DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, March, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 10 March, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1881

Sportsman Tavern

Latest 1973

57 Sydney Street

Folkestone

Sportsman 1950

Above photo showing the "Sportsman" circa 1950.

Sportsman 2009

Above picture taken from Google Maps, July 2009.

 

Originally a coffee house in 1880 and opened by builder Stephen Smith, a full license was applied for 1881 but was only awarded a beer off license on 24th August. However, Smith was caught flouting the law and prosecuted for supplying bee on the premises on 10th May 1884 and fined 5.

In 1915 the premises was extended by knocking through to number 55 and Thomas Smith took over as licensee whilst Jesse Wood continuing to live there on and off as a private house.

12th March 1930 the premises was able to sell wine as well as beer and on 14th March 1951 spirits could also be sold.

The premises finally closed in 1973, then being owned by Whitbread and having never been able to sell beer for consumption on the premises. It has subsequently become separate houses again for residential use.

 

Folkestone Express 20 November 1926.

Wednesday, November 17th:- Before The Mayor, Mr. G. I. Swoffer, Col. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. H. J. Blamey, and Mr. G. Boyd.

The following application for transfer of licence was granted: Sportsman Tavern, Sidney Street, from Mr. Jesse Wood to Mr. John Thomas Smith.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1926.

Wednesday, November 17th: Before The Mayor, Mr. G. I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G. P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, and Mr. J. H. Blamey.

The licence of the Sportsman Tavern, Sidney Street, was transferred from Mr. Jesse Wood to Mr. John Thomas Smith.

 

Folkestone Express 15 March 1930.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates had before them on Wednesday morning an application for an off wine licence by Mr. John Thomas Smith, of the Sportsman Tavern, 57 Sidney Street. Mr. G. I. Swoffer was in the chair, and the other members of the Bench were Col. G. P. Owen, Mr. J. H. Blamey, Mr. W. Griffin, Dr. W. W. Nuttall, and Miss A. M. Hunt.

Mr. B. H. Bonniface appeared in support of the application. Mr. Ernest William Hook proved the service of the necessary notices.

Mr. Bonniface said that the application was by the tenant of the Sportsman Tavern as it was called or was previously called, which had an off licence for the sale of beers, and was so that he could hold a licence for the sale of wine for consumption off the premises. These premises had been licensed as an off licence for some fifty years, and they had been in the ownership of Mr. Smith's family for the whole of that period. Mr. Smith was born on the premises, and his father held the licence, and it was carried on down to the time of his father's death. His mother then carried on until some three and a half years ago, when he took over after a severe accident, he himself having previously been a carpenter. The premises were his mother's, she having married again, and it was an arrangement whereby the widow was getting an income. On the death of his mother, Mr. Smith became interested as a part owner of those premises. The plans before them that morning were rather interesting to show the extraordinary growth in the town there, because there were no less than 463 new buildings which had been put up within the course of the last few years, the majority being of course their local Council housing estate, but in Joyes Road there were ten new houses and there was plenty of room for further development along there and it was still going on. They would also see that the only direct communication into the whole of that estate was Sidney Street, because in order to get into Dover Road there was only one road, and that was Joyes Road. While Wood Avenue at the extreme left hand went into Canterbury Road. They would therefore see that the off licence of the Sportsman was undoubtedly by far the nearest licence of any kind to those particular people on that estate. It might be said that despite the development in that direction it was very unlikely that those people who lived in those houses would want wine. Mr. Smith had submitted a notice of that application a month ago. During that time, despite the fact that he had had to work the business practically single handed, he had been able to obtain the signatures of no less than 299 people from that particular district. Ninety nine of those were his old customers not included in any way in those new buildings, customers to whom he supplied beer and delivered beer in the ordinary way. He was asked continually for wine. In addition to that there were some 200 who were amongst the inhabitants of the new dwellings, and of the whole 200 were his regular customers. He suggested to them that there was ample evidence of a demand, and a growing demand because the district was growing, for wine. Amongst his old customers Mr. Smith did not get a great demand for wine, for the reason that there was a licence which had been established as an off beer licence only for some fifty years, and therefore it was known to the old customers that of course they could not get wine. But even amongst those he had been continually asked for such wines as port, and similar wines, all of which required a licence. They could readily appreciate that even amongst his old customers at Christmas time particularly he got a very big demand. He had found that at Christmas time, that despite the fact that he was regularly supplying those customers, when they found they could not get wine from him they went, as far as he knew, to a district at least half a mile away and then bought both the wine and beer. Then there were the other licences in that particular district. They were used to seeing the opposition of the Licensed Victuallers, but on that occasion they had no opposition, so that he did not suggest to them that that was a very clear case that there must be, in that given area, quite sufficient for everybody to get a living in a legitimate way. Mr. Smith carried on a grocer's business.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 March 1930.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 12th: Before Mr. G. I. Swoffer, Colonel G. P. Owen, Mr. W. Griffin, Dr. W. W. Nuttall, Miss A. M. Hunt, and Mr. J. H. Blamey.

John Thomas Smith applied for an off wine licence at 57, Sidney Street.

Mr. B. H. Bonniface , for Mr. Smith, said that the application was for an off wine licence at the Sportsman Tavern which had an off licence for the sale of beers. For some 50 years the off beer licence had been in the ownership of Mr. Smith's family. The premises belonged to Mr. Smith's mother, and by an arrangement Mr. Smith had the tenancy from year to year, but on the death of his mother he would be part owner of the premises. The plans which he produced were interesting, said Mr. Bonniface, because they showed the extraordinary growth of buildings in that neighbourhood. Within the last few years there had been no fewer than 463 new buildings put up, the majority being on the local housing estate, but were being erected also in Joyes Road, and there was plenty of room there for further development. It was significant that although Mr. Smith's wife had been ill, he had been able to obtain himself during the last month a petition signed by no fewer than 299 people of the district supporting the application. Of that number 99 were his old customers, while some 200 people who had signed the petition were amongst the inhabitants of the new buildings. Mr. Smith would tell the Bench that among his very old customers there was a great demand for wine, and even among his old customers, who knew that he had only got an off beer licence, he had been asked continually for such medicated wine as port, Wincarnis, and Hall's wine, all of which required a licence. At Christmas time especially there was a big demand for wines, even from his old customers, and he also got very big demands from the inhabitants of new houses and from visitors during the summer. When they found they could not get wines from him, many persons of the district had to go about half a mile to get wines. There were no other licensed premises in that particular area, and no licensed house could be built on the estate in future. The Bench were used to seeing opposition from the Licensed Victuallers' Association and from other people, but on this occasion there was no opposition, and that in itself was significant, he suggested, and showed there was need for the licence.

John Thomas Smith, proprietor of the Sportsman Tavern said he had been for 3 years in the business. He had been born on the premises, and his father had been carrying on the business when he was born. Since his father's death his mother had carried on the business. On his mother's death, the property would revert to him, together with a brother. He had himself obtained all the signatures on the petition, of which there were 299. He had once been licensee of a house at Hawkinge, until he met with a serious accident.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 April 1930.

Friday, April 4th: Before Alderman C. E. Mumford, Alderman T. S. Franks, and Mr. F. Seager.

The Bench confirmed the granting of a wine licence to John Thomas Smith for the Sportsman's Tavern, at 57, Sidney Street.

Mr. B. H. Bonniface, for Mr. Smith, said that there was no opposition to the application when it was granted at the adjourned annual licensing sessions, and a petition supporting the application was signed by 299 people, 99 of them being old customers and 200 new residents.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 October 1943.

Local News.

At Folkestone Licensing Transfer Sessions on Wednesday the off licence of 57, Sidney Street was transferred from John Thomas Smith to Dennis George Couzens.

 

From an email received 4 November 2020.

My great grandfather was Jesse Wood a former agricultural labourer and soldier.

Originally from the East Riding of Yorkshire, he moved to Folkestone some time before 1901. A widower with 5 young children, he married Elizabeth Jane Smith, also a widow in 1902. She was running the pub then. They continued to do this for many years. Jesse died in 1941 and Jane Elizabeth in 1947.

Elizabeth Moreno.

 

LICENSEE LIST

SMITH Stephen 1881-99 dec'd

SMITH Jane 1899-1902

MAYOR Stephen 1902-06

WOOD Jesse 1906-26 beer retailer

Last pub licensee had SMITH John Thomas 1926-43

COUZENS Dennis 1943-56

CURSOE Herbert 1956-73

 

The following has kindly been researched and sent by Jan Pedersen and is still to be formatted.

 

Sportsman, Guildhall Street 1993 – 1998

Licensees

Terence Crux and Wendy McMorran 1997 1998 Renamed Lord Morris

Folkestone Herald 26 February 1993

Local News

Burglars broke into The Sportsman pub in Guildhall Street and stole 500 in cash from gaming machines, 25 CDs and a CD player.

Sportsman's Tavern, Sydney Street 1881 - 1973 (Off Licence)

Licensees

Stephen Smith 1881 1899
Jane Smith 1899 1902
Stephen Mayor 1902 1906
Jesse Wood 1906 1926
John Thomas Smith 1926 1943
Dennis Couzens 1943 1956
Herbert Cursoe 1956 1973

Folkestone Express 17 May 1884

Saturday, May 10th: Before The Mayor, Captain Carter, Alderman Sherwood and J. Fitness Esqs.

Stephen Smith was summoned for selling beer to be drunk on the premises, on the 6th March, without having a license to sell.

Mr. Jones, the Acting Supervisor of Inland Revenue, appeared to prosecute, and Mr. Minter defended.

Patrick Joseph Stanton, Inland Revenue Officer of Folkestone district, said the defendant held an off license to sell beer. On the 6th March, about half past nine, he called at Mr. Smith's house, and found there in the front room Wm. Lester. He was standing at the counter. He asked for Mr. Smith, and asked how he could account for Mr. Lester being on his premises drinking beer. He said he knew nothing about it, and he hoped witness would take no notice of it. He told him it was a very serious thing and he should report it. He did not go the next day and tell Smith what he intended to do, but Smith, on the following day, called and expressed his sorrow, and hoped witness would say no more about it. He replied that it was a very serious thing, and must go forward. He then said he would rather have given 50 than it should have occurred, as he was in hopes of getting a full license for the house later on and it might mitigate against that. He also said he would give witness 5 if he would say nothing about it. He told Smith he was not to be bribed, and that that was an offence in itself.

Cross-examined: The shop is a general shop, and his wife was serving. He sent Lester there, so that he might drop in and trap him. It was necessary to do so. There was not another man in the shop at the time he went in. There was one who went out.

Re-examined: I had never seen Lester before that evening.

William Lester, a painter, living at 78, New Bridge Street said he went to Smith's house on the evening of the 6th March, at half past nine. He called for a pint of beer. Mrs. Smith served him. He gave her 6d., and received 4d. out. The defendant was not in the shop. He drank the beer in the shop. He was not there more than ten minutes. Smith went round the same evening and asked if he would say he had half the beer in the house, and half out. He had never been supplied with beer in the house before except supper beer. When he went in there was a glass in front of a man named Kennett. He saw him drink the contents – ale or beer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter: How much money did Mr. Stanton give you to go into the place? – Sixpence

How much money were you to have for going to trap this man? – Nothing.

Then you pocketed 4d., and guzzled the beer? (Laughter) – That is it. I had a pint of beer, and paid for it out of the 6d.

You kept the 4d.? – Of course I did.

You know what you went there for, of course? – No, I did not.

Did you know what you received the 6d. for? – No.

Where did you receive the 6d.? – In the Two Bells.

Is that Burchett's? – Yes.

When you received the 6d., what did Mr. Stanton tell you to go and do with it? – He told me I could go and get a pint of beer up at Smith's.

Then what do you mean by saying you did not know what you were to do with it? – Well, he did not exactly tell me.

Did he tell you to take care to drink the beer on the premises? – He did not say anything about it.

Did he tell you to bring the beer outside or drink it on the premises? – He did not tell me to drink it inside. It did not matter to me where I had it. I had it inside.

You wish the magistrates to believe you don't know what the 4d. was for? – I don't know. It was my money. I don't know what the officer gave it to me for.

You say there was a man named Kennett in there? - Yes.

When you got your beer, did Mrs. Smith tell you to take it outside? – No.

You are in the habit of getting your supper beer there? – Yes.

Re-examined: Did Mr. Stanton tell you why he sent you there? – Yes, because Smith was selling beer on the premises.

Mr. Minter: Smith summoned you to the County Court for breaking his ladder, didn't he? – Yes.

And you had to pay for it? – Yes.

Edwin George Burchett, landlord of the Two Bells, was called to prove a conversation he had had with the officer about Smith's house, but the Magistrates' Clerk told the supervisor it was not evidence.

Mr. Jones said he wanted to show that it was from complaints made that this man was sent up.

Mr. Bradley said the magistrates could only hear evidence, and that was not evidence.

Mr. Jones then claimed the right to reply, but was told he could not.

Mr. Minter addressed the Bench for the defendant, pointing out that the prosecution did not come before them with clean hands. It did not want much perception to see that the case had arisen from the jealousy of Mr. Burchett, a rival landlord, who no doubt looked on the defendant as antagonistic to him in his trade, inasmuch as he sold beer for supper, and so on. The case rested solely on the evidence of that worthless character, Lester, who had lied backwards and forwards, whom it was admitted had been sent on purpose to entrap Smith, but who had told the Bench that he did not know what he went for.

He called Richard Kennett, a carter, living at 48, Sidney Street, who said he dealt at Smith's shop for bread and vegetables, and was there when Lester went in. It was false to say he took up a glass of ale or beer. He did not touch a glass of any description. He heard Lester call for a pint of beer. Mrs. Smith said “Where is your jug?”. He said “I haven't got one”. She said “All my cans and jugs are out. I'll lend you a glass to take it home”. She drew the pint of beer and gave it to him. He started drinking it directly. Mrs. Smith told him he mustn't drink it there – he must take it home.

Cross-examined: I went for bread and vegetables. I did not ask Lester if there was a police officer outside. Mrs. Smith did not call her husband to put him out.

Mr. Jones frequently interrupted Mr. Minter during his speech, evidently being stung by his caustic remarks.

Mr. Bradley told Mr. Jones that he ought to know how to conduct the case.

Mr. Jones: I think I do know.

Mr. Bradley: You have been most irregular.

Mr. Jones: The counsel for the defendant has been most irregular in his remarks. (Laughter)

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined the defendant 5, including costs.

Folkestone News 17 May 1884

Saturday, May 10th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Fletcher, Alderman Sherwood, and J. Fitness Esq.

Stephen Smith, a beer seller, of Folkestone, was charged by the Inland Revenue authorities with unlawfully selling a pint of beer, he having only an off licence, on May 6th. Mr. Jones, Supervisor of Inland Revenue, Dover district, prosecuted, and Mr. Minter defended.

Mr. Jones, in his opening remarks, said the case was brought forward in consequence of complaints that had been made of defendant selling beer to be drunk on his premises.

Patrick Joseph Stanton, an officer in the Inland Revenue, said he called at defendant's shop on the 6th, and found a man named Wm. Lester there drinking a pint of beer. Witness asked for Mr. Smith and then questioned him as to how it was he accounted for the fact of this man drinking beer on the premises. Defendant said he knew nothing about it and hoped no notice would be taken of it. Witness told him it was a serious thing and he should report it, and should take the next day or two to think over it. He did not, as he said he should, go down the next day and tell Mr. Smith, and the latter came up to him, expressed his regret at the affair, said it should not occur again, and hoped that the officer would not think anything more about it. Witness told him that after consideration he thought it was a very serious thing, and ought to go forward. Defendant then said that he would rather have paid 50 than have it occur, as he was anxious to get a full licence later on, and was afraid this would injure his prospect of so doing. Witness told him he could not help that, and that he should report the case. He then said he would rather give witness a 5 note to say nothing about it. Witness replied that he was not to be bribed, as that was an offence in itself. In cross-examination witness said he had never taken money from defendant.

Wm. Lester, of 73, New Bridge Street, said that on 6th March at half past nine he went into defendant's to call for a pint of beer. It was served to him and he changed 6d. and got 4d. out. Mr. Smith was not there. That was all he had; he drank it there. Smith came to him afterwards, and asked him whether he could not say he drunk half inside and half outside. A man named Kennett was there with a glass with some beer in it.

By My. Minter: Mr. Stanton gave him the 6d. to go and get the beer with. He was not to have anything for going. It was given to him in the Two Bells and Mr. Burchett was present at the time.

Mr. Minter: Did he (Mr. Stanton) tell you to take care you were to drink the pint of beer on the premises?

Witness: He told me to go and get a pint of beer, and didn't say about being careful.

Mr. Minter: Then why did you drink it inside instead of out on the pavement?

Witness: I don't know.

Mr. Minter: Why did you drink it inside? Do you mean to state that you did not know why you went up there to get a pint of beer?

Witness: I don't know anything more about it.

Mr. Minter: You knew how to keep the 4d. in your pocket. Do you know what that was for?

Witness: No. It's your own money if you have it given to you, I suppose.

Mr. Minter: The defendant, I believe, summoned you at the County Court for breaking his ladder?

Witness: Yes, that's right.

Mr. Jones explained that this case was instituted before the summons was issued.

Mr. Minter then addressed the Court at great length in support of the defence, and characterised the proceeding of the Revenue authority as constituting an unfair snare on the occasion, in employing a man who customarily went to the house to get beer to take away. It was unfortunate that in this case the man's wife could not be permitted to give evidence.

A witness named Kennett, a carpenter, said he dealt at Smith's shop for bread and vegetables. He was in there on the evening in question. It was false that he drank or bought any ale there or touched a glass of any description. When Lester came in, he asked for a pint of beer, and Mrs. Smith said “Where is your jug?” He replied that he had not got one. She said all her cans and jugs were out, and she would lend him a glass to take it home in. She drew the beer in a pint glass. Directly he got it in his hand he commenced drinking it. She told him he must not drink it there, but take it home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jones: He went to pay an account. Mr. Smith ordered the man out twice. He did not see him leave the house.

The Mayor said that the magistrates considered the case proved, and fined defendant 5.

The prosecution asked for their costs to be allowed.

The Bench decided that this could not be done.

Folkestone Chronicle 30 August 1884

Annual Licensing Meeting

The annual granting of public house and other refreshment licenses took place on Wednesday morning in the Session House, before The Mayor and other Magistrates. The whole of the licenses were granted without comment, except in the cases of the Alexandra Inn (sic) and an off beer license to a man named Smith.

Supt. Taylor informed the Bench that in the former case two serious convictions had been recorded, and in the latter, one. As the Alexandra bore an indifferent character, the Bench held the license over till the adjourned transfer day, on the 24th Sept. Smith's license was granted with a caution.

Folkestone News 30 August 1884

Wednesday, August 27th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Fletcher, J. Clark Esq., and Aldermen Sherwood and Caister.

Licensing Day

This being the annual licensing day, the holders of licenses in the district applied for renewals, which were granted without opposition except in the cases mentioned below.

Stephen Smith applied for a renewal of his off licence.

Supt. Taylor reminded the Bench that on May 10th the applicant was convicted of selling beer on the premises, and was fined 5 and costs.

Mr. Minter appeared for the applicant, and said the case alluded to was one in which it was proved and admitted before the magistrates that it was a plot laid by the excise officer, sending a regular customer to the house, supplying him with money for the purpose of procuring beer to drink on the premises. For the defence it was said that the wife of the defendant served the beer in a glass for it to be taken away, but this did not satisfy the Bench.

The licence was granted, The Mayor cautioning Mr. Smith to be careful in the future.

Folkestone Chronicle 19 December 1891

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Town Hall on Monday evening before the Borough Coroner (J. Minter Esq.) on the body of Cordelia Grinstead, who died suddenly in the Royal Standard Inn on Saturday morning.

Henry Grinstead, a plasterer, living in Canterbury Road, said the deceased was his wife, and her age was 51. She lived with him and died on Saturday, about a quarter past eleven, at the Royal Standard public house. He last saw her alive at eight o'clock on Saturday morning, going down the footpath leading to the road in front of his house. He was in his bedroom. She had not slept with him, but downstairs, on the same floor as his mother slept. His mother's age was 85, and was, considering her age, active, and did the housework. He went to bed on Friday night about 10.30, leaving his wife lying on the sofa, where she slept. He said to her “Don't you think it's time I slept upstairs and you there, as I'm sober and you're drunk”. He had been in the habit of sleeping on the sofa, as he would not sleep with her because she was drunk. She was drunk on Friday night. There was no quarrel between them, but they were in the habit of quarrelling, and that was the reason he did not sleep with her. The drunken habits of the deceased had been going on for ten or twelve years. As deceased was going down the path she appeared to be sober. She brushed her dress as she walked along.

Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Smith, wife of the landlord of the Sportsman's Tavern, Sidney Street, said on Saturday morning the deceased went to her house about 9.30 and asked for some beer, and witness refused her. She seemed all right, but looked very pale.

Mrs. Amy Merton, of the Royal Standard Tavern, said the deceased went to her house at about a quarter to eleven on Saturday morning. She was not indoors when deceased went in, but when she returned at about ten minutes to eleven she saw deceased in a fit in a chair. She sent for assistance, and Dr. Barrett came about twelve. Deceased was dead when he arrived.

Mrs. Sarah Holliday, of the Wheatsheaf Inn, said she saw the deceased between half past ten and eleven on Saturday morning. She asked for 4d. worth of whisky, and passed the remark that she was not feeling very well.

William Barrett, surgeon, said he was called to see deceased on Saturday at about a quarter to one. He went to the Royal Standard and found deceased lying on the couch dead. He had made a post mortem examination of the body and found she had a large and several small tumours on the liver. A small one had burst, causing syncope, from which she died.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Folkestone Express 19 December 1891

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Monday evening, before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of Cordelia Grinstead, who died suddenly in the Royal Standard Inn on Saturday morning.

Henry Grinstead, a plasterer, living in Canterbury Road, said the deceased was his wife, and her age was 51. She lived with him, and died on Saturday about a quarter past eleven in the Royal Standard public house. He last saw her alive at eight o'clock on Saturday morning, going down the footpath leading to the road in front of his house. She had not slept with him, but downstairs on the same floor as his mother slept. His mother's age was 85, and was, considering her age, active, and did the housework. He went to bed on Friday night about 10.30, leaving his wife lying on the sofa, where she slept. He said to her “Don't you think it's time I slept upstairs and you there, as I'm sober and you're drunk?” He had been in the habit of sleeping on the sofa, as he would not sleep with her because she was drunk. She was drunk on Friday night. There was no quarrel between them, but they were in the habit of quarrelling, and that was the reason he would not sleep with her. The drunken habits of the deceased had been going on for ten or twelve years. As deceased was going down the path she appeared to be sober, as she brushed her dress as she walked along.

Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Smith, wife of the landlord of the Sportsman's Tavern, Sidney Street, said on Saturday morning the deceased went to their house about 9.30 and asked for some beer, and witness refused her. She seemed all right, but looked very pale.

Mrs. Amy Merton, of the Royal Standard Tavern, said the deceased went to her house at about a quarter to eleven on Saturday morning. She was not indoors when deceased went in, but when she returned at about ten minutes to eleven she saw deceased in a fit in a chair. She sent for assistance, and Dr. Barrett came about twelve o'clock. Deceased was dead when he arrived.

Mrs. Sarah Holliday, of the Wheatsheaf Inn, said she saw the deceased between half past ten and eleven on Saturday morning. Deceased asked her to serve her with 4d. worth of whisky, and passed the remark that she was not feeling very well.

William Peard Barrett, M.R.C.S., said he was called to see the deceased on Saturday last at about a quarter to one. He went to the Royal Standard and found deceased lying on the couch dead. He had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found she had a large, and several small, tumours on the liver. A small one had burst, causing syncope, from which she died.

The jury found that the deceased died from natural causes.

Folkestone Herald 19 December 1891

Inquest

Mr. John Minter (Borough Coroner) held an inquest at the Town Hall on Monday evening last, touching the death of Cordelia Grinstead, who died on Saturday last at the Royal Standard public house, Bridge Street.

The jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was taken:-

Henry Grinstead, plasterer, living at 88, Canterbury Road, said deceased was his wife. He last saw her alive on Saturday morning last, when she appeared in her usual health. Witness said he did not sleep in the same bedroom as deceased, on account of her drunken habits. She was drunk the night before her death. Deceased had been given to drinking about ten or twelve years. He had had no quarrel, nor did he strike deceased on Friday.

Jane Eliza Smith, wife of Robert Smith, landlord of the Sportsman's Inn, Sidney Street, said deceased came into her house on Saturday morning last at half past nine and asked for a drink, but she refused to serve her.

Ellen Murten, wife of William Murten, landlord of the Royal Standard, said deceased came to her house about 10.45 on Saturday morning. She was not indoors at the time, but on returning found deceased in a fit. Witness at once sent for a doctor, and on his arrival found she was quite dead.

Mrs. Halliday, wife of George Halliday, landlord of the Wheatsheaf, said deceased came to their house between 10 and 11 a.m. and had some whisky. She complained of not feeling well, and soon after left the house. Witness afterwards saw her enter the Royal Standard.

Dr. William Peard Barrett, M.R.C.S., said he was called to deceased, and found her lying on a couch quite dead. He made a post mortem examination of the body. Deceased was suffering from an internal complaint, and in his opinion the immediate cause of death was syncope.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Folkestone Express 11 March 1899

Wednesday, March 8th: Before J. Fitness and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The off licence of a beer-house in Sidney Street was temporarily transferred to Mrs. Smith, widow of the late proprietor.

Folkestone Up To Date 11 March 1899

Friday, March 10th: Before J. Fitness Esq., Col. Hamilton, and W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following licence was transferred:

Off licence of beerhouse in Sidney Street temporarily transferred to Mrs. Smith, widow of late proprietor.

Folkestone Express 29 April 1899

Wednesday, April 26th: Before The Mayor, J. Fitness, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs., and Col. Hamilton.

An application for the transfer of the off licence of the Sportsman, Sidney Street, to Mrs. Smith, the widow of the late licence holder, was also granted.

Folkestone Herald 29 April 1899

Folkestone Police Court

On Wednesday last a beer off licence was granted to Mrs. Smith, of the Sportsman.

Folkestone Up To Date 29 April 1899

Wednesday, April 26th: Before The Mayor, J. Fitness, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs., and Lt. Col. Hamilton.

The following transfer was granted: 57, Sidney Street (beer off licence), Stephen Smith to Jane Elizabeth Smith (widow).

Folkestone Express 26 April 1902

Wednesday, April 23rd: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Colonel W.K. Westropp, and W. Wightwick, W.C. Carpenter, G. Peden and J. Stainer Esqs.

Mr. Stephen Major was granted a transfer of the Sportsman Inn.

Folkestone Daily News 24 March 1906

Saturday, March 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.C. Carpenter, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Mr. T. Ames.

Jesse Wood was granted the temporary transfer of the off licence of the Sportsman, Sydney Street.

Folkestone Express 31 March 1906

Saturday, March 24th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, W.C. Carpenter and T. Ames Esqs.

The licence of the Sportsman, Sydney Street, was temporarily transferred to John Wood.

Folkestone Daily News 11 April 1906

Wednesday, April 11th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, R.J. Linton, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Mr. Jesse Wood was granted the transfer of the off licence of the Sportsman Inn, Sydney Street.

Folkestone Chronicle 14 April 1906

On Wednesday morning, at the Borough Police Court, Mr. E.T. Ward presiding, the ordinary business was preceded by a special licensing sessions.

The transfer of the Sportsman Inn, Sidney Street, was granted to Mr. Jesse Wood.

Folkestone Express 14 April 1906

Wednesday, April 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and R.J. Linton Esq.

The following licence was transferred: The Sportsman to Jesse Wood.

Folkestone Herald 14 April 1906

Wednesday, April 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Mr. E.T. Ward and Mr. R.J. Linton.

A special session for the transfer of alehouse licences was held. Application was made and granted as follows: The licence of the Sportsman to Jesse Wood.

Folkestone Daily News 31 May 1906

Local News

On Wednesday afternoon a fatal accident occurred in the Warren. A youth named Smith, the son of Mr. W. Smith, builder and licensed victualler, of Sidney Street, fell over one of the cliffs, and died from the fall. An inquest will be held on Friday.

Folkestone Daily News 1 June 1906

Inquest

Today (Friday) G.W. Haines Esq. held an inquest on the body of Ernest Smith, aged 13, living in Sidney Street, a pupil of the Sidney Street Schools.

The jury having been sworn, the body was viewed and identified by William Henry Bayley, who said: I live at 16, Boscombe Road, and am an assistant master at the Sidney Street Council Schools, boys' department. The body now viewed by the jury I identify as that of Ernest Edward Smith, a pupil at the Sidney Street Schools. He was 13 years and 11 months old, and was the stepson of Jesse Wood. On Wednesday last he was one of a party of 31 boys that went to the Warren on an observation or nature study of climbing plants. This custom was started in the beginning of the spring. At 4.15 they cease to be in my charge, but I always make it a practice to see the boys are back in school area out of any chance of danger. I suggested this journey should be to the Warren. It is left to the teacher to fix the place. I had the sanction of Mr. Jones, the headmaster. We got to the spring in the Warren, near the iron bridge. The lesson finished at the bottom of the zigzag path. Some of the boys wanted to gather flowers. I counted them and found they were all there. I gave permission to those who wanted to remain. Some wanted to get home. I gave them permission to return by the same way as we came. I remained behind with the others for about fifteen minutes altogether. The average ages of the boys are from twelve to thirteen. We then moved towards home, when one of the boys informed me that little Ernest Smith was dying, having fallen from the cliff. I rushed over to the spot, and saw the little boy being carried by some gentlemen. The boy must have fallen eighty feet. Some other boys had been on the same spot. We did not go home the same way as we came, which was safe. When I saw him I did not recognise him. The gentleman who was carrying him laid him down. I saw he was injured. We got a wagon and took him to his home in Sidney Street. I could not say whether he was alive when we took him from the wagon. He has been out with me before. I consider the Warren a danger area.

Cecil Winde, a boy of 12, deposed that he lived at Linden Crescent with his parents. He went to the Sidney Street Schools, and was one of the party on Wednesday afternoon. Some of the boys wanted to go home. Smith asked some of the boys to go up to the cave with him. Witness went up higher than the cave and came down alright. When he got to the bottom he saw deceased had fallen. He did not see how he came to fall. They were told to go straight home by the master, but they went up to the cave. Witness ran up and told the master that deceased had fallen.

A stoker deposed that on Wednesday he saw the deceased fall 150 feet down the cliff. He assisted to take him home.

After hearing Dr. Larking's evidence the jury returned a verdict of accidental death, exonerating the master from any blame.

Folkestone Express 2 June 1906

Local News

An exceedingly distressing and sad fatality occurred in the Warren on Wednesday afternoon, a boy named Ernest Smith (13), living in Sidney Street, having a fall which resulted in breaking his neck. The facts are these: Deceased was a pupil at Sidney Street Council School, and on Wednesday afternoon he and the other boys in his class, with the teacher, went to the Warren for a lesson on botany. The lesson over, some of the boys asked for permission to go home by themselves, instead of accompanying the teacher, as they wanted to get home early. Permission was given, and six of the class went on ahead. Five of the boys with the deceased, it appears, went to see the cave which is in the face of the cliff. Having viewed the cave, Smith suggested that they should go up the cliff and go home by the Dover Road way, and at once commenced to climb. The other boys followed. They had not gone far when Smith appears to have slipped, a piece of turf giving was underneath him. He started rolling, and, coming to a curve in the cliff of some eight or nine feet, he shot forward on his head, which seemed to double under him. The body continued to roll, and in its course was stopped by a tree. Two of the boys immediately ran back and communicated with the teacher. They started for the spot, but were met by a man who had picked up Smith. He was quite dead. Deceased was taken to the Warren tea gardens, and from thence he was taken home in a cart. Deceased was a bright and intelligent boy and was in the sixth standard. He was much liked, and his death has cast a gloom over the school.

Folkestone Herald 2 June 1906

Inquest

The Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines) investigated yesterday afternoon the death of a Sidney Street School boy, named Ernest Edward Smith, who, after being dismissed from a nature study class, which had been conducted by his teacher in the Warren, made a daring climb up the face of a cliff, and, missing his footing, fell to the bottom and was killed.

Ernest Edward Bayley, of No. 16, Boscombe Road, an assistant teacher in the Boys' Department of the Sidney Street Council Schools, identified the body as that of Ernest Edward Smith, a pupil at the schools. He would have been 14 years of age in about one month's time. Deceased's father was Mr. Jesse Wood, who lived at No. 57, Sidney Street. On Wednesday afternoon deceased was one of a party of 31 boys who went with witness, about 2.40 p.m., from the schools, in order to find certain climbing plants to illustrate a lesson in connection with nature study. It was part of the lesson to see the plant growing. At the beginning of the spring the lessons were started. The students ranged from 12 to 13 years of age, and the lesson formed part of the school curriculum. At a quarter past four it was the time for dismissal, but witness had always made a point of seeing the scholars back to the school area. Witness fixed upon the Warren, and had mentioned to the lads his intention, having obtained the sanction of his Master (Mr. T.G. Jones) to go there. The lesson finished at twenty minutes past four, and witness and his class were at the bottom of a zigzag path which led down into the Warren. Some of the boys wanted to gather some flowers, so witness called them around him and counted them. They were all there. He asked how many wanted to gather flowers, and the majority put up their hands in favour. They were anxious to pick some periwinkles. A few of the boys said it was necessary for them to go home at once, and these lads were given permission to go home by the same way that the class had come. Those boys left. The remainder went to find flowers, and witness went up to a mound where he could see them all. He waved his hand, and the boys returned. One of the lads was not well, so the class waited while he sat down. The lads who had gone to pick the flowers moved towards home, and then one of the party who had started came back to witness, saying that Ernest Smith was dying, having fallen down the cliff. Witness reached to the point that was shown him. It was just under a hole in the cliff known as the cave. There he saw the boy being carried by a gentleman. From the cave to the foot of the cliff was about eighty feet. There were on the cliff about six of the boys whom witness had sent home. The cave was quite half way up the cliff. The class had not gone down to the Warren by the cave path. When witness first saw the boy, the latter did not recognise him. He was not dead, but appeared as though he was in a fit. When the farm at the end of the Warren was reached, the lad was placed in a wagon and conveyed to his home. He was quite insensible when home was reached. The lads who were sent home belonged to the highest class in the school.

Cecil Wiley, of 45, Linden Crescent, stated that he was a pupil at the Sidney Street Schools. On Wednesday he was in the Warren with the other boys and Mr. Bayley. When four o'clock came, nine of the boys, of whom witness was one, left the class for home. The deceased asked witness and some of the others to go to the cave. They climbed up there, and Smith and some of the others went higher. Witness, however, descended, and when he had reached the bottom he looked up and saw Smith falling down. He heard some of the others say that Smith trod on a turf. They had all been told to go straight home by the teacher, but they did not all intend to do so. A man who was near told witness to go for assistance, and witness met his master and told him.

A marone stoker stated that on Wednesday he was about 400 yards from the entrance to the arren when he saw about six schoolboys. He passed them about 75 paces to the eastward of the cave. Soon afterwards he saw them about 150 feet up the cliff, and one of them said they had better go back. He next heard one of them say that he could not get back. After they had gone about 170 yards he heard a scream, and saw the deceased falling. He was high up in the air, in a spread-eagle shape. Witness ran to the spot where he fell and picked him up, and was walking along when a platelayer and the teacher came up. Eventually the boy was taken to his home. He was certainly alive when he reached there.

Dr. A.E. Larking proved being called to No. 57, Sidney Street shortly after six o'clock on Wednesday, when he saw the dead body of the deceased. His partner, Dr. Lidderdale, had previously been to the Warren, and found that the lad had been conveyed home. There were several bruises on the body, and witness came to the conclusion that death was due to fracture of the skull, and shock to the system.

The Coroner, in summing up, said that the jury would have no difficulty in arriving at a conclusion. The master had very fairly said that he always looked after the boys, to see that they were out of danger. Some of the boys wished to remain behind. He permitted them to do so, but some of the boys asked to go home. If they had done what they were told they would not have heard of any catastrophe. Boys would be boys, and they would go where there was danger. There was a certain element of danger in approaching the cave, and the lad must have missed his footing, and fallen. They were all very sorry for the family.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”, exonerating the teacher from all blame.

Folkestone Express 9 June 1906

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Town Hall on Friday afternoon by the Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines), touching the death of Ernest Edward Smith, who fell from the cliff in the Warren, as reported in our last week's issue.

William Henry Brayley, of 16, Boscombe Road, an assistant teacher in the Sidney Street Council Schools (Boys' Department), identified the body viewed by the jury as that of Ernest Edward Smith, who, he said, was a pupil in the Sidney Street Borough Council Schools. He would have been 14 in a month's time, witness believed. He lived with his step-father, Jesse Wood, at 57, Sidney Street. Deceased was one of a party of boys, numbering 31, who went with witness to the Warren in Wednesday afternoon. They started from the school at ten minutes to three. They went to the Warren in order to find climbing plants with which to illustrate the lesson. It was for “Nature Sturdy”. Since the beginning of spring, witness had taken the boys out five or six times. It formed a part of the school curriculum. At a quarter past four, no matter where they were, it was then time for witness to dismiss the boys. He had, however, always made it a practice to see them back into the school area and out of danger. Witness fixed the Warren with the approval of the headmaster as the place to study. The lesson finished at twenty minutes past four. They were then at the bottom of a zigzag path in the Warren. Some of the boys wanted to gather wild flowers. Witness told those boys who wanted to gather more flowers to put their hands up. The majority of them did. The rest of te boys said it was necessary for them to go home at once and gave their reasons. Witness gave them permission and directed them to go the same way as they came. Those boys then left witness. He told the other boys to gather their flowers and waited for them. Witness waited about ten minutes and watched the boys from a mound. Subsequently witness waved his hand and the boys came back. They did not start for home, but sat down for another five minutes, as one of the boys was not very well. As they moved along one of the boys who had wished to go home came running back and said “Little Ernie Smith s dying. He has fallen from the cliff”. Witness rushed to the place that the boy had pointed out to him. It was just beneath the cave. The first thing witness saw was that the deceased was being carried by a man. He had had a tremendous blow on the forehead, and blood was coming from his mouth. He was taken to a farm, and afterwards conveyed home in a wagon. He was alive when placed in the wagon.

Cecil Winder (12) said he lived at 45, Linden Crescent with his father, and was a pupil in the Sidney Street Schools. On Wednesday afternoon he went to the Warren with the other boys and Mr. Brayley. After the lesson some of the boys wanted to get some flowers. Smith asked those boys who did not gather flowers to go up to the cave with him. They went to the cave, and then went higher. Deceased had got nearly to the top with three or four other boys. When witness got to the bottom of the cliff he saw Smith falling. Some of the boys said he slipped on a piece of turf which gave way. They had been told to go home. There were six of them. Witness went and told Mr. Brayley what had happened. A man had previously told witness to go to the iron bridge and get assistance. Witness met Mr. Brayley, and they met the man as they were going to the spot.

Coveney John Mulcahy, a marine stoker, said on Wednesday last he was in the Warren, and passed some boys about 75 paces to the east of the cave. When witness was underneath the cave he heard one of the boys say they had better go back. The boys were about 150 ft. up the cliff. There were about half a dozen of them. One of the boys replied “I can't return. I can't get back”. Witness passed on. Then he heard a scream. He looked round and saw the deceased in the air, and at once ran to the spot where he fell. He had fallen about 100 ft. and was lying on his face. Witness saw it was a hopeless case and picked him up. He had carried the deceased about 200 ft. when he met the teacher. Deceased was afterwards placed in a conveyance and taken home. Witness went home with him. When he got home deceased was alive, for there was pulsation.

Dr. Larking said soon after six o'clock on Wednesday afternoon he went to 57, Sidney Street, where he saw the dead body of deceased. His partner previously went to the Warren, but found deceased had been taken home. Witness examined the body and found several bruises of a severe nature. He came to the conclusion that death arose from fracture of the skull and shock to the system. The face was very much scratched and bruised all over.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death”, and exonerated the teacher (Mr. Brayley) from blame.

Folkestone Express 20 November 1926

Wednesday, November 17th: Before The Mayor, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Col. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. H.J. Blamey, and Mr. G. Boyd.

The following application for transfer of licence was granted: Sportsman Tavern, Sidney Street, from Mr. Jesse Wood to Mr. John Thomas Smith.

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1926

Wednesday, November 17th: Before The Mayor, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, and Mr. J.H. Blamey.

The licence of the Sportsman Tavern, Sidney Street, was transferred from Mr. Jesse Wood to Mr. John Thomas Smith.

Folkestone Express 15 March 1930

Local News

The Folkestone Magistrates had before them on Wednesday morning an application for an off wine licence by Mr. John Thomas Smith, of the Sportsman Tavern, 57 Sidney Street. Mr. G.I. Swoffer was in the chair, and the other members of the Bench were Col. G.P. Owen, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Mr. W. Griffin, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

Mr. B.H. Bonniface appeared in support of the application. Mr. Ernest William Hook proved the service of the necessary notices.

Mr. Bonniface said that the application was by the tenant of the Sportsman Tavern as it was called or was previously called, which had an off licence for the sale of beers, and was so that he could hold a licence for the sale of wine for consumption off the premises. These premises had been licensed as an off licence for some fifty years, and they had been in the ownership of Mr. Smith's family for the whole of that period. Mr. Smith was born on the premises, and his father held the licence, and it was carried on down to the time of his father's death. His mother then carried on until some three and a half years ago, when he took over after a severe accident, he himself having previously been a carpenter. The premises were his mother's, she having married again, and it was an arrangement whereby the widow was getting an income. On the death of his mother, Mr. Smith became interested as a part owner of those premises. The plans before them that morning were rather interesting to show the extraordinary growth in the town there, because there were no less than 463 new buildings which had been put up within the course of the last few years, the majority being of course their local Council housing estate, but in Joyes Road there were ten new houses and there was plenty of room for further development along there and it was still going on. They would also see that the only direct communication into the whole of that estate was Sidney Street, because in order to get into Dover Road there was only one road, and that was Joyes Road. While Wood Avenue at the extreme left hand went into Canterbury Road. They would therefore see that the off licence of the Sportsman was undoubtedly by far the nearest licence of any kind to those particular people on that estate. It might be said that despite the development in that direction it was very unlikely that those people who lived in those houses would want wine. Mr. Smith had submitted a notice of that application a month ago. During that time, despite the fact that he had had to work the business practically single handed, he had been able to obtain the signatures of no less than 299 people from that particular district. Ninety nine of those were his old customers not included in any way in those new buildings, customers to whom he supplied beer and delivered beer in the ordinary way. He was asked continually for wine. In addition to that there were some 200 who were amongst the inhabitants of the new dwellings, and of the whole 200 were his regular customers. He suggested to them that there was ample evidence of a demand, and a growing demand because the district was growing, for wine. Amongst his old customers Mr. Smith did not get a great demand for wine, for the reason that there was a licence which had been established as an off beer licence only for some fifty years, and therefore it was known to the old customers that of course they could not get wine. But even amongst those he had been continually asked for such wines as port, and similar wines, all of which required a licence. They could readily appreciate that even amongst his old customers at Christmas time particularly he got a very big demand. He had found that at Christmas time, that despite the fact that he was regularly supplying those customers, when they found they could not get wine from him they went, as far as he knew, to a district at least half a mile away and then bought both the wine and beer. Then there were the other licences in that particular district. They were used to seeing the opposition of the Licensed Victuallers, but on that occasion they had no opposition, so that he did not suggest to them that that was a very clear case that there must be, in that given area, quite sufficient for everybody to get a living in a legitimate way. Mr. Smith carried on a grocer's business.

The application was granted.

Folkestone Herald 15 March 1930

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, March 5th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. W. Griffin, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Mr. J.H. Blamey.

John Thomas Smith applied for an off wine licence at 57, Sidney Street.

Mr. B.H. Bonniface , for Mr. Smith, said that the application was for an off wine licence at the Sportsman Tavern which had an off licence for the sale of beers. For some 50 years the off beer licence had been in the ownership of Mr. Smith's family. The premises belonged to Mr. Smith's mother, and by an arrangement Mr. Smith had the tenancy from year to year, but on the death of his mother he would be part owner of the premises. The plans which he produced were interesting, said Mr. Bonniface, because they showed the extraordinary growth of buildings in that neighbourhood. Within the last few years there had been no fewer than 463 new buildings put up, the majority being on the local housing estate, but were being erected also in Joyes Road, and there was plenty of room there for further development. It was significant that although Mr. Smith's wife had been ill, he had been able to obtain himself during the last month a petition signed by no fewer than 299 people of the district supporting the application. Of that number 99 were his old customers, while some 200 people who had signed the petition were amongst the inhabitants of the new buildings. Mr. Smith would tell the Bench that among his very old customers there was a great demand for wine, and even among his old customers, who knew that he had only got an off beer licence, he had been asked continually for such medicated wine as port, Wincarnis, and Hall's wine, all of which required a licence. At Christmas time especially there was a big demand for wines, even from his old customers, and he also got very big demands from the inhabitants of new houses and from visitors during the summer. When they found they could not get wines from him, many persons of the district had to go about half a mile to get wines. There were no other licensed premises in that particular area, and no licensed house could be built on the estate in future. The Bench were used to seeing opposition from the Licensed Victuallers' Association and from other people, but on this occasion there was no opposition, and that in itself was significant, he suggested, and showed there was need for the licence.

John Thomas Smith, proprietor of the Sportsman Tavern said he had been for 3 years in the business. He had been born on the premises, and his father had been carrying on the business when he was born. Since his father's death his mother had carried on the business. On his mother's death, the property would revert to him, together with a brother. He had himself obtained all the signatures on the petition, of which there were 299. He had once been licensee of a house at Hawkinge, until he met with a serious accident.

The application was granted.

Folkestone Herald 12 April 1930

Friday, April 4th: Before Alderman C.E. Mumford, Alderman T.S. Franks, and Mr. F. Seager.

The Bench confirmed the granting of a wine licence to John Thomas Smith for the Sportsman's Tavern, at 57, Sidney Street.

Mr. B.H. Bonniface, for Mr. Smith, said that there was no opposition to the application when it was granted at the adjourned annual licensing sessions, and a petition supporting the application was signed by 299 people, 99 of them being old customers and 200 new residents.

Folkestone Herald 9 October 1943

Local News

At Folkestone Licensing Transfer Sessions on Wednesday the off licence of 57, Sidney Street was transferred from John Thomas Smith to Dennis George Couzens.

 

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML

 

LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room