DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Saturday, 13 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1875

Warren Inn

Latest 1892

East Cliff

Folkestone

Warren Inn circa 1880

Above showing the "Warren Inn" circa 1880.

Warren Tea Gardens

Above by kind permission of the "Black Horse" Densole.

Warren Inn 1910

Above postcard, 1910.

 

This house was situated just below the Martello Tower Number 1 and and when opened in about 1875 held a six day beer license, Sunday being closed. The license was changed to include the selling of cider and wine shortly after opening but in 1884, when they tried for a spirits license, the application was refused and I don't believe it ever hold the license to sell on Sundays. However, drinking often took place on Sundays and other prohibited hours and the license was suspended from time to time.

The Police were most certainly onto drinking out of hours and in 1892, hiding behind the Martello Tower caught 19 men drinking after the premises should have closed. The licensee, Henry Mutton was fined 5 and 9s. costs and instructed to leave the house. It was subsequently shut down by the landowner, the earl of Radnor.

After it closed as a public house the building was used as a tea house and continued operating as such till its closure in 1924. It was then demolished. The site where the house once stood has now been washed away by cliff erosion.

 

From an email received 18 February 2012

I have recently been doing some clearing out following my Fathers death, and have come across glass slides dating back to the turn of the (last) century. They were rescued when our Church was being pulled down in Manchester.

In researching the pictures I came across your website which had your contact details on. One of the pictures is of the "Warren Inn." A snapshot is attached, however it does not do justice to the picture quality. If it is wanted I will provide a better quality image once I have sorted out the technology. Please let me know who to provide it to.

Warren Inn

Regards,

Brian Sharples.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 August 1875.

Wednesday, August 25th: Before The Mayor, W. Wightwick, J. Tolputt, W.J. Jeffreason, T. Caister Esqs., and Captain Crowe.

This was the annual licensing day.

On the application of Mr. Minter, a license was granted to Mr. Timothy Harrison to sell beer and excisable liquors in the Warren.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1875.

Wednesday August 25th: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt, W.J. Jeffreason and T. Caister Esqs., and Capt. Crowe.

Wednesday being the sessions for the hearing of applications for licenses and transacting licensing business, the Magistrates present sat as a licensing committee, and were occupied for three quarters of an hour in renewing the licenses.

The Warren.

Mr. Minter applied to support an application by Mr. Timothy Harrison for a license to sell beer and other excisable liquors in the Warren. As they knew, the Warren was the scene of various picnics during the summer time, and great inconvenience was often occasioned from the impossibility of getting refreshments within the Warren. To meet this want Mr. Harrison had erected some buildings at it's entrance and now applied that they might be licensed, and the memorial had been very numerously signed. He might add that Mr. Harrison intended building a large hotel at the entrance of the Warren before next summer, for which he would apply for a full license.

Mr. Harrison was then examined in support of his application, and stated that the license was required for three substantial cottages with good conveniences for the supply of refreshments, but that he intended building a larger structure there. Parties sometimes consisting of as many as three hundred persons visited the Warren in fine weather during the summer. These persons were often inconvenienced by the difficulty of obtaining refreshments when picnicking in the Warren, the nearest licensed house being the Swan, Dover Road.

Mr. W.A. Watts, clerk at Mr. Hart's, having proved the service of the notices, the Mayor said the Committee were unanimous in granting the application, subject of course to the ultimate decision of the whole Bench at the annual session to be held a fortnight hence.

 

Southeastern Gazette 28 August 1875.

Brewster Sessions.

At the annual licensing meeting, on Wednesday the whole of the licences of the inns and beer-houses were renewed. A certificate for a retail beer licence was granted to Mr. Harrison for a house situate in the Warren, a favourite resort of visitors.

 

Folkestone Express 17 June 1876.

Inquest.

On Monday morning Mr John Bourne Adams was found drowned in East Wear Bay. It appeared that the deceased, who up till lately held the post of steward on board the packet boat Victoria, belonging to the South Eastern Railway Company, had been in the habit of bathing in the locality, but had been compelled to discontinue it for some time, owing to an attack of rheumatic fever.

An inquest was held on Monday evening at the Warren Inn, before Mr. Coroner Minter, when the following evidence was taken:

John Sherren Adams said: I am the son of deceased, and I identify the body just viewed by the jury as that of my father, John Bourne Adams, who was a steward in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. He was 53 years of age. He has lately been suffering from rheumatic fever, and has just recovered. About a week back my father asked me to go and bathe with him, but I refused on account of just returning from a hot climate. I last saw him alive yesterday morning at about half past eight, before going on board. I identify the clothes produced as being my father's.

John Griffiths said: I live at Folly Cottage, and am a collector of fossils. I went down to the East Wear Bay, and on arriving there at nine o'clock I saw some man's clothes on the beach. They were all placed together. The clothes now produced are the same I saw. It was low water. I saw no-one, and remained by the clothes for about an hour. I proceeded to search, and traced footsteps to the sea, and I then found deceased lying on the sand face downwards. He was quite dead and cold. There was a little pool of water round his head, with traces of blood which had flowed from his ear. Where the body laid was about half tide. From the place where his footsteps reached I think deceased must have gone into the water at about five o'clock. I obtained assistance and the body was removed. I then went and fetched his clothes, and I took a purse out of his trouser pocket which contained gold and silver.

Mr. Richard Mercer: I am a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, London. This afternoon at two o'clock I was called by Superintendent Wilshere to look at the body of deceased. I examined the body and found no marks of violence except a slight abrasion on the right ear and also a slight abrasion on the left eye. There was blood proceeding from the left ear. I think from my examination that in the deceased's state of health his going into the water to bathe would most likely have produced a fit, and then falling on his face, even in shallow water, would cause him to drown. I am of opinion that death arose from suffocation from drowning.

Mr. Timothy Harrison said: I occupy the Warren Farm, Folkestone. I have known the deceased from boyhood. Several times last year the deceased came over to East Wear Bay to bathe. He was in the habit of talking to me both before and after bathing.

P.C. Robert Hogben said: I produce the clothes, knife, corkscrew and a two shilling piece belonging to the deceased.

Superintendent Wilshere said: I received from the witness Griffiths the sum of 3 14s. 3d. and two French coins. I met the deceased on Saturday and had a long chat with him. He appeared to be very cheerful.

The Coroner said there was no need for him to sum up the evidence. He saw the deceased a day or two ago relative to the purchase by him of some property. The jury had heard the medical evidence and had heard that the deceased went to bathe against the advice of his medical attendant.

The jury at once returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

 

Folkestone Express 3 February 1877.

Thursday, February 1st: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, Captain Fletcher, R.W. Boarer and J. Kelcey Esqs.

Mr. Hills applied for the license which was granted to Mr. T. Harrison, for the Warren Inn, to be transferred to him.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 17 March 1877.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday the license of the Warren House, in the Warren was transferred from Mr. Timothy Harrison to Mr. Rowland Hills, the son of the late Bathing Establishment manager.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 November 1877.

Inquest.

An inquest was held on Tuesday last at the Warren Inn, before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of Lucien Du Prey, Captain of the brig “Edmund”, when the following evidence was adduced:

Eugene Lier, mate, and one of the survivors of the vessel, deposed: I was the mate of the vessel, bound from Sunderland to Caen. We had on board five hands all told. I identify the body as the Captain, who was 30 years of age. His place of residence was Langrund Sur Mer, Calvados, Normandy. On Monday morning, the 12th instant, about two o'clock, the vessel was driven ashore on the rocks at Copt Point, having broken from her anchors in Dungeness Bay. They got out a small boat, which was smashed by the waves. They got into the rigging with deceased and another, and were there an hour and a half when the masts went by the board and we were thrown into the water and then swam ashore.

Louis Basse, seaman, the other survivor, deposed that he was in the rigging when the masts went over, and the deceased was there also by the side of the mate. He swam ashore with the assistance of a piece of wood. He saw the Captain once on the waves.

Henry James Bull, fisherman, deposed to having found the body on the rocks.

Richard Mercer, M.R.C.S., deposed to having been sent for and viewed the body of deceased, whose death was caused by drowning.

P.C. Keeler deposed to having searched deceased's clothes and finding 1 handkerchief, knife, leather purse containing 8 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 3 Napoleons, 11 half-Napoleons, 3 quarter-Napoleons, 2 English florins, five shillings, one Franc, and one shilling in coppers, which he handed to his Superintendent.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidentally Drowned.

 

Folkestone Express 17 November 1877.

Inquest.

The heavy gale which prevailed on Sunday afternoon and during the night was felt at Folkestone in all it's fury. As usual on occasions when a storm is raging, large numbers of persons assembled near the pier to witness the arrival of the passenger boat from Boulogne. The scene which presented itself was grand. The waves dashed over the piers, sending up volumes of spray to a great height. The passenger steamer was due shortly before five, and she was preceded by a cargo boat. The latter had so much difficulty in making the harbour that the authorities deemed it prudent to signal the former, the Alexandra, to go on to Dover. The small cannon which stands on the parapet of the pier is used for this purpose, and in firing it an unfortunate accident occurred. The muzzle pointed down the pier, and the head of a lad named Harry Poole, sone of Mr. Poole, ironmonger, was in a direct line with it. The wad from the gun struck him on the forehead over they eye, and it was feared it had caused serious injury. He was carried to the waiting room at the Station, and Dr. Eastes was sent for. Subsequently the lad was removed to his home and he has now nearly recovered. The Alexandra altered her course and made for Dover, and on her arrival there a train had been provided to convey her passengers to London. The effects of the gale in the town were very considerable. We hear that a chimney stack on the Stade was blown down, and the tenant in the house was struck by a falling brick. Chimney pots and roofing tiles were blown down, and the streets in the old parts of the borough were strewn with fragments. The scaffolding around houses in the course of building suffered considerably in many cases. Rain fell in torrents during the night, and it's results were seen in the rush of water which poured from the culvert conveying the rivulet from Foord to the harbour, in place of the meandering stream which it usually is.

Unhappily the storm did not pass away without inflicting loss of life to some unfortunate mariners. Two shipwrecks took place within a short distance of each other. On the breakwater at Hythe a barque called the Lizzie Hobley stranded and became a total wreck. But that we could say with the poet “The splintered bones of a ship are yours, but not one life today” Her crew consisted of the following eight men: Hugh Griffiths, 36, Portmadoc, master; G. Griffiths, 53, Portmadoc, mate; R. Hentley, 26, Plymouth, boatswain; James Lewis, 24, New York, cook; M. Duffy, 23, Kingstown; William Kilby, 21, Belfast; D.N. Kenzie, 22, Ross, O.S.; John Dawson, 24, Aberdeen, seaman. Not one of them was saved. The body of a boy has washed ashore with arm broken and his skull smashed, and a boat and medicine chest have been picked up at Dymchurch. She was laden with log wood and palm oil. She sailed from Cape Haytien, having on board a cargo valued at 3,000, bound to Falmouth for orders, whence she was ordered to Havre. She was built in 1872, of 226 tons register, classed A1 at Lloyd's for 13 years, and was insured. She was owned by Mr. Griffiths, of Carnarvon, and was valued at 2,500. At low water the hull lies bottom upwards high and dry on the breakwater.

Nearer home a similar catastrophe occurred, the French brig Edmund, laden with coal, and bound from Sunderland to Caen, having gone ashore on the Copt Point Rocks, and been literally pounded to atoms. The two men who were saved from a crew of five tell a sad story. They had been for eight days at anchor off Dungeness, and about midnight on Sunday both her cables parted. They tried to make sail to keep off the coast until they could reach the harbour. They were all but successful, when the brig's cargo shifted and she became unmanageable, and soon after she grounded to the west of No. 3 Tower. An attempt was made to lower a boat, but a heavy sea came and smashed it. It was impossible to remain on deck, and the crew betook themselves to the rigging, where they clung for an hour and a half, when another angry wave struck the ill-fated ship and masts, rigging and crew went by the board. It is marvellous to relate that two of the crew succeeded in reaching the shore and scrambled up the rocks at the Warren, where they were discovered shortly before seven by a lad, and taken and well cared for in the Sanotorium. During the day the French Consul from Dover visited them and provided them with clothing. Before they were found, the dead body of the Captain, Lucien Duprey, had been discovered on the rocks below by a mariner named John Bull. It was considerably disfigured through beating against the rocks, and covered with sand, and information having been given to the police it was removed to the Warren Inn to await an inquest.

Meanwhile the storm had lulled and the sun shone, and hundreds of persons visited the scene of the disaster. It is impossible to imagine a more complete destruction. The bow half of the vessel was lying bottom upwards about a hundred yards from where she first struck. Two other portions of the hull were lying a quarter of a mile to the eastward. Her mainmast was broken a few feet from the deck, at a point where there were symptoms of previous unsoundness. Indeed the appearances of the hull indicate that she was a very old craft. Fragments of wreck were scattered along the beach for miles intermingled with battered and broken articles of all kinds, and eager search was made for some souvenir of the occurrence. On Wednesday Mr. John Banks sold such portions as had been rescued from the sea, two gangs of men having been at work at low tide in removing them out of reach of the waves. The gale is said to be the severest which has occurred since the memorable one of the 1st of January. From Dover, Ramsgate, Margate, Whitstable and other towns reports come of various disasters. Many vessels in the Downs broke loose from their moorings and became comparatively helpless.

The inquest on the body of the unfortunate Captain was held before J. Minter Esq., at the Warren Inn, on Tuesday afternoon, to which place the body was removed after it was discovered.

Mr. S. Earnshaw interpreted the evidence of the two men, who spoke in French.

The mate of the brig, named L'Air, gave the following evidence: I was mate of the brig Edmund, belonging to the port of Lohengrin-on-sea, France. She was bound from Sunderland to Caen with a cargo of coals. I identify the body as that of the captain of the brig. On Monday morning about two o'clock the vessel was washed on to the Copt rocks. We endeavoured to get into the harbour, but were unable to. We had been anchored in Dungeness bay, but about half past eleven on Sunday night she broke away from one anchor, and half an hour after the other went. We then endeavoured to make sail as best we could, but our cargo shifted and the vessel became unmanageable, and she was carried round the point and driven on to the rocks. We tried to get into the boat, but she was crushed. As it was impossible to remain on the deck we all got into the rigging. We were in the rigging about an hour and a half when a wave struck the ship and brought her round broadside, when the masts went by the board and we were cast into the sea. As soon as I was in the water I struggled and got my boots off and managed to get to the rocks. I did not see the Captain after he was in the water.

Louis Basse said: I was a seaman on board the brig Edmund. I was in the rigging of the brig when the masts went by the board. The Captain was in the rigging with the mate. I swam on shore. I saw the Captain in the water. He could not swim. He caught hold of me by the arm and said “We are lost”. I pushed him away, and caught hold of a piece of wood, which I placed between my legs and swam to shore. I saw the Captain once on top of the waves. I saw the other two men as I left the ship, but not afterwards. My supposition is that they were carried down by the rigging.

John Bull, mariner, living in Rendezvous Street, said he was on the rocks a little before six on Monday morning, and found the deceased lying on the weeds on the rocks. He was dead, and lying about five yards from the water. He sent a boy to give information.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, saw the body about three o'clock on Monday. Death appeared to have been caused by drowning.

P.C. Abraham Keeler said he searched the body while it was lying on the sands, and produced the articles found upon it. They were a knife, a handkerchief, a purse containing eight sovereigns, one half sovereign, three Napoleons, eleven half Napoleons, three quarter Napoleons, two English florins, five shillings,, one franc, and one shilling in coppers. He handed them to the Superintendent.

A verdict of Accidental Drowning through the wreck of the brig Edmund was recorded.

 

Folkestone Express 26 June 1880.

Saturday, June 19th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, R.W. Boarer and M. Bell Esqs. And Aldermen Banks and Hoad.

John Henry Marsh, of the Warren Inn, was summoned for opening his house in prohibited hours on Sunday the 13th inst.

Defendant said he was not at home and that his wife told him she drew some beer for a soldier who was a traveller.

P.C. John Gardener said he was on duty in plain clothes on Sunday afternoon, and visited the Warren Inn at twenty minutes past four. Previous to going in he saw a soldier in the Royal Engineers come out with a quart pot full of beer and stand it on a form. There were ten or a dozen people there, who all went away. He saw Mrs. Marsh and told her she was infringing the law, and she replied that she could not get them away.

Eliza Marsh, wife of the defendant, was called, and said she told the constable she had served three soldiers with a pot of beer, but that they did not enter the house as she handed the beer outside to them. They said they were travellers. She did not ask them where they came from.

The Bench inflicted a fine of 30s. and 10s. costs, and cautioned the defendant not to offend again.

 

Southeastern Gazette 26 June 1880.

Local News.

On Monday, John Henry Marsh was summoned for keeping open his house during prohibited hours on the afternoon of Sunday, the 13th inst. P.C. Gardner proved the case, and the defendant, who said he was not at home at the time, was fined 30s., costs 10s.

 

Folkestone Express 30 July 1881.

Notice.

To Mr. James Kennett, one of the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police for the said Borough.

I, Thomas Alexander, now residing at Cupola House, Dover Road, in the Borough of Folkestone aforesaid, and at the Warren Inn, in the said Borough, hereby give you notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the Borough aforesaid, to be holden at the Town Hall in the said Borough, on the Twenty fourth day of August next ensuing, for a Certificate of Justices for the grant of a license to sell by retail Beer, Cider and Wine in pursuance of the Wine and Beerhouse Act, 1869, and the Wine and Beerhouse Act Amendment Act, 1870, to be drunk or consumed either on or off the premises, at a house and premises thereunto belonging, situate at the Warren in the Borough aforesaid, and commonly known by the name or sign of the Warren Inn aforesaid in respect of which Inn and premises I now hold a license for the sale of beer either on or off the same.

Given under my hand this Twenty ninth day of July, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eighty One.

THOMAS ALEXANDER.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Day.

The Annual Licensing Day was on Wednesday last, the Magistrates on the Bench being The Mayor, A.M. Watkin, F. Boykett, and J. Clarke Esqs., and Ald. Caister.

An application for a beer and wine license for the Warren Inn was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Day.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, W. Bateman, A.m. Watkin, J. Boykett and J. Clark Esqs.

Thomas Alexander applied for a beer and wine license for the Warren Inn, which was granted.

Note: Confusingly, the report in the Chronicle states that the application was refused!

 

Folkestone Express 23 June 1883.

Wednesday, June 20th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq., Alderman Hoad, and General Armstrong.

The transfer of the license for the Warren was confirmed.

 

Folkestone Express 2 August 1884.

Notice.

To the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I, Benjamin Edward Coleman, Beerhouse Keeper, now residing at the Warren Inn, The Warren, in the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting, to be holden at the Town Hall, in the said Borough, on the Twenty-seventh day of August next, for a Licence to hold any Excise Licence or Licences to sell by retail under The Intoxicating Liquor Licensing Act, 1828 all intoxicating liquors to be consumed either on or off the House and Premises thereunto belonging, known as the Warren Inn, situate at The Warren, in the Borough aforesaid, of which premises the Right Honourable Jacob Earl Of Radnor is the owner or Lessee, of whom I rent them.

Given under my hand this 26th day of July, One Thousand, Eight Hundred and Eighty-Four.

B.E. Coleman.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 August 1884.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

The annual granting of public house and other refreshment licenses took place on Wednesday morning in the Session House, before The Mayor and other Magistrates.

Mr. B.E. Coleman, landlord of the Warren Inn, applied for a spirit license. Mr. Minter made the application, and Mr. Wightwick opposed it.

Mr. Minter said extensive improvements were being carried out by the proprietor of the Warren Inn, in the Warren, and the place was used so much now that it was a public necessity. As many as 2,000 persons a week visited the place.

Mr. Wightwick said the house already held a beer and wine license, and that was sufficient.

Mr. Minter: Let us hear for whom you oppose.

Me. Wightwick: Oh, that does not matter.

The Clerk: It is usual to state the fact.

A man in the public part of the court (excitedly): Yes, let's hear who it is. Out with it.

The Clerk: Just take that disorderly person out.

Mr. Wightwick: I may as well say that I appear for the Temperance Society. (Hisses in the court)

Mr. Wightwick: I shall appeal to the Bench to protect me from the mob of roughs in this Court.

The Superintendent objected to the application on the ground that there was no public necessity, and the Bench decided by a majority not to grant it.

 

Folkestone Express 30 August 1884.

The annual licensing meeting was held on Wednesday. The magistrates present were The Mayor, Captain Carter, J. Clark Esq., and Alderman Caister.

The following application for a new licence was heard:

The Warren Inn.

Mr. B. Coleman applied for a full licence to this house. Mr. Minter, who supported the application, said there was formerly a spirit licence to the house, but it had been allowed to lapse. The present tenant, Mr. Coleman, had made many alterations and improvements, and it was a place to which a licence should be granted. Last week, he said, there were two thousand persons visited the Warren.

Mr. Coleman said the rent was 25. He also stated that on several occasions there had been accidents in the Warren, and persons taken ill there, and Dr. Bateman had expressed an opinion that spirits ought to be obtainable there.

Mr. Wightwick opposed the granting of the licence on behalf of the Temperance Society, on the ground that the place was now respectably conducted, and a great accommodation, but that if a licence was granted, it would be an objection. There were already a number of houses within a short distance.

The Bench refused the application.

 

Folkestone News 30 August 1884.

Wednesday, August 27th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Fletcher, J. Clark Esq., and Aldermen Sherwood and Caister.

Licensing Day.

Mr. Coleman applied for a spirit licence for the Warren, in addition to the wine and beer licence granted to the house.

Mr. Minter conducted the application, and said that some few years ago a licence was granted to the Warren Inn, but it was allowed to lapse in consequence of the tenant getting into some pecuniary difficulty, and the house was shut up. The applicant had obtained a beer and wine licence, and had been carrying on the business some time. He contemplated making considerable alterations in the premises with a view to accommodate visitors by the erection of chalets and so on, and no doubt the Bench would think it was the place of all others that was likely to be suitable for the licence. It was perhaps right he should say at once that the applicant had received notice under the Act of Parliament from the Superintendent of Police that he intended to oppose the application. The notice stated that “the ground on which I shall oppose are that such licence is not required for the public accommodation”. The superintendent was entirely at fault and mistaken. Mr. Minter could well understand how Mr. Taylor was mistaken because his duty did not call him there, and perhaps he would desire that it should not. Mr. Minter would be very sorry to be obliged to put extra work upon the Superintendent by causing him to have an additional walk, but was sure that it would not do him any harm. He contended that the licence was necessary for public convenience because it was a public resort.

Mr. Coleman said that an average of 2,000 persons a week had visited the Warren during the past month. People frequently came to his house and asked for spirits. A lady fainted in the Warren once, and Dr. Bateman said they ought to have spirits at the Warren Inn, and when one gentleman fell over the cliff, and another nearly drowned, spirits were required.

Mr. Wightwick admitted that no-one had any fault to find with the way in which Mr. Coleman managed the house. In answer to Mr. Minter and a man who called out from the hall, Mr. Wightwick said he was appearing to oppose the granting of a licence for a Temperance Society, and some noise being made in Court at the statement, he asked the Bench to protect him, and order “those rowdies out of Court if they made a noise”. He feared that if Mr. Coleman did get the licence it might operate on him in a way he little thought of. As to accidents, if they were to consider them, they might place public houses all over the place. The present refreshments sold at the Warren were beneficial, and this might not be the case if the spirit licence were granted. He did not propose calling any witnesses.

The Bench decided, after a short consultation, not to grant the licence.

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 September 1884.

Brewster Sessions.

These sessions were held on Wednesday, before the Mayor, Captain Carter, J. Clark, and T. Caister, Esqs.

An application by Mr. Minter for a full licence on behalf of the Warren Inn was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 20 June 1885.

Saturday, June 13th: Before General Armstrong C.B., Aldermen Banks and Hoad, and F. Boykett Esq.

William Collins was charged with stealing a silver watch, value 2 10s., and a silver chain, value 10s., the property of Edmund Henry Walter.

Edmund Henry Walter, a farm assistant, living at Coombe Farm, said on Friday morning at ten o'clock he was bathing in East Wear Bay. In his waistcoat pocket he had a silver watch and chain. He left his clothes on the beach. After he had bathed and dressed himself he missed his watch and chain. He saw a man near his clothing, but he could not recognise him. The watch produced he identified by the number, 28,038, and the maker's name, Dent. He also identified the chain by it's general appearance. He only saw one man about while he was bathing. He had had the watch and chain for twenty years.

Thomas Inman, residing at the Warren Inn, said he saw the prisoner near that house about half past ten on Friday morning. He afterwards saw the prosecutor.

Joseph Johnson, a general dealer, said the prisoner went to his shop in High Street about twenty minutes to two on Friday, and asked witness if he bought old silver. He said he did. He produced the chain, and witness told him it was very common and he could only give him 9d. for it. Prisoner went away and said he would ask his mate. The chain was much below the standard value. He returned twenty minutes after and said he would take the 9d. He said he found the chain when scavenging, and had rubbed the dirt off. It was hardly silver. He had no recollection of P.C. Gilham going to his shop. A constable did go to him and say something had been stolen from a bather. If he had given the matter a thought he should not have thought the chain referred to was the one. It was only a piece.

Alderman Hoad: I am afraid your memory is very bad.

P.C. Bean said he apprehended the prisoner in Dover Road that morning. He said to prisoner he should take him in charge on suspicion of stealing a watch and chain. He said he supposed he must go, but he wished he had never seen the watch. He took prisoner to the police station, when he was charged by Sergt. Pay. He said he was Guilty. When asked if he had the watch he produced it from his trousers pocket.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone News 20 June 1885.

Saturday, January 13th: Before General Armstrong, F. Boykett Esq., Aldermen Hoad and Banks.

William Collins, labourer, was charged with stealing a silver watch and chain, value 3, the property of Edmund Henry Walter, on the 12th of June.

The prosecutor, living at Coombe Farm, said: I was bathing at East Wear Bay yesterday morning about 10 o'clock. I had my watch and chain in my waistcoat pocket when I undressed. After I had bathed and dressed myself I missed them. I saw a man near my clothes, but I did not recognise him. I identify the watch produced by the number and the maker's name. The value is 3.

Thomas Inman said: I reside at the Warren Inn. I saw prisoner near there about half past 10 yesterday morning. I afterwards saw prosecutor there.

Joseph Johnson, 37, High Street, Folkestone, dealer in old silver &c., said: I recognise prisoner, who came to my shop yesterday about 20 minutes past two to ask if I bought old silver. I said “Yes”. He offered me the chain produced, and I told him it was very common – I could only give him 9d. for it. He went away, and said he would ask his mate about it. He returned in about 20 minutes and said he would take the 9d. He said he had found the chain when scavenging and had rubbed the dirt off it. I don't remember if information had been given of a chain being stolen before prisoner came. A constable had been to my shop and said something about a watch and chain having been lost by a bather, but the chain looked like an old broken one, and I did not think there was anything wrong when prisoner came back the second time.

P.C. Bean said: I apprehended the prisoner this morning in Dover Street. I told him the charge, and he said he wished he had never seen the watch. I took him to the police station where he was charged by Sergt. Pay in my presence. He said in reply that he was guilty, and on being asked if he knew anything of the watch he produced it from his trousers pocket.

The Magistrates' Clerk said this was all the evidence, and as the prisoner had been previously convicted he must be sent for trial.

Prisoner was then committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 3 August 1887.

Extract from a description of The Warren:

The Warren is situated between Folkestone and Dover, the line to the latter place running through it. It is easily reached by a short walk of about a mile. We can proceed from the East Cliff along a disused road, which brings us to it's commencement, or can make our way along the Tram Road, and, crossing the line towards the Junction Station, walk up a narrow road leading to the Warren Inn.

The Warren Inn is a tumble-down sort of place, somewhat of the nature of a tea garden; and tea, hot water, and light refreshments can be obtained there at reasonable prices. We can conveniently rest here a short time, especially if the day is a hot one, before proceeding on our journey to explore this interesting and unadorned piece of nature's handicraft.

 

Folkestone Express 13 August 1887.

Local News.

A correspondent sends us the following: A party of visitors from London who are staying in Folkestone were paying a visit to the Warren, when their attention was attracted by loud calls from the cliff above, which rise here from a height of from three to four hundred feet from the rugged undercliff below. After considerable difficulty, they were enabled to make out at about fifty feet from the top, two young men, who, after a foolhardy attempt to scale the face of one of the most difficult and inaccessible parts of the cliff, had become fixed in such a position that it was evident to those below that, unless speedy help was forthcoming from above, nothing could save them from a terrible death. Large pieces of chalk were already falling from beneath their slender foothold into the underwood below so that their position became more critical at every moment. One of the gentlemen below, Mr. E. Clarke, of London, at once dispatched a younger brother across the hills to a small inn about a mile distant for aid, in the shape of ropes, whilst another gentleman of the party, Mr. S. Marsh, also of London, clambered with much difficulty up the face of the cliff to attract attention from above. In a very short time a party arrived at the top with ropes, and at the imminent risk of his own life a local policeman, named Bailey, clambered down from the top, as near as possible to the two unfortunate lads, who were standing immovable with their faces towards the cliff, and with the aid of his comrades above succeeded in lowering a rope to them, which the elder of the two placed with much difficulty under the arms of his companion, and without further delay he was hauled to the top to safety. A second time the rope was lowered to the second unfortunate, who placed himself within the noose and was drawn to the top in a fainting condition, amid cheers from the onlookers. The young men rescued turned out to be two brothers who are staying in Folkestone, and whose names were not ascertained. They are suffering from severe shock to the system, both of them stating that they never expected to reach the top alive. Great praise is due to the landlord of the Warren Inn for his speedy aid in sending ropes, and to the brave fellows who volunteered to the rescue.

 

Southeastern Gazette 15 August 1887.

Local News.

A party of visitors to Folkestone were on Tuesday morning at that part of the coast known as “The Warren,” when their attention was attracted by loud calls from the cliffs above, which rise here to a height of from 400ft. to 500ft. They saw, about 50ft. from the top, two young men, who, after a foolhardy attempt to scale the face of one of the most dangerous parts of the cliff, found themselves in such a position that, without aid, they must meet with a terrible death. Large pieces of chalk from beneath their slender foothold were already falling into the undercliff below, so that their position became more critical at every moment. One of the visitors, Mr. E. Clarke, of London, at once despatched a younger brother to a small house known as the Warren Inn, about a mile distant, for ropes and men; whilst another gentleman, Mr. S. Marsh, also of London, went with considerable difficulty and danger to himself, as far as possible up the face of the cliff to endeavour to attract attention from above. In a very short time a party arrived at the top with ropes, and at the imminent risk of his own life, one of them, a local policeman, named Bolton, crept down from the top as near as possible to the two unfortunate lads, and succeeded in lowering a rope to them. The elder of the two placed the rope with much difficulty under the arms of the other, who was hauled to the top in safety. The rope was then lowered to the other lad, who placed himself within the noose, and he was drawn up in a fainting condition amid the cheers of the onlookers. The young men rescued are brothers, and are staying at Folkestone; their names were not ascertained.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 September 1887.

Local News:

George Daice was charged at the Elham Petty Sessions on Monday with stealing a dog from William Aird, a cow keeper and proprietor of the Valiant Sailor at the top of Folkestone Hill. The value of the dog was 1. It appears that Percy Southern, in the employ of the prosecutor, was at the Warren Inn about six o'clock on Saturday morning, when he saw the prisoner there. He observed that he had a dog in a basket, and after a few words had passed between Southern and the prisoner, the former, thinking that it looked like his master's dog, went to the prosecutor and asked him if he had missed the animal. A search was made and it was found to be missing. Aitd immediately sent information to the Folkestone police, with the result that enquiries were made, and the defendant was subsequently found by Police constable Scott at the Tramway Tavern in Folkestone. The prisoner had the animal, which was only two months old, in his arms. When questioned by the magistrates the prisoner said that he did not intend to steal the dog. When he saw it, it had evidently lost it's way and he picked it up. Mr. Kirkpatrick said the Bench entertained some doubt as to whether the prisoner really did mean to steal the dog, and he would therefore be given the benefit of the doubt, and the case would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 January 1888.

Wednesday, January 11th: Before Major Penfold, J. Hoad, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Mr. Coleman applied for an extension of the licence of the Warren Inn that night until 12 o'clock, on the occasion of a dinner. The Bench refused to grant the extension, Mr. Fitness remarking “You must begin a little earlier”.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 July 1889.

Local News.

A hen belonging to Mr. Coleman, of the Warren Inn, has hatched three cygnets during the present week.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 7 February 1891.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

A sitting of this Court was held on Friday before Mr. Registrar Furley. Mr. H. Broughton represented the Official Receiver, for whose absence he apologised.

Re. Benjamin Edward Coleman, publican, Folkestone. Mr. F. Hall appeared for the debtor.

Mr. Broughton said the assets were nil.

The debtor said he first started business in 1855. He then came home from Australia, and there he made 500 or 600. In 1865 he had accumulated debt to the extent of 2,000, and a dividend of 8s. in the was paid. He carried on a grocer's business till 1869, and from then till 1883 he was engaged purchasing horses and cattle on commission. He purchased provisions for the French Army. In 1883 he took the Warren Inn. He had a capital of 65. In March 1886 he made an assignment for the benefit of his creditors. His rent was 25 a year. He regularly paid that rent. He paid his rent to Lord Radnor.

The examination was adjourned for a week.

 

Folkestone Express 7 February 1891.

East Kent Bankruptcy Court.

Friday, January 30th:

Re. Benjamin E. Coleman: The debtor was formerly a publican, and kept the Warren Inn, Folkestone. Mr. Hall appeared for the debtor.

The Registrar: This is a case I see of all debts and no assets.

Mr. Broughton, acting for the Official Receiver, said the debtor was now out of business. His unsecured debts amounted to 284 12s. 9d. The assets were nil. The list of creditors includes Allen and Co., Dover, 54 3s., Geo. Belgrave, Folkestone, 10 10s. 6d., Chapman and Sons, Ashford, 24 4s. 10d., E.G. Glasscock, Folkestone, 10, J.A. Jones, Bromley, 31 10s., Rolls and Co., Dover, 28 10s., J. Tritton, Staple, 17 4s. 4d., Walter and Richardson, Ashford, 30 7s. 6d., John Ward, Folkestone, 29.

The cause of failure was alleged to be slackness of trade. The Warren Inn was entirely a summer house, and the last three seasons had been particularly short.

In answer to Mr. Broughton, the debtor said he first started in business as a grocer in England in 1885, on his arrival from Australia. He had then 500 or 600, which he had amassed out there. He put the money into his father's business, which he carried on, and supported his six sisters. In ten years he got into debt to the extent of 2,000. He then made an assignment for the benefit of his creditors, and paid 8s. in the pound. In 1865 he commenced a grocer's business in Strond Street, Dover, and carried it on until 1869. He did not know what capital he had then – not a great deal – perhaps 100; not more. It was not a paying business. It was not a new business. He had it a portion of the time that he was carrying on the shop in Deal. He made an arrangement with his creditors in 1869. From 1869 to 1883 he was engaged purchasing fodder, horses and cattle for the French Government. In May 1883 he took the Warren Inn.

The Registrar: Had you made any money out of the horse commission business?

Debtor said it was during the French War. He was buying provisions for the horses in the French army. The valuation of the Warren Inn came to about 15. It was all valued in at that. There was a bailiff in the house for about 15, and he paid him out. He had a capital of 65. The other 50 went on furnishing and buying different things - 15 would not buy much for a public house – hardly pay for glass. In March 1886 he made an assignment for the benefit of his creditors, owing about 200. The debts were principally owing to brewers – all except a few pounds. Some of the brewers accepted the composition. Messrs. Mackeson, of Hythe, did not. He owed them 21, and had had to pay. The East Kent Brewery Company had nothing to do with what he did then. Before that time he bought beer of different brewers – it was a free house and he got the beer where he could. The trustee under the assignment disposed of the effects of the Warren Inn to the East Kent Brewery Company for 175.

How did you increase the valuation to 175? - I did not increase it at all. That was what they charged for it.

Was it all at 175? – Yes. There was no valuation.

The Company allowed you to remain in possession, in fact, till the 1st January last? – Quite so.

In what position were you in the house; were you manager? – Well, I suppose so; literally.

The Registrar: You say literally. Let us get to the date. It was after 1886 – the chattels were all there? – Yes.

Did you own anything there? – Not even the furniture. It was all in assignment.

How much, and in what way? – I don't know that I was termed the manager. I simply was there and bought stuff of them, and took the profits.

The Registrar: Then you were not manager. You were an ordinary individual.

Mr. Broughton: What rent did you pay? - 25 a year.

Was it always the same rent? – Always the same.

Have you paid the rent regularly? – Yes.

I suppose your name was over the door? – Yes.

And on the licence? – Yes.

There was nothing at all to show but that the business was entirely yours? – No. I suppose not.

The Registrar: How was the furniture dealt with then? – Merely by valuation. The assignment was made to Oscar Berry, and he sold the effects.

You say “assignment”. Did you sign anything?

Mr. Broughton: Oh, yes, he made an assignment.

Debtor: Then some of the creditors accepted the composition and some did not. I had to pay them after. The assignment was made to the firm of Stapleton, of the East Kent Brewery Company.

How did you come out again? – Simply because I had not done business for them, and they came and took possession.

Did they know you were about to file a petition? – No.

Had they given you notice to quit? – Yes. Some time before.

The Registrar: They were not the landlords of the house. Who was? – Lord Radnor.

Did you get notice from Lord Radnor? – No.

Mr. Broughton: To whom did you pay your rent? – Lord Radnor.

Why did you give up possession? – The property belonged to them.

The Registrar: The house did not belong to them – they had no more right there than I had. When did you turn out? – On the 1st January.

Mr. Broughton: They had no right there?

The Registrar: None whatever.

Mr. Broughton: They were simply trespassers. When did you file your petition? – On the 9th.

What is the name of the new tenant? – Mutton.

What did he give you to go out before your time? – He gave me nothing.

Do you know what he paid for valuation? – No.

It is untrue if it is alleged that Mutton gave you 50? – Mutton has not paid me 50.

Has he paid anybody 50 for your benefit? – I don't believe he has paid anything.

The Registrar: Has he agreed to pay anyone? – Not me.

Has he agreed to pay anybody? – I can't say.

Do you expect to get any money? – No. I walked out and left it as it was.

The Registrar: Do you say Mutton is in now? Is he a relation of yours? – No.

Mr. Broughton: Do you know what Mutton was before he took the house? – He has lived with me for some time.

The Registrar: Oh!

Mr. Broughton: As what? – For four or five years, employed in the garden, assisting in the bar, and cleaning up.

A sort of general assistant to you? – Yes.

When did you go, the day you gave up possession? – You must understand, I did not live there. I lived with my wife.

Mr. Broughton: You used to go and live with your wife and your wife's father? – Yes. I used to walk to and fro.

The Registrar: Do you go on the premises now? – Yes. I was there yesterday.

What did you do there yesterday? – I don't know that I did anything.

Mr. Brouhgton: You partially live at the Warren Inn, don't you? – No.

The Registrar: Have you made arrangements for the buying of stuff? – No. Nothing to do with it.

Mr. Broughton: How came Mutton to be the tenant? – I don't know. I told him I was going to give it up, and if he could make arrangements with the brewers he could.

When was this? – At Christmas.

Did Mutton know your financial position? – I believe he did. I should say he ought to. He has seen summonses enough brought there.

The examination was adjourned.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 February 1891.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

A sitting of this Court was held on Friday, before Mr. Registrar Furley. Mr. H. Broughton represented the Official Receiver, for whose absence he apologised.

Re. Benjamin Edward Coleman, Publican, Folkestone.

Mr. F. Hall appeared for the debtor. Mr. Broughton stated the assets were nil.

The debtor said he first started business in 1855. He then came home from Australia, where he had made 500 or 600. In 1865 he had accumulated debts to the extent of 2,000, and a dividend of 8s. in the was paid. He carried on a grocers business till 1869, and from then till 1883 he was engaged purchasing horses and cattle on commission. He purchased provisions for the French Army. In 1883 he took the Warren Inn. He had a capital of 65. In March, 1886, he made an assignment for the benefit of his creditors. His rent was 25 a year. He regularly paid that rent. He paid his rent to Lord Radnor.

The examination was adjourned for a week.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 February 1891.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

A sitting of this Court was held at the Guildhall on Friday, before Mr. Registrar Furley.

Re. B.E. Coleman, late of the Warren Inn, Folkestone.

The further examination of this debtor was adjourned until February 27th, the Official Receiver wishing to communicate with the Board of Trade in reference to holding a private examination.

 

Folkestone Express 18 April 1891.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

A sitting of this Court was held on Friday, before the Registrar, Walter Furley Esq.

Re. B.E. Coleman, Warren Inn, Folkestone.

The Official Receiver said this case had been adjourned two or three times in order that some transactions between the debtor and the East Kent Brewery Company might be investigated by private examination, and he was satisfied about those transactions.

The debtor stated that his wife claimed all the furniture, which was left her by her father. The value of the furniture was about 43. The only books he had kept were day books. He first knew that he was insolvent last Michaelmas. His debts were contracted in the ordinary course of business. He had defended three or four actions against him to gain time. He had previously made a composition with his creditors.

Debtor was allowed to pass.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 October 1891.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

A sitting of this Court was held on Monday before His Honour Judge Selfe. Mr. Martin Mowll attended as Deputy Official Receiver.

Re. Benjamin Edward Coleman, late of the Warren Inn, Folkestone.

Mr. Hall appeared for the debtor.

The Deputy Official receiver said the debtor commenced business as a grocer at Deal, which place he subsequently left owing 2,000, and he made an arrangement with his debtors. He then took a business at Dover, which he again left, and made another arrangement with his creditors, and at a later period he made an assignment to his creditors. He subsequently took the Warren Inn, Folkestone.

Mr. Mowll asked the Court to find (1) that the assets were not of the value of 10s. in the 1; (2) that the debtor failed to keep proper books of account; (3) that he continued to trade after knowledge of insolvency; (4) that he contracted debts without any reasonable chance of paying them; and (5) that he did on three occasions make composition or management with his creditors.

His Honour suspended the order of discharge for four years.

 

Folkestone Express 26 March 1892.

Local News.

The police visited the Warren Inn on Sunday, and found there about a score of mechanics, who were drinking during prohibited hours.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 April 1892.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Saturday, before J. Holden, J. Fitness, E.T. Ward and J. Pledge Esqs., Henry George Mutton, landlord of the Warren Inn, was summoned for keeping his house open during prohibited hours on the previous Sunday.

Defendant pleaded Guilty.

Sergeant Harman said on Sunday the 20th of March he watched the Warren Inn, in company with Sergeant Lilley and P.C. Lawrence. They secreted themselves in a field near the Martello Tower. They watched from quarter to eight until eleven o'clock, and during that time they saw 16 men enter the front door. During the same period four men came out. All those who entered came from the direction of the town. At eleven o'clock he entered the house, having placed Sergeant Lilley and P.C. Lawrence outside. Witness went into the taproom. The defendant was standing behind the bar serving beer. He counted 19 men in the bar. They were all drinking out of glasses which contained beer. As soon as the men saw him they cleared out of the bar into the kitchen to make their escape, but witness told them it was no use running away as he had got the house surrounded, and that they had better keep quiet and come back. They did so. To his knowledge 17 of the men were now residing in Folkestone. He told defendant he should report him, and he said “I can't help it; I'm very sorry”.

Defendant said he was extremely sorry for what had occurred. It was a fine day, and there were several people walking out there. He had tried to keep the house in a respectable way sine he had had it. Of course there were always a good many bona fide travellers passing that way, whom he was allowed to serve.

In answer to a Magistrate, Superintendent Taylor said that was the first time the defendant had been charged.

Mr. W.B. Radford said the house belonged to Lord Radnor, whom he represented. His Lordship wished it to be conducted in a proper manner He was very sorry that the defendant had transgressed, but he had had notice to quit. The greatest care should be taken in future to have the house conducted in a proper manner. In the course of time, no doubt another house would be erected there.

Superintendent Taylor said the house had been conducted in this manner for years, but they had never been able to prove a case against it, and they had had the greatest difficulty in getting this case.

Mr. Radford said he could have changed the tenant had he known that.

Supt. Taylor said when they informed the owners of houses about the conduct of the tenants they were always told to prove a case against them and prosecute.

After a few moments consultation with Mr. Bradley the Bench retired for a short time, and, upon returning, the Chairman said they considered it a very bad case. It was bad in itself, and it was bad as far as the defendant was concerned, because he was cautioned of the character of the house when he took up the licence. He was distinctly told that it would not be continued if the house were carried on as it was in the time of his predecessor. The conduct of the house was notorious. It was situated in the midst of fields, and the police could never reach it. There was a system of telegraphing going on as soon as the police put in an appearance, and the house was cleared. The defendant was, no doubt, more sorry for the penalty than for the offence. The maximum penalty was 10, but the Bench had decided to inflict a fine of 5 and 9s. costs, or, in default, one month's imprisonment. They had retired, not for the purpose of fixing the amount of the fine, but to see whether they ought to endorse the licence, and they had come to the conclusion that, under all the circumstances – there was nothing like it in all Folkestone – that the licence would be endorsed.

Defendant: Don't do that, sir, for the sake of Lord Radnor.

The Chairman said in the interests of the morals of the town, and in support of the police, they could not do otherwise.

 

Folkestone Express 2 April 1892.

Saturday, March 26th: Before J. Holden, J. Pledge, J. Fitness, and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Henry George Mutton was summoned for having his house, the Warren Inn, open for the sale of liquor during prohibited hours on the 20th inst.

Sergeant Harman said on Sunday the 20th, about ten minutes past eight, he, with Sergeant Lilley and P.C. Lawrence, placed himself in a field near the Martello Tower. The kept watch on the Warren Inn till about eleven o'clock. About five minutes past ten he saw one man go into the house, and at seven minutes past ten, another. Between five minutes past ten and five minutes to eleven sixteen men entered the house by the front door, and four left. The men who entered came from the direction of the town. About eleven o'clock he went to the house, having previously stationed Lilley and Lawrence at points outside. He entered the front taproom, where there was a bar, and defendant was behind it serving beer. He counted 19 men in the bar, and most of them had liquor in front of them. There were two pots containing beer, and ten glasses, and on the side there were 17 glasses. As soon as the men saw him they were going to clear out of the room and make their escape, but he said “It is no use running away; I have got the house surrounded, and you had better come back”. He took their names and addresses. To his knowledge 17 of the men were living in Folkestone. He told the landlord he should report him, and he replied “I can't help it. I am very sorry”.

The defendant said in answer to the charge that he was extremely sorry. It was a fine day and there were several walking out there. He had studied to keep the house respectable and in a proper manner. He had really kept it more as a refreshment house than as a public house, but it happened to be a fine day, and they often had bona fide travellers from Dover, the Camp, and Sandgate, who he was allowed to serve, he believed, under the existing licensing laws.

Mr. Bradley asked if it was the first offence.

The Superintendent: It is the first time defendant has been charged.

Mr. Radford asked to be permitted to say a few words. The house belonged to Lord Radnor, and he of course desired that it should be conducted in a proper and orderly manner, and that nothing should interfere in any way with the property or be a source of trouble or annoyance to the inhabitants in any way whatever. They had good references with the defendant at the time he took the house, but of course he had notice to quit immediately that took place. They had taken the greatest care that the house should be conducted in a proper way. In course of time a better house would be erected to take the place of the present one. He was sure his Lordship would be very sorry that the thing should have happened.

Mr. Bradley: There is no doubt about that.

Alderman Pledge asked if the Bench understood that the defendant had notice to quit.

Mr. Radford said “Yes”. He was a yearly tenant, so that his notice would not expire till September.

In answer to a question, Supt. Taylor said the house had been a continual trouble. Owing to it's remoteness it could not be kept under proper police surveillance. They had the very greatest difficulty in getting that case.

Mr. Radford said, had he known it, they would have taken care that it did not occur.

Mr. Holden said it had been so for years. They had had no end of complaints about it.

Mr. Ward: How long has the defendant been there?

Mr. Radford: A little over 12 months.

Supt. Taylor said in cases like that they could not bring any allegations against the defendant unless they were prepared to prove it in Court.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return Mr. Holden said: This case, in the opinion of the Bench, is a very bad one. It is bad in itself, and it is bad in as far as you (defendant) are concerned, because you know that when you were allowed to take up the licence you were cautioned as to the character of the house, and told plainly and distinctly that the licence would not be continued if the house held the character that it had during the time of your predecessor. It was known to the Bench and known to the police, but being situated in the middle of a field, they could never reach it. There was telegraphing going on as soon as a policeman put in an appearance, and the house was closed at once. It is very well for you to say you are sorry. The penalty for the act itself – so flagrant is it that the Bench felt that they ought to inflict the full penalty of 10. But they will not do that – they will inflict a penalty of 5 and 9s. costs, leviable by distress, and, in default one month's imprisonment. Now, we retired, not for the sake of ascertaining the amount of the fine, but to ascertain whether we ought not to endorse the licence. We have come to the conclusion that, under all the circumstances, it having been so notorious a house – there is nothing like it in all Folkestone –that the licence shall be endorsed.

Defendant: I hope you don't do that, for the sake of Lord Radnor.

Mr. Holden said the Bench had given it every consideration, and in the interest of the morality of the town they could do no other. It was not a pleasant thing for them to do, but they had to do it.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 April 1892.

Police Court Jottings.

The case that really accounted for the crowded state of the court was the summons against Henry Geo. Mutton, landlord of a not-unknown public house called the Warren Inn, which the police charged him with keeping open for the sale of intoxicating liquors during prohibited hours, on Sunday the 20th of March.

On that eventful morning Sergts. Harman and Lilley, and P.C. Lawrence, “placed themselves”, as the first named Sergt. expressed it, in a field near the Martello Tower and kept watch on defendant's house (he pleaded Guilty, by the way), from quarter past eight till near eleven. During that time they saw sixteen men go into the house and four come out. Most of these men, we regret to say, came from Folkestone. About eleven the police made their descent upon the place. Sergt. Harman went inside, leaving his two comrades on the outside. Nineteen men were in the bar drinking, and the defendant was serving them. As soon as the Sergt. appeared, a rush was made for the back door, and then ensued a bit of a comedy-drama. “Stop”, shouted the sergeant, “It is useless. The house is surrounded (two men). You had better come back”, and the culprits did so, and submitted meekly to their names and addresses being taken – for use on a future occasion.

“All this is perfectly correct”, admitted the defendant, in reply to the Bench, “and I am extremely sorry for it. I have studied to keep the house respectable, and in a proper manner, since I have had it. I keep it more for a refreshment house than for a public house, and I often have travellers on the Sunday from Dover and elsewhere, who, I believe, I am bound to serve”.

Superintendent Taylor, in reply to the Bench, said it was the first time defendant had been charged.

Mr. Radford, on behalf of Lord Radnor, to whom the house belonged, said his Lordship's wish was that it should be properly conducted. It had been a source of trouble to them, he admitted. With reference to the defendant, he could only say that he received notice to quit, of course, immediately they heard of the affair, and the greatest care would be taken in the future that it was properly conducted.

Then Superintendent Taylor put in a word. The house, he said, had been for years conducted in that way, but owing to the distance of the place from any other there had been found the greatest difficulty in obtaining any evidence against it. Men were posted as outlooks, and directly a policeman came in sight those who were in it ran away. If the police complained to the owners they were told they had better prosecute.

The Bench retired, and were absent about twenty minutes. On their return, the Chairman, Mr. Holden, with whom were Messrs. Fitness, Pledge, and Ward, delivered quite an elaborate decision. He said the case, in the opinion of the Bench, was a very bad one. Bad as far as the defendant was concerned because he knew when he was allowed to take out a licence he was cautioned as to the character of the house, and he was told plainly and distinctly that the licence would not be continued if it was carried on as it had been in the time of his predecessors, when the character of the place was notorious both to the police and the Bench. Being situated in the middle of a field, the police could never reach it, for there was telegraphing going on, and as soon as a policeman appeared in sight the house was at once cleared. He knew that he was doing wrong. It was all very well to come there and say he was very sorry; he was sorry more for the penalty than for the offence. The Bench had the power to inflict a penalty of 10. They would not inflict the maximum, but the conduct of the house was so flagrant that he would be fined 5 and 9s. costs, leviable by distress, or a month's hard labour. They retired not for the sake of deciding the amount of the fine, but to consider whether it was a case in which the licence ought to be endorsed, and they had come to the conclusion that under all the circumstances, it being so notorious a house – in fact there was no other like it in all Folkestone – that the licence should be endorsed.

Defendant hoped they would alter that for the sake of Lord Radnor.

But the chairman said the Bench had given it every consideration, and in the interests of the morals of the town and the support which should be given to the police they felt they could do no other. It was not a pleasant thing to do but they had to do it.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 6 April 1892.

Parish Patrol.

The police made a fine haul at the Warren Inn on Sunday morning, the 20th March. It was a pleasant day, and the thirsty beer drinkers, unable to wait the properly authorised hour for guzzling on that day, strolled round to catch a glimpse of the beauties of spring at East Wear Bay, with the secret design of heightening the enjoyment of the loveliness of nature while quaffing the nectar of a pint of beer. Gradually they assembled at the Warren, and, like a lot of rabbits, duly entered a favourite burrow whose entrance is guarded by a certain Mouton, a friendly sheep of the conies. It almost reads like a fable; nineteen of these harmless “bunnies” crowded into the sheltering refuge, and blissfully enjoying the hospitality of the presiding Mouton in security. But it so happened that another party were out that fine morning for sport, and like wolves in sheep's clothing drew near to their prey; these were Police Sergeants Harman and Lilley and a police constable. Outside the rabbit burrow Lilley and the constable stood ready for the scampering rabbits, and, like a ferret, Harman boldly entered the hiding place!

At the Police Court on Saturday there was an extraordinary crush to get in to view the proceedings. Thomas Ashley, James Boxer, George Beadle, William Emery, Robert Flowers, Alfred Friend, Thomas Hawkins, George Hogben, George Jell, William Lacey, James Nickolls, Arthur Rutley, Thomas Spickett, Henry Vye, John Wills, Richard Wills, William Whitnall, James Williams and Richard White were charged with being found on licensed premises, to wit the Warren Inn, during prohibited hours on Sunday, March 20th. Spickett did not appear; all the others pleaded Guilty to being on the premises, but Rutley and Lacey, privates of the Royal Artillery pleaded that they were bona fide travellers. To substantiate this defence, Adjutant Carey, of the Royal Artillery, said he had that morning measured the distance from their barracks at Shorncliffe to the Warren Inn: the distance was over three miles and a third. The Magistrates' Clerk said that the soldiers were therefore beyond the three miles radius, but the question was whether they were bona fide travellers. Defendants said they were on the road to Dover and went to the Warren Inn to have a drink.

The Magistrates decided that the whole of the defendants must be convicted, and they each had to pay ten shillings. The landlord, Mr. Mutton, had been convicted a week previously, when he was fined 5 and the licence of the house endorsed. The moral of the whole affair is that however thirsty for beer you are on Sunday morning the legal hours are sufficient, and more than sufficient, for such as composed this batch of nineteen, and in the interests of everyone the clever capture of Sergeants Harman and Lilley deserve the highest praise.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 April 1892.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before Major Poole, Aldermen Banks and Pledge, Surgeon General Gilbourne, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert and J. Brooke Esqs.

Two gunners belonging to the Royal Artillery, named William Lacey and Arthur Rutley, and seventeen civilians named Thomas Ashley, John Willes, George Beadle, James Boxer, William Emery, Robert Flowers, Albert Friend, Thomas Hawkins, George Hogben, George Jell, William Whitnall, James Nichols, Thomas Spickett (who did not appear), Henry Vye, Richard Willes, John Williams and Robert White, were summoned for being found at the Warren Inn during prohibited hours on Sunday morning, March 20th.

The defendants all pleaded Guilty, with the exception of the two soldiers, who pleaded that they were travellers.

Sergeant Harman stated that he, in company with Sergeant Lilley and P.C. Lawrence, watched the Warren Inn on the day in question. He saw a number of men go into the house and at eleven o'clock he entered and found the nineteen defendants. Some of them were smoking and drinking beer, and there were a large number of glasses standing about. As soon as his presence was discovered they attempted to make their escape. Witness said “It's no use you running away. I've got the house surrounded. You had better remain in the room”. They did so, and gave him their names and addresses. The landlord, Mr. Mutton, was summoned last week and fined 5 and the licence endorsed.

Captain Carey, on behalf of the two soldiers, stated that he had that morning measured the distance between the Camp and the Warren Inn, by way of the Military Hill and Sandgate Road. As far as he could make out it was about three miles and a half, so that his men were beyond the limit, and could only be treated as travellers.

Rutley and Lacey said they both slept at the Camp on the previous night and intended to walk to Dover and called at the Warren Inn for a drink.

The Bench overruled the defence and imposed a fine of 1s. and 9s. costs, and fined each of the civilians 2s. and 8s. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

Several of the defendants applied for time for payment but the Bench declined, the Chairman remarking that they could find money to get drink and they must find it to pay the fine.

 

Folkestone Express 9 April 1892.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs. Surgeon General Gilbourne, and Alderman Banks.

Nineteen men were summoned for being on licensed premises, the Warren Inn, on the previous Sunday week during prohibited hours. Their names were Thomas Ashby, James Boxer, George Beadle, Wm. Emery, Robert Flowers, Albert Friend, Thomas Hawkins, George W. Hogben, George Jell, James Nickolls, Thomas Spickett, Henry Vye, John Wills, Richard Wills, William Whitwell, John Williams, Robert White, William Lacey and Arthur Rutley. All the defendants appeared except Spickett, who Superintendent Taylor said was away from the borough. They all pleaded Guilty.

Sergeant Harman gave evidence as to his visit to the inn, and finding the defendants there, smoking and drinking. They all gave their names and addresses.

The last two named defendants - Lacey and Rutley – were privates in the Royal Artillery, stationed at the Camp, and they said they were given to understand that the Warren was beyond three miles from the Artillery Barracks, and therefore they, as bona fide travellers, were entitled to have refreshment. The distance had been measured by Lieut. Geary.

Lieut. Geary attended the Court and expressed an opinion that the military defendants should be treated as travellers. He had measured the distance himself.

The Magistrates' Clerk told Lieut. Geary that he was not entitled to address the Court, but he could give evidence. He was therefore sworn, and said he had measured the distance from the Artillery Barracks to the Warren Inn that morning by the nearest road, down the Military Road, through the town. The distance was three and a third or three and a half miles. He could not say whether the men were in Camp or on pass on Saturday and Sunday.

Mr. Bradley said the distance was proved. The question was whether they were bona fide travellers. He asked where they slept on Saturday night.

The two men said they slept in barracks on Saturday night, and left about nine o'clock on Sunday morning. They went through Sandgate and were on their way to Dover.

Major Poole said the defendants had all pleaded Guilty, and they were all liable to a penalty of 40s. They would, however, not be fined the full penalty. All the civilians would be fined 2s. and 8s. costs, and the soldiers 1s. and 9s. costs.

Some of the defendants asked for time, but they were told that they must get the money in the course of the day or distress warrants would be issued.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 April 1892.

Police Court Jottings.

Half a dozen Magistrates were present at the Court on Saturday, viz., Messrs. H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert, and Surgeon General Gilbourne and Alderman Banks.

No less than 19 men (with the exception of the last named, who did not appear) answered to summonses charging them with having been on licensed premises during prohibited hours on the previous Sunday week. They were: Thomas Ashby, James Boxer, George Beadle, William Emery, Robert Flowers, Albert Friend, Thomas Hawkins, George W. Hogben, George Jell, James Nickolls, Henry Vye, John Wills, Richard Wills, William Whitwell, John Williams, Robert White, William Lacy, Arthur Butler, and Thomas Spickett.

The summonses arose out of a case heard at the previous Court, when the landlord of the Warren Inn was fined 5 and costs and had his licence endorsed for keeping his house open during prohibited hours for the sale of intoxicating liquors.

Sergt. Harman, who in company with two other officers made the raid, proved finding all the defendants there smoking and drinking. Some endeavoured to escape, but when he told them the house was surrounded they returned and all gave their names and addresses.

On behalf of the defendants Lacy and Roberts, who were privates in the R.A., an officer, Lieut. Geary, appeared, and stated that he had had the distance between the Barracks and the Warren in measured that morning and it was found 3 1/3 or 3 miles. He contended therefore they came under the definition of travellers.

The Bench declined to accept this military interpretation of the term bona fide travellers, and fined the civilians 2s. and 8s. costs, and the two soldiers 1s. and 9s. costs, or a half sovereign all round.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 9 April 1892.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Saturday seventeen men were fined 2s. and 8s. costs for being on licensed premises (the Warren Inn) during prohibited hours on Sunday, the 20th ult., and two others, soldiers in the Royal Artillery, were fined 1s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1892.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before Mr. J. Clark, Alderman Pledge, Councillor Holden, and Messrs. J. Fitness, J. Boykett, H.W. Poole and W. Wightwick.

Annual Licensing Session.

Folkestone Clergymen on Licensing.

Mr. A.H. Gardner said he had been instructed by the Church of England Temperance Society, not in any spirit of antagonism towards the Bench, but in order that they might know the Society's views upon the subject, to put before them a resolution, passed the other day at the Vestry of the Parish Church, the Rev. M. Woodward presiding. The resolution was to the effect that the clergymen representing the various churches in the town, respectfully asked the Bench not to grant any new licenses, except to private hotels and restaurants, such to be used for bona fide customers, and not for bars, etc. He also added that he was particularly urged to ask the Bench not to grant any additional licenses to grocers, as such licenses were fraught with very mischievous consequences, inasmuch as they held out great temptations to women. Mr. Gardner stated that the clergymen further added that the meeting also desired the Bench to consider the propriety of refusing the renewal of the licenses of those persons who had been convicted during the past year, and, in conclusion, they pointed out the great preponderance of public houses east of Alexandra Gardens over those west of the Gardens.

The Bench then proceeded with the renewal of the licenses.

Adjournments.

The Superintendent of Police having reported that convictions for offences against the Licensing Act had been obtained against the following in the course of the past year, the Bench decided to refer their applications for renewals to the Adjourned Session, Wednesday, September 28th: Chidwell Brice, Alexandra Hotel; Burgess, Folkestone Cutter; A. Mutton, Warren Inn; Laslett, Wonder Tavern; Weatherhead, Cinque Ports Arms; and Halliday, Wheatsheaf Inn.

 

Folkestone Express 27 August 1892.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before J. Clark, Alderman Pledge, W. Wightwick, J. Fitness, J. Holden, H.W. Poole, and F. Boykett Esqs.

Annual Licensing Day.

Mr. A.H. Gardner said he had been instructed by the Church of England Temperance Society, presided over by the Vicar of Folkestone, to appear before the justices. He did not do so in any spirit of dictation to the Bench, but that they might see the views of the Society upon the subject, and he would put in a resolution passed the other day at a meeting held in the vestry, asking the justices not to grant any new licenses, except to private hotels or restaurants. It also particularly urged that grocer's licenses were peculiarly fraught with mischief as giving great facilities to women. They also thought that the number of licenses, of which there were 82, should be reduced, especially where there had been convictions for violation of the law. They did not specially single out any particular houses, but they thought when there had been recent convictions, they might refuse the renewal of licenses to such houses. Further they especially called attention to the preponderance in the number of houses at the lower end of the town – there were 79 east of Alexandra Gardens, while there were only three on the west. Mr. Gardner also referred to the fact that the magistrates last year refused to renew in English counties 117 licenses, and in boroughs as many as 101.

Adjourned Applications.

The applications in respect of the Folkestone Cutter, the Alexandra, the Wheatsheaf, the Warren, the Wonder, and the Cinque Ports Arms, where there had been convictions for breaches of the law, were ordered to stand over until the adjourned licensing day, Wednesday the 28th of September.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 October 1892.

Adjourned Licensing Session.

The Adjourned Licensing Session for the Borough was held at the police Court on Wednesday morning, on which occasion considerable interest was evinced in the proceedings by reason of the fact that the renewal of the licenses of several well known and old established houses in the town was opposed by the Superintendent of Police, acting under the direction of the Licensing Committee of the Bench.

The Magistrates present were Mr. J. Clarke, Alderman Pledge, Councillor Holden, and Messrs. H.W. Poole and J. Wightwick.

Mr. Martyn Mowll, of Dover, appeared to support the objections of the police, and Mr. J. Minter and Mr. Hall, severally, appeared on behalf of the claimants.

At the opening of the Court, the Chairman said, before the business commenced he wished to make one announcement. It referred to something which had been done in other towns, and which the Committee thought it best to do in Folkestone. It was the opinion of the Committee that there were too many licensed houses in Folkestone, and they therefore suggested that the owners of the houses should talk the matter over amongst themselves, and agree as to which houses it would be best to close. If nothing was done before the next Licensing Session, the Committee would be obliged to suppress some of the licensed houses themselves. But if the owners would talk the matter over amongst themselves and agree upon the houses to be closed it would save a great difficulty.

The Warren Inn.

Henry George Mutton applied for the renewal of the licence of this house.

Mr. Minter appeared for the Licensed Victuallers' Protection Society, and Mr. Hall for the claimant.

Mr. Mowll objected to Mr. Minter, and the Magistrates' Clerk sustained the objection.

Mr. Minter said the Society desired to see that a respectable man should not lose his licence.

Mr. Mowll said this was a very different case to the others, and he would ask their Worships seriously to consider whether it would not be their duty to take away the licence. The defendant was convicted as far back at the 26th of March last for Sunday trading. The conviction was a serious one, because he was fined 5 and costs, and his licence was endorsed. Notwithstanding this, the defendant still remained in the house. There were two other grounds of objection, one was the premises were so remotely situated as to be beyond the ordinary supervision of the police. The house, furthermore, was a very small one, and not suited for visitors, and as the house belonged to Lord Radnor, he had no doubt he would concur in all that he had said.

Evidence was then given with regard to the difficulty of keeping the house under supervision, both by Superintendent Taylor, and Sergeant Harman.

Mr. Hall asked for the renewal on behalf of his client, pointing out that the house had proved of great convenience to visitors to The Warren.

The Bench were, however, of the unanimous opinion that the licence should not be renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 1 October 1892.

Local News.

Many people will hear with surprise and regret of the withdrawal of the licence to the Warren Inn. It is perfectly well known that it has not been well conducted, but that a house in that locality is wanted in the summer is clear. There is reason to suppose that there was an informality which will perhaps lead to a reconsideration, but as it was put before the Bench, the justices could hardly do otherwise. A good deal of comment has been caused by the employment of a Dover solicitor. It is not easy to see why a legal gentleman was necessary, but any one of the practicing solicitors in Folkestone could well have done what was essential. A question is to be asked in the Council on the subject.

Wednesday, September 28th: Before J. Clark, J. Holden, W. Wightwick, H.W. Poole, and J. Pledge Esqs.

This was the adjourned licensing day, and Mr. J. Clark said: Before the business commences I want to make an announcement. It has been done in other places, and we consider the same should be done here. It is the unanimous opinion of the licensing committee that there are far too many licensed houses in Folkestone, and they would suggest to the owners of houses that they should talk it over amongst themselves and agree as to which houses it would be best to drop. If nothing is done between now and next licensing day, the magistrates will be obliged to suppress some of the houses in the town. So if the owners would talk it over among themselves which houses it would be best to drop, it would save us great difficulty.

The Warren Inn.

The holder of the licence of this house, Henry Mutton, applied for it's renewal. Mr. Mowll opposed and Mr. F. Hall supported the applicant. Mr. Minter was instructed on behalf of the Licensed Victuallers' Association to support the application.

Mr. Mowll contended that the Licensed Victuallers' Association had no right to be represented. The landlord of course had a right to be represented, but he did not see what right Mr. Minter had to appear for a body of men who had nothing to do with it.

Mr. Minter: They only desire to support a respectable man.

Mr. Bradley said anybody could oppose, but only the owner or occupier had a locus standi to appear in support.

Mr. Minter: Very well. Then I'll leave it to my friend Mr. Hall.

Mr. Mowll said that was a very different case indeed from those which had gone before. It was a case in which he should have to ask their worships to seriously consider whether it would not be their duty under all the circumstances to take away the licence. The defendant had been convicted for Sunday trading, and 19 men were found in the house. He was fined 5 and costs, and the licence was endorsed. Notwithstanding the endorsement the tenant still remained in the house, whereas it was usual when a licence was endorsed or the tenant to be got out. There were other grounds of opposition, one of which he desired to bring to their serious attention, and that was that the house was situated beyond the usual ordinary jurisdiction of the police, and there was great difficulty in catching the men, although the Superintendent felt convinced the tenant was carrying on Sunday trading. He complained that a watch was kept, so that a warning of the approach of the police was given. The house belonged to Lord Radnor, and no doubt his lordship would take a broad view of the matter and agree that a licence to that small cottage was not required. It was not the style of place to have a licence.

Evidence was given as to all the matters Mr. Mowll referred to, and Superintendent Taylor said he had given notice to Mr. Radford that the licence would be opposed.

Mr. Hall submitted to the Bench that it was a place of resort for pleasure parties, and for their convenience it ought to be licensed. The Bench ought not to study the convenience of the police in the matter, as against that of the public. It was very hard that they should not be able to get reasonable refreshment, simply because the place was too remote for the police supervision.

The Chairman announced that it was the unanimous opinion of the Bench that the licence should not be renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 October 1892.

Police Court Jottings.

Considerable interest was manifested on Wednesday in the proceedings at the adjourned Licensing Meeting for the Borough as the Licensing Committee had instructed the police to serve notices of six objections. Mr. Mowll, of Dover, appeared to support the police in their opposition by instruction of the Watch Committee.

The Chairman, Mr. J. Clark, at the outset said it had been suggested that the same plan adopted elsewhere should be pursued there. It was the unanimous opinion of the Licensing Committee that there were too many licensed houses in Folkestone and they would suggest that the owners of licensed houses should talk it over among themselves and agree, before the next annual meeting, which houses should be dropped out. The Licensing Committee felt compelled to suppress some of the houses in the town, and if the owners would carry out that suggestion it would do away with a great difficulty and relieve the Magistrates of an invidious task.

The renewal of the licence of the well-known Warren Inn was opposed by Mr. Mowll on the ground that the house was nothing but a cottage. There were no other houses at all near, and that from it's isolated position it was perfectly impossible the police could have any supervision over it. It was the property of Lord Radnor, and as his Lordship was not represented, it was to be presumed that he did not object to the abolition of the licence. Mr. Minter appeared on behalf of the local Trade Protection Society, but acting on the advice of their Clerk, the Bench ruled that he had no locus standi, and declined to hear him. Mr. Hall, on behalf of the tenant, contended that large numbers of visitors flocked to the Warren during the season, and the house, which had been erected for their accommodation, was a considerable boon. The Bench, however, refused the renewal.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 1 October 1892.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates decided to take an important step at the Adjourned Licensing Meeting on Wednesday, the Chairman stating that the court of Magistrates were unanimously of opinion that there were too many licensed houses in the borough, and that if the owners did not reduce the number within the next twelve months the Magistrates would do so at the next Sessions. All the licences were renewed, with the exception of that of the Warren Inn, which was refused, a conviction for Sunday trading having been obtained against it.

 

Southeastern Gazette 4 October 1892.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Magistrates decided to take an important step at the Adjourned Licensing Session on Tuesday, the Chairman stating that there were too many licensed houses in the borough, and that if the owners did not reduce the number within the next twelve months the Magistrates would do so at the next sessions.

The licence of the Warren Inn Was refused, a conviction for Sunday trading having been obtained against it.

 

Folkestone Council Minutes 26 February 1923.

The Warren Inn.

The Sports Superintendent reported that further damage had been done to the Warren Inn.

The Borough Surveyor advised that the Warren Inn being so close to the cliff it would not be worth spending any money on it.

 

Folkestone Council Minutes 23 April 1923.

The Warren Inn.

The Borough Surveyor reported that he had demolished the Warren Inn and cleared the site and realised about 10 over the expenditure.

 

Folkestone Gazette 16 September 1953.

Local News.

The days when goats and donkeys roamed the streets of Folkestone, and sea water (3d. a pail cold and 5d. hot) was delivered to hotels in the west end of the town, are recalled by the retirement of one of the town's oldest businessmen, 80-year-old Mr. Alfred Clement Lake, of Cheriton Road, Folkestone.

Since the last war Mr. Lake and his wife, Trixie, have run the Criterion Hotel and Restaurant in Cheriton Road, but on September 23rd their business comes under the auctioneer’s hammer. “People are hard to please these days,” said Mr. Lake, recalling an August Bank Holiday before 1914-18 war when he sold over 700 bottles of mineral water at his tea chalet adjoining the Warren Halt Station. Now Mr. Lake is going to take a well-earned rest after 70 years of working 12 and more hours a day. “Hard work never killed anybody”, says Trixie, who despite her 70 years is as sprightly as ever. “I am already looking for another job. Perhaps somebody would like a good cook. That is the sort of work that would suit me”.

Mr. Lake started his working life as a farmer's boy in the days when cattle roamed through the Warren. His employer was the late Mr. Edwin Burbidge, who farmed near the No. 3 Martello Tower on East Cliff, where he kept pigs. Farmer Burbidge’s bullocks and cows grazed on either side of the railway line through the Warren. And young Alfie Lake used to help drive them home to the cowsheds which once stood on the site now occupied by the Savoy Cinema. Next door, where a picture dealer now has premises, stood a shop where Mr. Burbidge sold milk.

They were the days of the old Prince Albert Hotel before it was modernised. Not only did young Alfred Lake have to drive the cows and bullocks to the Warren and to a meadow, known as Jenkins field on the site of Segrave Road, but he had to look after farmer Burbidge’s many donkeys and goats.

In the summer the donkeys hauled bathchairs up the Road of Remembrance from a stand adjoining the old toll house at the foot of the hill.

Small open carriages, drawn by one or two goats, were popular with children who were taken for rides along the sea front. Quite frequently the goats and the donkeys strayed from their stables into Rendezvous Street. The police (there were only five in Folkestone 70 years ago) often called on Mr. Burbidge to round up the straying animals, although they did not constitute a real danger because there was so little vehicular traffic in those days.

Very often the goats would stroll as far as The Rose Hotel on the site of Messrs. Burton’s shop. There some of the practical jokers of the day would ply the animals with beer until they were drunk. “One day”, said Mr. Lake, “they were not content just to get one of the old goats drunk. They painted it all the colours of the rainbow and then turned it loose to find its way back to our yard. Another favourite visiting place for the goats was the corn factor’s shop on the opposite side of the street. They had many a free meal before the indignant shopkeeper drove them away”.

Mr. Lake well remembers as a boy delivering milk to the notorious Warren Inn, where drinking out of hours was a special attraction, especially on a Sunday morning. “There were three large rooms at the inn”, said Mr. Lake, “and from an early hour they were crowded with people who walked miles for a drink. There was also a tea garden adjoining the premises”. The inn was closed over 60 years ago.

In the yard in Rendezvous Street Mr. Burbidge installed several big coppers in which he used to boil sea water. “We used to draw the water from the inner harbour”, said Mr. Lake, “carry it in big barrels on two wheels drawn by donkeys to our premises and boil it. Then we would set out for the west end of the town to fulfil orders from visitors and residents who liked to take sea water baths. Cold water sold at 3d. a pail and hot sea water at 5d. “When Mr. Burbidge gave up the sea water business it was taken over by the proprietors of the Bathing Establishment, who used an elaborate cart for their sea water round”.

True to the old story, the farmer’s boy married the farmer’s daughter but the first Mrs. Lake died in 1916. Before then Mr. Burbidge had moved to premises in Beach Street where he had a milk shop and continued to run his farm. He died a few years before the outbreak of war in 1914 and Mr. Lake carried on the business. For several years before the First World War he had a tea chalet close to the Warren Halt Station. In those days the Warren was a favourite spot with picnic parties. “People used to bring all their own food, tea, sugar and milk”, he said. “I used to supply the hot water, cups, saucers and plates. I always had milk on sale at 8d. a quart because so very often the visitors would slip on the steep paths and spill the milk they were carrying in their baskets. The Warren was a far prettier spot in those days than it is today”, mused Mr. Lake. “I knew every inch of the twisting paths, and so did my pack-ponies which carried supplies to the chalet. I often rode one of the ponies from the Warren Halt to the farm on East Cliff in five minutes. They knew every twist and turn of the undulating paths and could travel very fast”.

The outbreak of the 1914-18 war brought an end to the cattle grazing on the chalky slopes of the cliffs between Folkestone and Dover, although Mr. Lake well remembers the landslip at Eagle’s Nest when a complete house slid down the cliff. One of his cows was slightly injured by falling chalk. The War also brought an end to Mr. Lake's catering activities at the Warren Halt. In 1920 Mr. Lake married again. His bride was Miss Trixie Rush and it was not long before they were back in business beneath the tall white cliffs, this time at the Warren Tea Chalet, built by the Corporation after the Warren had been given to the town by Lord Radnor. They were there for three years, and then followed similar ventures on East Cliff. They had a small tea hut on the site of the East Cliff Pavilion and another at the Roman remains. For nine years before the outbreak of war in 1939 they carried on a business at the Zig-Zag Cafe on the Marine Promenade, but the coming of war saw them catering for thousands of troops and sailors at a cafe in Tontine Street. Nine years ago they took over the Criterion Resturant in Cheriton Road. When the East Cliff Pavilion was opened it was Mrs. Lake who organised the first whist drive and dance at the new building. To this day Trixie is well known in Folkestone as a whist drive M.C. Every week she runs a drive at Oxford House for the East Ward Conservative Association, of which she is Chairman, and for the past two years she has organised whist drives for the Catholic Church. Mrs. Lake also takes a great interest in the Guildhall Over 60 Club of which she is Chairman.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

HARRISON Timothy 1875-77 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

HILLS Rowland 1877 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

MARSH John 1877-81 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

ALEXANDER Thomas 1881-83 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

COLEMAN Benjamin 1883-91 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

MUNTON/MUTTON Henry G 1891-92 (age 40 in 1891Census) More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

 

SOUTHAN Robert 1901+ (general labourer age 36 in 1901Census)

Tea rooms till 1924

 

More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyMore Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

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