fynmore, J. Stainer and W. Carpenter Esqs.

A well-known character, named James Butcher, was placed in the dock charged with committing wilful damage by breaking the plate glass window of the bar of the Isle Of Cyprus public house the previous night.

William Holford said he was the landlord of the house. About forty minutes past ten the previous night he was in the bar with his man, James Spicer, when he heard tapping at the door. Spicer opened the door, and the prisoner, who was carrying the tin can produced, asked for some beer. Witness told him to go away because the house was closed. Spicer shut the door, and immediately afterwards he heard the smash of glass. On going outside he found the plate glass window of the bar broken. Both Spicer and himself ran after the prisoner, who made off towards the Bayle Steps. They overtook him, and witness asked him why he wanted to break the window. He replied “Because I want to get locked up”. Witness took him up Rendezvous Street, and then handed him over to P.S. Dunster. He found the tin can on the ground outside the window. The window was valued at 6 15s.

Butcher, asked if he had any questions to put to Mr. Holford, said “He had brought it on himself by kicking me. I am flesh and blood and not stone”.

James Spicer, the barman, corroborated the last witness. Butcher asked this witness if he did not beat him half way down the street. Witness denied doing so.

P.S. Dunster said Mr. Holford handed the prisoner over to him in Rendezvous Street for smashing a plate glass window in the bar of his house.

Prisoner: Serves him right, too.

Witness took prisoner to the cells, and afterwards returned to the house where he saw a large hole had been made in the window. It was almost large enough to admit a man.

The Chief Constable asked the Magistrates to commit prisoner for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

Asked if he had anything to say, Butcher said he wished to say a lot.

The Chairman: Take my advice and say nothing.

Butcher said he wanted to be tried that day, but he was told by the Chairman that he was committed to the Quarter Sessions. Bail was offered him in one surety of 20 and himself in 20.

Butcher: I will write to my brother. Money is no object to him.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 November 1904.

Monday, 31st October: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman G. Spurgen, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. W.C. Carpenter, and Mr. J. Stainer.

James Butcher, an old offender, was charged with wilfully smashing a plate glass window.

William Halford, landlord of the Isle Of Cyprus public house, stated that shortly after ten o'clock on Sunday night he was in the bar with the barman. They heard a tapping at the bar door, and Spicer opened it. There they saw the prisoner, who wanted some drink. As it was after closing time, Spicer ordered Butcher away, and the door was closed. Shortly afterwards there was a smash, and the front plate glass window was seen to have a great hole knocked through it. Spicer and witness ran out of the house and saw the prisoner running away. They gave chase and caught him near the Bayle Steps. Witness asked him what he had broken the glass for, to which he replied “Because I want to get locked up”. Witness then took him to Rendezvous Street, where he handed him over to P.S. Dunster. A tin can (produced) was in Butcher's hand when he first came to the house, and it was with that that the window had been broken. There was nobody about but the prisoner. The damage to the window amounted to 6 15s.

On the Bench examining the tin can, prisoner informed the Magistrates that that was what he scooped his beer up. It was a handy little tin can.

James Spicer corroborated Mr. Halford's evidence.

Prisoner: When you came out of that bar, what did you do? You followed me.

Witness: I did not.

Prisoner: Didn't you beat me half way down the hill with your fists?

Witness: No.

Prisoner (to the Bench): He beat me half way down the hill all over the temples, and if I hadn't been a bit sharp on my hands and feet I would not have been able to see this morning.

Sergt. Dunster proved receiving the prisoner into custody.

The charge was then read over to the prisoner, and the Chairman, in administering the usual caution, advised him to say nothing, as the Bench intended to commit him for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

Prisoner: I want to say a lot.

The Chairman: You had better say that on another occasion.

Prisoner: Am I to be kicked and beat by these two men? That big one there (prosecutor) threatened to murder me. He looks like a murderer.

The Chairman: That is nothing to do with this charge.

Prisoner: It is a lot to do with the case, though.

The Chairman: Tell the Recorder that.

Prisoner: All right.

The accused was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions, being offered bail in one surety of 20, and himself in 20.

Prisoner: Well, I will see. I will write to my brother.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 January 1905.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, December 31st: Before J.C. Lewis Coward.

Jimmy Butcher, who has been many times convicted for drunkenness, begging, &c., before the borough bench was committed to take his trial for breaking a large square of glass in the front of the Cyprus Hotel, on The Bayle. Mr. Dickens prosecuted.

From the evidence before the Magistrates it appeared that Butcher knocked at the public house door and demanded to be served. The landlord refused to do so, and shortly after he heard the crash of the window, opened the door, and saw Butcher running away. He chased him to the Parade Steps, brought him back, and confronted him with the damage.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

Chief Constable Reeve deposed that prisoner had been convicted 35 times.

Butcher said it was caused through drink, which was the root of all evil.

One month's imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 7 January 1905.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, 31st December: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

James Butcher, 43, described as a gardener, but generally known as the “Folkestone Pest”, pleaded Guilty to unlawfully and maliciously breaking a plate glass window, valued at 6 15s., the property of the landlord of the Isle Of Cyprus Inn.

Prisoner said it was all through drink. God had given him strength to work, and he could work, but the drink had got the better of him.

The Recorder: That drink again.

Chief Constable Reeve said that Butcher was a pest to the borough. The man had been already convicted 35 times. One of his habits was to walk into a public house where the landlord would not serve him, pick up and drink another person's liquor, and decamp.

The Recorder advise Butcher, after his sentence, to keep clear of the Borough of Folkestone, or his next appearance would be very serious. He would now go to prison for one month, with hard labour.

Mr. Dickens appeared for the Crown.

 

Folkestone Express 7 January 1905.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, December 31st: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

James Butcher was charged with unlawfully and maliciously damaging the plate glass of a certain window, the property of William Halford, the damage so committed being to the amount of 6 15s., at 10.40 p.m. on October 30th. Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Dickens said the prisoner broke the front window of the public house the Isle of Cyprus, on The Bayle, during a fit of anger, because he was refused drink. The value of the glass was 6 15s.

The Superintendent said prisoner had been in the town on and off for four and a half years. He was always getting drunk, and there were 35 convictions against him in different parts of the country – five times for larceny, one as an incorrigible rogue, and others.

Prisoner: It was all through drink, your Worship.

The Recorder: Yes, it is the curse of the country.

The Superintendent, continuing, said prisoner was in the habit of going into gin shops and helping himself to the gin when no-one was about.

The Recorder said the gin shops should be shut up, and then prisoner could not help himself.

Prisoner: This is all through drink. It is the road to ruin, and has been my downfall.

The Recorder: Has he been on bail?

The Superintendent said prisoner had been in custody.

The Recorder, in passing sentence, said prisoner's record was a bad one. It was shocking and could not have been worse. When he came out of prison he advised him to leave the town. He would take into consideration that fact that prisoner had been in prison for two months, and he would have to go to prison for one calendar month.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 January 1905.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, December 31st: Before J.C.L. Coward Esq.

The Grand Jury returned a true bill against James Butcher, who pleaded Guilty, and his case was taken at once.

Mr. E.F. Dickens appeared to prosecute. The prisoner, he explained, was indicted for breaking a plate glass window at the Isle of Cyprus public house, and doing damage to the amount of 6 15s. The offence occurred at half past ten on the night of Sunday, the 30th October. The police had instructed counsel to say that the prisoner was a regular terror to the publicans, and that he was an injurious drunkard.

The Chief Constable stated that the prisoner had been in the town on and off for about four years. He was a thorough pest when he was in the town, getting drunk and roaming about the town. No less than 35 convictions had been recorded against him in different parts of the country. They included 15 for drunkenness, 10 for vagrancy, one as an incorrigible rogue, two for larceny.....

The Recorder: Are there any serious larcenies?

Witness: No, sir. Two for stealing coats in Monmouthshire.

Prisoner: It is all through drink.

The Recorder: I know that perfectly well. It is the curse of the country, and it will be the curse of this borough if they don't do something.

Prisoner: It is the root of all evil.

The Chief Constable: He is in the habit of going into public houses, and if anyone is absent he will go behind the bar and steal the gin.

The Recorder: Then all I would say is, close the gin shops. (To prisoner) What have you to say?

The accused: I don't know what to say. It is all through drink, and drink is the root of all evil. I have no cause to steal, or do anything like that if I keep off the drink. I can earn good money when I am at work, if it please God Almighty to give me strength.

Prisoner now handed up a written statement to the Court, which the Recorder perused.

The Recorder, in sentencing the prisoner, said: This is a bad record. It is shocking, and could not be worse. You will have to get out of this borough as quickly as you can when you come out of prison. I have taken into consideration the fact that you have been in prison waiting trial for two months. I am sorry you have had to wait all that time. The sentence of the Court is that you be imprisoned, with hard labour, for one calendar month.

Prisoner: Thank you, Your Worship. God bless you!

On leaving the dock, prisoner walked from the Court in an attitude resembling that of a cake walker.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 5 May 1906.

On Friday morning at the Police Court, before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Messrs. J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and Linton, James Albert Spicer, a barman in the employ of Mr. Holford at the Isle of Cyprus Inn, The Bayle, was charged with attempting to break and enter, but before the case was proceeded with the charge was amended to that of breaking and entering. The accused was represented by Mr. G.W. Haines.

Herbert Crumby said: I reside at 5, Bradstone Avenue, and I occupy a lock-up office at 35, Shellons Street, consisting of one room. The office is part of a dwelling house in the occupation of Mr. S. Ferris, who resides on the premises. At ten o'clock last evening I left the office. Before leaving the office I left it secure, the door locked, and the window looking into Shellons Street fastened. Affixed to the frame of the window inside there is a glass screen, the one now produced, that is secured by bolts on each extremity of the frame. I was called to the office about 12.30, when I found the window broken just above the catch, and the glass screen outside against the wall, with some finger marks on it. There were similar marks upon the window. I examined the office and missed nothing, only finding some books and papers pushed from the top of the desk which stands in front of the window.

By Mr. Haines: When I saw the window it was open, not fastened. The glass was then outside. I have no key to the front door, but a key to the main door. The main door is left to be cleaned in the morning. The prisoner is my cousin. There is no unpleasantness between us to my knowledge. I do not remember seeing him for a month or six weeks. I do not owe him anything, or he me.

P.C. Albert Butler said: About 12.05 I was passing 38, Shellons Street. I found the window was broken by the catch. The window was open, and the bottom sash up. I examined the broken window. On the glass was a quantity of dry mud. I made a search, and found the glass screen (produced) standing against the wall on the pavement, about 9 ft. from the window. I entered the office by the broken window, and then sent for Mr. Crumby. The desk in the office was a roll-top one, close up to the window. I found newspapers on the floor, but no indication of any person entering the office.

By Mr. Haines: The desk was in its proper position. Anyone could get into the office easily over the desk. I did myself. The sash on the pavement had to be removed before anyone could enter the office.

Mrs. Catherine Holford said: I am the wife of William Holford, landlord of the Isle of Cyprus Inn, on The Bayle. The prisoner is in my husband's employ as barman. Last evening was his night out. I returned home about 11 o'clock; prisoner was not in then. I let him in about 20 minutes past twelve, as near as I can say. He then seemed all right to me, nothing in his demeanour attracting my notice.

By Mr. Haines: Prisoner has been in our employ just on four years.

Det. Sergt. A.W. Burniston said: At five minutes to twelve last night, as I was passing the bottom of Shellons Street, I saw the prisoner, whom I know, standing with his back to the office of 38, Shellons Street. On seeing me he walked a few yards up Shellons Street. I went to the corner of No. 38, and watched the prisoner. About a minut later he returned to the window and stood in the same position as when I first saw him. He remained there about a minute or two, and again walked a few yards up Shellons Street, when he stopped. As I was going towards him he walked towards me and met me on the corner. I stopped him and said “What are you doing in Shellons Street at this time of night? You had better get home”. He made no reply, but walked as far as the Rose, when he left me and went on The Bayle. I came into the police station. A few minutes later, from a communication I received, I went to 38, Shellons Street, and found the window of the office had been broken near the catch. The screen (produced) was standing on the pavement. Butler and Inspector Lilley were at the office. Inspector Lilley handed me the stone produced, which he had picked up in the roadway. The stone was then quite clean, as now produced. I examined the broken glass of the window, and found on it several impressions of dry mud. The window broken was plate glass. At twenty minutes to two, accompanied by Inspector Lilley and P.C. Butler, I visited the Isle of Cyprus Hotel, where I found prisoner lying on the bed fully dressed. Inspector Lilley cautioned the prisoner and said “I am going to ask you a few questions” He said “What were you doing in Shellons Street tonight?” He made no reply.

The Chairman: Burniston, the Bench consider that replies to a police constable when in answer to questions put to the prisoner are not admissible.

I examined his hands and found on the palm of each dry mud. I then said “I shall charge you with breaking and entering the office of 38, Shellons Street, with intent to commit a felony”. I cautioned him, and he said “I saw you. I met you on Grace Hill. You told me to go home”. Prisoner further said “I am not guilty”. He had been drinking, but was not drunk. I asked him how he accounted for the mud on his hands, and he said “I must have fallen down”.

By Haines: The mud on his fingers was dry. The stone produced is clean, and has no mud on it. We did not have to wake prisoner; he roused up as we entered the room, and recognised Inspector Lilley and I as we entered. At the station I searched the prisoner. He had 4s. 8d. in money and some letters. When I saw the prisoner in Shellons Street I was watching him, not the window.

Without calling upon the accused the Chairman said: Spicer, the Bench have heard the evidence against you, and have unanimously come to the conclusion that there is no case against you.

 

Folkestone Daily News 16 June 1906.

Before Messrs. Ward, Fynmore, and Vaughan.

The licence of the Isle of Cyprus, The Bayle, was transferred to Mr. William Taylor, son of Mr. Tom Taylor.

Mr. William Taylor has been for 29 years at the Pavilion Hotel.

 

Folkestone Daily News 11 July 1906.

Licence Transfer.

Before Messrs. Hamilton, Fynmore, and Linton.

The Isle of Cyprus from T. Halkin (sic) to W. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Express 14 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Vaughan, and R.J. Linton Esq.

This being the day fixed for the special licensing sessions, the following licence was transferred: The Isle of Cyprus, from Mr. Holford to Mr. E. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. Linton.

Licence was transferred as follows: The Isle of Cyprus, from Mr. Holford to Mr. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Daily News 17 October 1906.

Wednesday, October 17th: Before Messrs. Swoffer, Linton, Leggett, and Ames.

Frank Head, a brewer's assistant, in the employ of Messrs. Mackeson, was charged with obstructing the thoroughfare by leaving some cases of bottled beer outside the Isle of Cyprus.

He was fined 14s. 6d. including costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 October 1906.

Wednesday, October 17th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Major Leggett, Mr. T. Ames, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

Frank Head was summoned for causing an obstruction on The Bayle by leaving 36 cases containing bottles of beer on the pavement.

P.C. Butler said the cases remained on the pavement outside the Isle of Cyprus on The Bayle while defendant delivered some goods somewhere else.

Defendant, who admitted the constable's statement, was fined 5s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 August 1907.

Monday, August 12th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Leggett and Stainer.

Edward Moriarty was charged with being drunk and disorderly on Saturday on The Bayle. He pleaded Guilty.

P.S. Butcher said at 2 p.m. he saw the prisoner on The Bayle very drunk. Prisoner put himself in a fighting attitude, and threatened the landlord of the Cyprus Inn. As he refused to go away he was taken into custody.

He was fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 17 August 1907.

Monday, August 12th: Before The Mayor, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs.

On Saturday afternoon, shortly after two o'clock, P.C. Butcher was on The Bayle, when he saw Edward Moriarty being assisted out of the Isle of Cyprus public house in a rather unceremonious way. The landlord also came out of the house, and when in the roadway, Moriarty, who was drunk, put himself in a fighting attitude and twice rushed at the publican. The constable then thought it was time to interfere, and upon Moriarty refusing to go away he felt bound to take him away and keep him safe for a short time. When his bad behaviour was told to the Magistrates he said he had nothing to say as he was drunk.

The Chief Constable explained that the man had been about the town selling lavender for some days, and he had been spoken to once or twice about his conduct. The constable had made enquiries at the licensed house from which the man was ejected, and had found that he had not been served there.

The Mayor said the prisoner would have to pay 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

Moriarty had no money, so he went down.

 

Folkestone Daily News 13 April 1909.

Tuesday, April 13th: Before Messrs. Ward and Fynmore.

Thomas Spearpoint was charged with causing wilful damage at the Cyprus Inn, The Bayle, by breaking a plate glass window.

Corporal Edmonds, of the Military Foot Police, deposed that at 10.30 last night he was on duty on The Bayle, when he saw the prisoner, who was very excited. A large crowd was also there. Prisoner was about halfway between the Globe and the Cyprus. He said he would fight any soldier who was in the Cyprus, and came up to witness and shook his fist in his face, and said “You are a ---- lot of swankers”. Prisoner's friends took him away in the direction of the Bayle Steps, but he returned a few minutes later and walked to the Cyprus. Witness walked in the direction of High Street, and while doing so he saw the prisoner strike the window of the Cyprus, breaking it. The landlord came out, and witness pointed the prisoner out to him, and followed the accused to High Street, where he was given into custody by the landlord.

William Edward Taylor, landlord of the Cyprus Inn, said at 10.30 last night the prisoner was in his house. Several of the prisoner's friends were with him. They were making a lot of noise, and witness asked them to be quiet, or he would have to ask them to leave the house. As they did not desist he asked them to leave, and they did so. About ten minutes later he heard a crash of glass, and went out and found prisoner in the centre of the road, and a window broken. It was a plate glass one. Witness followed the prisoner to High Street, and there gave him into the custody of P.C. Johnson. The value of the window was 10. Prisoner was sober.

P.C. Johnson said he received the prisoner from the last witness at 10.40 last night for breaking the plate glass window at the Cyprus Inn. Prisoner was bleeding from the right hand, and was under the influence of drink. He became very violent, and witness had to get the assistance of another constable and two military police. On being charged he made no reply. The window is 7ft. by 6ft., and four feet from the ground.

Prisoner was committed to the Quarter Sessions on Monday next. Bail was allowed, himself in 20 and one surety of 20.

 

Folkestone Express 17 April 1909.

Tuesday, April 13th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Thomas Spearpoint, a fisherman, was charged with committing wilful damage by breaking a plate glass window at the Isle of Cyprus public house.

Corpl. Edmonds, of the Military Foot Police, stationed at Shorncliffe, said shortly after ten o'clock he was on duty on The Bayle, where he saw the prisoner, who was very excited, about half way between the Globe and the Isle of Cyprus. He was surrounded by a large crowd. He was shouting “I will fight any soldier you have got in the Cyprus”. He came up to witness and shook his fist in his face, and made use of an obscene expression. His friends took him away in the direction of the Parade Steps. He returned a few minutes after, and walked on the pavement past him (witness) in the direction of High Street. As he walked past the front window of the Isle of Cyprus he struck it with his fist and smashed it. Mr. Taylor, the landlord, came out of the house, and witness pointed the prisoner out to him. A constable eventually took the prisoner into custody.

William Edward Taylor, the landlord of the Isle of Cyprus, said just before 10.30 the previous night the prisoner was in his house with several friends. Prisoner was kicking up a bit of a row, and witness asked him not to do so. After using obscene language, the prisoner left the house with all his friends. About ten minutes after he heard a crash of glass, and on going outside he saw the prisoner in the middle of the road. He also found the centre window broken. Witness followed the prisoner and overtook him at the top of High Street, and when P.C. Johnson came up he gave him into custody. It would cost him 10 to replace the glass. The prisoner had been in and out of his house all the evening and was sober.

P.C. H. Johnson said he was called to the Isle of Cyprus public house at 10.40, and the landlord gave the prisoner into custody. He noticed that Spearpoint was bleeding from the right hand. He was under the influence of drink, but was not drunk. He became very violent, and witness had to obtain the assistance of P.C. Sales and two or three military police to get him to the police station. The window was 7ft. by 6ft.

Prisoner had nothing to say, except that he was very sorry.

The Magistrates committed him for trial at the Quarter Sessions on Monday next, bail being offered, himself in 20 and one surety of 20.

The Chairman called Mr. Taylor forward and said the Magistrates understood there had been several rows at his house lately, and it was not quite so well conducted as they would like it to be. He had better be careful. Spearpoint was in and out of the house all the evening, and although he was not drunk, he was suffering from drink. No sober man would have done such a thing. He must be more careful in the management of his house.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 April 1909.

Tuesday, April 13th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward and Lieut. Colonel R.J. Fynmore.

Thomas Spearpoint was charged with wilfully breaking a plate glass window at the Isle of Cyprus Inn the previous night.

Corpl. Edmunds, of the military foot police, stationed at Shorncliffe, stated that at 10.30 the previous night he was on duty on The Bayle. He saw the prisoner, who was very excited. There was a big crowd round him. He was about half way between the Globe Inn and the Isle of Cyprus. He said he would fight any soldier in the Cyprus. He came up to witness and shook his fist in his face, saying that they were a lot of swanks. Prisoner's friends took him away in the direction of the Parade Steps, but accused returned a few minutes after, and walked past witness in the direction of High Street. As he passed the window of the Cyprus he struck it with his fist and broke it. Mr. Taylor then came out and followed prisoner to the top of High Street. P.C. Johnson arrived, and took the prisoner into custody.

William Edward Taylor, landlord of the Isle of Cyprus Inn, stated that just before 10 o'clock the previous night the prisoner was in his house. There were several of his friends with him. They were making a bit of a row, so witness told them to be quiet, or he would have to ask them to leave the house. Prisoner used bad language to witness, so he asked them to leave the house. They did so. Soon after he had left the house, witness heard a crash of glass. Witness found the prisoner leaving the pavement; he was in the centre of the road. The window was broken. Witness followed the prisoner, and overtook him at the top of High Street, where he gave him into the custody of P.C. Johnson. Prisoner was sober. He valued the window at 10.

P.C. Johnson said at 10.40 the previous night he was called to the Isle of Cyprus. At the top of High Street witness saw prisoner and Mr. Taylor. Mr. Taylor said that he wished to give the prisoner into custody for breaking his window. Witness noticed that prisoner's right hand was bleeding, and he was under the influence of drink. When witness took the prisoner into custody, he became very violent. With the assistance of P.C. Sales and two of the military police witness took the accused to the police station. When charged by Mr. Taylor he made no reply.

Prisoner now expressed his sorrow.

The Bench committed the accused to take his trial at the Quarter Sessions on Monday next.

The Chairman, addressing Mr. Taylor, said the Magistrates were given to understand that there had been several rows at his house lately. The prisoner was in and out of his house all the evening, and though perhaps he was not actually drunk, he was under the influence of drink. A sober man would not put his fist through a great plate glass window like that. He told Mr. Taylor to be careful.

 

Folkestone Daily News 19 April 1909.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, April 19th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Thomas Spearpoint was charged with breaking a plate glass window at the Cyprus Inn.

The evidence given at the hearing before the Magistrates was to the effect that the prisoner had been in the house drinking during the evening, and had been ordered to leave by the landlord owing to his conduct. He did so, and after a short time returned and smashed the window with his fist.

Defendant pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Weigall prosecuted and briefly detailed the facts, saying there was nothing known against him.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner had never been in trouble before.

The landlord was called and severely censured by the Recorder, who told him he did not believe what he had said. He also told the Chief Constable to keep his eye upon the house in question, and then bound the prisoner over to be of good behaviour for 12 months.

 

Folkestone Express 24 April 1909.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, April 19th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Thomas Spearpoint, aged 28, a fisherman, pleaded Guilty to wilfully breaking a plate glass window, the property of William Edward Taylor, the landlord of the Isle of Cyprus public house, and doing damage to the extent of 10, on April 12th.

Mr. Weigall, who prosecuted for the Crown, said about half past ten the prisoner was in the Isle of Cyprus and he got a little noisy. The landlord properly requested him to leave. He went, and walked up the street, and about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards the landlord heard a crash of glass, and on going outside found that the prisoner had deliberately put his fist through the plate glass window. He did not know whether he did it to show a little resentment because of him being requested to leave. The constable who took the man into custody said Spearpoint had been drinking, but was not drunk.

The Chief Constable said there was nothing against the man, who was a Folkestone fisherman.

The Recorder: I have not had a Folkestone fisherman in the dock for many years.

Prisoner: I should not have been here now if I was not drunk at the time. I was in the house from seven o'clock to 10.30. The landlord said I was sober. I was drunk, and had been drinking all the evening. I also had drinks before I went into that man's house.

The Chief Constable further said the prisoner was a hard-working man, and was single.

William Edward Taylor, the landlord, was called into the witness box. In reply to the Recorder, he said he had been in the house two years and nine months.

The Recorder: This man was in and out of your house, apparently, the whole of the evening?

Witness: About twice.

The Recorder: That is not what you said before the Magistrates. You said “He had been in and out of my house all the evening”. Is it true that it was so? Why do you say twice now? Be careful how you give evidence in Court. He says he was the worse for liquor. What do you say?

Witness: He only had two bottles of ale during the evening.

The Recorder: I do not believe you. I disallow your expenses. Go out of the Court.

The Chief Constable was questioned by the Recorder as to whether he had had any complaints about the house, and he replied that it had not been altogether satisfactory during the last few months.

The Recorder: I gathered as much from the depositions. Keep your eye on it.

The Chief Constable: Yes, sir.

The Recorder, addressing the prisoner, said he was very sorry to see a Folkestone fisherman in that position. The law looked upon that as a serious crime. Unfortunately, it said that he must be brought either before a judge at Assize or before him. He saw that the prisoner was violent when taken to the police station. He (the Recorder), however, believed he was really sorry for what he had done. He would give him another chance. He was not going to make a gaolbird of him. He (the prisoner) had had a taste of what prison was like. He should bind him over to be of good behaviour for a year. If he broke his parole he would be severely dealt with. He wished to say that he thought the prisoner's position was brought about a great deal by the amount of drink he was allowed to have in the Isle of Cyprus.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 24 April 1909.

The "Isle of Cyprus" Smash.

Thomas Spearpoint, a fisherman, was indicted of unlawfully and maliciously smashing a plate glass window at the "Isle of Cyprus" public house on 12th of April, and doing damage to the extent of 10.

Prisoner pleaded "guilty."

Mr. L. A. Weigall prosecuted and said that about 10:30 on the evening of 12th April prisoner was in the "Isle of Cyprus," which was a public house, on the Bail. He began to get a little noisy, and the landlord properly requested him to leave. He left the inn, and went down the street, and about 10 minutes or a quarter of an hour later the landlord had a crash of glass. On going out he found that the prisoner had deliberately put his first through the plate glass window. A lance corporal who was called before the magistrates, saw the occurrence, and said that the prisoner was making a noise in the street between the "Isle of Cyprus" and the "Globe," and offering to fight soldiers. His friends took him away, but as he passed the "Cyprus Inn" he committed the wilful damage. When arrested, a constable said the prisoner had been drinking, but was not drunk.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner was a Folkestone fisherman, and had not been in trouble before.

The Recorder:- I have not had a fisherman in the dock for many years. How did you come to do this?

Prisoner:- I should not be here now if I was not drunk when I did it.
The Recorder:- You had had a drop?

Prisoner:- I was in this house from 7 till nearly 10:30.

The Recorder:- How many drinks did you have?

Prisoner:- I was drinking all the evening, I had some before I went there.

The Recorder:- Is he a hard working man?

The Chief Constable:- Yes.

The Recorder:- Married?

The Chief Constable:- No.

The recorder ordered the landlord to be called.

William Edward Taylor then entered the box, and said that he was the landlord of a house.

The Recorder:- Is it a tied house?

Yes.

You are the manager.

No, I am the proprietor.

How long have you been there?

2 years and 9 months.

This man was in and out of your house apparently the whole evening?

About twice.

That is not what you said before the magistrates. What you said was that he had been in and out of the house all the evening. Is that true?

Yes.

Why do you say twice to the Court now?

Witness gave no answer.

Be careful how you give evidence in Court. He says he was the worst for liquor. What do you say?

He only had two bottles of ale during the evening.

I don't believe you. I disallow your expenses, sir. Go out of the box. (To the Chief Constable). Have there been any complaints about the "Cyprus."

The Chief Constable:- It has not been altogether satisfactory during the last few months.

The Recorder:- I gathered that from the depositions. Very well, you keep an eye on it. Addressing Spearpoint, he said that he was very sorry to see a Folkestone fisherman in the dock. The law looked upon this as a serious crime. He had no doubt that prisoner did not think of that in his drunken fit. He was very violent when arrested, and it required four men to remove him to the police station. he believed, however, that the prisoner was very sorry for what he had done, and he had said so when he was arrested. He would not like a gaolbird of him. He had already had a taste of what prison was like, but he would have no further taste. He would be bound over to be of good behaviour for 12 months, but if he did not behave himself, and was brought before the Court or Magistrates he would have broken his parole, and would be dealt with severely. He had no doubt that prisoner's condition was brought about a good deal by what he had been allowed to have in the "Cyprus" public house.

 

Folkestone Daily News 13 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Licensing Bench on Wednesday, February 12th, was constituted as follows: Messrs. Ward, Boyd, Leggett, Swoffer, Stainer, Herbert, Fynmore, Hamilton, and Linton.

The Chief Constable read his report (for which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said the report of the Chief Constable was very satisfactory, but the Bench were still of opinion that there were too many licensed houses in a certain portion of the town. Therefore a number would have their licences withheld until the adjourned sessions on the ground of redundancy. Formal opposition to the renewals would be served so that full enquiries could be made into the trade of these houses, with a view of referring some of them to the Compensation Authority.

The following were the licences which were held over: The Raglan, Dover Street; Oddfellows, Dover Street; Royal Oak, North Street; Isle of Cyprus, Bayle; Lord Nelson, Radnor Street; Lifeboat, North Street; Wellington, Beach Street.

 

Folkestone Express 15 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Brewster Sessions were held on Wednesday morning. The Justices present were E.T. Ward Esq., Major Leggett, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, G. Boyd, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer Esqs. Mr. Boyd and Mr. Stainer did not take part in the licensing business, not being on the committee.

The Chief Constable read his report as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 119 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz., Full Licences 73, Beer On 7, Beer Off 6, Beer and Spirit Dealers Off 15, Grocers, etc. Off 9, Confectioners' Wine On 3, Chemists Wine Off 5. This gives an average, according to the Census of 1911, of one licence to every 281 persons, or one on licence to every 418 persons. As compared with the return submitted last year this is a decrease of two licences. At the general annual licensing meeting last year a new licence was granted for the sale of beer off the premises at Morehall, and two other off licences were discontinued.

At the last adjourned general annual licensing meeting the renewal of the licence of the Rendezvous Hotel was referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy, and at the meeting of that Committee on the 7th August, 1912, the licence was refused, and after payment of compensation the house was closed for the sale of drink on the 28th December last.

During the past year fifteen of the licences have been transferred; one licence was transferred twice.

Six occasional licences have been granted for the sale of drink on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 34 extensions of the usual time of closing have been granted to licence holders on special occasions.

During the year ended 31st December last 85 persons (62 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 64 were convicted and 21 discharged.

In the preceding year 54 males and 31 females were proceeded against, of whom 66 were convicted and 19 discharged.

The number convicted of drunkenness last year, viz., 46 males and 18 females, is, I find, the smallest number convicted in any year since 1896.

Of those proceeded against, 31 were residents of the Borough, 34 were persons of no fixed abode, 13 residents of other districts and seven were soldiers.

No conviction has been recorded against any licence holder during the past year. Proceedings were taken against the holder of an off licence for a breach of the closing regulations, but the case was dismissed.

Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902.

There are 17 places licensed for music and dancing, eight for music only, and two for public billiard playing.

I have no complaint to make as to the conduct of any of the licensed houses, and offer no opposition to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct.

The Chairman said it was a very satisfactory report indeed, but they felt that there were still too many licensed houses, particularly in certain portions of the Borough, and the Justices would direct that a certain number of the applications for renewal should be deferred till the Adjourned Sessions, so that they might have evidence as to the trade those houses were doing, and decide whether any of them ought to be referred to the Compensation Authority.

The houses to be dealt with were seven in number, namely; the Raglan Tavern, the Oddfellows, the Royal Oak, the Isle of Cyprus, the Lord Nelson, the Lifeboat, and the Wellington.

With those exceptions the existing licences were granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 12th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggett, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. G. Boyd.

The Chief Constable presented his annual report (for which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman remarked that the report was a very satisfactory one, but, in the opinion of the Bench, there were still too many public houses in certain portions of the town, and they would defer the renewal of certain of the licences to the adjourned sessions, so that they might have evidence as to what trade they were doing, and see if any of them were to be referred to the compensation authority.

The licensees of the Raglan Tavern, the Oddfellows, Dover Street, the Royal Oak, North Street, the Isle of Cyprus, the Lord Nelson, the Lifeboat, and the Wellington were called forward.

The Chairman said the renewal of the licences of those public houses would be deferred until the adjourned licensing sessions, and notice of opposition would be served in the meantime on the ground of redundancy. The Chief Constable would be directed to serve the notices.

The licences of all the other houses were then renewed.

 

Folkestone Daily News 10 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 10th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Stainer, Herbert, Harrison, Morrison, Linton, Boyd, Stace, Jenner, and Giles.

There was again a large crowd in Court on Monday morning, when the fate of 7 licensed houses (referred for redundancy) hung in the balance.

At the commencement of the proceedings the Chief Constable said the Bench had to consider the seven licences adjourned from the annual sessions on the ground of redundancy. He invited the Bench to hear the evidence in regard to such houses separately and give a decision after hearing all the evidence.

The Cyprus.

Licensee, Mr. E. Taylor, brewers, Messrs. Mackeson and Co.

The same claim of objections were offered by the Chief Constable. The rateable value of the house is 40. In this case the Chief advanced an additional ground of objection, the back premises having access by window to two houses in the rear, making police supervision absolutely impossible. Mr. Taylor had held the licence since 1892 (sic).

Mr. Haines, for the brewers, elicited from the Chief Constable that the main ground for objection was redundancy, and he had no knowledge of the brewers ever having been warned to remedy structural defects. He had never heard of any breach of the licensing law through these windows.

Mr. Haines called Mr. H. Mackeson, who said the barrelage from 1908 to 1912 increased. In 1912 the barrels sold were 171 1/8 exclusive of bottled beers. In 1909, 1910, and 1911 the barrelage had averaged 3 barrels per week, and in 1912 4 barrels. The spirits sold in 1912 were 85 gallons. The trade had increased 25 percent in 1912. No objection had ever been served as regards the rear structure. If it had been, no doubt the objection would have been dealt with.

Mr. W.E. Taylor said when he took the Cyprus he owed nearly 400. He paid 270 for the valuation, and out of the profit of the Cyprus he had paid off all his old indebtedness within 20. The average takings were over 20 per week. His cash register showed the number of purchases per day varying from 200 to 370 odd. He had done very well and hoped to save money in the future.

By the Chief Constable: The cash register showed the number of purchases and not necessarily the number of purchasers.

The Bench retired at 4 p.m., and returned at 4.10, the Chairman announcing that the Lord Nelson and the Isle of Cyprus would be referred to Canterbury and the other five licences would be renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 15 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

At the annual licensing sessions seven licences were deferred to the adjourned sessions, which were held at the Town Hall on Monday. The Magistrates on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Alderman Jenner, and W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, W.J. Harrison, J.J. Giles, E.T. Morrison and A. Stace Esqs.

Isle Of Cyprus.

The Isle of Cyprus was the next licence considered. Mr. G.W. Haines represented the owners and the licence holder.

Mr. Reeve, the Chief Constable, said the house was situate on the Bayle, and was formerly known as the Druids Arms. The licensee was Mr. William Edward Taylor, who had held the licence since 11th July, 1906. The registered owners were Messrs. Mackeson and Co., of Hythe. The rateable value was 28 10s. There were two front entrances to the house opening into a front bar which was divided two compartments by a partition six feet high. There was a door from the street into the separate compartments. Behind the bar there was a small bar parlour, which was dark, having no outside light. That room was approached from the compartment on the left side of the house. Behind that room was another room, which was not now used by the public, and appeared to be simply a store room used by the licensee. From the front bar or right hand side compartment a door opened into a narrow passage, which ran down by the side of the houses for the whole length, about 48ft. long. That passage was covered over for about 17ft. 6in. There was a urinal three parts of the way down the passage. At the far end a door opened to the scullery of the house. The right hand side of the passage to which he had referred for the whole length was really the wall of the adjoining house, and in the glass-covered portion of the passage there were two windows looking into the passage. One of those was a window opening into a living room in the house next door, 76, The Bayle. That was five feet wide by 2ft. 4in. The second window, which did not appear to have been opened for some time, looked into the living room of 70, Bayle Court, which adjoined and backed onto 76, The Bayle. In the open portion of the passage there was another window, 1ft. 9in. by 1ft. 4in.. That opened into the scullery of the house, 70, Bayle Court. That small window was open on his recent visit. The cottages were occupied, and they both had an entrance from Bayle Court. The nearest licensed house was the Globe, 37 yards away, the rateable value of which was 40. The Earl Grey was 84 yards away, and the rateable value was 30. The George Inn was 82 yards away, and the rateable value was 40. The trade was small, and smaller than that done at the houses in the immediate neighbourhood. In his opinion if the licence was taken away there would be ample accommodation provided in the licensed houses in the vicinity.

Cross-examined, Mr. Reeve said his objection was that the licence was not required for the requirements of the neighbourhood. No notice had ever been given to the owners or tenant to remedy the so-called defects. He considered it was a very improper thing for windows to look into licensed premises as those in the two cottages did. He had never heard of any breach of the licensing laws owing to those windows. If the trade was double what it was said to be he would still say he was of opinion that there was an excessive number of licences in the neighbourhood. In his opinion, the more public houses they had, the more drinking there was. It was not desirable to have an excessive number of licensed houses in a working class neighbourhood. Since they had closed public houses drunkenness had gradually decreased. Some people said drunkenness in that town was excessive, but he did not think so.

Inspector Lawrence said he knew the house, and that in the passageway there were three windows looking into adjoining property. The only access to the premises was by two front entrances in Bayle Street. He knew a door led from the public bar into the passage. He further corroborated the Chief Constable as to the construction of the premises. The fact that the windows were situate in the position they were made it difficult for proper police supervision to be given to the premises.

Cross-examined, the witness said apart from the three windows there would be no difficulty in having proper police supervision over the premises.

Mr. H. Mackeson said the barrelage from 1908 up to 1912 was an increasing trade. In 1910 and 1911 there was a trade of three barrels a week, and in 1912 four barrels. That included bottled beer and crates. With regard to the spirits and wines, in 1910 75 gallons were sold, in 1911, 80, and in 1912, 53, which was caused by the Budget. In 1908 the number of gallons was 108, and in 1909 about 70. He was satisfied with the trade done.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, Mr. Mackeson said he did not know that the houses in Bayle Court backed the licensed house. He did not know that the window from that passage in the cottages was the only means of through ventilation.

Mr. Taylor said he had 350 indebtedness when he went into the house, and out of the profits of the house he had paid off all that with the exception of 20. His average takings were over 20, and in the season they exceeded that. From June, 1912, up to the present, the purchasers in his house numbered from 200 up to 350. He was well satisfied with his business and he hoped to save a little money from it. Since had had been there he had not done anything he ought not to have done in connection with the windows.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not mean to say he had 200 customers in his house each day. He had only been out waiting three or four times recently. It was not because trade had fallen off that he had closed one room, but it was because he could not control it. He was going in for a more classy trade now than he did previous to an affair over a broken window.

Re-examined, witness said if there was a considerable demand for lunches he could use that particular room.

Mr. Haines said the owners were willing to carry out any alterations the Bench might suggest. The house was just on the fringe of the congested area. The place was used a great deal by the military and was more easy of supervision as it was situate near the Town Hall. The trade was an increasing one, and he put it that there was no evidence the house was not required.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return the Chairman announced that the licences of the Lord Nelson and the Isle of Cyprus would be referred to the Quarter Sessions. For those there would be provisional licences. The five other licences would be renewed, but they thought that the owners of the Wellington and the Raglan should consider the question of the urinals.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned Annual Folkestone Licensing Sessions were held at the Police Court on Monday, when the licences of the seven houses deferred at the Annual General Sessions came up for hearing. Mr. E.T. Ward was in the chair, and he was supported by Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel C.J. Hamilton, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman C. Jenner, Captain Chamier, Mr. J.J. Giles, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison and Councillor A. Stace.

Isle of Cyprus.

The licence of the Isle of Cyprus, The Bayle, was next considered. Mr. G.W. Haines represented the owners (Messrs. Mackeson and Co.) and the licensee (Mr. W.E. Taylor).

The Chief Constable said the house was formerly known as the Druids Arms. The licensee was William Edward Taylor, who had held the licence since 11th July, 1906. The registered owners were Messrs. Mackeson and Co., and the rateable value 28 10s. There were two front entrances to the house, opening into a front bar, which was divided into two compartments by a partition six feet in height. There was a door leading from the street into each separate compartment. Behind the bar was a small bar parlour, which was dark, having no outside light. This room was approached from the compartment on the left side of the house, as one entered. Behind this was another room, which was not now used by the public, and appeared to be simply a spare room used by the licensee. From the front bar and the right hand side compartment a door opened into a narrow passage, which ran down the side of the house for its entire length – about 48 feet. This passage was covered over with glass for about 17ft. 3ins. There was a urinal three parts of the way down the passage. At the far end of the passage another door opened into the scullery of the house. On the right hand side of the passage, for its whole length, was the wall of the adjoining house. In the glass covered portion of the passage there were two windows looking into the passage. One of these windows opened into the living room of the house next door, 76, The Bayle. This window was 3ft 5ins. by 2ft. 4 ins. in size. The second window, which did not appear to have been used for some time, looked into the living room of 70, Bayle Court, which backed on to No. 76, The Bayle. In the open portion of the passage was another window, 1ft 9ins. by 1ft 4 ins. in size. This opened into the scullery of No. 70, Bayle Court. This small window was open on the occasion of a visit which he (the Chief Constable) paid to the premises recently. The houses were both occupied, and they both had an entrance from Bayle Court. The nearest licensed house was the Globe, which was 37 yards away, and had a rateable value of 40. The George Inn, in George Lane, was 82 yards away, the rateable value of this house being 40. The Earl Grey was in High Street, 84 yards away, and had a rateable value of 32. The trade of the house was small, and was similar in character to the trade of the houses in the immediate vicinity. Having regard to those windows which opened directly into the licensed premises, and to the covered portion of the house, it was quite impossible to give proper and efficient police supervision to the house. In his opinion, if the licence was taken away, there would be ample accommodation found in the houses in the vicinity for the trade that was done in this house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: His objection was chiefly on the grounds that the house was not required for the needs of the neighbourhood. If there had neen any serious objection to the structural conditions, some steps would have been taken to ask for the owners to rectify them. No such steps had, to his knowledge, been taken. He considered it a very improper thing to have windows looking into licensed premises. He had never heard of any breach of the licensing laws because of these windows. Even if this house did double the trade, he was still of opinion that there were more licensed houses than required in this neighbourhood. Common sense told him that the more licensed houses there were, the more drinking there would be going on, and it was, to his mind, not desirable to have an excessive number of licensed houses in working class neighbourhoods. The cases of drunkenness were just the same last year as in the previous year. There had been a decrease since 1906 – when they started closing these houses. Some people said that drunkenness in the town was excessive, but he did not think so himself.

Inspector Lawrence said that he knew the house, and he knew that in the passageway referred to there were three windows looking into adjoining property. Inspector Lawrence gave further evidence substantially in corroboration of the Chief's statement, and added that, in his opinion, the fact of having windows like these opening into the licensed premises made it more difficult for proper police supervision.

Cross-examined: Apart from these three windows there would be no difficulty in supervising the house, for there would be then only the front to attend to.

Mr. H. Mackeson gave evidence with regard to the barrelage. Last year it showed an increase on the two previous years of 25 percent. Regarding the spirit trade, in 1910 it stood at 75 gallons, in 1911 it reached 80 gallons, and in 1912 it came down to 53 gallons – that was as a result of the Budget, which had affected all the houses. In 1908 the number of gallons was over 100, and in 1909 he thought it was about 70 gallons. He was quite satisfied with the trade done at the house, and he did not want it to go. He had heard no suggestions regarding structural alterations.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: He thought this was a house that was wanted. It did a good trade, and there were two licences that had already been taken away in the immediate vicinity during recent years.

Mr. Taylor said he had 350 indebtedness when he went into the house, and out of the profits of the house he had paid off all that with the exception of 20. His average takings were over 20, and during the season they were more than that amount. The average number of purchasers a day, as shown by his register, was 200, and on occasions the number went up, as high as 350. The average of 200 extended over the past nine months. He was very well satisfied with the business he had done. With regard to the windows, during the time he had been licensee he had never done anything he should not have done. (Laughter) He was prepared to adopt any suggestions that the Bench might make in the direction of structural alterations.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable; The register referred to did not indicate different customers. If a person had four drinks, it would count as four purchases. It was not because trade had fallen off that he had ceased to use the room for the public at the back of the bar. He had ceased to use it because he could not control it. He was going in for a more classy trade now than he did previously to an affair over a broken window.

Re-examined: If there was a demand for refreshments or luncheons the room at the back would be useful.

Mr. Haines remarked that they were not called there that day because of structural alterations, but on a matter of trade. They had figures before them to show that the house was doing an increasing trade. It was much used by the military, and he would point out it was easier to supervise a house that was situated so close to the Town Hall. He submitted that it had not been proved that the house was not required. They had only the Chief Constable's statement to go on.

The Magistrates retired for a period to consider their decisions. On their return the Chairman said that the Isle of Cyprus they would refer to Canterbury.

 

Folkestone Express 12 July 1913.

East Kent Licensing.

On Wednesday, at St. Augustine's, Canterbury, the Compensation Authority sat for the purpose of considering applications for the renewal of licences which had been referred to them by the various licensing authorities in East Kent. Amongst the licences which came before the Authority was the Isle of Cyprus, Folkestone. Lord Harris presided.

Mr. C.M. Pitman (instructed by Mr. G.W. Haines) asked for the renewal of the Isle of Cyprus on behalf of the owners, Messrs. Mackeson and Co., and the tenant, Mr. W.E. Taylor. Mr. E. Wetton opposed the granting of the licence.

Mr. H. Reeve, the Chief Constable, said the Isle of Cyprus was in the congested area, in which there were 841 houses, and he reckoned five people to a house. In that area there were 30 on licenses – 26 full and four beer on licences. There were also seven other licences, making a total of 37 premises licensed for the sale of drink. That gave one licence to 113 persons, or one on licence to every 140 persons. For the whole of the borough there was one licence to every 286 persons, or one on licence to every 418 persons. They had 117 premises licensed for the sale of drink in the borough. The Bayle, on which the Isle of Cyprus was situate, was an isolated district. The present tenant, Mr. W.E. Taylor, became the licensee on July 11th, 1906, and was the ninth tenant in fourteen years. In the district of the Bayle there were sixty occupied houses, and allowing for five inmates per house, that made a population of 300, and in that district there were three fully licensed houses. From the public bar there was a passage running from the side of the house for the whole of the length. There was no back entrance to the house. The passage for 17ft. 6in. was covered with glass. There was a urinal about three parts of the way down and at the end of the passage there was an opening in the landlord's kitchen or scullery.

Mr. Pitman interposed by saying that the licence was brought there on the question of redundancy, and not because of its structure.

Mr. Reeve, proceeding, said a window in the passage opened into No. 76, The Bayle. The next window opened into the living room of No. 70, Bayle Court, and further down another window opened into the same house.

Lord Harris: The house sounds so structurally bad, I cannot understand why the local authority allows the licence at all. Have you ever objected to it on the grounds of structural defects?

Mr. Reeve: I did not know about the structure until recently. Continuing, he said the house had a very small trade during the day, and the trade at night was chiefly soldiers and girls.

Cross-examined, the Chief Constable said the house was on the edge of the congested area. He certainly objected to the windows in the passage, but no objection had been made to the licensing Justices about them. He considered it would be a difficult matter to make any alterations because the other property belonged to someone else. If the windows could be done away with, and the other houses were able to get the light and air they had received, his objections to the structure would be done away with. Seven houses were adjourned to the adjourned annual licensing meeting, but only two were referred to the Compensation Authority. The second house was the Lord Nelson, the licence of which was renewed when it came before the preliminary meeting.

Inspector Lawrence said owing to the windows in the passage it made it very difficult to have proper police supervision of the house. There was very little day trade done at the house.

Mrs. Johnson, of 70, Bayle Court, gave evidence as to the urinals of the licensed house.

Mr. H. Mackeson, giving evidence in support of the renewal of the licence, said since the adjourned meeting of the Justices he had made inquiries, and he had found that the figures he then gave to the Justices with regard to the trade were not correct. In 1909 they did 181 barrels of beer, 114 gallons of spirits, and 38 gallons of wine. In the following year the figures were 157 barrels, 147 gallons of spirits and 37 gallons of wine; in 1911, 172, 153, and 24; in 1912, 207, 167, and 20; in 1913, up to June 30th, 103 barrels, 67 gallons of spirits, and 11 gallons of wine. When the matter was before the licensing Justices he gave the figures of spirits sold in 1912 as 54 gallons, but since then they had found the tenant had been purchasing spirits elsewhere than from them, thus breaking his agreement. There had been no complaint made to them about the structure before. If there had been he would have taken steps to have had it altered. He produced plans which showed how access by the windows could be stopped. His firm were willing to take them before the Bench and carry out the plans.

Cross-examined, Mr. Mackeson said in 1912 the tenant purchased over 100 gallons of spirits and wines from elsewhere.

Mr. W.H. Wilkins, clerk to Mr. Haines, solicitor, said he went through Mr. Taylor's books with the tenant, and he had found since he had been in the house he had paid off a total indebtedness of 260 10s. 3d., which he incurred in a lodging house in Marine Parade. He had also paid 60 8s. 6d. for an automatic piano. He produced a list of various payments made by the tenant to Mr. Binfield for wines and spirits, and he produced invoices showing the amount of spirits he had also purchased from Mr. Binfield and Messrs. Lukey. He had been through Mr. Taylor's account books, and he found in 1906-7 the cash takings were 1,121; in 1907-08, 1,088; in 1908-09, 1,100; in 1909-10, 809; in 1910-11, 853; in 1911-12, 959; and from June, 1912, to June, 1913 1,024. His cash register also showed that there were, on an average, 200 purchasers in the house daily.

The application for renewal was refused, and the house will go for compensation.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 July 1913.

East Kent Licensing.

Tuesday, July 8th: Before Lord Harris.

The only Folkestone house down for consideration was the Isle of Cyprus, The Bayle, Folkestone, of which the tenant is Mr. William Edward Taylor, the owners being Messrs. Mackeson. Mr. Wetton appeared for the Licensing Justices, and Mr. S.M. Pitman for the renewal.

Mr. Wetton submitted that there were three other fully licensed houses in the immediate locality of The Bayle, and this house had a small and falling trade.

The Chief Constable detailed licensing statistics in the borough. He said there were three licensed houses in this congested area, and that out of 85 charges for drunkenness, 46 came from this area. There was a very small trade, chiefly with soldiers and girls in the evenings, and if the licence was taken away there was ample accommodation in the vicinity. There was also no back entrance, but a long passage rand from the front to the rear of the premises to a lavatory, which passage had windows opening on to it from adjoining houses, making it bad for police supervision.

Lord Harris: The sanitary construction is so bad that I don't know why the local authority renewed the licence at all.

In reply to Mr. Pitman, Chief Constable Reeve denied that the fact of the windows looking on to the passage was the reason for the house being referred, adding that the house was mentioned three or four years ago.

Inspector Lawrence said the house did very little day trade.

Mrs. Johnson, living at Bayle Court, one of the houses looking on to the passage, said both she and her husband had complained. She was on good terms with the licensee, but she used the house chiefly to get pennies for the slot gas meter. (Laughter)

Mr. H. Mackeson gave figures of trade on behalf of the brewers. As regarded the structural arrangements and the passage, he had never heard of any complaints, or the firm would have taken steps to effect a remedy. Since it had been brought to their notice their surveyor had prepared plans which would cut off these windows without affecting light and air rights. Their firm were only too anxious to do away with any trouble on that account.

Mr. Wilkins, an accountant, gave figures as to the trade done at the house. He stated he had inspected all account books and documents relating to the business, which showed that the licensee, Mr. William Edward Taylor, who took over the licence in 1906, had since paid 260 10s. 3d. off a loan, and paid 60 for a piano. The annual takings since then had averaged 993 14s. 8d. The house had about 200 customers.

Mr. Pitman submitted that on the evidence of the trade done, rateable value of the house, etc., the house was one that should be allowed to remain. If there was anything wrong with the structure of the house, there was ample means of calling the attention of the licensing justices to it, and it could be at once enforced, and such structural alterations put right.

The Committee decided that the application for the renewal of the licence must be refused.

 

Folkestone Express 8 November 1913.

East Kent Licensing.

At a meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee on Tuesday, compensation was awarded to the owners and tenants of houses in the district which are to be closed, as under:

Isle of Cyprus, The Bayle, Folkestone; tenant Mr. William Edward Taylor; owners, Messrs. Mackeson and Co. Ltd., Hythe. Total 1,408: owners 1,238; tenant 159 10s.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 November 1913.

East Kent Licensing.

The supplemental meeting of the East Kent Compensation Authority was held at the Sessions House, Canterbury, on Tuesday. Lord Harris presided.

Among the compensation sums apportioned was the Isle of Cyprus, Folkestone, 1,408; owners 1,248 10s., tenant (Mr. W.E. Taylor) 159 10s.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

LYNE Richard 1877-81 (age 60 in 1881Census) Bastions

LYNE Mrs Matilda 1881-88 BastionsPost Office Directory 1882

PRICE Edwin 1888-92 Bastions

MEPHAM Lucien 1892-95 Bastions

PREECE George 1895-96 Bastions

SMITH Alfred 1896-97 Bastions

AVERRE Alfred 1897 Bastions

GRIST Charles Giles1897-1900 BastionsKelly's 1899

CLAYSON Frank 1900-02 (age 30 in 1901Census) BastionsPost Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

HALFORD William 1902-06 Bastions

TAYLOR William E 1906-13 BastionsPost Office Directory 1913

 

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

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