DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Dover, December, 2018.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 20 December, 2018.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Barry Smith and Paul Skelton

Earliest 1845

Shipwright's Arms

Latest 1872

(Name to)

12 Strond Street

Beach Street Bagshaw's Directory 1847

Dover

Shipwrights Arm 1852

Above picture of Shipwrights Arms 1858.

 

Before 1845, the business had moved to Strond Street, but in 1859, the ground being needed by the South Eastern and Chatham Railway, it moved again, in the same street, to number 47. That contradicts the number I have entered for the "Ship" but perhaps due to that upheaval the numbers altered. (Original info.)

 

A new licence was issued to Simms in 1857 and it was he who continued at the third house which was then neighbour to the "Packet Boat Inn".

 

From the Dover Telegraph, 20 March, 1847.

Dover Petty Sessions.

"Friday James Epps was charged by Muggeridge Inspector of Nuisances for shaking a carpet in the Ship Hotel Lane, Strond Street, after 8 o'clock in the morning contrary to the provisions of the Pavement Act.

Muggeridge stated that he had previously warned the defendant. Wednesday last about noon the Defendant was shaking the carpet which, being witnessed by some members of the Pavement Board, he was directed to get a summons against Epps who admitted the offence but stated that he was ordered to shake the carpet at the time in question which was the only opportunity they had of taking it up. Fined 10 shillings and 10 shillings costs, to be paid in a week.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 16 January, 1858.

William Sims, landlord of the "Shipwrights' Arms," Strond Street, was fined 7s. and costs for having his house open at an hour contrary to law.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 29 March, 1867.

UNLADYLIKE BEHAVIOUR

Sarah Ann Jones, a woman of the town, was charged with drunkenness and disorderly conduct, with assaulting Mr. Charles Sims, son of the landlord of the "Shipwrights' Arms," in Strond Street, and with breaking a couple of windows at the house mentioned.

It appeared from the evidence of the young man who had been assaulted, that the defendant came into his father's house about eight o'clock on Saturday evening in company with some sailors. She was very much intoxicated. She desired to be served with more drink, and on complainant refusing to comply with her request she seized hold of some glasses which were standing on the bar counter, and threw them at him, she also threw at his head a small tub, used for washing glasses in, which was also standing on the counter. On being put out of the house she took up some stones and threw them at the windows, breaking glass to the value of 5s.

The defendant had nothing to say in her defence, and the Magistrates fined her including costs for the whole of her offences, 1 0s. 6d. In default, fourteen days' imprisonment.

Some female friends of the defendant who were in the body of the Court, requested that an hour's grace might be given her, and hastily left the Court for the purpose of getting the money.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 11 October, 1867.

UNPROVOKED ASSAULT

George Hearn, a young man eighteen years of age, was placed before the magistrates, charged with kicking up a great disturbance, while in the state of drunkenness, in Snargate Street, on the previous night, and assaulting without the slightest provocation several persons who happened to be passing in the street.

The first person who preferred a charge of assault was Mr. Charles Sims, who said he kept a public-house in Snargate Street, called the "Shipwrights' Arms"; that he left the "Clarendon Inn," in Snargate Street, shortly before eleven o'clock on the preceding night, and had proceeded a short distance on his way home, when he became aware that some one was following him. On his turning round he saw the prisoner, who without saying anything struck him several times. He (Sims) had given Hearn no provocation, and he did not remember that he had ever seen him before. The defendant behaved in the same way to other persons.

Another young man whom the prisoner had assaulted was in Court, and was prepared to prove a similar offence against him, and police-constable Faith said he had been called to a public-house, where the defendant was causing a disturbance, earlier in the evening; but on getting to the house he found the defendant had thought it prudent to disappear.

The only apology the defendant had to offer for his scandalous conduct was that he was drunk; and he assured the Magistrates that he was too well behaved when sober to think of acting in such a way. He was a hard-working fellow, and was not disposed to interrupt any one when in his proper senses.

The Magistrates fined him 5s. and costs, or, in default, seven days' imprisonment; and told him, with decided truthfulness, that he might consider himself fortunate in getting no heavier punishment.

The defendant sent home to his mother for the money, and was detained in custody till it was forthcoming.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 5 July, 1872.

LICENSING

Mr. Coleman applied on behalf of Mr. William Sims, of the "Shipwright's Arms," in Strond Street, that the name of his house be altered to the "Ship Inn," which was granted.

 

 

Charles Simms officiated in 1872 (son of William) when it was renamed "The Ship". However, it seems that William was still in charge to at least 1874.

 

LICENSEE LIST

WARNHAM George 1845

BAKER G 1847 Bagshaw's Directory 1847

BURGESS Joseph 1850

NASH John 1850 end

SIMS William 1857-61+

SIMS Charles 1867-72

 

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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