DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Canterbury, November, 2019.

Page Updated:- Friday, 15 November, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1769-

Cock Inn

Latest 1867+

(Name to)

5 Westgate Grove (Water Lane 1832) (Cock Lane 1838Stapletons Guide)

Canterbury

Canterbury map 1874

Above map 1874 identified by Rory Kehoe.

Cock Inn 2017

Above photo, August 2017, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

 

Kentish Gazette 22 February 1769.

On Tuesday next will be a Match for One Hundred Guineas, between Two Horses, which are to Trot from the Sign of "Sir John Falstaff," in St. Dunstan's, or the "Cock" without Westgate, Canterbury, to the Fifty-One Mile Stone on Boughton-Hill, and back again, computed about nine Miles and a Half: To start at Ten o'clock precisely.

There will be a genteel Ordinary at the "Three Tunns" in St. Margaret's, exactly at One o''Clock; where the horses may both be seen on Tuesday Morning before starting.

 

From Cock Inn Report to Mayor and Magistrates. Guildhall May 22 1856.

"I beg leave to report that the inhabitants about the neighbourhood of the "Cock Public House." Westgate Grove, complain of the manner the House is conducted, there being Prostitutes kept in the House and frequent disturbances with them and soldiers who use this House."

J. Clements, Supt. of Police.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle. 23 July 1859. Price 1d.

CANTERBURY POLICE COURT. MONDAY.

(Before the Mayor, Alderman Plummer, W. Mount, Esq. and Captain Love.)

SHOCKING CASE.

A woman, respectfully dressed, named Fanny Beal, was charged by Mr. Russell, of the “Cock” public-house, with starving her child for purposes of begging. The child was brought into Court in the arms of an honest navvy a wife, whose name did not transpire. A more horrible sight was never witnessed in a court of justice. The child - a mere baby - was reduced to a perfect skeleton, its face discoloured and distorted with pain, and in fact, in such a condition that it seemed wonderful that it should be alive.

It appeared that some women had spoken to defendant about the child, and she said it would not take the breast from her, although it would from others. Indignant at this assertion they held her back while one of them placed the child to her breast, and found that it sucked eagerly. The mother was the only person in court unmoved when the child was exhibited.

Mr. Russell said the woman had lodged at his house. She used the child excite compassion and get money by begging, and he had reason to believe the child was hired out by the day to other women.
Mr. Ratcliffe, the overseer of Westgate Without, was sent for by the Bench.

Mr. T. S. Cooper entered the room and stated that the woman had once brought the child to him and he prescribed for it. He thought there might have been no neglect as “there were many pour sickly children like that.”

Mr. Ratcliffe having arrived said he would keep a watch on the woman, and if it could be proved that she neglected the child he would have her apprehended “if she remained in his parish.”

The Bench upon this, without any further inquiry, directed the child to be given up to its mother, and the parties left the Court.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 21 January, 1860.

CANTERBURY POLICE COURT.

Mr. Russell, landlord of the "Cock" public-house, Westgate Without, applied to the Bench respecting what he designated a case of peculiar hardship. He said his house was "extensively patronized" as a lodging-house; and a woman was staying there who was suffering from extreme debility and destitution. She had had medical assistance sent to her by a benevolent lady, and Mr. Rigden had given a certificate that she was suffering from want of proper nourishment. He (Mr. Russell) had applied, on behalf of the woman, to Mr. Ratclifle, overseer of the parish, to whom he gave Mr. Rigden’s certificate. Mr. Ratcliffe said he would see to the case, and relieve the woman. His complaint was that, though Mr. Ratcliffe promised to relieve the woman, he had not done so.

In reply to a question from the Bench, Mr. Russell said the woman was not in a fit state to be removed to the workhouse.

The Mayor said the Bench had no power to make any order or to interfere with the case. They could send for Mr. Ratcliffe, and urge him to attend to the woman.

Mr. Ratcliffe was accordingly sent for, and he as soon as possible presented himself before the Court. Mr. Russell again stated the circumstances; and Mr. Ratcliffe stated that if Mr. Russell would get another certificate from the surgeon (as was legally requisite), he would at once attend to the case.

The parties then left the Court.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 23 June, 1860.

SATURDAY.

(Before William Brock, Esq., Captain Love, and Peter Martin, Esq.)

There were six prisoners for examination this morning belonging to the East Kent Militia.

James Kelley, E.K.M., was brought up in custody, charged with three assaults—one committed on Mrs. Sarah Ann Postlethwaite, of 3, Westgate Grove, the second on T. J. Russell, landlord of the "Cock" public-house, and the third on P.C. Epps, while on duty in Black Griffin-lane. All the offences were committed on Friday afternoon, and all arose out of the same circumstances. It appeared that the prisoner, in a state of intoxication, went into the house of Mrs. Postlethwaite between three and four o'clock. She requested him to leave, but instead of doing so he tried to push past her and struck her. She tried to ward off the blow, which fell upon her forehead.

She sent for Mr. Russell who came to her assistance, and got the prisoner out. The prisoner was drunk, but he knew well enough what he was doing.

The bench decided to hear the second charge before deciding upon the first.

Mr. Russell deposed that on the previous afternoon he was called to the assistance of the last witness. When he went the prisoner took hold of him by the collar, and he was thrown down. After that, and while the complainant was leaning against his own door, the prisoner laid hold of him by the legs and threw him down again, struck him on the head and face, blackened both his eyes, and contused his face very much. The prisoner was given into custody, but he was so violent that the police required the assistance of four or five civilians to take him to the station.

The bench fined the prisoner 10s. and expenses for the first offence, or 14 days' imprisonment; and 40s. and expenses, or a month's imprisonment, for the assault on Mr. Russell.

P.C. Epps then stood forward to prefer a charge of assault against the prisoner. On the officer attempting to apprehend him in Black Griffin-lane, the prisoner threw him down on his back by which his arm was very severely injured. For this offence the bench inflicted an additional fine of 10s. and expenses, or a fortnight's imprisonment, to commence at the expiration of the six weeks for the two previous offences.

 

South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 10 September 1861.

CITY PETTY SESSIONS. THURSDAY.

Most of the old licenses were renewed, but those of the following publicans were left for consideration until an adjourned licensing day (the 12th inst.) in consequence of complaints having been made of the way in which the houses have been conducted. Robert Whittaker, "Princess Royal," Northgate; Thomas Denne, "Wellington," Broadstreet; Richard Drew, "Three Grenadiers," Military Road; William Taylor, "True Britton," Northgate; and Charles Moore, the "Cock," Westgate.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle and General Advertiser, 14 December, 1861. Price 1 1/2d.

Catherine Keene was charged with stealing one half-sovereign and seventeen shillings, the property of Edward Burnett.

The prosecutor said:- Yesterday, about half-past twelve o'clock, I went to the “Cock” public house, I saw the prisoner there. I gave her some gin and glass of whisky. We went upstairs together, and I fell asleep. On my waking I misled a half-sovereign and 17s. in silver out of my purse. I had previously given the defendant 2s. The prisoner had left the house. I went into several public-houses looking for her during the evening, and at last found her at the “Three Grenadiers,” in Military Road. I told the landlady there what had occurred, and she sent for a policeman.

Mrs. Moore said:- My husband keeps a public-house called the “Cock.” The prisoner lodges at my house. Yesterday afternoon she came down stairs and wanted her bonnet and shawl in a great hurry, so that I expected there was something wrong. The prosecutor told me afterwards that he had missed some money.

Richard Drew:- I keep the “Three Grenadier” public-house in the Military road. The prisoner came to my house about five o’clock last night, and stayed about half an hour. During that time she spent about eighteen-pence. She came again about seven o'clock and changed a half-sovereign. The prosecutor came to my house, and the prisoner was given into custody.

P.C. Cherison said that when the prisoner was searched, 10s, was found on her.

She was committed for trial.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle and General Advertiser, 4 January, 1862. Price 1 1/2d.

John Kelley, a private in the 70th Regiment, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Westgate Grove, between twelve and one o'clock on Sunday morning.

It appeared that the prisoner and several other soldiers were beating at the door of the “Cock” public-house and demanding admission.

An officer belonging to the regiment was present, and gave the man a good character.

The Bench, considering the circumstances, and the previous good character or the man, and the fact of his having been in custody since Sunday, decided to discharge him without punishment.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 7 February, 1863.

CANTERBURY POLICE COURT. MONDAY. DRINK AGAIN.

James Baxter, a labourer, was charged with being drunk and creating a disturbance at the “Cock” public-house, in Westgate. On being removed to the police station he made an attack upon the constable and attempted to trip him up.

Fined 5, or one month's hard labour, having been before the court on a previous occasion, under similar circumstances.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 21 February, 1863.

STEALING FROM THE PERSON IN A PUBLIC-HOUSE.

At the Canterbury Police Court, on Monday, Barnes, a tramp, was charged with stealing some money from the person of Walter Harwood, labourer, of Herne Bay, at the “Cock” public-house, Westgate Without on Saturday evening. It appeared that the prosecutor was sitting asleep in a chair, at the “Cock,” when the prisoner was seen by the landlord and another man in the room, to kneel down and put his arm behind him. The other man in the room said, “come none of that” on which the prisoner drew back his hand and some money consisting of a half crown, a penny, two half pence, and a foreign coin fell on the floor.

The landlord sent for the police, and the prisoner was given into custody.

The prosecutor deposed that when he went to sleep he had two half crowns and some copper in his watch pocket but when he awoke it was all gone. He identified the foreign coin as his property. The prisoner pleaded “guilty” and was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labour.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 28 May, 1864.

CANTERBURY POLICE COURT.

ASSAULT AND ATTEMPTED ROBBERY.

Two gunners in the Royal Horse Artillery, named Harry Page and Thomas Cormick. was charged with assaulting and attempting to rob John Wills, servant to J. W. A. Wright, Esq., Barton Fields. Wills stated that he was returning from between 10 and 11 o’clock on Thursday night, when he met three soldiers near the railway bridge. The prisoners were two of the three. One of the soldiers struck him across the face with a stick and his hat fell off. The prisoner Cormick picked his hat up and offered to give it him, first for 2s. and then for 1s. He refused to give them any money, and they then ran off taking his hat with them. He followed them through Chantry-lane, Ivy-lane, and Broad-street, but eventually lost them. On Saturday morning he went to the Barracks, and the men being paraded he pointed out the prisoners as two of those who attacked him.

The prisoners attempted to prove an alibi. A gunner named Dendy deposed that the prisoners were in his company from Wednesday until Friday evening. On Thursday night they went to the “Cock” public house, Westgate Grove, between five and six o'clock, and remained there till about 11. They then went up the road past the railway bridge, and slept under a hedge. Another gunner named Tyrrell gave similar evidence.

John William Thomas was then called to rebut the evidence for the prisoners. He said that between half-past ten and a quarter to eleven on Thursday night he met the prisoner Page running down Broad-street.

The Magistrates decided to deal with the case as one of assault only, and convicted the prisoners, who were each sentenced to hard labour for three weeks in the City Gaol.

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 4 May, 1867. Price 1d.

William Constant was charged, on suspicion, with stealing a horse's hood, a rag, and a brash, the property of some person unknown.

P.I. Hayward said:- From information I received last night, I went to the “Cock” public-house, at about half-past twelve, into a room where prisoner was sleeping. I asked prisoner if he had been in the “Britannia” public-house, and, I believe, he said he had. There was a bundle in a chair close to the bed which contained a home's hood and a rag. I asked the prisoner if he brought the handle from the public-house where he had been lodging, and he replied that he had no bundle. Prisoner had given the landlord the brush for his bed. The landlord gave the brush to me, and I took the prisoner to the station-house. The charge was then, entered in the book, and read to prisoner, who said he could not give us any information about the articles then, but that he would tell us all about them, the nest (Thursday) morning. He has not done so, and I, therefore, ask for a remand.

In answer to the Bench, witness stated that no information had been given him that the things were actually stolen.

Mr. Aris remarked that it was very strange prisoner should have things in possession he was a painter and glazier.

Prisoner said he bought the things off an officer's servant named Thompson, for 2s. 6d.

The Magistrates remanded the prisoner.

 

From the Historic Canterbury web site www.machadoink.com date unknown.

The four tenements in Cock Lane, now called Westgate Grove, are immediately beyond the Westgate, two of them are old, and one of these is a public house of the sign of the "Cock"; the corner house is, or has very recently been, a worsted manufactory. (A 10-ply yarn). A large manufactory of parchment faces them.

 

I believe this pub changed name to the "Westgate Tavern." The area used to be called Cock Lane, hence the name of this house.

I do have reference to a William Small, victualler in 1838 and 40, addressed as Cock Lane.

Situated at number 5 (now 8) is a building called Tavern Cottage. I do not yet know whether there is a connection with the "Cock Inn."

 

LICENSEE LIST

SMALL William 1824-47+ Pigot's Directory 1824Pigot's Directory 1828-29Stapletons GuidePigot's Directory 1832-34Historic Canterbury web siteBagshaw's Directory 1847

RUSSELL Thomas Francis 1853-60+ Kentish Chronicle

MOORE Charles 1861+

SKINNER ???? to Mar/1866 Maidstone and Kentish JournalKentish Chronicle

SPRATT Sidney Mar/1866-71+ (widower age 65 in 1871Census) Maidstone and Kentish JournalKentish Chronicle

 

Historic Canterbury web siteHistoric Canterbury web site www.machadoink.com

Kentish ChronicleKentish Chronicle

Pigot's Directory 1824From the Pigot's Directory 1824

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Stapletons GuideStapleton's Guide 1838

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Maidstone and Kentish JournalMaidstone and Kentish Journal

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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LINK to www.Pubshistory.com