DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Friday, 22 November, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1871-

Prince of Wales

Latest 1966

Drainless Drive

Woodnesborough

Prince of Wales 1950

Above photo, circa 1950, kindly sent by Michael Mirams.

Unknown Pub

Duncan Brown has recently been given this photo, which shows Alan Wright with his father (Charlie Brown), the small boys being Alan's nephew, John Saich.

 

Prince of Wales card 1951

Above aluminium card issued June 1951. Sign series 3 number 27.

Woodnesborough map 1896

Above map 1896.

Former Prince of Wales 2019

Above photo, August 2019, kindly taken and sent by Rory Kehoe.

Former Prince of Wales 2019

Above photo, August 2019, kindly taken and sent by Rory Kehoe.

 

Regarding the Dover Express and licence transfers of the Taylor's (1937), the address is given as Woodnesborough.

This was the local of of fighter ace Wing Commander Bob Stanford-Tuck DFC who farmed nearby.

 

From the Deal, Walmer, and Sandwich Mercury, 16 June, 1900. 1d.

SUDDEN DEATH AT WOODNESBOROUGH

A cloud was cast over the rejoicings at this little village on Saturday by the announcement that whilst the proceedings were in progress, a young fellow, named Henry Dilnot Smith, who had taken an active part in the preparation, had died suddenly. Young Dilnot had prepared the costumes in which he was to appear in the procession, and his father, with other members of the family, was to have taken part. On the previous day the deceased was taken ill in his father's workshop, but no fears were entertained as to his recovery, and the news of his death came as a shock to the village in which the family had carried on the business of wheelwrights for may generations. Death was due to peritonitis, but, as will be seen from the evidence adduced at the inquest, the seizure was not regarded as one that was likely to prove fatal.

THE INQUEST

Was held at the "Prince of Wales," Drainless Drive, by Mr. R. M. Mercer, on Monday evening, the jury comprising Messrs. Samuel W. Burbidge (foreman), Ernest Chas. Watson, John Ovenden, Edward Clements, Chas. Rogers, Thomas. Cornes, Frederick. Burr, Wm. Gambrell, William. Dixon, Charles. Sole, Albert Pettman, William. F. Rogers, and John Frederick. Taylor.

The Jury having viewed the body, John Dilnot Smith, wheelwright, the father of the deceased was sworn. he did not know why the doctor had not given a certificate. The deceased was 16 years of age, and was learning the trade, working with witness. he was engaged in the shop, and was apparently all right up to 3.30 on Friday afternoon. he had made no complaints whatsoever. he had been working alone for a few minutes, and when witness' daughter went into the shop about that time she found him leaning across the bench and in great agony. She endeavoured to lead him into the road, and when outside he fell. Witness was close by, and when he arrived on the spot the deceased was on the ground. The young man was unconscious, and witness believed the seizure took place about ten minutes before his daughter's visit to the shop. Witness questioned the deceased as to the cause of the illness, but he could give him no reason, and said he had lifted nothing or done anything to strain himself. Witness then got the assistance of Mr. Deveson, and they gave him some brandy and took him to his home on a barrow, and he was put to bed. His son complained of having severe pains in the stomach, but he remained conscious until the time of his death at 8.45 on Saturday evening. Deceased had only had ordinary plain food, and had never had an illness before. No other member of his family had been seized with the illness.

Harold J. Pickering, surgeon, at present practising at Sandwich, said he was called to the deceased at about 8 o'clock on Friday evening. He saw deceased in bed, and he complained of pain in the abdomen. He did not make an absolute diagnosis, but enquired into the history of the seizure, and localised the pains. He treated the case and ordered medicine with the object of relieving the pain. The pain was very acute, but he could discover no swelling. General swelling began almost immediately after death. He visited him again on Sunday morning, when there were no signs of collapse, but rather an improvement. Witness spoke to the deceased, who said he felt some relief. Deceased had been sick once or twice previously to the first visit, but when witness visited again he did not think his life was in immediate danger. His impression was that the complaint was internal, the primary cause of death being peritonitis caused by ulceration, followed by collapse. There were no signs of foul play whatsoever.

Isabelle Dilnot Smith, sister of deceased, said her brother had only had ordinary plain food, which the rest of the family had partaken of, and no other member had been seized with the illness.

The Coroner, in summing up, described the action of the perforation and its results, and said he occasionally met very similar cases, and he thought it practically impossible for a patient to get over such a seizure. it was generally accompanied by the most fruitful agony. He recommended the Jury to return a verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence.

The Jury gave a verdict accordingly.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 15 June, 1900.

and the Whitstable Times, 16 June, 1900.

DEATH IN THE WORKSHOP

The East Kent Coroner (R. M. Mercer, Esq.) held an inquest on Monday at the “Prince of Wales,” Woodnesborough, touching the death of Henry Dilnot Smith, aged 16. It appeared that deceased was at work alone in his father's wheelwright shop at Woodnesborough at 3.30 on the previous Friday afternoon, when shortly afterwards his sister found him leaning over a bench. His father came up and asked him if he had been lifting any weights, and he said “No.” he was taken home to bed, suffering from pain in the stomach. He was conscious up to his death on Saturday at 8.45. According to Mr. Harold John Pickering, surgeon, of Sandwich, who attended the deceased, death was due to (1) perforation of the bowels and (2) syncope and collapse.

The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

 

From the Deal, Walmer, and Sandwich Mercury, 24 November, 1900. 1d.

SUDDEN DEATH

Yesterday (Friday) morning Mr. T. Taylor, landlord of the "Prince of Wales," Drainless Drive, died very suddenly indeed. He was employed by Mr. Rogers, market gardener, and was at his usual occupation in the morning. He went home to dinner about 11.30, and made a very hearty meal, remarking to his wife how much he enjoyed it.

Very shortly afterwards (about 12.30) he fell from his chair and expired.

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 4 November, 1910.

WINGHAM PETTY SESSIONS

The license of the "Prince of Wales," Woodnesborough, was transferred from T. Deverson to Albert Taylor. It was stated that it had formerly been arranged to transfer the licence to J. F. Taylor. A temporary transfer was granted at Dover from Deverson with the object to getting a temporary one granted to J. F. Taylor. Both were granted.

 

From the Whitstable Times, 12 December, 1900.

WOODNESBOROUGH. SUDDEN DEATH.

On Friday morning Mr. T. Taylor, landlord of the "Prince of Wales," Drainless Drove, died very suddenly. He was employed by Mr. Rogers, market gardener, and was at his usual occupation in the morning. He went home to dinner about 11.30, and made a very hearty meal, remarking to his wife how much he enjoyed it Very shortly afterwards (about 12.30) he fell from his chair and expired.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 15 October, 1954.

HENRY NEVER MISSES.

Henry Farrier at the Prince of Wales, Woodnesborough, 1954

If we could see the inventory of the "Prince of Wales" pub at Woodnesborough we'd expect to find, pretty high on the list of fixtures, the name of Henry Farrier.

Farm-worker Henry, who lives at Drainless Drive, Woodnesborough, claims that every single evening for the past thirty-three years, he's popped into his local for a pint and a chat. He's never missed, he declares.

"Mark you, that doesn't mean to say I'm a heavy drinker," says Henry solemnly. "Call me a regular drinker if you like, but that's a very different thing from the man who doesn't know how much is good for him."

"You get 'em, you know," muses Henry. "I remember one chap standing at this very side of the bar, complaining that the beer was off. 'I'll be glad when I've had enough,' he said."

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

WYBORN Alfred 1871+ Census

TAYLOR James B to 1891-Nov/1900 (age 58 in 1891Census)

TAYLOR T to Dec/1900 dec'd

DEVERSON T to Nov/1910 Dover Express

TAYLOR Albert Nov/1910 Dover Express (temporary for 1 week)

TAYLOR Mr John Frederick Nov/1910-Sept/1936 dec'd (also blacksmith age 42 in 1911Census) Dover Express

TAYLOR Mrs Annie Sept/1936+ Dover Express

TAYLOR Mr H Jan/1937 Dover Express

GAMBLE Mr P W Jan/1937+ Dover Express

EDWARDS Mr F W Feb/1937? Dover Express

STONE Jimmy 1950s

 

CensusCensus

Post Office Directory 1914From the Post Office Directory 1914

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML