DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Monday, 30 October, 2023.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1787-

Ewe and Lamb

Closed ????

Stocks Road

Wittersham

Ewe and Lamb

Above photo, date unknown, kindly submitted by Jane Seabrook.

Ewe and Lamb postcard pre WW2

Above postcard pre WW2. Kindly sent by Peter Checksfield.

Ewe and Lamb 1968

Above photo, 1968, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Ewe and Lamb 1960s

Above postcard 1960s. Kindly sent by Peter Checksfield.

Former Ewe and Lamb 2010

Above photo 2010 by David Anstiss Creative Commons Licence.

Ewe and Lamb sign 1991

Above sign March 1991.

Ewe and Lamb signEwe and Lamb sign 1994

Above sign left, date unknown, sign right December 1994.

With thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com.

Ewe and Lamb matchbox<

Above matchbox, date unknown.

 

This former public house if now a private residence, but I am informed at the time of photographing in 2020 the building the pub sign was still on display on the opposite side of the road, near to the village sign.

There have actually been two buildings here with this name, the original being known as the "Old Ewe and Lamb" and in 1852 was sold then being in three dwellings.

 

Kentish Gazette, Tuesday 11 September 1787.

To be sold by auction, in many lots, for the accommodation of purchases, on Tuesday, 18th of September, 1787, between the hours of 3 and 6 in the afternoon, at the sign of the "Ewe and Lamb," in Wittersham, in Oxley, in Kent, (unless disposed of in the meantime by private contract, of which public notice will be given.)

The following Freehold Estates of Mr. William Waters, late of Wittersham, deceased........

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 3 January 1804. Price 6d.

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, BY JOHN SAUNDERS.

AT the “Ewe and Lamb” Public house, in Wittersham, in Kent, on Tuesday, January 10th, 1804, All that capital Post Corn Windmill; together with the scales, weights, sacks, and bags; a good stable and waggon lodge, entirely new; one cart and harness; all in one lot; the Mill standing on a small piece of ground, at a place called Wittersham Stocks.

For further particulars enquire of Mr. Esau Parks, the proprietor, or of the Auctioneer, “Swan Inn,” Appledore.

The sale to begin at three o'clock in the afternoon.

 

From Kentish Gazette 11 October 1842.

TAVERNS, ALEHOUSES, LAND, etc.

Late the Property of Samuel Shepherd, Esq. deceased, and by his Will directed to be sold.

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, By Mr. BENJAMIN HATCH,

At the "Saracen's Head Inn," in Ashford, on Tuesday, the 1st day of November, 1842, at Four for Five o'clock precisely in the afternoon,

LOT 1. - A most substantial and well-fitted Brewery, with convenient Storehouses, Stabling for ten horses, commodious Lofts over the same, Brewer's House, one other House adjoining, with Five Cottages, and a Shed contiguous, in the best part of the Town of Tenterden, whereon the business of a Brewer has been several years carried on by the deceased, and is now continued by his Sons.

Lot 2. - The "Ewe and Lamb" Public House, with Stables, Coach-house, and other Out-buildings, and Two Acres of Arable Land, at Wittersham, and in the occupation of Thomas Drewery.

 

Kentish Gazette, 9 October 1849.

KENT FREEHOLD BREWERY, PUBLIC HOUSES, and LAND, situate in Tenterden, High Halden, Woodchurch, Wittersham, Biddenden, and Old Romney, late the property of Samuel Shepherd, Enq., deceased.

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, (By order of the Trustees,) BY MR. BENJAMIN HATCH,

AT the "White Lion Inn," TENTERDEN, on FRIDAY, the 26th day of October, 1843, at Four for Five o'clock precisely in the afternoon, (unless previously disposed of by private contract, of which due notice will be given.)

A most substantial and well-fitted BREWERY, with convenient Storehouses, Stabling for ten horses commodious Lofts over the same, BREWER’S HOUSE, ONE HOUSE adjoining thereto, with FIVE COTTAGES, situate in the centre of the town of TENTERDEN, wherein the business of a brewer was for several years carried on by the deceased, and is now continued by his sons.

Also the "EWE AND LAMB" PUBLIC HOUSE, with excellent Stables, Coachhouse, and other Buildings, and two acres of ARABLE LAND, at WITTERSHAM, on the turnpike road from Tenterden to Rye, and within about six miles of the Brewery. Also a large MESSUAGE in Three Dwellings, (formerly the old "Ewe and Lamb" public house,) with excellent Garden adjoining, in WITTERSHAM.

 

Kentish Gazette, 3 August 1852.

FREEHOLD BREWERY.

Plant, Freehold Public Houses and Land at Tenterden, Faversham Old Romney, Wittersham and Woodchurch, in Kent.

To peremptorily sold, pursuant to the decree and an order of the High Court of Chancery, made in a cause Horse v. Shepherd, with the approbation of William Henry Tinney Esq., one of the Masters of the said Court, by Mr. Thomas White Collard, the person appointed by the said master to conduct the said sale, the following freehold and other property. In 10 lots.

Lot 4:- A Freehold Public House, called the "Yew and Lamb," with stables, coach-house and other buildings and garden at Wittersham, about 6 miles from Tenterden.

Lo6 6:- A Freehold messuage in three dwellings, with gardens adjoining, (formerly the "Old Ewe and Lamb" public house at Wittersham.

 

Southeastern Gazette, 18 January 1853.

WITTEHSHAM. A Woman Burnt to Death.

On Thursday last an inquest was held at the "Ewe and Lamb," before W. T. Neve, Esq., deputy coroner, to enquire as to the cause of death of Mercy Randolph.

Sarah, wife of Henry Neve, deposed:— I live in an adjoining cottage to that of the deceased, who was a widow, about 82 years of age, a poor woman receiving relief from the parish. On Monday last I went in and saw her, when she appeared as well as usual. On Tuesday morning, between 11 and 12, I heard a groan in her dwelling, and I went in and found her sitting upright close by the back door, enveloped in flames; she did not speak. I procured a sack and threw it on her. I went for assistance and called my husband, who came, and we put out the flames, but not until she had been very much burnt nearly all over her. There was a fire alight in the kitchen, and she usually sat by the fire. It was a coal fire, with a few pieces of hop-poles on it. She wore a cotton print dress. She lived until late in the evening of the same day, when she died. She appeared sensible to the last, but having received injury myself in putting out the fire, I did not go in to her. When I first went into the house the deceased was the only person there.

Henry Neve deposed:— I assisted in putting out the flames, and frequently saw the deceased afterwards. She was insensible a short time, but afterwards she became sensible, and in answer to my inquiry as to how it occurred, she told me that a brand had fallen out of the fire and set her dress on fire, and she was in flames in a moment. She was accustomed to take opium, and often in the course of the day she fell asleep. I am quite satisfied that her dress took fire accidentally while sitting near the fire. She always refused to go into the union-house, and her out relief was taken off to induce her to do so.

Verdict, "Accidentally burned to death."

 

Kentish Gazette, 18 January 1853.

Wittersham.

A Woman Burnt to Death.

On Thursday last an inquest was held at the "Ewe and Lamb," before Wm. T. Neve, Esq., deputy coroner, to enquire as to the cause of death of Mercy Randolph.

Sarah, wife of Henry Neve, deposed:— I live in an adjoining cottage to that of the deceased, who was a widow, about 82 years of age, a poor woman receiving relief from the parish. On Monday last I went in and saw her, when she appeared as well in health as usual. On Tuesday morning, between 11 and 12, I heard a groan in her dwelling, and I went in and found her sitting upright close by the back door enveloped in flames; she did not speak. I procured a sack and threw it on her and went for assistance and called my husband, who came, and we put out the flames, but not until she had been very much burnt nearly all over her. There was a fire alight in the kitchen, and she usually sat by the fire. It was a coal fire, with a few pieces of hop pole on it. She wore a cotton print dress. She lived until late in the evening of the same day, when she died. She appeared sensible to the last, but having received injury myself in putting out the fire, I did not go in to her. When I first went into the house the deceased was the only person there.

Henry Neve deposed:— I assisted in putting out the flames, and frequently saw the deceased afterwards. She was insensible for a short time, but afterwards she became sensible, and in answer to my enquiry as to how it occurred, she told me that a brand had fallen out of the fire and set her dress on fire, and she was in flames in a moment. She was accustomed to take opium and often in the course of the day she fell asleep. I am quite satisfied that her dress took fire accidentally while sitting near the fire. She always refused to go into the Union-house, and her out relief was taken off to induce her to do so.

Verdict, "accidentally burned to death."

 

Southeastern Gazette, 19 July 1853.

WITTERSHAM.

On Friday last an inquest was held at the "Ewe and Lamb," before W. T. Neve, Esq., coroner, to enquire as to the death of a man named Thomas Burden, when the following evidence was adduced.

Thomas Croucher, of Tenterden, labourer, deposed:- I have contracted with Mr. Seaman Beale to dig a well in his wood in this parish, and I had engaged the deceased to assist me; the deceased was about 32 years of age, and was a labourer living at Tenterden; he had never worked in a well before. We began to dig the well last Monday week, and worked there every day except last Saturday when it was too wet. I went down for about two hours, and he then took a turn down for about the same time. Last Wednesday we finished steening the well at about three o’clock down to the present depth 37ft. We then sat down and took some coffee, and in about half an hour he went down with a pick, mattock and other tools to clean the bottom out and dig deeper. I had been in the well all day from six o’clock in the morning, and he now took his turn he put his foot in the clasp at the end of the rope, and I let him down, and he kicked the clasp away. I then drew the rope part of the way up, when I heard the deceased moan. I called to him several times, but he made no answer. I looked down, and saw the deceased sitting down apparently leaning against the side of the well. The air in the well was a little hazy, and it got more so afterwards. I then went for assistance, but could find none for a quarter of an hour. I then found Abel Baker, and he returned with me. I let him down about 20ft.; he stood upright in the bucket and held by the rope. I told him if he found any thing the matter to call out, and I would wind him up directly. When I had let him down about 20 feet, which didn't occupy a minute, he let go the rope and fell backwards, the bucket turned up against the side of the well, and he hung by his feet with his head downwards, for half an hour. I was afraid to pull him up. I did not succeed for some time in getting further assistance. Mr. Jury went down very near as low as Baker, when he called out that be could not bear it any longer. We afterwards with great care got Baker up, when he was quite black in the face and nearly dead, but he afterwards revived. We did not succeed in getting the deceased up until about a quarter before six; he was quite dead and cold. I have been a well digger for 20 years, and have frequently found foul air in a well, and have then come up directly and worked it off by means of working green boughs up and down the well. In steening the well I used new bricks, and when I came out of the well there was a very sulphurous smell from the bricks; they were very hot and dry. I had no suspicion that the air was

foul when he went down; we had been working through marl and rocky sand until we came to a rock at the depth it now is.
Mr. John Jenkin Terry, surgeon, deposed:- On Wednesday last, at four o’clock, I was sent for to the well, and arrived there just after Baker was got up. They did not succeeded in getting the deceased up for some time afterwards. The air in the well was very thick, but I could just see the deceased at the bottom. They were working some boughs up and down the well to work the foul air up. I afterwards let a lighted candle down the well, and at about eight feet down it was extinguished. They then worked the boughs again, and I afterwards tried the candle, when it was extinguished at about twenty feet deep. We at length raised the deceased by means of a grapnel. I have no doubt that death was caused from the foul air in the well, which I think must have issued from the earth at the bottom of the well.

The jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally suffocated."

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, Saturday 23 March 1872.

ASHFORD. SALE OF PROPERTY.

A sale by auction took place at the "Saracen’s Head Hotel," on Tuesday, conducted by Mr. Alfred Thomas. There was a large attendance. The property is situated in the town and neighbourhood of Tenterden, and consisted of 14 lots.

.....

Lot 12, the "Ewe and Lamb" public house, Wittersham, fetched 900.

.....

 

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 18 October 1873.

ASHFORD PETTY SESSIONS.

A young man named Petts, was charged with assaulting Mr. Ben Stretten, landlord of the "Ewe and Lamb," Wittersham, on the night of September 27th.

He was committed for fourteen days, in default of paying a fine of 1 14s 6d including costs.

 

Peter Checksfield says the following:- "I believe there was an earlier "Ewe & Lamb" in the Street (opposite the "Queens Head") which until recently operated as the "Old Inn B&B," but the 1870 OS Map clearly shows the "Ewe & Lamb" to be the pub you list, so at what point it moved I’m not sure."

Further information as shown below indicates that it was called the "Fair Haven" up to 1925 when it was sold.

 

From the Kentish Express, April 1925.

The "Fair Haven," Wittersham has been sold by Messrs. Clark and Manfield, estate agents, of 50, Jermyn Street, S.W., for Miss Laurence Alma Tadema, who is moving to Versailles, after nearly twenty years' occupation of the house. It is said to be one of the oldest houses in Wittersham and during the 18th Century was the "Ewe and Lamb Inn," and Miss Alma Tadema restored it with great care, bringing back to life its original charm. The interior displays a wealth of old oak timbers, beams and joists, and has a wonderful old inglenook fiereplace.

 

LICENSEE LIST

PARKS Mr Esau 1804+

FORSTER Thomas 1828+ Pigot's Directory 1828-29

DUNSTER Richard 1832-39+ Pigot's Directory 1832-34

DREWERY/DRURY Thomas 1841-Oct/1842 (age 30 in 1841Census)

HILL Phillip 1851+ (age 33 in 1851Census)

DUNSTER James 1858-61+ (age 36 in 1861Census)

SPRINGETT George 1859+ (also butcher & beer retailer)

CATT Joseph 1871+ (age 31 in 1871Census) (Mill Corner)

STRETTEN Ben James 1873-82+ (age 35 in 1881Census)

DAVIS John 1891+ (age 54 in 1891Census)

FORSTER/FOSTER Frederick 1901+ (age 62 on 1901Census)

JENNER Walter 1903-11+ (age 76 in 1911Census) Kelly's 1903

ADDY William Henry 1918-38+ (son of Harry Addy)

https://pubwiki.co.uk/EweLamb.shtml

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/ewelambinn.html

 

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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LINK to www.pubwiki.co.uk