DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 05 October, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1300s

Bull

Latest 2013

(Name to)

Milkhouse Street

Sissinghurst

Bull drawing

Above drawing, date unknown.

Bull 1931

Above postcard, circa 1931, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Bull card of matches 1985

Above card of matches, circa 1985, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Bull

Above photo circa 1988.

Bull sign 1975

Above sign, 1975.

With thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com.

Picture of Whitbread sign. Kindly sent by Dave Down.

Bull card 1950Bull card 1950

Above aluminium card issued 1950. Sign series 2 number 40.

Picture of Whitbread sign. Kindly sent by Dave Down.

Bull card 1955Bull card 1955

Above card issued March 1955. Sign series 4 number 8.

Bull 2009

Above photo 2009 by Oast House Archive Creative Commons Licence.

 

The one time Style and Winch public house was later sold to Frederick Leney of the Phoenix Wateringbury Brewery.

 The Bull is reputedly a fourteenth century building with its own priest's hole, in which frightened clerics could take refuge when hounded by their religious opponents in the dangerous Reformation years of the mid-sixteenth century. This hidey-hole was doubtless used by smugglers in later times, as Sissinghurst was a centre of activity for the infamous Hawkhurst Gang.

 

From the South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 15 June, 1852.

CRANBROOK.

On Monday the Cranbrook Friendly Society held its anniversary at the "Bull Inn," Sissinghurst. The members attended divine service, when an impressive sermon was preached by the Rev. Thomas Furlong, after which they adjourned to a spacious marquee behind the "Bull Inn," where an excellent dinner was provided for them, by Mrs. Dann, and to which ample justice was done. The chair was taken by Mr. David Butler; Mr. George Waters, secretary to the society, very ably sitting in the vice-chair. A large number of visitors joined the party at dinner. In spite of the weather the booth during the afternoon was crowded to excess, indeed there could not have been less than 800 persons present. The splendid Cavalry Depot band was in attendance. This society was established in 1818; the present number of members is 118, and its funds amount to 1,830.

 

Bull pewter mugBull pewter mug

The above photo of the pewter mug were kindly sent to me by Chris Murray who says the engraved inscription says it belonged to W. Moore, so that would date it to circa 1900. It is stamped "PINT" and "GR" with a Crown and "2", the mark for George V, City of London, and the makers mark on the base reads "Loftus 321 Oxford Street, London.

 

From the Maidstone Telegraph, Saturday 13 March 1869.

Sissinghurst. A child burnt to death.

A coroner's inquest was held at Mr. Mark Moor's, at the "Bull Inn," Sissinghurst, on Monday last, before J. H. Farrah, Esq., coroner and a respectable jury, consisting of the principal inhabitants of the district, who elected Mr. John Osborne, their forman, to enquire into the cause of death of Flora Caroline Brown, a little girl a year and 8 months old, the daughter of Alfred Brown, an agricultural labourer, living at the "Three Chimneys" in this district and in the parish of Cranbrook.

The child, her chair, and remains of her clothes were brought in for the inspection of the jury, and it appeared by the evidence of the child's mother that she lives in a cottage detached from any other and on Wednesday, the 3rd instant, between 12 and 1 on the day she left it to fetch a pail of water, leaving her baby in bed, her son, 4 years of age, and the little girl in question seated in her chair, about a yard and a half from the fire and fastened in by a stick.

On her return they were all right as she left them. She then went across two little fields to a neighbour's house for some salt, both occasions occupying only a quarter of an hour. On her return the second time in opening the door she heard great screaming, and saw her little daughter in the chair enveloped in flames. She undressed her as quick as she could, dressed her body with oil, and sent to Biddenden for a medical man. On her enquiring of her son how it happened, he said, "I did it with a stick." It is supposed he was smoking the stick in imitation of a pipe and a piece falling on the clothes of his sister caused them to ignite.

Mr. Underhill, surgeon, of Biddenden, said he was called in on the 3rd instant and found the child excessively burnt, particularly about the abdomen. He dressed it and also on the next morning, but the shock was so severe to the system that it caused inflammation of the lungs, of which the girl died. He also said he could confirm a good deal of the evidence of the mother.

The Coroner said the boy could not be supposed to have any malice towards his sister, and if he had he was too young to be made responsible for his actions.

Sergeant Fisher said there was another woman who was called in at the time by the mother and would have given the same evidence, but she was taken suddenly ill and could not attend.

The Coroner said he would adjoin the case if the jury wished it.

The jury said there was not necessity as they were perfectly satisfied, and immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental death."

 

From: The Broad Highway (1910) by Jeffery Farnol (1878 -1952).

"To Siss'n'urst!"

"How far is that?"

"'Bout a mile acrost t' fields, you can see the point o' Joel Amos's oast-'ouse above the trees yonder."

"Is there a good inn at Sissinghurst?"

"Ay, theer's 'The Bull', comfortable, an' draws fine ale!"

"Then I will go to Sissinghurst."

"Ay, ay," nodded the old man, "if it be good ale an' a comfortable inn you want you need seek no further nor Siss'n'urst; ninety an' one years I've lived there, an' I know."

"Ninety-one years!" I repeated.

"As ever was!" returned the Ancient, with another nod. "I be the oldest man in these parts 'cept David Relf, an' 'e died last year."

"Why then, if he's dead, you must be the oldest," said I.

"No," said the Ancient, shaking his head,--"ye see it be this way: David were my brother, an' uncommon proud 'e were o' bein' the oldest man in these parts, an' now that 'e be dead an' gone it du seem a poor thing--ah! a very poor thing!--to tak' 'vantage of a dead man, an' him my own brother!" Saying which, the Ancient rose, and we went on together, side by side, towards Sissinghurst village.

 

Kent & Sussex Courier, Friday 25 March 1966.

A PUB IS NOT A PARADISE.

LIKE many men, Major Lionel Durkin, ex-Regular Army officer and former motor trade employee, always hankered for a "pub in the country."

But now, after 19 months in his first one — The "Bull" at Sissinghurst — he is giving up.

He says the pub trade in the country involves too much work for too little return and gives him no time for his hobbies — amateur boxing and church music (he plays the organ) — or "even to take the dog for a walk."

The dog is quite something. Kim is an Alsatian and a giant of his race. A dog that needs a lot of long walks.

The Durkins handed over the pub last week to Mr. Ernest John Conway, of Bearded Golf Club, and his wife, Barbara. They were previously at the "Swan," Charing.

The Durkins are to live for the present in a local farmhouse and have a rest.

Major and Mrs. Durkin have two sons — one in the R.A.F., the other at Dulwich College, Preparatory School — and a daughter, Susan, who is a London model.

 

Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, Saturday 21 July 1973.

Landlord leaves.

Regular customers of the "Bull Inn," Sissinghurst, gathered in the gardens recently to say farewell to the family that has acted as hosts for 7 and a half years.

Mrs. R. Church presented Mr. John Conway with a cut glass decanter, his wife Barbara with the canteen of cutlery and their daughter, Sharon, with a writing case. Mrs. Conway's mother, Mrs. Ross Wright, was presented with a gold watch on behalf of the public bar regulars.

Mr. Conway came to the "Bull" from the "Swan" at Charing. He and his wife decided they needed a quite a life after the rush of the roadhouse, but in the time they have been at Sissinghurst they have developed a name for themselves in the catering trade by serving a cold buffet.

The couple are to take over the "Half Moon" at Hildenborough in two weeks time and in the meantime they will be taking a well-earned rest in the cottage they own at Wilsley Pound.

Mr. Conway, who says he will be sorry to be leaving the area was born into the licensed trade and was associated with the old 5B's brewery in the Medway Towns - Budden and Biggs' Body Building Beverages.

During their time at Sissinghurst the Conway's have not spent all their time behind the bars. Mrs. Conway, together with local people has developed the Bun Penny Club and every Christmas old people in the village were entertained with dinner at the "Bull" and presented with a food hamper.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

DANN John 1828+ Pigot's Directory 1828-29 (Milkhouse Street)

DAM Suzahnnah 1832+ Pigot's Directory 1832-34 (Milkhouse Street)

DANN Henry 1851+ (also farmer age 42 in 1851Census)

DANN S Mrs 1852-58 (also Farmer)

BURSBY Henry 1861-62+ (age 55 in 1861Census)

MOORE Mark 1871-74 (also Farmer age 38 in 1871Census)

MOORE Walter 1881-1903 (also Farmer age 45 in 1881Census) Kelly's 1903

PASSMORE James 1911+ (age 60 in 1911Census)

HOOD William Albert 1913+

LEVETT Ernest 1918-Oct/19 Kent and Sussex Courier

QUICK Walter Oct/1919-22+ Kent and Sussex Courier

STEMP Meshack 1939+ (also farmer age 60 in 1939)

DURKIN Major Lionel Aug/1964-Mar/1966

Last pub licensee had CONWAY Ernest John Mar/1966-Mar/73 Next pub licensee had

???? Bert & Vera 1985+

https://pubwiki.co.uk/Bull.shtml

http://theweald.org/P2.asp?PId=Ck.BullInn

 

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

CensusCensus

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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