DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Canterbury, December, 2018.

Page Updated:- Friday, 21 December, 2018.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest ????

Mayflower and Pilgrim

Latest 2009+

6 Palace Street

Canterbury

Mayflower and Pilgrim 2009

Above picture from Google, March 2009.

Mayflower and Pilgrim signMayflower and Pilgrim sign 2009 Mayflower and Pilgrim plaque

Mayflower & Pilgrim signs left date unknown. Right March 2009.

Above with thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com

Inside the Mayflower Restaurant

Above postcard circa 1960.

Mayflower restaurant 1960

Above postcard circa 1960 kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

 

Taken from http://www.canterbury-archaeology.org.uk/#/cushman/4557747839

ROBERT CUSHMAN (1578-1625)

Robert Cushman was born in Rolvenden near Tenterden in Kent in 1578. His ancestry remains a matter of dispute, despite detailed research by those studying the early American pilgrims, but we know he was baptised in Rolvenden parish church on 9 February that year. He moved in early life to Canterbury where he worked as a grocer's assistant in Sun Street. Robert was also active in the Puritan movement, which was challenging the beliefs and practices of the established church, and this led to his examination before the Canterbury Diocesan Court in 1603. However, he continued his Puritan activities, and in 1605 appeared before the local Quarter Sessions for non-attendance at services. He was later excommunicated and served a short prison sentence in the small goal above the Westgate (image 1). In 1606, aged 28, he married Sarah Reder, a local girl then living in the Cathedral precincts - the service took place in St Alphege church (image 2). Robert's next career move was as apprentice in the grocery and tallow chandler's store trading in the Whitefriars area of the city on the site of what is now M&S (image 3). His next door neighbour here would have been the poet Christopher Marlowe. Robert went on to run his own store on the site of what is now 13 The Parade (image 4), currently the Orange mobile shop, and become a freeman of the city. Their child Thomas was born here in 1607, and baptised in nearby St Andrew's church (image 5). Fearing further religious persecution, the family moved in 1611 to Leiden in the Low Countries (now Holland), where they lived with other Puritan exiles, many from Canterbury. Robert's leadership skills and managerial flair were recognised in his work for the Leiden community, and in 1617, following the early death of his wife Sarah, he returned to England to negotiate the financing and hiring of the Mayflower to take pilgrims to America. He spent some of this time at an inn in Palace Street, now the Mayflower Restaurant (image 6), and may well have been staying here when the Mayflower contract was agreed. Robert's plan was to sail to America with his son on a sister ship the Speedwell. This failed when, early in the voyage, the Speedwell proved unseaworthy, but Robert and son Thomas made it to Plymouth in America in 1621 on the Fortune. Later that year, Robert returned to England to further the interests of the early colonists, but in 1625 died in London following an outbreak of plague. His places of death or burial are not known.

Cushman has little by way of memorials in Canterbury, although the painting of the Mayflower at 59 Palace Street reminds us of our link with the early pilgrims and there is a road named after him in Wincheap. A Cushman memorial does stand in Burial Hill outside Plymouth Massachusetts, a 25 ft granite column that dominates the hill. Thomas Cushman became Ruling Elder of the Plymouth community, and married Mary Allerton, the last surviving Mayflower passenger, who was also from a Canterbury family. Their descendants, from their 50 grandchildren, include General Robert E Lee.

Sources: Bateman (1984); Bateman (2001); Boyle (1974); Lyle (2002); Woodman (1995)

A helpful web site (but it's disturbing that the author thinks Canterbury is part of Plymouth!):  http://minerdescent.com/2010/08/06/robert-cushman/

Church court records for 1603 (CCA-DCb-PRC/44/3) and Quarter Session papers for 1606 (CCA-CC-J/Q/405/vi) can be seen at Canterbury Cathedral Archives

 

 

 

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