DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Sheerness, March, 2024.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 27 March, 2024.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1804-

Star

Latest 1881+

18 High Street

Blue Town

Sheerness

Former Star 2016

Gigi's cafe appears to be number 18 High Street, 2016.

 

Sheerness Guardian 30 April 1859.

INSOLVENT DEBTOR TO BE HEARD BEFORE the judge of the County Court of Kent, holden at Canterbury on Thursday the twelfth day of May, 1859, At eleven o'clock in the forenoon precisely.

Alfred Stroud, (also known as Alfred Baker), formerly at the "Star Inn," High Street, Blue Town, Sheerness, in the county of Kent, licensed Victualler, and Post-master, then of number 49, Dane John place, Watling-street, and late of the "Duke’s Head Inn," Wincheap street, both in Canterbury, in the said county of Kent, out of business or employ.

T. THORPE DELASAUX,

Insolvent’s Attorney,

Canterbury.

 

Sheerness Guardian 16 July 1859.

Before J. D. Dyke, Esq at Sittingbourne, on Tuesday, July 12th.

Thomas Cain A.B. of H.M.S. Trafalgar, was charged with stealing two medals and two clasps from the person of Charles Foffard, private of R.M. serving on board H.M.S. Amphion, at the "Swan Inn," Sheerness on 11th of July.

Charles Fofford on being sworn stated that he was in the tap room of the "Swan Inn," on Monday last. The prisoner was there also. He laid down on the form and fell asleep. His medals were safe on his breast at the time. A short time afterwards a man came in and awoke him and asked him what had become of his medals. He put his hand to his breast and missed them. The prisoner was missing also. He then gave information to the police.

Sergeant Ovenden stated that the prosecutor had reported the loss to him. He was sober at the time. They went to the "Star" tap room in Blue Town, where they found the prisoner sitting between two marine artillerymen. The prosecutor pointed to them and said they were the men that were in the room when he lost his medals. Sergeant Ovenden then addressed them and said "just hand over these medals." The prisoner thereupon slipped his left hand behind him and dropped the missing articles (which were now produced).

Sergeant Ovenden then apprehended the prisoner and was quite sure that he was the party who had dropped the medals. The articles will work 19s. The prisoner was fully committed for trial at the insuring assizes.

 

Sheerness Guardian 3 August 1859.

KENT SUMMER ASSIZES.

ROBBING A SOLDIER OF HIS "HONOURS".

Thomas Cain. 25, seaman, was charged with stealing two silver medals from the person of Charles Fofford, on the 11th July, at Sheerness. Mr. White was for the prosecution.

The prosecutor is a private in the Royal Marines, and on the 11th July he was at the "Swan" public-house, where he went to sleep on a stool. Some person woke him up, and asked him where his medals were, and he then found that they had been cut from his breast, he gave information to police-sergeant Ovenden, who went with him to the "Star Inn," where they found the prisoner in company with two artillerymen. Ovenden (addressing the three) said, "Just hand over those medals," when the prisoner put his hands behind him, and the two medals fell to the floor.

Three months hard labour.

 

South Eastern Gazette,10 January, 1860.

SECOND COURT.

(Before T. S. Clarke, Esq., Chairman).

Stephen Lincoln, marine, was indicted for having stolen two blankets, value 11s., the property of William Watson, at Minster in Sheppy, on the 27th November. Mr. White prosecuted.

Charles Rose, barman to the prosecutor, who kept the "Star Inn," at Sheerness, deposed that on the above day he missed some blankets.

Edward Middleton, a coffee-house keeper, at Sheerness, deposed that on the evening in question the prisoner asked him for a night’s lodging’s. He had something under his arm, which turned out to be the blankets, which he said he had bought. Witness thought the prisoner’s conduct suspicious, and he gave information to the police.

Evidence was given as to the apprehension of the prisoner, and the blankets being found in the table in the bed-room.

Two months’ hard labour.

 

Sheerness Guardian, 14 January, 1860.

EAST KENT QUARTER SESSIONS.

The following cases of local interest, have just been heard at the above Sessions:—

Obtaining Goods by False Pretences.

Stephen Lincoln, marine, was indicted for having stolen two blankets value 11s, the property of William Watson, at Sheerness, on the 27th November. Mr. White prosecuted.

Charles Rose, barman to the prosecutor, who kept the "Star Inn" at Sheerness deposed that on the above day he missed come blankets.

Edward Middleton, a coffee-house keeper at Sheerness deposed that on the evening in question the prisoner asked for a night's lodging. He had something under his arm, which turned out to be the blankets which he said he had bought. Witness thought the prisoner’s conduct suspicious and he gave information to the police.

Evidence was given as to the apprehension of the prisoner, and the blankets being found on the table in the bed-room.

Two month’s hard labour.

 

South Eastern Gazette, 21 February, 1860.

The Knife.

George Riley, a seaman belonging to H.M.S. Forte, was examined at Sittingbourne, before E. Twopeny and J. D. Dyke, Esqrs., on Monday, charged with cutting and wounding a gunner of the Norfolk Artillery at Sheerness, on the 3rd February. It appeared that the prosecutor went into the "Star" public-house about half-past 10 and stopped a short time. On his coming out there was a crowd at the door, and the prisoner immediately struck him in the face. Prosecutor returned the blow, when the prisoner drew his knife and cut him about the face, inflicting six gashes, and cutting off part of his nose. Mr. Saffrey, jun., was soon in attendance, and the prosecutor was conveyed to Mr. Swales’ surgery.

Prisoner, who said he was drunk, was committed for trial at the assizes.

 

South Eastern Gazette, 20 March, 1860.

Savage Assault by a Seaman at Sheerness.

James Riley, a seaman belonging to H.M.S. Faulkner, was indicted for stabbing Joseph Maskell, with intent to murder him, at Minster in Sheppey; a second count charged prisoner with intent to do grievous bodily harm. Mr. Russell was for the prosecution.

The prosecutor, a gunner in the Norfolk Artillery Militia, said that on the night in question he was at the "Star" public-house, Sheerness, and on coming out of the door he saw several young men standing around it. Prisoner at once struck him with his fist, and he returned the blow. Prisoner then drew his knife, and gave him several severe stabs in the face. A piece of his nose came off from the injuries he received.

William Parkes, a smith in the Dockyard at Sheerness, said, hearing a cry of "Knife, knife," he ran up to the crowd, and saw the prisoner with a seaman’s clasp-knife in his hand. He ran away, but was pursued, and kept witness off from him with the open knife still in his hand. It, however, was ultimately taken away from him.

Police-sergeant Ovenden produced the knife, with marks of blood upon it.

Mr. Saffery, a medical student, said he came along at the time this occurred, and saw that the prosecutor was bleeding profusely from his face, on which he found six incised wounds. A piece was cut out from the tip of the nose; one of the wounds was nearly through the upper lip; another wound, two inches long, almost through the cheek; and a third was so near the carotid artery, that there was no doubt it would have been severed had the knife been sharp-pointed. In fact, he might say that prosecutor was within half an inch of losing his life.

Prisoner said he was drunk at the time, and had been himself assaulted, and that he stabbed prosecutor under the impression that he was going to be robbed and murdered.

The jury found the prisoner guilty, and his Lordship said he had always considered it of the last importance that men should not resort to such an unmanly practice as the use of the knife. He should therefore sentence the prisoner to fifteen months’ hard labour.

 

Sheerness Guardian, 24 March, 1860.

MAIDSTONE LENT ASSIZES.

Before Mr. Justice Wightman.

James Riley, a seaman belonging to H. M. Ship Formidable, was indicted for stabbing J. Maskell, with intent to murder him, at Minster, in Sheppey; a second count charged the prisoner with intent to do grievous bodily harm. Mr. Russell was for the prosecution.

The prosecutor, a gunner, in the Norfolk Artillery Militia, said that on the night in question he was at the "Star" public house, Sheerness, and on coming out of the door he saw several young men standing around it. Prisoner at once struck him with his fist, and he returned the blow. Prisoner then drew his knife, and gave him several severe stabs in the face. A piece of his nose came off from the injuries he received.

William Parkes, a smith in the Dockyard at Sheerness, said, hearing a cry of "Knife, knife," he ran up to the crowd, and saw the prisoner with a seaman’s clasp-knife in his hand. He ran away, but was pursued, and kept witness off from him with the open knife still in his hand. It, however, was ultimately taken away from him.

Police-sergeant Ovenden produced the knife, with marks of blood upon it.

Mr. Saffery, a medical student, said he came along at the time this occurred, and saw that the prosecutor was bleeding profusely from his face, on which he found six incised wounds. A piece was cut out from the tip of the nose; one of the wounds was nearly through the upper lip; another wound two inches long, almost through the cheek; and a third was so near the carotid artery, that there was no doubt it would have been severed had the knife been sharp pointed. In fact, he might say that prosecutor was within half-an-inch of losing his life.

Prisoner said he was drunk at the time, and had been himself assaulted, and that he stabbed prosecutor under the impression that he was going to be robbed and murdered.

The jury found the prisoner guilty, and his Lordship said he had always considered it of the last importance that men should not resort to such an unmanly practice as the use of the knife. He should therefore sentence the prisoner to fifteen months' hard labour.

 

Sheerness Guardian, 7 April, 1860.

POLICE CASES.

(At the Public Rooms, Sittingbourne, before J. D. Dyke, Esq., Monday Marsh 26th.)

William Baker, seaman at H. M. Ship "Forte," was charged with stealing from inside the shop of Mr. Henry Woolf, of Sheerness, four silver watches, value 14, on Sunday evening the 25th of March.

Henry Woolf, deposed that about 9 o’clock on the evening in question, he missed four silver watches, which were safe in his window at six o’clock. He immediately gave information to Sergeant Ovenden, K.C.C. The four watches produced by the police were those he lost.

John Broad, eating-house keeper, deposed that on the same evening the prisoner came to his shop at about 9 o’clock, and asked him to buy a watch, he took it and showed it to Mr. Woolf who identified it. He afterwards gave it to the police.

Henry Brooks, labourer, deposed that about 8 1/2 o’clock on the same evening, he saw the prisoner fighting with another seaman, at the "Nelson" public-house, Sheerness. In the scuffle he dropped his purse. He (witness) picked it up and gave it to him when he said he would make witness a handsome present for his honesty. He then gave him a watch. Witness afterwards went to the "Star" public-house where he was about to sell the watch to a person named Watson, for 8s. and a pot of beer, when Police-constable Foord came in and took possession of the watch.

Bridget Russell, deposed that about 8 1/2 o'clock on the same evening she was at the "Nelson" public-house. The prisoner came in. She had been in his company before. He fought with another seaman, but before doing so handed her a watch and asked her to hold it while he fought. About 11 o'clock the same night, Sergeant Ovenden asked her for it and she gave it to him.

Sergeant Ovenden, deposed that about 9 o'clock, he apprehended the prisoner at a cook shop in Blue Town. Prisoner said he would not be searched nor go to the station. Witness caught hold of him, when a struggle ensued. Prisoner made a desperate resistance, but two other constables came to his assistance and he was then carried to the station. Witness searched him and found a watch in his trousers' pocket. He also received a watch from the witness Broad and another from the witness Russell, (which were now produced).

The usual caution was then read to the prisoner and on being asked what he had to say, he stated that he bought the watches from some Militia-men, at about 8 o’clock and gave 7s. each for three of them and 9s. for the fourth. Prisoner was then committed to take his trial at the Quarter Sessions at St. Augustine’s on Tuesday April 3rd, on which day he was placed at the bar on the aforesaid charge. Mr. Russell was for the prosecution. The prisoner conducted his own defence. The whole of the evidence given above, having been related, the chairman briefly summed up, and the jury after a short deliberation, found the prisoner guilty, and he was sentenced to six months hard labour. The chairman afterwards censured Mr. Woolf for leaving his premises unprotected and thus placing temptation in the way of the evil-disposed.

 

Sheerness Guardian, 14 April, 1860.

Fatal Accident To a Cab Horse.

On Friday the 6th instant, as a party of Mr. W. H. Shrubsole, grocer, Mr Barnard, watchmaker, the Rev. W. Hickman Smith, and some others were returning from attending a public anniversary tea meeting at Minster, the following fatal accident occurred to a valuable grey horse of Mr. Watson of the "Star Inn," Blue Town.

It appears that the party had engaged Mr. Watson's brougham for the occasion and were being driven homeward by Mr. Keeler. The Vehicle was proceeding at a fair pace and at the proper side of the road, when it was met and run foul of by a horse and cart, which was being driven at the wrong side of the road, by Mr. W. Pratten. The shaft of the cart entered with great force into the horses breast, — penetrated its heart and killed it almost immediately. It was a fine animal and is supposed to have been worth not less than 30. We understand that an action for damages is likely to issue from the occurrence.

 

Sheerness Guardian, 12 May, 1860.

SITTINGBOURNE PETTY SESSIONS.

(Monday, May 7th, before a full bench of Magistrates.)

William Watson of the "Star Inn," Blue Town, was charged by the police with having his house open for the sale of beer, on Sunday morning, the 22nd of April, at about eleven o’clock. Sergeant Ovenden gave evidence in support of the charge. Defendant stated that he was not at home at the time. The magistrates said they considered the case proved and thought it a very gross case.

Fined 4 and 9s. costs.

 

Sheerness Guardian, 22 September, 1860.

SITTINGBOURNE PETTY SESSIONS.

Monday, before E. Twopenny, (chairman), J. D. Dyke, Sir T. M. Tylden and the Rev. G. B. Moore.

General Licensing Day.

With regard to Mr. Watson, of the "Star Inn," Sheerness, and Mr. John Wood, of Milton, both of whom had been fined during the year, for having their houses open at improper hours, the bench administered a reproof and trusted that the warning would be a caution to them and that they would not repeat the offence.

 

Sheerness Guardian, 27 October, 1860.

Local and Other Intellegence.

Police Case.

James Robinson, a man of colour was charged on Monday last, at Sittingbourne, before the Rev. G. B. Moore, with burglary ans stealing one hind-quarter of mutton and one hind-quarter of pork, value 1. 2s 4d., the property of Mr. G. Allen, butcher, of Blue Town, on the night of the 19th, October, 1860. The stolen property was identified by George Grimtead, a servant in the employ of the prosecutor.

Sergeant Ovenden deposed that he met the prisoner on the morning of the 20th with something in a cloth. He watched him and saw him enter the "Star Inn," to which place he followed him and took possession of it and found that it contained the quarter of mutton in question, he afterwards searched prisoner’s lodgings and there found under the bed a quarter of pork wrapped up in the prisoner's jacket. The meat altogether weighed 29 3/4 lbs. and is worth 1. 2s. 4d. The prisoner made no defence and was committed for trial at the Winter Assizes at Maidstone.

 

South Eastern Gazette, 25 September, 1860.

Petty Sessions, Monday (Before E. Twopeny, Esq., in the chair, Sir J. M. Tylden, the Rev. G. B. Moore, and J. Dixon Dyke, Esqrs,)

This was the annual licensing day, and the Chairman congratulated the Innkeepers present that no complaint had been made against any of them, with two exceptions, Mr. W. Watson, of the "Star Inn," Minster, and Mr. John Wood, of the "King's Arms," Milton, both of whom it appeared had been fined by that Bench. These licenses, however, were renewed, as also were the whole of the others.

 

South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 26 April 1864.

County Court, Friday.

(Before J. Espinasoe, Esq., Judge.)

Vallance v. John Tomlyn and Charles Shrubsole.

This was an action to compel the defendant Tomlyn to give up possession of a public house, called the "Star," at Sheerness. Mr. Heywood, solicitor, of Rochester, appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. Bramwell, of London for the defendant.

Mr. Bramwell said that the assertion of his learned friend was a very strange one, as Mr. Tomlyn was now in court, and denied that he had ever given such a promise.

Mr. Haywood assured his honour that he had done so, and upon other occasions than the one referred to. He must offer himself as a witness to prove that the defendant had agreed to give up possession.

Mr. Bramwell, however, objected to Mr. Haywood giving evidence, as it was illegal, and his objection was allowed.

Mr. Haywood then called William Sussams, who said he was in Mr. Hayward's office a few days since, and Mr. Tomlyn was there when the subject of conversation between them was the giving up of the "Star" public house, and he heard Tomlyn say that he was willing to give up possession of the "Star."

In cross examination he said no time was mentioned when he was to give up possession, nor were any terms talked about.

Mr. George Payne, of Sittingbourne, said he was agent for Mr. Vallance, and he had served Tomlyn with a proper notice to quit, and he had never offered any objection whatever about going out of the house.

In reply to Mr. Bramwell, Mr. Payne said there had been an argument in writing as to Tomlyns tenancy, but he had not brought it. Mr. Bramwell said this agreement ought to be produced, and objected to the case being further heard, as the proceedings were not quite regular, the tenancy not being legally proved.

His Honour however, said the case had been proved to his satisfaction and ordered the defendant to give up possession of the house immediately.

Mr. Bramwell:- Then I shall ask for a case to try the question.

His Honour said he should not state a case.

Mr. Bramwell again ask the judge for a case.

His honour:- No. I consider the defence most disgraceful.

Mr. Haywood then applied for the costs of attorney and two witnesses, which his Honour allowed.

 

Local knowledge, further pictures, and licensee information would be appreciated.

I will be adding the historical information when I find or are sent it, but this project is a very big one, and I do not know when or where the information will come from.

All emails are answered.

 

LICENSEE LIST

DRYER Elizabeth Mrs 1855+

STROUD Alfred 1858+

WATSON William 1860-61+ (age 41 in 1861Census)

TOMLYN John 1862+ (also loan office)

HOGBEN T 1867 ("Globe," 18 High Street)

HOGBEN Thomas S 1871-81 (also cab proprietor age 42 in 1881Census)

https://pubwiki.co.uk/Star.shtml

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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