DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 15 June, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1769-

Red Lyon

Latest 1862+

 

Ospringe

 

Only instance of this pub found to date is as below. I am not sure whether it is a forerunner of the "Lion."

 

From the Kentish Gazette or Canterbury Chronicle, Saturday 13 May to Wednesday 17 May, 1769. Price 2d.

TO COVER THIS SEASON, 1769

The property of Granado Chester, at Mr. Hensrey's, the “Red Lyon,” at Ospringe, in Kent, at One Guinea, and Half a Crown, the Money to be paid at the Stable-door.

The Noted Horse Commoner, fifteen hands three inches and a half high, bred by Henry Pierce Esq; of Beedle, near Richmond in Yorkshire. He was got by Ribb, out of his daughter of the famous horse Belgrade, sire of Volunteer, his grandma by Johnson's Arabian, his great grandma by Tisster, his great great grandma by Old Haautboy, his great great great grandma by Brimmer, his great great great great grandma by Diamond. He is master of any weight, and is allowed by all judges to be as fine a horse as is in England. He is extraordinarily remarkable for getting fine colts; many of them have been sold for more money at their age than any colts that ever yet were bred in Kent. He won the three and four heats at Wakefield, for fifty pounds, when seven started. He beat the famous Dunkirk for two hundred guineas at York. He came second for the King's plate at Nnewcastle and Nottingham, when seven started, four heats at each place.

The above horse will be at the “Star,” without St. George's gate, Canterbury, every Saturday, during the season.

N.B. Good grass for the mares, with good care. He will be shown for the first time on Saturday the 22nd instant, and will be at Ospringe as usual.

 

Kentish Gazette, Tuesday 14th August 1770.

To be sold by auction. On Tuesday the 22nd, Wednesday the 23rd, and Thursday the 24th of this Inst, August.

All the Household Goods of Mrs. Jane Tassel, Widow, deceased, at her late dwelling house in Faversham.

Catalogues may be had, next Thursday, at the "George" at Boughton, the "Red Lion" at Ospringe, the "Fox and Goose" at Bapchild, the Post-house at Sittingbourne, the "Dolphin" and the "Ship" at Faversham, and at Mr. Thomas Roch, Upholsterer and Appraiser in St. George's Street, Canterbury.

 

Kentish Gazette, 28 March 1778.

Red Lyon, Ospringe.

William Griffin, from Rochester, most respectfully informs and Nobility, Gentry, and Public in general, that he has taken the above Inn, which is fitted up in the most elegant manner, and has laid in a large assortment of the very best wines, and other liquors. He humbly entreats the Honour and Favour of his Friends, whose countenance and protection he hopes to merit by the Assiduity and Attention, which he will ever employ to oblige them.

Neat Post Chaises with good horses.

Likewise the good Stall Stabling.

 

Kentish Gazette, 14 February, 1781.

To be let, and enter upon at Lady day next.

The "Red Lion Inn," at Ospringe in the county of Kent.

The premises consist of an exceeding good House, Yard, Stabling, Outhouses, with every other convenient Office; a Garden and Bowling Green, with 40 acres of lands thereunto belonging; situate in the High Road from London to Dover, and 1 mile from Faversham; is in complete repair, a great sum of money having been lately laid out in Addition and improvements, and the Rent easy.

For further particulars enquire of W. Griffin at the said house.

 

Kentish Gazette, 23 May, 1781.

Ospringe.

Richard Bedford, begs leave to acquaint his friends and the public in general, that he has taken the "Red Lion Inn" at the above place, and fitted it up in a neat and commodious manner, and has laid in a fresh stock of the best wines and liquors of all kinds.

Those who please to honour him with their company, may depend on the best of usage, and their favours gratefully acknowledged by their obedient humble servant.

Neat post chaises and able horses to any part of England.

Coaches and Diligences stop at the above inn every day too and from London.

 

Kentish Gazette - Friday 8 August 1788.

CAME ASTRAY.

On Thursday, the 31ft of July, to the "Red Lion," Ospringe.

A CROPT BLACK MARE, with a Blaze down her Face, two White Legs behind; her near Knee much broke.

The Owner may have her again with paying the Charges, by applying as above.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 16 April 1790

Richard Bedford, "Red Lion" Ospringe, informs friends and public that he has taken the “Nag's Head Inn” at Southwark.

 

Kentish Gazette 22 September 1809.

DIED.

Last week, at the "Red Lion Inn," Ospringe, Mr. Robert Jennings, pilot, of Dover. His death was occasioned by breaking his thigh from a fall off one of the stage coaches, which broke down in Ospringe about six weeks since.

 

Kentish Gazette, Friday 22 September 1815.

BELL TAVERN AND POPST HOUSE, MAIDSTONE.

Valentine Wildish, successor to D. Wildish, respectfully informs the Nobility, gentry and Public, that he has removed from the "Red Lion," and taken and entered the "Bell Tavern," Maidstone, where he earnestly solicits their patronage and in which it will be his most anxious endeavour to deliver an unremitting and uniform attention to the continuous accommodation, and economy of those who honour with their favours.

Old wines of the best vintage.

The Posting will, as usual, be carried on with respectable care and the most able and active horses. A handsome chaise for the convenience of private families.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle and General Advertiser, 24 May, 1862. Price 1 1/2d.

SUICIDE AT OSPRINGE.

T. T. Delasaux, Esq., held an inquest at the “Red Lion Inn,” on Tuesday, on the body of George Swinyard, who had committed suicide by hanging himself, the same morning. The following evidence was taken.

William Haines:— I am a grocer’s assistant. This morning, a little before nine o’clock, in consequence of information I received, I went to Ospringe, to the house where the deceased lodged. I knocked at the door, but could make no one hear; and then a person came and I proceeded up stairs, and in a bedroom was the deceased apparently kneeling down with his eyes towards the ceiling. I called for assistance, and Mr. Harvey came. We then went and called Mr. Hills and proceeded upstairs, and cut the deceased down; but he was quite dead. I have known the deceased about six months and I never observed anything particular in his conduct. I last saw him alive yesterday, in Ospringe-road, and he appeared quite well then.

Horace Hills:- I live at Ospringe. I have known the deceased about eight mouths. I saw him alive this morning, about twenty minutes before six. I saw the deceased suspended from his bed this morning.

William Harvey a miller, residing at Ospringe, corroborated the evidence of the two former witnesses.

Susannah Wakefield:- I have known the deceased about eighteen months. This morning, about ten minutes past six I saw him in my shop. I saw him take some money from a wooden measure, and some tobacco from a jar, both the articles being the property of my husband. As my husband has been robbed lately, I was watching. When I saw the deceased take the articles, I came from my hiding place and accused him, and he offered me what I liked to make it up; but I refused to take anything. He then said he should destroy himself.

The jury returned a verdict of felo de se.

 

LICENSEE LIST

HENSREY Mr 1769+

GRIFFIN William 1778-May/81

BEDFORD Richard May/1781-Apr/90

WILDISH Valentine to Sept/1815 Next pub licensee had

 

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