DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 29 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1866

Prince of Wales

Closed 2007

71 Guildhall Street/Coolinge Road

Folkestone

Prince of Wales

Above photo kindly sent by Chris Excell, 13 March 1983.

Prince of Wales 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Prince of Wales 2009

Above Google image, May 2009.

Former Prince of Wales 2016

Above Google image, August 2016.

Prince of Wales card

The above sign, wasn't actually designed and released by Whitbread, but has been designed by Robert Greenham in the same style as the card sets they distributed as a representation of what the sign looked like. Robert says:- This was based on the image which appeared on Whitbread's metal map for East Kent which was painted by D. W. Burley in 1950, on commission from Whitbread.

Whitbread metal map 1950

The above metal map, kindly sent by Robert Greenham was released, in 1950 and painted by D. W. Burley, and was titled Inn-Signia of Whitbread Houses in East Kent, Whitbread & Co Ltd. The Inn Signs designed by:- M. C. Balston, Vena Chalker, Kathleen M Claxton, K. M. Doyle, Ralph Ellis, Marjorie Hutton, Harvey James, Prudence Rae-Martin, Violet Rutter, L. Toynbee and Kit Watson.

 

I have only recently added Folkestone to this site. The information gathered so far is from "Old Folkestone Pubs" by C H Bishop M.A. Ph.D. and Kevan of http://deadpubs.co.uk/

Any further information or indeed photographs would be appreciated. Please email me at the address below.

This page is still to be updated.

 

Lilian Hawkes

Above photo showing licensee Lilian Hawkes, and Shandy. Kindly sent by Rob. Taken in a garden in Castle Street, Dover

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869.

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Spirit License (Fresh Application)

Thomas Wilson, of the Prince Of Wales, Coolinge Terrace, applied. Mr. Creery supported the application.

The Court was then cleared. When re-opened the Chairman said that the Magistrates had come to the unanimous decision that no more licenses should be granted, but in exceptional cases, as they were of opinion that too many licensed houses already exist. The application would be refused.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 August 1869.

Annual Licensing Day.—A full bench of magistrates attended on Wednesday to grant renewals and hear fresh applications.

Mr. Arthur Andrews, of the Guildhall Hotel; Mr. Burgess, Richmond Tavern; Mr.Thomas Wilson, of the Prince of Wales; and Mr. Chittenden, of the Star and Garter, made fresh applications but were refused; the magistrates stating that no more licenses would be granted except under exceptional circumstances.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 June 1871.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Thomas Wilson, another beerhouse keeper, landlord of the Prince Of Wales, was charged with keeping an open house during prohibited hours on the 28th inst. He pleaded Guilty and was fined 20s. and costs.

The offender was cautioned as to how he conducts his houses in the future, and promised not to offend against the law again.

 

Folkestone Express 3 June 1871.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Thomas Wilson, proprietor of the Prince Of Wales beerhouse was summoned for having his house open for the sale of drink on the morning of Sunday, the 20th inst.

Superintendent Martin said he went to defendant's house at five minutes past twelve and he found nine men in front of the bar; they were standing up drinking. The beer was fresh-drawn, and defendant was in the act of drawing some when he went in.

The defendant said he was obliging a few friends who had “come down”.

The Mayor: You have no business to keep your house open. This being the first offence you will be fined 1 and 9s. costs, or one month's imprisonment. If you are caught again you will be fined 5.

 

Southeastern Gazette 21 May 1872.

Local News.

Isaac Berry was charged at the Police Court, on Monday, with drunken and disorderly conduct.

P.C. Smith stated that when on duty in Guildhall Street, a little before eleven on Saturday night, he saw the prisoner twice forcibly ejected from the Prince of Wales Inn, the second time being locked out. The prisoner “up with his fist” and sent it through a window. Witness took him into custody.

The prisoner expressed his sorrow, and stated that he had only just met his brother, whom he hadn’t seen for a good time, and he treated him to a lot of liquor and so on.

The prisoner was further charged with wilfully breaking a pane of glass.

He again pleaded guilty.

Fined 5s., costs 3s. 6d., on the first charge, or seven days’ imprisonment; and on the second, fined 5s., costs 3s. 6d., damage 3s. 6d., or fourteen days’. The prisoner's wife asked for time, but the magistrates were inexorable, and prisoner was removed.

 

Folkestone Express 25 May 1878.

Saturday, May 19th: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, W.J. Jeffreason Esq., and Captain Carter.

Thomas Wilson, landlord of the Prince Of Wales, was summoned for keeping open his house for the sale of liquors on Sunday morning, the 10th of May, and Henry Downs and John Williams were summoned for being on the premises at illegal hours on the same day.

P.C. Ovenden said he visited the house about 10 o'clock on Sunday morning. There was a pint of beer and a glass in front of the two defendants. The glass appeared to have had beer in it. As he was going in he saw two other persons leaving the premises.

The defendant Wilson said he had had the door open, and the two men came in for lodgings and he gave them a pint of beer each. He was fined 50s. and 8s. costs. The Mayor told him that if he was brought there again the penalty would be 20, and also that his license would be endorsed. This being his first offence they would not endorse his license.

The other two defendants were fined 2s. and 8s. costs each, or in default seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 August 1879.

The Annual Licensing Session was held at the Town Hall on Wednesday, the magistrates on the Bench being Dr. Bateman (in the chair), Capt. Crowe, J. Jeffreason Esq., and Alds. Hoad and Caister.

Prince Of Wales.

Mr. Minter made an application for a full license for this house, which belongs to Mr. Thomas Wilson, landlord, but was refused.


 

Folkestone Express 23 August 1879.

Wednesday, August 20th: Before W. Bateman Esq., Aldermen Caister and Hoad, Captain Crowe, M. Bell, W.J. Jeffreason, and J. Clark Esqs.

Annual Licensing Session.

Application For New License:

Prince Of Wales, Coolinge Terrace

Mr. Minter applied on behalf of Mr. Thomas Wilson for a full license to the Prince Of Wales, Coolinge Terrace.

Applicant is the owner and occupier, and has held a license there for eleven years. He said there was only the Eagle licensed in the neighbourhood.

There was no opposition.

The Bench retired to consider the application, and on their return the chairman announced that they had decided to refuse the application.

 

Folkestone Express 2 October 1880.

Wednesday, September 29th: Before The Mayor, General Cannon, Alderman Caister, M.J. Bell and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

This was the adjourned annual licensing day, and the following application was considered:

Thomas Wilson, landlord of the Prince Of Wales, applied for a full license for his house. He said he had kept the house as a beerhouse for more than twelve years, and was frequently asked for spirits. The nearest inn was the Eagle, 30 rods off. The application was unanimously refused.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 September 1881.

Notice.

To the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I, THOMAS WILSON, Beerhouse Keeper, now residing at the Prince Of Wales, Guildhall Street, in the Town of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the adjournment of the General Annual Licensing Meeting to be holden at the Town Hall in the said Borough on the Twenty-eighth day of September next, for a License to hold any Excise License or Licenses to sell by retail under the Intoxicating Liquor Licensing Act, 1828, all intoxicating liquors to be consumed either on or off the House and Premises thereunto belonging, situate at Guildhall Street, in the Borough aforesaid, of which premises I am the owner.

Given under my hand this Thirtieth Day of August, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eighty One.

THOMAS WILSON.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 October 1881.

LICENSES.

Saturday, September 24th: Before The Mayor, Gen. Cannon, Capt. Carter, Ald. Caister, J. Clark, W. Jeffreason, J. Holden, and F. Boykett Esqs.

An application to sell spirits at the Prince Of Wales Inn was again refused.

 

Folkestone Express 1 October 1881.

Licensing.

Thomas Wilson applied for a license to sell spirits at the Prince Of Wales beerhouse. Mr. Mowll supported the application, which had been refused on several previous occasions.

The application was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 5 August 1882.

Saturday, July 29th: Before Alderman Caister, Captain Carter, J. Clark, J. Holden, J. Fitness, and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

Charles Austen was summoned for assaulting George Ward on the 24th ult.

Complainant, a stonemason, living in Darlington Place, said on Monday, the 24th ult., about twenty minutes to seven in the evening, he was at the Prince Of Wales beerhouse, with defendant, who wanted to fight, and he alleged that after endeavouring in all sorts of ways to induce him to fight, defendant took up a stool and struck him, and also hit him in the face.

Defendant denied the assault, but said that Ward had been making too free with his name.

Witnesses were called on both sides, and the evidence was of a very conflicting character. The Bench therefore dismissed the case.

 

Folkestone Express 18 August 1883.

Saturday, August 11th: Before R.W. Boarer, J. Boykett and M.J. Bell Esqs.

James Laws was summoned for assaulting Charles Austin on Monday evening in the Prince Of Wales Inn.

Complainant said on Monday evening, between six and seven, he was passing the Prince Of Wales Inn, in Guildhall Street, and went in. He had two chisels in his hand. Defendant's brother-in-law took the chisels to look at, and threw them into the street. He asked him what he meant by it. Defendant's brother-in-law wanted to fight. Defendant came in just at the time, struck him in the eye, knocked him down, punched him when he was down, and jumped upon him. A month ago defendant “promised him”. Next morning he saw defendant, and he then wanted to fight him for a sovereign, but he declined.

Defendant said complainant was he aggressor, and called John Smith, bathchairman, who said he heard complainant challenge anyone in the bar to fight. He struck two men before he received a blow from the defendant.

Lewis Smith also said complainant challenged anyone in the bar and struck defendant a back-handed blow on the chest. Laws then struck him. He had not spoken to him previously.

In reply to complainant, witness said he saw Laws jump on him.

The Bench dismissed the case, each party having to pay 2s.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 January 1885.

Licence Transfer.

Wednesday, January 28th.

At the Police Court on Wednesday morning the following transfer of licence was effected:

The Prince Of Wales: to William Stocker.

Note: Listed as Henry Stocker in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 31 January 1885.

Wednesday, January 28th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Hoad, W. Bateman and F. Boykett Esqs.

The Licence of the Prince of Wales was transferred to Henry Stocker.

 

Folkestone News 31 January 1885.

Wednesday, January 28th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Hoad, Mr. Bateman and Mr. Boykett.

Mr. Henry Stocker applied for and obtained a transfer to himself of the licence of the Prince Of Wales Inn.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 November 1889.

Monday, November 25th: Before Captain Carter, J. Fitness Esq., and Alderman Banks.

Thomas Love, who had the appearance of an engineer, was charged with stealing 10s. from the person of Thomas Stocker, a lad of nine years, on the 23rd inst.

Henry Stocker, landlord of the Prince Of Wales Inn, Guildhall Street, said the prisoner was in his bar on Saturday afternoon, from about three o'clock till five and twenty past. Witness gave his son 10s. in silver whilst he stood there, and told him to go to the Silver Spring Company and order a dozen large and a dozen small lemons, and to get some stamps. The prisoner heard what passed. The boy left at 20 minutes past three, and the prisoner went about five minutes afterwards. The boy afterwards returned without the stamps and without the money, and from what he said he communicated with the police.

Thomas Stocker, aged nine, said his father on the day in question gave him 10s. He told him to get 10s. worth of stamps from Stace's. He had first to go to the Silver Spring Company in Foord Road and order some goods. After he had left the Silver Spring Company he met the prisoner at the corner of Shellons Street. He said witness was to go back to the Silver Spring Company and order two dozen lemons instead of one, and that witness was to give him the money and he would get the stamps. Witness gave him the money and prisoner told him to come and meet him again on Grace Hill. Witness accordingly went to look for him, but could not find him.

P.C. John Brace, of the Dover Borough Police Force, said he went to the Dover Priory Station on Saturday evening with P.C. Dawson at ten minutes past seven. There was a London train just about to leave and witness rode as far as Kearsney Station. When the train stopped he got out and searched it. Witness found the prisoner in a third class carriage and remarked “I believe your name is Thomas Love”. He said “No, you have made a mistake”. Witness charged him with stealing 10s. at Folkestone. He said “I never thought it was coming to this”. He was searched at Dover and 13s. 5d. was found on him.

Witness pleaded Guilty and was sentenced to one month's imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express 30 November 1889.

Monday, November 25th: Before Capt. Carter, Alderman Banks, and J. Fitness Esq.

Thomas Love, described as an engine driver, was charged with stealing 10s. on the 23rd inst., the money of Mr. William Stocker.

Prosecutor, landlord of the Prince Of Wales Inn, 71, Guildhall Street, said the prisoner had been in his bar on two or three occasions. He was there on Saturday afternoon when he gave his son, Thomas, 10s. in silver to get some stamps, and directed him also to go to the Silver Spring Company and order some mineral waters. The prisoner heard what he said. It was about ten minutes past three. Prisoner left the house about five minutes later. The boy returned without the stamps and money, and told him how he had lost the money.

Thomas Stocker, a little boy, son of last witness, said his father gave him 10s. on Saturday afternoon to get 10s. worth of stamps at Mr. Stace's at the Post Office. He was to go first to the Silver Spring Company in Foord Road and order some goods. He went there, and on the road to Mr. Stace's he met the prisoner, who told him he was to go back to the Silver Spring Company and order two dozen lemons instead of one dozen, and that he was to give him the money and he would get the stamps.

P.C. Graves, of Dover, said he went with P.C. Dawson on Saturday to the Priory Station at Dover. When he reached there a train was just starting. He got into the train and went as far as Kearsney, where he got out and searched the train, and found the prisoner in a third class carriage. He said “I believe your name is Thomas Love” and he replied “No. You have made a mistake”. Witness said “I am a police officer, and shall charge you with stealing 10s. at Folkestone” and he said “I never thought it would come to this”. The prisoner was searched at Dover police station and 13s. 5d. found upon him.

The prisoner pleaded Guilty, and the Bench sentenced him to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 January 1900.

Friday, January 26th: Before C.J. Hoad and Colonel Westropp.

James Wheeler (sic) obtained confirmation of the licence of the Prince Of Wales beerhouse, Guildhall Street.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

Yesterday (Friday) a temporary authority was granted to Mr. James Weaver for the Prince Of Wales Inn.

 

Folkestone Express 10 March 1900.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before J. Fitness, C.J. Pursey, W. Wightwick, and J. Pledge Esqs.

James Wheeler (sic), Prince Of Wales, Guildhall Street applied for a transfer of licence for the above-mentioned public house. Granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday, the following transfer was granted: Prince Of Wales, Guildhall Street, to Mr. J. Wheeler.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 September 1902.

Wednesday, September 24th: Before Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Harry Moon, a lance corporal in the Buffs, and wearing the South African medal, was charged with attempting to obtain the sum of 8 14s. 6d. by means of a worthless cheque from Councillor J. Jones.

Councillor J. Jones said: On Monday, the prisoner, accompanied by a woman, came to my shop. He selected various articles of furniture, and said he would call back and pay for them. He did not call any more that day, but came back between two and three yesterday afternoon. He told me that he had a cheque for 15. Would I take it and give him the change which was to come out of the account? I asked him if the cheque was from the Government for his pay. He said “Yes”, and I asked him to go and get the cheque. He went away and came back in about half an hour. He then produced a cheque for 25, dated Sept. 23rd. He selected some more goods, and wanted the difference, 8 14s. 6d., out of the cheque. I said to him “This is not the Government cheque for 15”. He replied “My money is in the National Provincial Bank, and this is my own cheque”. I said “Why did you not get it cashed at the bank this morning?” He said “I found it was too late; the bank closes at three”. I then said “Why not wait until tomorrow when the bank opens?” He answered “Because I want particularly to get away by the five train; my wife is ill, and I want the goods delivered to the station before five”. I said to the accused “I don't want any nonsense; is this money at the bank or not?” He said “Yes, and much more than that”. I said “I don't think that I have sufficient change”. My wife said “Oh, yes, you have”, and accused said “If you have not got quite enough – I am in a hurry, and will have some more goods; these pictures will do, and it will make the change 5 or 6”. I said “You sit down, and if your cheque is all right I'll change it in three minutes”. He replied “The bank is closed; it's no use going there”. I said “Sit down; while you are chatting, I'll get the change”. I then made enquiries, and went to the police station and gave particulars to Sergt. Dawson. On my return, prisoner said “Have you got the money?” He was then outside the shop talking to the woman. I told him to come into the shop, and P.C. Scott came down. I then invited him to come to the police station and explain matters. At first he demurred. I said “Where did you get this cheque from?” He replied “From Bill Weaver, at the Prince of Wales; he gave me the cheque”. I then accompanied prisoner to the station, and at six o'clock last night signed the charge prepared by the Chief Constable.

Mrs. Major, wife of Charles Major, of the East Kent Arms Hotel, said: The prisoner came into the bar yesterday afternoon, and brought a note from my sister. In consequence of the note I gave the prisoner a blank cheque.

Charles John Lee, accountant at the National Provincial Bank, said he did not know the prisoner, and had not seen him before. Accused had not an account at the bank, and to his (witness's) knowledge never had one.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty. He said that when in South Africa he had had some money transferred to his account at Cape Town. He came from the Sussex Regiment to the Buffs, and now the money could not be traced.

Councillor Jones appealed to the Bench to deal with the accused under the First Offenders Act. The man had only just married, and it would be a pity to blight two young lives. The case had been brought in the public interest. He had not lost any money, and no real harm had been done.

An officer present said the regimental record of the accused was clean. He was transferred to the Buffs in South Africa, and invalided home with enteric fever.

Moon, questioned, said he had two more years service with the colours to do.

Alderman Herbert: Moon, you have shown great ingenuity – misplaced ingenuity – in perpetrating this act. Fortunately for you your regimental sheet is clean, and the prosecutor has pleaded hard for the Bench to deal leniently with you. You will therefore be bound over under the First Offenders Act in the sum of 20 to be of good behaviour for six months.

Prisoner: Thank you, sir.

It should be explained that Mr. Weaver of the Prince of Wales is Mrs. Major's brother. Prisoner went to the Prince of Wales in the afternoon, and spoke freely about his money at the bank. He said he did not wish to buy a book of cheques when one would do, and upon this, Mr. Weaver being out, Mrs. Weaver obliged prisoner by sending a note to Mr. Major, knowing that he banked at the N.P.B.

 

Folkestone Express 27 September 1902.

Wednesday, September 24th: Before Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and G.I. Swoffer Esq.

Harry Moon, a lance corporal of the Buffs, was charged with attempting to obtain 8 14s. 6d. from John Jones by means of a worthless cheque.

Prosecutor said between eleven and twelve o' clock on Monday prisoner, accompanied by a woman, went to his shop and selected some furniture. Prisoner said he would come back between two and three p.m. He did not do so, however, and came on Tuesday afternoon. Prisoner stated he had a cheque for 15 and asked witness if he could give him the change. Witness enquired if it was a cheque from the Government, and he replied “Yes”. Witness asked him for the cheque and prisoner said he would go and get it. He returned about half an hour later and selected some more furniture and presented a cheque on the National Provincial Bank for 25 and wanted the difference, 8 14s. 6d. Witness said it was not the Government cheque for 15. Prisoner replied “No; my money is in the National Provincial Bank, and this is my cheque”. Witness said “Why did you not cash this at the bank?” Prisoner replied “I forgot it until it was too late. The Bank closes at three o'clock”. Witness proposed that he should wait until next day and then cash it, but prisoner wanted particularly to get away by the five o'clock train, as he said his wife was ill. He wanted the goods delivered at the station before five o'clock. Witness told prisoner he did not want any nonsense, and asked whether the money was at the bank or not. Prisoner replied “Yes, and a lot more than that”. Witness said he did not think he had the change, so prisoner selected more goods, which left him change of 5. Witness told prisoner to sit down, and if his cheque was all right he would change it in three minutes. Prisoner said “The Bank is closed; it is no good going there”. Witness went to the bank, and on making enquiries and finding prisoner had no account, he went to the police station and gave information. When witness returned, prisoner said “Have you got the money?” He was then standing on the pavement. Witness told him to come inside as he did not do business on the pavement.

Constable Scott then came inside and asked prisoner to go to the police station and explain the matter. When asked where he got the cheque, prisoner said “From Bill Weaver at the Prince of Wales”.

Mrs. Alice Major, of the East Kent Arms, said prisoner went to their house on Tuesday afternoon and took a note letter, and she then put a blank cheque in and handed it to prisoner.

It was a cheque obtained in this way that prisoner used.

Charles John Mason, accountant at the National Provincial Bank, said prisoner had no account then at the Bank, and so far as witness knew he never had.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty and said he had some money transferred from Cape Town, but could not trace it at all.

Mr. Jones asked the Bench to deal as leniently as possible with prisoner.

An officer gave prisoner a very good character so far as he knew, but the prisoner's company sheet was in South Africa, and the officer commanding the regiment was away. Prisoner was at present on sick furlough, having caught enteric fever while at the front.

The Bench bound the prisoner over in the sum of 20 to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 September 1902.

Wednesday, September 24th: Before Mr. Herbert, Mr. Swoffer, and Councillor Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Harry Moon, a soldier in the Buffs, was charged with endeavouring to obtain 8 14s. 6d. from Councillor Jones by means of a worthless cheque.

Councillor Jones said prisoner went to his shop on Grace Hill with a woman and selected some articles of furniture. He then said he would call the next day. Witness saw him when he called, and prisoner told him that he had got a cheque for 15, asking him to take it and give him the change. Witness asked him whether it was the cheque from the Government for prisoner's pay, and he said “Yes”. Witness then asked him for the cheque, and he said he would go and get it, and went away. Witness said he would be there when prisoner returned. Prisoner came back in about half an hour, and produced a cheque for 25. He wanted 8 14s. 6d. change out of the cheque. Witness said to him “This is not the Govenment cheque for 15”. Prisoner answered “No. My money is in the National Provincial Bank, and this is my cheque”. Witness said “Why did you not get the cash this morning from the bank?” Prisoner replied “I forgot it until it was too late. The bank closes at 3 o'clock”. Witness then said “Why not wait until tomorrow when the bank opens?” He said “I want particularly to get away by the 5 o'clock train. My wife is ill, and I want the goods delivered to the station before five”. Witness said “I don't want any nonsense. Is this money at the bank or not?” Prisoner answered “Yes, more than that – much more than that”. Witness said “I don't think I have got nearly 9 in change”. Prisoner then said “If you have not got it, I am in such a hurry that I will have some more goods so that I can have 5 or 6 in change. I will have those pictures”. Witness said “If your cheque is right, I will change it in three minutes”. Prisoner replied “The Bank is closed; it is no use going there”. Witness then told him to sit down, and while he was chattering he would go and get the change. Witness then went to the Bank, and on the way back, to the police station, and thence to his shop again. Prisoner said “Have you got the money?” Witness replied “come in my shop. I don't do business out here”. P.C. Scott came down, and witness said “Will you come to the police station and explain this matter?” Prisoner the said he had got the cheque from Bill Weaver at the Prince Of Wales. Witness accompanied him to the police station.

Charles John Wilson, accountant at the National Provincial Bank, said he had never seen the prisoner before. He had no account at the Bank, and had not to witness's knowledge had one.

Councillor Jones made an appeal for the prisoner, remarking that it was a hard case and he did not wish the man and his young wife to be blighted thus early in life. No-one had been harmed – he had not been defrauded, but he thought it right to bring the case before the Bench in the interests of the public. He would appeal for mercy and consideration.

An officer from the Camp said prisoner had a clean sheet, and was now on sick furlough.

Prisoner was dealt with under the First Offenders Act, and bound over in 20 to be of good behaviour.

Prisoner, who was deeply moved, said “Thank you very, very much, sir”.

 

Folkestone Express 11 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and J. Stainer Esqs., and Alderman Vaughan.

Mr. Minter made an application on behalf of the landlord of the Prince of Wales Inn for an alteration of the premises, and explained to the Magistrates that through a mistake the plans were deposited one day late, but said that the Magistrates had power to waive the objection.

The Magistrates, however, adjourned the consideration.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 September 1903.

Wednesday, September 2nd: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, E.T. Ward, and J. Stainer.

Permission to alter the Prince Of Wales public house, Guildhall Street, was granted by the Bench.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1904.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and W.G. Herbert, E.T. Ward, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

Prince Of Wales.

Mr. Minter supported an application for a full licence for this house, an old beer house. No evidence was given.

The Chairman remarked that it was not an opportune time to apply for new licences. It would be better to await the passing of the new Act.

This concluded the business.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1904.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonels Hamilton, Fynmore, and Westropp, Messrs. J. Ward and C.J. Pursey.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Chief Constable first presented his annual report (for which, see Folkestone Express 13 February 04).

The Chairman then addressed his colleagues (for which, see Folkestone Express 13 February 04).

Mr. Minter, on behalf of the owners, offered to surrender the beer licence of the Prince Of Wales, Guildhall Street, which had been granted under the old Act of 1869, if the Bench would grant a new full licence under the Act of 1902, but the Justices, in view of the present state of affairs, declined the offer.

 

Folkestone Express 28 November 1914.

Wednesday, November 25th: Before E.T. Ward, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, and E.T. Morrison esqs.

Mrs. Weaver made an application for the transfer of the licence of the Prince of Wales from her father.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 November 1914.

Wednesday, November 25th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Councillor G. Boyd, Alderman C. Jenner, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Mr. J.J. Giles.

Miss Weaver applied for the temporary transfer of the licence of the prince of Wales beerhouse, Guildhall Street herself. She explained that her father, who formerly held the licence, was dead.

This was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 27 November 1915.

Local News.

At a sitting of the Folkestone Bench on Wednesday, before E.T. Ward Esq., and other Magistrates, the licence of the Prince of Wales (beerhouse), Guildhall Street, was temporarily transferred from Miss Weaver to Mr. Claude Banks.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 November 1915.

Wednesday, November 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Councillor G. Boyd, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Col. G.P. Owen.

The licence of the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street, was temporarily transferred from Miss Weaver to Mr. C. Banks.

Note: This is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 15 January 1916.

Wednesday, January 12th: Before E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, R.G. Wood, E.T. Morrison and J.J. Giles Esqs.

The justices granted the transfer of the licence of the Prince of Wales beerhouse, Guildhall Street, to Mr. Claude L. Banks from Miss Weaver.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 January 1916.

Wednesday, January 12th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Councillor G. Boyd, Councillor R.G. Wood, Mr. J.J. Giles, and Mr. E.T. Morrison.

Mr. L. Banks made an application for the transfer of the licence of the Prince of Wales beerhouse, Guildhall Street, from Miss Weaver to Mr. C.L. Banks. Granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 April 1917.

Friday, April 20th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Claude Latham Banks, landlord of the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street, was summoned for permitting drinking in prohibited hours. Defendant, who pleaded Not Guilty, was represented by Mr. A.K. Mowll.

P.S. Sales said at 11.50 p.m. on April 16th, he saw a light in a rear room of the Prince of Wales. He knocked at the door and asked if anyone was on the premises. Defendant said “No, only the wife and kiddy. Why?” Witness said “I have reason to believe you have”. Defendant then said he had a few friends in. Witness entered the premises, and in a rear room saw three civilians and a soldier sitting at the table. Defendant said they were his guests, and the soldier said “We have been having supper”. Witness said he could not see any sign of supper, to which defendant replied that they had had supper some time before. On the mantel he found two pint glasses and two wine glasses. One of the large glasses contained about half a pint of beer. The landlord said “That's mine”, and drank the contents. The other glasses had evidently had mineral waters in them. Witness took the names of the men and said he would report them for a summons. The soldier said “This is a bit of red tape; worse than being in France”. Defendant said “Don't make it too thick; it is most unfortunate. I would have given anything for it not to have happened”.

By Mr. Mowll: Defendant showed him a bottle of ginger wine in the bar, and said that was what the men had been having. He was not satisfied that the glasses had been used for ginger wine. Defendant told him he had invited the men at 9 o'clock.

By the Magistrates' Clerk: The room was not a public one. There was nothing of any kind on the table, and there were no marks of glasses.

P.C. Whittaker corroborated.

Mr. Mowll submitted that he had no case to answer, and pointed out that the section under which the action was taken said “Any person who sells or exposes for sale”, whilst another section stated that the Court must be satisfied that a transaction in the nature of a sale was about to take place. This, he suggested, had not been proved.

The Magistrates decided to hear the evidence for the defence.

Defendant stated that he and three of the other men, whose birthdays came near together at the beginning of April, met at the Hippodrome on the previous Saturday, and arranged to have a birthday supper on the Monday. Witness provided the supper, which was laid in his own private room. Nothing was provided to drink with the supper, but later the men had some ginger wine, and witness had a glass of beer. Witness offered to show Sergt. Sales the remains of the supper, and he replied “No, I am perfectly satisfied”.

By the Chief Constable: The fifth glass must have been either removed with the supper, or have been on the floor.

Pte. W.T. Tillings, Royal Fusiliers, corroborated.

At this point the Bench dismissed the case, with a caution to licence holders that they ran great risks by giving these little suppers.

 

Folkestone Express 28 April 1917.

Friday, April 20th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Claude Latham Banks, landlord of the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street, was summoned for selling drink during prohibited hours on April 16th. Mr. A.K. Mowll appeared for the defendant and pleaded Not Guilty.

P.S. Sales said at 11.50 p.m. on the 16th he was on duty, when he saw a light in a room at the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street. He knocked, and on the defendant appearing, he asked him if he had anyone on the premises. He said “Only the wife and kiddie”. Later, he said he only had a few friends, and witness said he would see them. In a room at the back of the bar, witness saw four men sitting at a table, one of them being a soldier. Witness asked them what they were doing there, and defendant said “They are my guests”. The soldier said they had stayed to supper. Defendant, in reply to the Sergeant, said he invited the men about 9 o'clock. The room was described by the landlord as his private room. On the mantelshelf there were four glasses, one of which contained about half a pint of beer. Defendant said that was his. The other glasses had apparently contained “minerals”. He took the names of the men, and said they would be reported for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours. The soldier said “This is red tape; I'd sooner be back in France”. Defendant, when told he would be reported, said it was most unfortunate; he would not have had it happen for anything. He was very sorry.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: The house was properly locked up. Witness was satisfied that the men were not there for supper. Defendant showed him a bottle which contained non-alcoholic ginger wine.

By the Clerk: There were no glasses on the table.

By the Chief Constable: The glasses were within reach of the men sitting at the table.

P.C. Whittaker, who accompanied the last witness, corroborated.

Mr. Mowll submitted that there was no case for him to answer, as it had not been proved there had actually been a sale.

The Bench ruled that the case must proceed, and Mr. Mowll called the defendant, who, giving evidence, said it was arranged to give a birthday supper party, but this was put off because witness was ill. However, the four of them met at the Hippodrome on Saturday, and arranged to meet for supper at his house on Monday. They occupied his own private room. For supper cold beef, mixed pickles, and bread and cheese were served, but they had nothing to drink at all for supper. After the repast the supper things were removed into the kitchen. After supper his guests had a non-alcoholic ginger wine. They had not played at cards. The soldier told them about Vimy Ridge, where he was wounded at the previous battle.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: He did not remember saying to the Sergeant when asked whether he had anyone on his premises “No, only the wife and kiddie”. All his guests left the premises at 8 o'clock, and returned at 9 o'clock. Witness charged nothing for the supper. He was sure they had nothing to drink with the meal. After the supper they all drank ginger wine with the exception of witness. The fourth glass must have been removed with the remains of the supper, or been placed on the floor. The time after the supper was spent in conversation, and he was surprised how quickly the time went.

By the Clerk: The civilians had been customers of his ever since he had had the house – about 18 months. They were invited because their birthdays were all close together. They did not have a party last year. The soldier's experiences were the topic of the evening. He had to “call time” on beer at 7 o'clock that evening, because he only had a certain amount of beer to sell per day, and had to keep it down.

Private William T. Tillings, who was one of the party, said the landlord arranged the supper as they were leaving the Hippodrome on Saturday. He was wounded at Vimy Ridge on May 23rd last. He had a pass which entitled him to be out till midnight.

The Chief Constable: Didn't you find all this conversation rather dry work? – Not particularly.

How many glasses of ginger wine did you have? – Only one.

Did you have anything to drink with the supper? – No.

Rather dry, wasn't it? – Yes, it went down rather dry.

The Chairman here announced that the majority of the Bench held that there was not sufficient evidence to justify a conviction, and the case would therefore be dismissed. They, however, wished to caution licence holders about “these little supper parties”, and hoped this sort of thing would not happen again. Let licensees think of the risks they were running.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 July 1917.

Local News.

The following licence was transferred at the Police Court on Tuesday, Mr. E.T. Ward being in the chair: Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street, from Mr. Barber (sic) to Mr. C. Stay.

 

Folkestone Express 18 August 1917.

Local News.

On Wednesday at the Police Court the following licence was transferred; the Prince of Wales beerhouse, Guildhall Street, from Mr. C.L. Banks to Mr. C. Stay.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 August 1917.

Local News.

At a sitting of the Borough Magistrates on Wednesday, Mr. G.I. Swoffer presiding, the licence of the Prince of Wales beerhouse was transferred from Mr. C.L. Banks to Mr. C. Stay.

 

Folkestone Express 2 February 1918.

Friday, January 25th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillors G. Boyd and E.T. Morrison, and the Rev. Epworth Thompson.

Charles Stay was summoned in respect of a breach of the Lighting Order in Guildhall Street, and the case was adjourned till the morrow, defendant not appearing.

Sergt. Burniston said that when he called at the house the defendant remarked to him “Oh! You go to h---“.

Saturday, January 26th: Before G. Boyd and E.T. Morrison Esqs.

Charles Stay, of Guildhall Street, summoned for a bright light at the Prince of Wales public house, whose case was adjourned from the previous day, now appeared, and he was defended by Mr. H.W. Watts.

The evidence given on the previous day was repeated and the defendant and his daughter also stated that no light was showing from the room.

The Magistrates imposed a fine of 2, there being a previous conviction for a similar offence.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 February 1918.

Local News.

On Saturday at the Police Court, Charles Stay, occupier of the Prince of Wales beerhouse, was fined 2 for a breach of the Lighting Order.

 

Folkestone Express 31 May 1919.

Friday, May 23rd: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Col. Owen, the Rev. Epworth Thompson, Messrs. Collins, Condy, and Blamey.

Mr. Charles Stay, of the Prince of Wales beerhouse, was summoned for allowing a child to be in the bar during opening hours. Mr. H.W. Watts appeared for the defendant and pleaded Guilty.

Inspector Sales said at 12.45 on May 18th he saw the defendant's son serving customers. Defendant said the boy was 14 last December, but witness said his information was that the lad was 13 years of age. Subsequently Mr. Stay produced the birth certificate, which showed that the boy was 13 last December.

Mr. Watts, addressing the Bench in mitigation, said on the day in question Mrs. Stay was away, and defendant had the services of his son, a Boy Scout, honestly believing he was 14 years of age. The boy had not been in the bar since, and Mr. Stay was sorry the mistake had occurred.

Fined 10s.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 June 1919.

Wednesday, June 4th: Before Mr. A. Stace and Mr. W. Hollands.

Mrs. Mary Ann Williams was charged with wilfully damaging crates and bottles, value about 7s. 6d., the property of Mr. C.L. Verral, of 38, Foord Road.

Mr. Verral stated that defendant came to his premises drunk on Tuesday evening and asked for drink, which was refused. She then said “If you won't ---- serve me, I'll throw these over”, and deliberately pushed over the crates. Witness followed her up to Guildhall Street, where he gave her into custody.

P.C. Whitehead stated that in company with the first witness he went to the Prince of Wales Tavern, where defendant was in the private bar. He took her outside, and told her he would have to take her into custody, at which she became very violent.

Defendant said she was very sorry, but as her sight was bad she fell over the crates.

The Chief Constable said defendant had a very bad record, there being no less than 21 previous charges against her.

The Magistrates sentenced her to 14 days' hard labour, without the option of a fine.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 December 1919.

Local News.

We regret to announce the death of Mr. Henry Stocker, who passed away after a brief illness on Sunday last, at his residence, Lilford Villa, Cheriton Road, in his 71st year. Deceased, who was a Londoner by birth, had resided in Folkestone for over thirty years, and up to the time of his retirement held the licence of the Prince of Wales Tavern, Guildhall Street, having previously been proprietor of an off licence in Foord Road. The deceased was a shrewd man of business. He was a member of the Sandgate Lodge of Freemasons, and in politics was an enthusiastic unionist. In the later years of his life he took a keen interest in gardening, and was passionately fond of flowers, especially roses. He leaves behind him a widow and six children. Of these three are abroad in the United States, Canada and Nova Scotia. Another is a well-known employee at the Post Office. Genuine sympathy is expressed for the widow and family.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 11th: Before The Mayor, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Councillor A. Stace, Col. Owen, Rev. Epworth Thompson, Councillor Hollands, Councillor Morrison, and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

Mr. H. Reeve (the Chief Constable) presented the following report: I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 113 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz.; Full licences 70, beer on 7, beer off 6, beer and spirit dealers 15, grocers, etc. off 6, confectioners wine on 8, confectioners wine off 6, a total of 113. This gives an average, according to the Census of 1911, of one licence to every 296 persons, or one on licence to every 495 persons. During the past year 13 of the licences have been transferred. Since the last annual licensing meeting the licensees of the undermentioned premises have been convicted as follows: Prince of Wales Tavern, fined 10s. on 23rd May, for allowing a child to be in the bar of his licensed premises; East Kent Arms, fined 10s. on 29th August for supplying drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Star and Garter, fined 10s. on 30th November for supplying intoxicating drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Globe Hotel, fined 10 on each of two summonses on 4th December for charging more for whisky than the maximum price allowed under the Order made by the Food Controller. During the year ended 31st December, 46 persons (35 males and 11 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 34 were convicted and 12 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. In the preceding year 26 persons (17 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 14 were convicted and 12 discharged. The regulation of the Liquor Control Board restricting the hours for the sale and consumption of intoxicating liquor remains in force. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. There are 24 premises licensed for music and dancing, 2 for music only, and 2 for public billiard playing. Numerous visits have been made by the police at irregular intervals during the year to the licensed premises and places of entertainment, and I am pleased to report that the houses generally have been conducted in a satisfactory manner.

The Mayor said the Magistrates had considered the report, and they thought it very satisfactory. There had been a little increase in drunkenness, but they hoped that would disappear again. With reference to the licences, the Bench had decided to renew them all, except the Prince of Wales Tavern, East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, and Globe Hotel, in consequence of new legislation that might come on. The licences referred to would come up for consideration at the adjourned meeting.

The adjourned sessions were fixed for the 10th March.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions for Folkestone were held at the Police Court, the Mayor presiding.

Mr. H. Reeve presented his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Mayor said the report was very satisfactory, although there was a little increase in drunkenness. They would renew all the licences to the licensed premises, except the four mentioned in the report, which would be adjourned to a later court.

 

Folkestone Express 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 10th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer and G. Boyd, Col. Owen, and Messrs. A, Stace and G.H. Blamey.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, the Prince of Wales, the Globe, and the Star and Garter were renewed, they having been adjourned from the annual meeting.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 9th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G.P. Owen, Councillor A. Stace, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Mr. J.H. Blamey.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, Globe, and Prince of Wales, deferred at the annual sessions, were now renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 28 May 1921.

Local News.

On Wednesday at the Police Court the following transfer was granted: Prince of Wales beerhouse, from Mr. C.J. Stay to Mr. J.C. Lee.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 May 1921.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, Councillor W.J. Harrison being in the chair, the licence of the Prince of Wales Inn, Guildhall Street, was transferred from Mr. C.S. Stay to Mr. J.C. Lee.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 May 1922.

Local News.

Mary Ann Williams appeared at the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday to answer a charge of being drunk and disorderly. Mr. G.I. Swoffer was the presiding Magistrate. Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Pritchard said about 9.30 p.m. on Monday he was on duty in Guildhall Street. Prisoner came out of the Prince of Wales public house, shouting and using obscene language. He took her into custody. She had been refused a drink at this house, and turned out by the landlord.

Prisoner said she was very sorry. She had met some friends and had a little drop to drink. She got her drink at Cheriton. She went to the Prince of Wales, and the landlord said he would throw her out if she did not leave. That made her lose her temper. She was very sorry to be brought there again. She had a drop of drink, and that overcame her. She had tried to be good since she was last here. She asked for another chance.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew): She was here about three months ago. No longer a period than usual.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve): There are thirty convictions against her.

The Chairman said they would give her one more chance. She would be fined 2, or a month's imprisonment.

Prisoner: Can I have time?

A fortnight was allowed for payment.

Mr. Andrew: Some day you will be bound over to be of good behaviour for twelve months and you will not be able to find the sureties, and then you will have to go to prison for a year. Just think that over.

 

Folkestone Express 9 February 1924.

Tuesday, February 5th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Miss I. Weston, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman C.E. Mumford, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. Morrison, and Mr. W.R. Boughton.

John Charles Lee, Prince of Wales Inn, was summoned for an alleged breach of the Licensing Act in regard to closing hours.

Patrick McBrine, Herbert Walters, Charles Skinner, Sidney Rye and Charles Phillips were summoned for alleged consuming liquor during prohibited hours.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said he had received a letter from Mr. Rutley Mowll (Dover) stating he had been instructed to defend the case, and asking for an adjournment.

The Bench acceded to an adjournment until Friday in next week.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Miss Weston, Miss Hunt, the Rev. Epworth Thompson, Alderman Pepper, Col. Owen, Col. Broome-Giles, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, A. Stace, W. Hollands, E.T. Morrison, J.H. Blamey, and W.R. Boughton.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) presented his report as follows: I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 114 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor, and taking the population of the Borough according to the last Census this gives an average of one licensed house to every 329 persons. The following are particulars of the licensed premises: Full licences 71; beer on 7; beer off 6; beer and spirit dealers 13; grocers, etc., off 6; confectioners wine on 3; chemists wine off 4; cider and sweets off 1; Total 114 (81 on and 33 off). Fifteen of the licences have been transferred during the year. Four occasional licences have been granted to licence holders to sell drink on special occasions elsewhere than on their licensed premises, and 60 extensions of hours have been granted to licence holders when dinners, etc., were being held on their licensed premises. In no case has any abuse of the privilege been reported. Six hotels and one restaurant have authority under Section 3 of the Licensing Act, 1921, to supply intoxicating liquor with meals for one hour after 10 p.m. on weekdays, viz.: Metropole Hotel, Grand Hotel, Majestic Hotel, Regina Hotel, Esplanade Hotel, Royal Pavilion Hotel, and Central Cafe. During the year ended 31st December, 1923, 26 persons (21 males and 5 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 16 were convicted and 10 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. Of those proceeded against, 8 were residents of the Borough, 5 were soldiers, 10 were of no fixed abode, and 3 were non-residents. This is an increase of one as compared with the number proceeded against last year, when 25 persons (16 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 16 were convicted and 9 discharged. The permitted hours, as allowed by the Licensing Act, 1921, have been fixed by the Licensing Justices for the Borough of Folkestone as under: On weekdays from 10.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Sundays from 12 noon to 2 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. All the licensed premises have been periodically visited at irregular intervals by my officers during the year to see that the same are being conducted in a satisfactory manner, and I am pleased to report that with few exceptions no adverse reports have been submitted to me. There are 28 premises licensed for music and dancing and one for public billiard playing. During the year two licensees have been proceeded against for breaches of the Intoxicating Liquor Laws, viz.: (1) 15 June 23 Henry William Cork, George the Third, Fenchurch Street, permitting intoxicating liquor to be consumed on his licensed premises during non-permitted hours; the case was withdrawn upon my application to the Bench. (2) 7 September 23 Alfred John Cope, Rose Hotel, Rendezvous Street, failing to have his name and expression of business for which the licence was granted affixed to the premises; fined 10s. On 20th October, 1923, Michael Ivory, of the Bouverie Hotel, Bouverie Road, was convicted and fined 1 at Newport, Isle of Wight, for consuming intoxicating liquor on licensed premises during restricted hours. I beg to report that in my opinion there is still a redundancy of licensed premises on the older portion of the Borough. Observation has been kept, and it would appear that very unequal trade is done between house and house in the same neighbourhood. Three houses, viz.: The Oddfellows, Dover Street, The Belle Vue, St. John's Street, The Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, according to reports received, are doing the least trade in the area referred to, and I have no hesitation in saying that they are redundant to the needs of the public, and I accordingly recommend that the licence of each house be referred back for your consideration at the adjourned meeting. I have to express my appreciation of the fairness and courtesy extended to me by the Bench during my first year of office, and also for the able assistance I have received from your Clerk, Mr. John Andrew.

The Chairman said they were especially pleased, it being the Chief Constable's first year there, that he was in a position to present such a good report. The members of the Licensing Authority were very gratified that the report was so good. They were of opinion that such a good report must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law had been carried out and adhered to on every possible occasion. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded that in one instance the Chief constable withdrew the summonses, and in the other case the offence was of a technical nature. Then with regard to the cases of drunkenness, out of the 16 convictions only eight of them were residents of the Borough. When they considered the population of Folkestone and that Folkestone was a port, with a fishing quarter, and with a military district adjoining, the Magistrates thought it spoke well for the community. They knew the community of Folkestone was very sober, but it only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record. They were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past year, and they hoped the number would not be increased during the present year. On behalf of the Bench he offered his congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had enabled the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report. The Justices had given full consideration to the question of the renewal of those houses specifically mentioned with regard to redundancy, and they had decided to put back the renewal of those licences for consideration at the adjourned meeting, and they directed the Chief Constable to cause opposition to their renewal. As proceedings were also pending against the Prince of Wales Inn for alleged breaches of the Licensing Act that licence would not be renewed, but would be put back to the adjourned meeting also. The question of the renewal of the licences of the Rose Hotel and the George the Third had also been considered, and they would be renewed that day. All the other licences would also be renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1924.

Tuesday, February 5th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman C.E. Mumford, Mr. W.R. Boughton, and Miss E.I. Weston.

John Charles Lee, the licensee of the Prince of Wales public house, was summoned for a breach of the Licensing Act by supplying liquor during prohibited hours. Patrick McBrine, Herbert Walters, Charles Skinner, Sidney Rye and Charles Phillips were summoned for consuming liquor during prohibited hours.

The Clerk read a letter from Mr. Rutley Mowll stating that he had been instructed for the defence, but he was unable to attend, having been previously engaged in another case, and asking for the Magistrates to adjourn the case.

The Chief Constable said he had no objection to an adjournment.

The case was adjourned until Friday, February 15th.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman A.E. Pepper, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Councillor W. Hollands, Colonel P. Broome-Giles, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Miss E.I. Weston.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) read his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said they had heard the report of the Chief Constable, and they were especially glad, it being his first year, for him to be in a position for him to present such a good report at this annual licensing meeting. He did not think it required many words from him, beyond saying that the members of the licensing authority were very grateful that the report was so good, and they were all of opinion that having such a good result must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law was carried out and adhered to on all possible occasions. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded in one case that the Chief constable withdrew the summons, and the other case was of a technical nature. He thought they would agree with him that neither of these charges could have been of a serious nature. With regard to the convictions for drunkenness, they had heard that out of sixteen offenders only eight were residents of the borough. When they considered the population of Folkestone and further that the town was a port, with a fishing quarter, and had a military camp close at hand, to know that only eight of the offenders were residents spoke very well, he thought, for the community. (Hear, hear) The community as a whole was a very sober one in Folkestone. It only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record, and they were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past twelve months, and they hoped that the number of offenders would not be increased during the coming year. They offered their congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had undoubtedly assisted the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report as they had had that morning. The Bench felt that the question of the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows Inn, the Belle Vue, and the Richmond Tavern should have further consideration on the grounds of redundancy, and therefore they would put back the licensing of these houses to the adjourned sessions. They also directed the Chief Constable to give opposition to the renewals on the ground stated. The licence of the Prince of Wales, against which proceedings were pending, would also be put back. The Rose Hotel and the George the Third Inn had also been considered, and in these cases the licences would be renewed that day. Therefore, with the exception of the three houses mentioned on the grounds of redundancy, and the one against which proceedings were pending, all the other licences would be renewed that day.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 February 1924.

Friday, February 15th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Mr. W.R. Boughton.

John Charles Lee, the licensee of the Prince of Wales public house, was summoned for selling intoxicating liquor during prohibited hours. Defendant, who was represented by Mr. Rutley Mowll, of Dover, pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Laurence said at 10.05 p.m. on the 26th ultimo he was in Guildhall Street near the Prince of Wales public house in company with P.C. Nicholls. He noticed a number of men leave the public bar of the Prince of Wales, and through the open door he noticed a number of men consuming liquor from glasses. He kept observation through the bar door window and saw five men consume liquor. At 10.08 p.m. he saw Patrick McBrine served by Mrs. Lee, the wife of the defendant, with a pint of beer, and she received payment for same. The licensee was in the bar at the time. Witness entered the bar with P.C. Nicholls at 10.10 p.m. The clock in the public bar was 10.16, six minutes fast. He asked Mr. Lee whether he was aware of the time. He replied “My clock is fast. I've just called time”. Witness had not heard defendant call “time”. He could have heard him if he had. McBrine still had his glass of beer in his hand, and was drinking it. He said to the defendant “There you are, Mr. Lee. There's a man drinking here now”. McBrine said “I paid for this beer before time, and I am going to drink it”. McBrine then finished the beer up. It was then 10.13. Witness told the landlord that he would be reported for selling, supplying and allowing intoxicating liquor to be consumed on his premises during prohibited hours between 10.05 p.m. and 10.10 p.m. Defendant replied “Nothing was served here after time”.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll, witness said he was giving the time by his own watch, which had been set by the Town Hall clock. He left the Town Hall at 9.57 p.m. He put his watch on then. It was a very short walk from the Town hall to the Prince of Wales. He joined the other constable outside the Shakespeare Hotel. They went to the Prince of Wales at 10.05, and when they got there he saw some people coming out. The door of the public bar was not closed. He kept observation standing on the doorstep, and if anyone had come out they must have passed very near to him. He did not hear defendant call “Time”. He could not say what happened between 10 and 10.05.

P.C. Nicholls corroborated.

Mr. Rutley Mowll, for the defence, said defendant had been conducting a licensed victualler's business for twenty years. The customers were leaving at the time the constable arrived. His submission to the Court was that the two police officers would have been doing their duty quite effectively, and more acceptably, if they had gone into the house and helped the landlord to get rid of the few remaining stragglers. Instead of that they remained outside, and got a case against the defendant. If two police officers were unable to prevent McBrine from drinking his beer, how in the world could they expect the unfortunate landlord to be powerful when two police officers were powerless?

The Chairman said they considered the case proved and defendant would be fined 2. They thought the police gave their evidence very fairly.

Patrick McBrine, Herbert Waters, Charles Skinner, Sidney Rye and Charles Phillips were summoned for consuming drinks during prohibited hours at the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street, on the 26th ultimo. Mr. Rutley Mowll defended.

P.C. Laurence said that at 10.10 p.m. on the 26th ultimo he entered the Prince of Wales public house, where he saw the defendants finishing their beer. Between 10.05 and 10.10, when he was keeping observation through the window, they all drank from their glasses. At 10.20 he was overtaken by Walters, who asked why witness had put his name in his book. As Waters was not satisfied with witness's statement, he advised him to go to the Police Office. At first he demurred, and said he would stick to witness all night, but after a time they both went to the office. Witness told the officer in charge that proceedings might be taken against the defendant, who then appeared to be satisfied. At the time he was in the bar he did not tell the defendants that they would be reported.

By Mr. Mowll: At the Town Hall he told Walters that he would be wanted to give evidence. The men were drinking from beer glasses, but witness did not test them.

By the Magistrates' Clerk: He intended to make a report on the matter, and leave it to his superior officer to decide whether proceedings should be taken.

P.C. Nicholls corroborated.

McBrine, on oath, said at 9.45 he entered the Prince of Wales Inn and called for a pint of beer. He drank a little of it and then left the bar. He heard the landlord call “Time”, and when he returned he took the glass in his hand, but did not drink anything. The police then rushed in.

Defendants were fined 5s. each.

There was a further summons against Mr. Lee for selling, through his wife, liquor for consumption on the premises without it having been paid for before or at the time of sale. Mr. Rutley Mowll defended, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Miss Harriett Hood said that about the 18th December she went to the Prince of Wales and asked Mrs. Lee for a bottle of stout and a glass of burgundy, saying that she would pay for them on the following Saturday. Mrs. Lee said that would be all right, and witness drank the burgundy and took the stout away. She paid for the drink the following Saturday night. Witness had recently had a letter from Mrs. Lee, as follows: “Please pay the money you owe to us for drinks, otherwise I am going to see your mistress. I may then tell her something to interest her. Also please stop your lying tongue”. Witness showed the letter to a police constable, and to Inspector Pittock.

By Mr. Mowll: There had never been any trouble about her not paying for drinks, and she had never been turned out of another public house for a similar reason. It was before she consumed the drink that she told Mrs. Lee that she would not pay for it at the time.

Sergeant Pittock said that at 6.20 p.m. on the 8th instant he saw the defendant and Mrs. Lee at the Prince of Wales, the latter telling him that Miss Hood owed them some money. She also admitted sending the letter produced. When told he would be reported, defendant said that he did not call the sale a credit one, adding that after the last witness had consumed the drink she said that she could not pay for it until the following Saturday.

Mrs. Chapman, of 16, Darlington Street (called by the defence), said that she was at the Prince of Wales when Miss Hood was there. Miss Hood asked for a bottle of ale or stout, and also for something to drink. Mrs. Lee was very busy, and did not ask for the money at the time, but when she did ask for it Miss Hood said that she would pay the following day, or when she got paid. Mrs. Lee said that if she had known that, she would not have supplied Miss Hood.

Mrs. Kate Lee said that when Miss Hood obtained the drink there was no arrangement that she should have it on credit. After she had had the stuff she said that she had left her purse in the kitchen draw, and witness said “You know my husband does not allow that”. She also told Miss Hood that if she had known that, she would not have supplied her with the drink.

The Bench dismissed the case, but the Chairman said the police were quite justified in bringing it forward.

 

Folkestone Express 23 February 1924.

Friday, February 15th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. E.T. Morrison and Mr. G. Boyd.

John Charles Lee, landlord of the Prince of Wales Hotel, was summoned for selling one pint of beer at 10.08 p.m. on the 26th January. Mr. R. Mowll appeared for defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Lawrence said that at 10.05 p.m. on the 26th January he was in Guildhall Street, near the Prince of Wales public house, in company with P.C. Nicholls. He noticed a number of men leave the public bar of the Prince of Wales, and through the open door he noticed a number of men consuming liquor in the public bar, He kept observation through the window, and saw five men consume liquor, and at 10.08 p.m. he saw Patrick McBrine served with a pint of beer by Mrs. Lee, who received payment. The licensee was in the bar at the time. He entered the bar with P.C. Nicholls at 10.10 p.m. Town Hall time, and the clock in the bar was 10.16, six minutes fast. He asked Lee if he was aware of the time, and he replied “My clock is fast. I have just called time”. He had not heard defendant call “time”, but would have done so had he called “time”. McBrine still had the beer in his hand, and was drinking it. He said to the licensee “There you are, Mr. Lee, there's a man drinking here now.”. McBrine said “I paid for this beer before time, and I am going to drink it”. He finished it up, and it was then 10.13. He told the landlord he would be reported for selling intoxicating liquors to be consumed on his premises during prohibited hours, from 10.05 to 10.10 p.m., and he replied “Nothing was served here after time”.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: He gave the time by his watch, which was set by the Town Hall clock. They put their watch right at ten o'clock when they came out of the Town Hall. He put it right that night. He joined P.C. Nicholls near the Shakespeare Hotel and went on to the Prince of Wales. The door was left open five or six inches. He kept observation through the window in the bar door. He could see it was a pint of beer supplied by Mrs. Lee to McBrine. He saw him hand Mrs. Lee something. He could not say what happened between 10 and 10.15, or whether the landlord closed all the doors, with the exception of the public bar.

P.C. Nicholls corroborated.

Mr. Mowll said the police constables would have been doing their duty quite as effectively, and much more acceptably, if they had gone into the house and helped the landlord to get rid of the few remaining stragglers. Instead of that they stayed outside, and apparently they had got a case against the man. If two police officers, standing in the bar, were apparently unable to prevent McBrine carrying out his intention, how in the world could they expect the unfortunate landlord to be powerful when two police constables were apparently powerless? The landlord said he was trying to get the people out, and had already turned them out of four other rooms. Defendant had been a licence holder for 20 years, and 20 years' character in the public eye ought to stand a man in good stead when it was a question of eight minutes over the time on a Saturday night.

The Chairman said defendant would be fined 2. They thought the police gave their evidence very fairly.

Patrick McBrine, Herbert Waters, Charles Skinner, Sidney Rye and Charles Phillips were summoned for consuming after prohibited hours. Mr. R. Mowll defended.

P.C. Lawrence said he saw McBrine consume his beer, and the four other men finished their beer between 10.05 and 10.10. At 10.20 he was overtaken by Walters, who asked why witness had put his name in the book. As Waters was not satisfied with witness's statement, he advised him to go to the Police Office. At first he demurred, and said he would stick to witness all night, but after a time they both went to the office. Witness told the officer in charge that proceedings might be taken against the defendant, who then appeared to be satisfied. At the time he was in the bar he did not tell the defendants that they would be reported.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: He told the men they would probably be wanted as evidence against the landlord. At the police station he said the man had been found on the premises consuming liquor during prohibited hours.

P.C. Nicholls corroborated.

McBrine said that at 9.45 he entered the Prince of Wales and called for a pint of beer. He drank about half of it, and then left the bar. Mr. Lee called “Time”, and he hurried up to finish the remainder fo his beer. The police rushed in, and he picked his glass up, but he did not drink. It was exactly four minutes past ten, and his watch was right by the Town Hall clock.

Defendants were fined 5s. each.

John Charles Lee was further summoned for having, on the 18th December, sold, through his wife, a glass of ale to be consumed on the premises without it having been paid for before or after the beer was consumed. Mr. Mowll defended, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Miss Harriett Hood said she had been a customer at the Prince of Wales Hotel, and belonged to the share-out club there. She went there in December and had a drink, and brought a bottle away, for which she paid. About the 18th she went in again, and asked for a small bottle of stout and a glass of Worthington, and let her pay for it on Saturday. She was allowed to do so, and did not pay for it at the time. She paid for it on the Saturday night. She had received a letter from Mrs. Lee, as follows: “Will you please pay us the money you owe to us for drinks, otherwise I am going to see your mistress. I may tell her something to interest her. Also please stop your lying tongue”. She showed the letter to a police constable, and to Inspector Pittock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: There had never been any trouble in the house because she had not paid for drinks. She did not play a similar trick on the Lees eighteen months ago, and was turned out of the house. She told Mrs. Lee she had forgotten her purse, and had left it in a drawer in the kitchen.

Inspector Pittock said that at 6.20 p.m. on the 8th inst. he went to the Prince of Wales public house, where he saw Mrs. Lee and the defendant. He said “I believe Mrs. Hood owes you some money”. Mrs. Lee said “Yes, she does”. At that time he had no intention of reporting her for an offence. He asked Mrs. Lee if she had sent the letter, and she replied “Yes, I did, because what I object to greatly is that she has taken another customer away from this house”. He told Mr. Lee he would be reported for supplying drink for consumption on the premises on credit, and he replied “I don't call this a credit sale, and what is more, I am the licensee of this house, not my wife. She served her with the drink, I didn't, and after she had got the drink she said she couldn't pay for it until the following Saturday”.

This concluded the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Mowll called Mrs. Chapman, 16, Darlington Street, who said she was in the house when Miss Hood went in, and when Mrs. Lee asked for the money she said “I will pay for it tomorrow”. Mrs. Lee said if she had known she was not going to pay for it she would not have had it.

Mrs. Lee, wife of the licensee of the Prince of Wales, said there was no arrangement to supply Miss Hood on trust, and it was not until she had consumed one glass, and partly consumed another glass, that she said she had left her purse at home, and would pay the following night. She had had trouble with Miss Hood before.

The Chairman said there was some conflict of evidence, and the case would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 1 March 1924.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson and other Magistrates.

Mr. Andrew, the Clerk, said at the annual licensing meeting the licence of the Prince of Wales beerhouse was put back for consideration at that meeting on the ground that proceedings were pending for alleged breaches of the Licensing Act. The licensee had since been convicted.

The Chairman intimated that the licence would be renewed.

The licence of the Prince of Wales was also temporarily transferred from Mr. J.C. Lee to Mr. F.E. Doveton (sic).

 

Folkestone Herald 1 March 1924.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Mr. J. Blamey, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said at the annual general licensing sessions the renewal of the licence of the Prince of Wales beerhouse in Guildhall Street was deferred for consideration until that day on the ground that proceedings were pending against the house for breaches of the Licensing Act. The licensee was convicted. So far as the application in regard to the Prince of Wales beerhouse was concerned an application would be made for a protection order for an incoming tenant. He might say that the testimonials of the applicant were perfectly satisfactory to the police. There would be a subsequent application for the full transfer of the licence to the incoming tenant, and therefore it would be unnecessary to deal with the renewal of the licence to the old licensee.

A protection order was granted to Mr. Frank Doveton (sic), of Leicester, in respect of the Prince of Wales beerhouse.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 March 1924.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates, the licence of the Prince of Wales Inn, Guildhall Street, was transferred to Mr. F.E. Lupton, of Leicester.

 

Folkestone Express 24 May 1924.

Wednesday, May 21st: Before the Rev. Epworth Thompson, Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Councillor W. Hollands, Mr. Blamey, and Col. P. Broome-Giles.

Alterations to the Prince of Wales Hotel, Guildhall Street, were approved.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 May 1924.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Wednesday before the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson and other Magistrates, plans for alterations to the Prince of Wales Hotel were submitted to the Magistrates, who approved of them.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 February 1925.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 11th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Colonel G.P. Owen, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Mr. W. Hollands, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Colonel P. Broome-Giles.

Plans for alterations at the Prince of Wales public house were approved.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 January 1927.

Obituary.

We regret to announce the death, on Saturday, at the Prince of Wales Inn, Guildhall Street, of Mr. Frank Ernest Lupton. Deceased, who was forty three years of age, was a draper until he took up the calling of a licensed victualler. For a time he was in the employ of Messrs. Lewis and Hyland. He was widely esteemed. The funeral took place at the Cemetery on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 July 1939.

Local News.

Alleged blows in a public house were the subject of a summons at the Folkestone Police Court yesterday. Charles T. Howes, of 40, Radnor Park Crescent, Folkestone, was summoned for assault by Sydney Melbourne Mooring, of 143, Cheriton Road, Folkestone, who alleged that he struck him with a stick. There was a cross-summons in which Howes alleged that Mooring kicked him. Each defendant pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. H.G. Wheeler appeared for Howes.

Giving evidence, Mooring said on June 22nd at 2.15 p.m. he was in the Prince of Wales public house, Guildhall Street. He saw defendant there and said to him “Good morning, Charlie”. Howes replied “Good morning”, and there followed a conversation concerning their sons. Shortly after, Mooring said, he received a blow across the head. He put his glass down and turned round, receiving a further blow across the arm and a cut under the left eye. He had since attended the hospital for treatment for his injuries. Blood was streaming from the cuts and he could not see. He did nothing to cause Howes to strike him, and he denied any assault on Howes.

Mr. Wheeler: I put it to you that you lunged out at Howes with your foot and struck him on the shin.

Mooring: I did not.

Do you know that Mr. Howes sustained a severe accident in 1937? – Yes.

And he cannot stand without the support of a stick? - I don’t know anything about that.

Miss Joan Lupton, daughter of the licensee of the Prince of Wales, said Howes struck Mooring with his stick Further blows followed but Mooring did not strike or kick Howes.

Cross-examined, witness said she did not say to Howes the same evening that she had not seen what happened.

Mrs. Annie Lupton the licence holder of the Prince of Wales, said Mooring was in “a terrible state” after the blows and the bar floor was like a slaughter house.

By Mr. Wheeler: Howes made no complaint to her that Mooring had kicked him.

Howes, giving evidence, said without any warning at all Mooring made a “swipe at his shin”. If he struck Mooring it was in self defence; it was unintentional.

After commenting that there was a conflict of evidence, Mr. Wheeler said his client expressed his regret for what took place, although he maintained that what he did was in self defence.

The Magistrates dismissed the summons against Mooring, and fined Howes 10s.

 

Folkestone Express 8 July 1939.

Local News.

Two Folkestone men summoned each other for assault at Folkestone Petty Sessions on Friday. They were Charles Howes, of 4, Radnor Park Crescent, and Sydney Mooring, of 143, Cheriton Road. The summons against Mooring was dismissed, but Howes, represented by Mr. H.G. Wheeler, was fined 10/-. Both defendants denied the allegations.

Sydney Melbourne Mooring, of 143, Cheriton Road, said on June 22nd at 2.15 p.m., in the Prince of Wales public house in Guildhall Street, he saw the defendant. Witness said he did not know their boys were connected in some trouble some weeks ago. Witness turned round to take a drink from his glass, when he received a blow across the head. He put his glass down, and as he turned round he received a blow on the arm. He also received a cut above the left eye. His face was bandaged at the public house, and he later went to hospital, and had since attended there. After the blows had been struck blood streamed down his face, and he could not see. He did not incense Howes and did not strike him.

Mr. Wheeler: What happened, in fact, was this. You and Mr. Howes had some heated argument, and suddenly, without any warning, you lunged at him with your foot and struck him on the shin.

Witness: I did not.

Are you aware that Mr. Howes suffered a severe accident in 1937? – I am aware of that, and so I did not attempt to take any liberties.

Do you know Mr. Howes has a very large bruise on his left leg? – Perhaps he done it himself.

Miss Joan Daisy Lupton, the daughter of the licensee of the Prince of Wales Inn, said Mr. Howes struck Mr. Mooring with his stick. More blows followed. As a result of the blows Mr. Mooring was hurt. He did not strike or kick Mr. Howes.

Cross-examined, witness said she had never told Mr. Howes that she did not see what happened.

Mrs. Edith Annie Lupton, the licence holder of the public house, said after the incident Mr. Mooring was in a terrible state, and the bar floor was like a slaughterhouse.

Replying to Mr. Wheeler, witness said Mr. Howe made no complaint to her that Mr. Mooring had kicked him.

Howes, giving evidence, said that when Mooring came in there was a discussion over a certain matter. He told Mooring he “ought to be ashamed of himself”, and Mooring made a swipe at his shin. If he struck Mooring it was in self-defence.

Mr. Wheeler said his client had asked him to express his regret for what had occurred, but he contended what he did was in self-defence.

The Chairman (Mr. L.G.A. Collins) said the summons against Mooring would be dismissed. Howes would be fined 10/-, which would have to be paid within a month.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 January 1952.

Notice.

Borough of Folkestone.

To: The Clerk to the Rating Authority for the Borough of Folkestone in the County of Kent,

The Clerk to the Licensing Justices for the Borough of Folkestone in the County of Kent,

The Superintendent of Police, Kent County Constabulary, Folkestone in the County of Kent

And to all whom it may concern:

I, Christopher John L. Hawkes, now residing at the Prince of Wales, Folkestone in the County of Kent Beer-house keeper do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the said Borough of Folkestone in the said County, to be holden at the Town Hall, Folkestone aforesaid on Wednesday the 13th day of February, 1952 for the grant to me of a Justices' Licence authorising me to apply for and hold an Excise Licence to sell wine by retail at the licensed premises situate at the Prince of Wales, Folkestone, in the County of Kent, for consumption either on or off the premises and of which premises Mackeson and Company Limited, of Brewery, Hythe in the said County are the Lessees of whom I rent them.

Given under my hand this 7th day of January, 1952.

C.L. Hawkes.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 February 1952.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Mr. C.J. Hawkes, licensee of the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street was at Folkestone Annual Licensing meeting on Wednesday granted a wine licence. He said he had only been able to supply beer, and he produced a petition signed by 129 customers in support of the application for a wine licence.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 January 1960.

Notice.

To: The Clerk to the Rating Authority for the Borough of Folkestone in the County of Kent.

The Clerk to the Justices for the Borough of Folkestone in the County of Kent

The Chief Constable of Kent,

And to all whom it may concern

I, Christopher John L. Hawkes, of the “Prince of Wales”, 71, Guildhall Street Street, in the Borough of Folkestone, in the Licensing District of Folkestone, Beerhouse Keeper, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the First Session of the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the said Borough of Folkestone, in the said County of Kent, to be holden at the Town Hall, Folkestone aforesaid, on Wednesday, the 10th day of February, 1960, for the grant to me of a Justices' Licence authorising me to apply for and hold an Excise Licence to sell by retail Spirits in addition to the Beer and Wine now authorised to be sold there for consumption on the premises situate and being the “Prince of Wales”, 71, Guildhall Street, Folkestone aforesaid, of which premises Messrs. Mackeson and Company Limited, of Brewery, Hythe, in the said County, are the leasehold owners and of whom I rent them.

Given under my hand this 8th day of January, 1960.

C.J. Hawkes.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1960.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Licences to sell spirits, in addition to beer and wine, were granted to the Star and Garter, Harvey Street, and the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street.

Mr. M. Biskin, applying on behalf of Mr. C. Hawkes, of the Prince of Wales, said there was a considerable demand for spirits there.

 

South Kent Gazette 4 April 1979.

Local News.

A purse containing 20 was snatched from a bar counter in the Prince of Wales pub, Coolinge Road, Folkestone, on Thursday.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 March 1982.

Local News.

Landlady Lilian Hawkes has been given 14 days to quit her Folkestone pub. At a County Court hearing last Thursday the owners of the Prince of Wales in Guildhall Street, brewers Whitbread Fremlins Limited, were granted a possession order for the premises.

Mrs. Hawkes, agreeing the brewers were entitled to have thr order, did not contest the application. She told Judge Donald Sumner, presiding, that the brewery is willing to let her stay on at the pub until she has found a new home. The landlady has already approached Shepway District Council and has been told it will find her a place to live as soon as possible, she added.

Solicitor Mr. Christopher Bushnell, for Whitbread Fremlins, said the brewery will not take any steps which will cause hardship to the landlady.

Judge Sumner said “They have said they will do all they can to assist her and not enforce the claim unreasonably. I think they are being very fair and helpful”.

There were no claims for money or costs from the defendant.

A spokesman for Whitbread Fremlins said the eviction took place because the landlady wanted to be evicted. Mrs. Hawkes is a widow and due for retirement. The pub has been closed since Christmas, but no decision has been made yet on a new manager or tenant. The brewery will probably go through its usual process to get a new publican. This could take up to three months. But it depends on what the brewery decide to do, the spokesman added.

 

South Kent Gazette 5 May 1982.

Local News.

Days of pulling pints are over for Folkestone landlady, Mrs. Lilian Hawkes, who has retired from the Prince of Wales pub. She managed the Whitbread-owned pub in Guildhall Street for 31 years with her husband until he died four years ago.

Now Whitbread has decided to sell the Prince of Wales to a freeholder.

Whitbread officials, local licensees and members of the Licensed Victuallers' Association turned out to give Mrs. Hawkes – known to regulars as Jean – a good send-off during a reception at the Guildhall Hotel.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 April 1983.

Advertising Feature.

The Prince of Wales is one of those “blink and you miss it” sort of pubs. Situated in the heart of a residential area on the comer of Guildhall Street and Coolinge Road, it never pretended to be anything other than a quiet local. But there have recently been some big changes. In fact it has both a new look and a new landlord. Three small bars have been knocked through into one and there are plans to build up a darts team and serve hot and cold food.

The new man in charge is 40-year-old Kevin Atkins, who says proudly that the pub has been packed every day since he re-opened on March 1. “We've still got a bit of work to do, but I think we are well on the way to achieving what I want – a good, friendly pub”.

A free house, it serves 14 different draught beers and lagers – one of the biggest selections in the area.

Before coming to Folkestone, Mr. Atkins was manager of the White Hart in Reigate and before that worked in the Middle East. He was originally a career soldier but after 18 years in the Army was given a medical discharge after being injured in an I.R.A. explosion in Londonderry.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 February 1984.

Local News.

His name was Atkins, late of the British Army, and the order rang down the years since demob – “Atkins! Get your 'air cut!” Now remustered into civilian life as a landlord Kevin Atkins jumped to it, and half an hour later stood shorn as any rookie soldier recently subjected to the tender ministrations of a camp barber.

“It was a bit of a laugh, but there was a more serious purpose behind it”, said Kevin, landlord of the Prince of Wales pub in Folkestone's Guildhall Street, as he brushed away the stray hairs from his collar. “We wanted to raise money for the Poppy Appeal in a way that would give the regulars a bit of a giggle. My hair was 18 inches long, and I suppose someone must have thought that was a bit unmilitary. I suppose I should have seen what was coming next. The idea was that customers should be able to have a go at my hair for five pence a snip. Now I should say that my hair varies in length between four inches and a quarter of an inch. Still, it was 24 years ago on Monday that I went into the Army, and I don't think the camp barber did any worse”.

Kevin's previous hairstyle – long tresses almost to the shoulder – had earned him the nickname “Buffalo Bill” among the regulars. As he stared wistfully at the growing golden pile he reflected with some pleasure that the whole exercise had raised 35 for the Poppy Appeal. AQ helmet which had found its way out of the possession of the Argentinian government was produced, and Kevin placed it on his head with not a hair out of place, simply because there was very little hair to be out of place. And as smart as the Atkins of 24 years ago, Kevin posed for the camera, head up, chest out and thumbs in line with the seam of the trousers.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 June 1985.

Local News.

A pub landlady had her arm slashed by a pint glass and her door smashed after telling Elizabeth Queen to get out of the pub.

Folkestone Magistrates heard Queen and a group of friend swere creating a disturbance in the Prince of Wales in Guildhall Street. Landlady Minaxi Atkins asked one of the group to leave and Queen got involved in a row with her, said Gareth Isaac, prosecuting. Queen had a pint glass in her hand, said Mr. Isaac. She threw it, cutting Mrs. Atkins, who needed hospital treatment. Outside the Folkestone pub she started to hit a glass door with her hands, eventually smashing it.

She pleaded Guilty to the offences of causing actual bodily harm and criminal damage, said Susan Watler, for Queen. But Queen, of Keyes Place, Folkestone, had drunk so much she could not remember assaulting Mrs. Atkins. “She has had problems with her drinking”, Mrs. Watler told the court. Queen had attended a special clinic in Canterbury to help with these problems, Mrs. Watler told the Magistrates. But Queen’s family problems meant she lost the incentive to stop drinking.

“You must realise drinking is no friend to you”, said presiding Magistrate Mary Bean. “You seem to lose your temper.” Queen was given a year’s conditional discharge for each of the offences and ordered to pay compensation of 20 to Mrs Atkins and 28 for the damage caused to the door.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 April 1986.

Local News.

Champion money raisers at the Prince of Wales pub in Guildhall Street, Folkestone, are celebrating their success with an off-beat New Year’s party - on April 5.

“It all started with a bet, really”, said landlord Kevin’s wife Minaxi Atkins.

The pub, which has raised over 600 for the Royal British Legion outside their annual Poppy Appeal Week, stands to raise well over 100 from the oddball scheme. Christmas decorations have been left up since the end of 1985 and Christmas Eve will be celebrated on April 1. With cards from regulars and the full party spirit, a New Year’s party will be held on April 5 - all for a joint bet of 80 from beer suppliers Charringtons.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 May 1986.

Local News.

Patriotic pub customers marked St. George's Day in fine style. Regulars at the Prince of Wales in Guildhall Street, Folkestone, joined landlord and landlady Kevin and Minaxi Atkins by dressing up to celebrate the country's patron saint's day. Costumes with an English theme were set off by red roses. As a result of the evening's fun, a feature of which was country and western music by Keith Harwood, 40 was raised for the Royal British Legion's Poppy Appeal. There was further fun at the Prince of Wales on the following evening, when the pub met a team from the British Sailors' Society, Dover, in a friendly game of pool.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 October 1986.

Local News.

Another royal port of call has been found for the ship’s badge from the last H.M.S. Folkestone. The Prince of Wales pub in Guildhall Street succeeds the Prince Albert in Rendezvous Street as home for the solid brass plaque. It had been in danger of leaving the Shepway area - where it has been on public display for over 30 years.

Alan White, retiring landlord of the Albert where the badge has spent the last 22 years, wanted to sell it to a local buyer. But only on condition that it would be kept in the public eye when he and his wife Kay left Rendezvous Street. Otherwise it went with him into safe keeping. His S.O.S. in the Herald was answered by a concerned regular, who wants to stay anonymous. He bought the badge for 250, and donated it to the Prince of Wales where he also enjoys a pint.

Landlord Kevin Atkins - “Yorkie” to his friends - has pledged to keep the maritime relic in Folkestone. “I will carry on the same tradition as Alan”, he said at Thursday night’s presentation by Mayor Kelland Bowden. “The badge will stay in Folkestone when I move on”. Mr Bowden told the packed Prince Albert that he remembered the ship’s badge when it hung on the bar wall at the Ship in Sandgate over 30 years ago. He also had the pleasant task of presenting 100 to the Kent Blind Nation’s Dave Garrod collected by customers at the Albert.

Alan and Kay White retired after 22 years behind the bar of the Rendezvous Street pub at the end of last week. What would they remember most from over two decades of serving drinks? “Our friends in Folkestone”, said Mr. White, “and that includes our fellow licensees”.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 November 1986.

Local News.

Customers at the Prince of Wales pub in Folkestone got together on Sunday to remember those who fought in the First World War, commemorated by the presentation of 650 to the Poppy Day Appeal. The Mayor of Folkestone, Cllr. Kelland Bowden, was presented with the cheque at the pub in Guildhall Street, by Mr. Kevin Atkins, landlord of the pub.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 December 1988.

Local News.

Kind-hearted regulars at The Prince of Wales pub, Folkestone raised over 1,000 for a Poppy Day appeal. The cash was raised during the year by filling a large whisky bottle with cash, and also by running sweepstakes.

By the last sweepstake 840 had been raised, and then landlady Mrs Minaxi Atkins won 200 in her own competition. Generous Minaxi decided to donate some of her winnings to the appeal to make the pub’s total 1,001. "Every year we raise more money, and this year we were going for the 1000 mark”, Mrs. Atkins said. “It looked as if we were going to fall short of our target until I won the sweepstake, so I gave the extra money to the appeal. It had to happen. The first time I win I have to hand over the cash”.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 November 1989.

Local News.

Regulars at the Prince of Wales pub in Folkestone raised more than 1,000 for charity this year. The money went to the Poppy Appeal, the Royal Marines School of Music Appeal Fund, Guide Dogs for The Blind, and the elderly in need.

Chelsea Pensioners Ron Heritage and David Redpath-George came from London to collect a cheque and meet Folkestone Mayor, Michael Luck.

The money was raised by collections, auctions and selling lottery tickets.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 April 1991.

Local News.

A man threw a part-filled charity bottle from a bar at a licensee after being asked to leave a Folkestone pub, a Court heard. Empty glasses and pump tops were also thrown.

Kevin Atkins, licensee of the Prince of Wales, in Guildhall Street, was left with four cuts on the side of his head needing 13 stitches after the incident last June, said Tracey Ayling, prosecuting at Maidstone Crown Court.

Stephen Paul Currie, 23, of Naseby Avenue, Folkestone, was jailed for a year, suspended for two months, after a jury convicted him of unlawful wounding. Currie, who denied the charge, was also ordered to pay 250 compensation and 220 prosecution costs.

Judge Keith Simpson told him “Mercifully Mr. Atkins didn't suffer more serious injuries, particularly having regard to the area where the wounds were inflicted”.

Miss Ayling said Currie was in the pub with two women and a child. “There came a time when there was a slight argument between Mr. Atkins and the defendant, first about someone sitting on a pool table, and a drink spilt on the table. Mr. Atkins asked Mr. Currie to leave”. The woman and child went out first. Currie went up to the bar, behind which was Mr. Atkins, and asked people around for a cigarette. “Mr. Atkins again asked him to leave because his presence was not wanted – he had been a little aggressive – whereupon Mr. Currie started throwing things”. After his arrest Currie told police that he lost his temper after the licensee allegedly dragged the child off the pool table. There was an argument and he was asked to leave.

Mr. Atkins said in evidence that after asking Currie to leave the second time, he turned back to the optics. “The next thing, I got a smash on the head from a large collecting bottle we had for the poppy appeal”.

Cross-examined by Maureen Fleischmann, for Currie, Mr. Atkins said he did not touch the child or take her off the table. He also denied snatching Currie's glass and hitting himself with it.

Currie did not give evidence at the trial.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 June 1992.

Local News.

Cigarettes and spirits, totalling 300, were stolen from the Prince of Wales pub in Guildhall Street, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 March 1998.

Toby Jugs.

Picture the scene .... December 31, 1999, The Prince of Wales pub in Guildhall Street, glasses raised as Big Ben strikes .... The bar TV shows the usual crowds swaying in unison in the crisp night air of Trafalgar Square – some risking a dip in the freezing fountains. But the main conversation in the Prince of Wales is still – love it or loathe it – is the Millennium Dome.

It is here to stay, though, and even my drinking pals who mock the idea can not, in their heart of hearts, imagine life without it. Of course Folkestone Royal Victoria Hospital needs more money, but will you be heading down there to dance in the aisles in the early hours of 2000, as you can at the Dome?

Not landlord Norman King, anyway. Crystal Palace in London was thought to be a white elephant when it was built a hundred years ago, he comments. “Everyone said that wouldn't work, and it proved a success”.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

WILSON Thomas 1866-85 Next pub licensee had (age 38 in 1881Census) Bastions

Last pub licensee had STOCKER Henry 1885-1900 (age 41 in 1891Census) Bastions

WEAVER James 1900-14 Bastions

WEAVER Fanny 1914-15 Bastions

BANKS Claud 1915-17 Bastions

STAY Charles 1917-21 Bastions

LEE John Charles 1921-24 Bastions beer house

LUPTON Frank 1924-27 Bastions

LUPTON Edith 1927-51 Bastions

HAWKES Christopher 1951-77 dec'd Bastions

HAWKES Lilian "Jean" 1977-82 Bastions

ATKINS Kevin & Minaxi 1982-91 Bastions

COALIN Coalon 1991-92 Bastions

ATKINS Kevin &  Minaxi and BROWN Thomas 1992-96 Bastions

KING Norman 1996-2000 Bastions

STEVENS Richard and MARRIOTT Heather 2000-03 Bastions

PALUMBO Kenneth and PALGARNO Palgarno 2003-04 Bastions

BEESON Pamela & Cherilynn 2004+ Bastions

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/princeofwales.html

 

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