DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, June, 2023.

Page Updated:- Sunday, 18 June, 2023.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton & Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1849

Marquis of Granby

Latest 1869

(Name to)

52 Old High Street

Folkestone

 

Not to be confused for the other "Marquis of Granby" addressed at 1 High Street.

Found as early as 1851 and changed name to the "Eagle Tavern" in 1869.

 

Maidstone Gazette 4 July 1848

Advertisement:

Folkestone, Kent. To Brewers, Innkeepers and Others. Valuable freehold inn, to be sold by auction by Mr. M.M. Major, at the Marquis of Granby Inn, in Folkestone, on Wednesday, the 12th day of July, 1848, at two o'clock in the afternoon (subject to such conditions as will be produced at the time of sale.)

All that valuable freehold inn, called the Marquis of Granby, situate at the bottom of the High Street, in the town of Folkestone, and fronting the new street now forming through the valley.

The house is capable of being converted into a first-rate inn, as the purchaser may, at his option, be accommodated with a sufficient portion of land adjoining the said new street, whereon he may make such additions as he may deem requisite.

This property is well worth the attention of brewers or innkeepers, it being situate in front of the said new street, now forming in the rapidly improving town of Folkestone, and which new street will be the chief thoroughfare and principal place for business of the town.

The house has for some time past, and is now, doing a considerable business, and several clubs are held there.

The property may be viewed by application to the tenant, and all further particulars had of Mr. C. Porter, Albion Villas, Folkestone; or of the auctioneer, Folkestone; or of Messrs. Brockman and Watts, Solicitors, Folkestone.

 

Dover Telegraph 8 July 1848

Advertisement: Folkestone, Kent. To Brewers, Innkeepers and Others. Valuable freehold inn, to be sold by auction by Mr. M.M. Major, at the Marquis of Granby Inn, in Folkestone, on Wednesday, the 12th day of July, 1848, at two o'clock in the afternoon (subject to such conditions as will be produced at the time of sale.)

All that valuable freehold inn, called the Marquis of Granby, situate at the bottom of the High Street, in the town of Folkestone, and fronting the new street now forming through the valley.

The house is capable of being converted into a first-rate inn, as the purchaser may, at his option, be accommodated with a sufficient portion of land adjoining the said new street, whereon he may make such additions as he may deem requisite.

This property is well worth the attention of brewers or innkeepers, it being situate in front of the said new street, now forming in the rapidly improving town of Folkestone, and which new street will be the chief thoroughfare and principal place for business of the town.

The house has for some time past, and is now, doing a considerable business, and several clubs are held there.

The property may be viewed by application to the tenant, and all further particulars had of Mr. C. Porter, Albion Villas, Folkestone; or of the auctioneer, Folkestone; or of Messrs. Brockman and Watts, Solicitors, Folkestone.

Dated 1st July, 1848

 

Maidstone Gazette 24 October 1848

Advertisement: To publicans and others, Marquis of Granby Inn, Folkestone, Kent. Mr. M. Major respectfully announces that he is favoured with instructions from the proprietors (in consequence of the house being required for the improvements in the new street), to sell by auction on the premises, on Monday and Tuesday, October 30th and 31st, 1848, the whole of the valuable furniture, quantity of nearly-new plate, linen, china, glass, and other effects belonging to the old-established and for many years well-conducted inn; including beds of the first quality and condition, bedsteads and every chamber requisite, club room and bar furniture, a first-rate bagatelle board by Thurston (new), with cues, set of ivory balls, and marking board complete, 2 excellent beer engines, and all the necessary implements for carrying on business in the public line.

Full particulars will be contained in catalogues, to be had of Mr. Christopher Porter, Builder, and of the Auctioneer, Folkestone.

Sale to commence at One o'clock each day.

Note: This apparent closure previously unknown. C. P. Davis notes that the house had been bought by the Tontine proprietors.

 

Maidstone Gazette 18 December 1849

Petty Sessions, Tuesday; Before David Major Esq., Mayor, Charles Golder and Wm. Major Esqs.

Transfer of licenses: John Baker, Marquis of Granby, to Samuel Cheeseworth;

Notes: Marquis of Granby; Neither licensee previously known.

 

Dover Chronicle 2 March 1850

Dover County Court, Saturday last, before Charles Harwood Esq., Judge.

Hawkins v Samuel Cheeseworth: This was an action for the recovery of 4 10s. The debt was for a beer-engine which the plaintiff, a plumber, at Buckland, sold to the defendant, an innkeeper, at Folkestone. Mr. Richard Harvey supported the claim, and Mr. James Gravener appeared for the defendant. The objection raised by defendant to the payment of the debt was that the engine was a very indifferent one, and did not act well. It was also stated on the part of the defendant that the expense of repairing the engine, owing to its defects, had been very great.

His Honour, in giving judgement, said that he would take off 15s., which had been paid for the repair of the beer engine, and gave a verdict for the plaintiff for the remainder, 3 15s.

 

Dover Telegraph 2 March 1850

Dover County Court, Saturday last, before Charles Harwood Esq., Judge.

Hawkins v Cheeseworth: This was an action for the recovery of 4 10s., the amount of a three-pull beer-engine , sold to defendant, a publican, at Folkestone. Mr. Harvey supported the claim, and Mr. Gravener, jun., appeared for the defendant. Witnesses were examined on both sides, and from the evidence elicited it appeared that defendant, in November, 1849, bought the engine of plaintiff at the sum now claimed, with the understanding that it was to do its work well. After being supplied with the article payment was requested, but for various reasons put off. Subsequently, on being pressed for the money, defendant complained of the defective action of the engine, and that it was not, nor had it been when first purchased of plaintiff, in the condition warranted. Evidence was also adduced that it was leaky, and had undergone repairs, and required new rods. At the conclusion, it having been satisfactorily proved that it was not what plaintiff warranted it to be, judgement was given for 3 15s., 15s. being deducted for the necessary repairs to put it into good working condition.

 

Dover Chronicle 13 April 1850

Dover County Court, April 11, before Charles Harwood Esq., Judge.

Cheeseworth v Bryant: Mr. Tapley, for plaintiff, stated that this was a claim for 5, received by defendant under the following circumstances:- Some time since defendant, hearing that Cheeseworth was desirous of leaving a public house at Folkestone, went to him, and offered his services to procure a tenant. Defendant then wrote to a person named Rogers, who looked over the house, and eventually agreed to take the same, for which he paid defendant a deposit of 5. Rogers afterwards refused to ratify the agreement, and defendant kept the 5 for his expenses in the transaction.

Mr. Harvey, for defendant, said his client considered himself entitled to some recompense for his trouble, and would leave it to the Court to fix the amount.

His Honour thought a guinea was ample remuneration for the services rendered, and gave the plaintiff a verdict for 3 19s.

 

Dover Telegraph 13 April 1850

Dover County Court, April 11, before Charles Harwood Esq., Judge.

Cheeseworth v Bryant: Mr. Tapley, for plaintiff, stated that this was a claim for 5, received by defendant under the following circumstances:- Some time since defendant, hearing that Cheeseworth was desirous of leaving a public house at Folkestone, went to him, and offered his services to procure a tenant. Defendant then wrote to a person named Rogers, who looked over the house, and eventually agreed to take the same, for which he paid defendant a deposit of 5. Rogers afterwards refused to ratify the agreement, and defendant kept the 5 for his expenses in the transaction.

Mr. Harvey, for defendant, said his client considered himself entitled to some recompense for his trouble, and would leave it to the Court to fix the amount.

His Honour thought a guinea was ample remuneration for the services rendered, and gave the plaintiff a verdict for 3 19s.

 

Maidstone Gazette 22 October 1850

Petty Sessions, Wednesday; Before J. Bateman, C. Golder, T. Golder and W. Major Esqs.

The following licenses were transferred: From Samuel Cheeseworth, of the Marquis of Granby, to George Castle Hills.

 

Maidstone Gazette 21 October 1851.

Petty Sessions, Wednesday; Before R. Hart Esq., Mayor, J. Bateman, W. Major and S. Mackie Esqs.

George Castle Hill, landlord of the Marquis of Granby, High Street, was summoned for allowing the drainage of his house to run on the public highway. Mr. Bamford and Inspector Steer proved the case. Defendant stated that he had no drain into the main sewer, and could not afford to put one, and his landlord, Mr. Delmar, had refused to do so. The magistrates fined him 50s. and costs, to be paid in three days, and advised him to have a drain put in at once, or he would be liable to similar penalties.

 

Dover Chronicle 6 November 1851.

Dover County Sessions, yesterday, before S. Finnis Esq., Mayor;

William Whitehouse, labourer, was charged with stealing a drab great coat, value 3, from H. Worthington Esq., of Maxton Farm, on the 27th June last.

Mr. Worthington said the coat produced was the property of his son, Henry, who was now in America. On the 27th June it was safe in the hall of the house, and was missed on the same evening. He gave intimation of the robbery to Police Constable Bayley on the following day, who then told him that he had the coat at the station house, having found it in the possession of the prisoner, whom he apprehended at Folkestone on another charge.

Police Constable Bayley said that on the previous evening he apprehended the prisoner on his liberation from the gaol, where he had been confined. On the 28th June last he had apprehended him at Folkestone on a charge of stealing three waistcoats belonging to Oliver Underwood. The prisoner was tried and convicted of this theft at the last sessions. When taken at Folkestone he said he had been lodging at the "Marquis of Granby." Witness there found the coat produced, in charge of the landlord, named Hills, who said he had received it from the prisoner. Prisoner then acknowledged that he had stolen the coat.

Whitehouse, in defence, said that he was Guilty of the theft, and that the state of starvation he was in at the time alone prompted him to steal it.

His Worship committed him to take his trial at the East Kent Quarter Sessions at Canterbury.

 

Folkestone Observer 19 July 1862.

Drunk And Riotous.

Monday July 14th:- Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer and J. Kelcey Esqs.

James Lightfoot, painter, was charged with being drunk and riotous. P.C. Reynolds was on duty in High Street about half past twelve, when there was a great disturbance in front of the Marquis Of Granby, in consequence of the prisoner being very drunk, and quarrelling. Defendant said he only had five glasses of beer that evening. They Mayor thought prisoner would be of more use at work than in prison, and as he had been already two nights in prison, he would now be dismissed.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 13 August, 1864.

DRUNK AND RIOTOUS

Tuesday August 9th:- Before James Kelcey, R.W. Boarer and S. Eastes, Esqs.

William Pettit was charged with being drunk and riotous, and using obscene language.

P.C. Hills said that about six o'clock last night he met the prisoner coming up High Street, talking very loudly, in company of two soldiers and two officers' servants. They went into the "Marquis of Granby" and came out again. He was riotous and said he should use what b--- noise he liked. Witness told him to go home, and as he refused, took him into custody and brought him to the station. There were about thirty people there when he was using the obscene language. One of the soldiers attempted to strike the prisoner, but he did not attempt to strike in return.

The bench fined the prisoner 2s. 6d. – costs 4s 6d.

 

Folkestone Observer 10 June 1865.

Saturday June 3rd:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt Esq., and Captain Leith R.V.

Samuel Frodsham, landlord of the Marquis of Granby beerhouse, High Street, Folkestone, was summoned for allowing disorderly conduct in his house on May 28th, by allowing a number of persons to remain drinking and making a great noise and disturbance at ten o'clock at night, in contravention to his license.

Defendant pleaded Not Guilty.

Police sergeant Newman said that on Sunday night last, about ten o'clock, he was coming up the High Street when he saw a crowd of about 40 or 50 persons assembled in front of the Marquis of Granby beerhouse. The defendant is the occupier of the house.

Defendant here produced his excise license, which the magistrates retained.

Witness went on to say that he went up to the house, and hearing some persons quarrelling inside, he entered and saw a female standing opposite the bar with her jacket off, and using dreadfully disgusting language to another female. Mrs. Frodsham was sitting in the bar at the time, and witness told her she ought to remove the girl from the house. She replied that Louisa had had too much to drink. There was a third girl who joined in making the disturbance. He did not see the landlord. The house is one of ill-fame and there had been frequent complaints about it. He saw three men in the house at the time.

No defence was offered, and the defendant was ordered to pay fines and costs amounting to 2 19s.

 

Folkestone Observer 18 May 1866.

Wednesday May 16th:- Before R.W. Boarer and James Kelcey Esqs, and Captain Kennicott R.N.

Samuel Frodsham was charged with having a defective covering to the cellar door of the Marquis Of Granby, High Street.

It appeared from the evidence that the covering had been broken nearly two months ago and notice given by the police to defendant to repair. The repair not being effected, he was at last summoned.

Defendant said orders had been given six weeks ago to Mr. Pope to make a new cover, and last week he was spoken to again about it, and it was by Mr. Pope's neglect the cover had remained as it was. That side of High Street was not used as a footpath.

Fined 2s 6d, with 9s costs.

 

Southeastern Gazette 22 May 1866.

Local News.

At the Borough Petty Sessions, on Wednesday, Samuel Frodsham, landlord of the Marquis of Granby, High Street, was charged with having permitted a cellar flap to remain in a defective and dangerous State in front of his house.

Police constable Reynolds proved that two or three months ago a girl fell down the cellar, in consequence of which he cautioned the defendant about getting the cellar flap repaired. A board was afterwards laid loosely over it, which tilted up when any person stepped on to it. Defendant had not bad it repaired when witness came off duty that morning.

The defendant said he had given an order to “Master Pope” to mend the place six weeks ago.

The Bench told defendant he had made himself liable to a fine of 40s., but they should only fine him 2s. 6d. and 9s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 July 1867.

Harbouring Prostitutes.

Friday July 26th: Before the Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Samuel Frodsham, of the Marquis Of Granby, High Street, was fined 3 and costs, or two months' imprisonment, for this offence. The money was paid.

 

Folkestone Observer 27 July 1867.

Friday, 26th July: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Samuel Frodsham was charged with allowing prostitutes to assemble and continue in his house.

Supt. Martin said: On Tuesday last I visited the defendant's house in the morning, about 11 o'clock, and saw three girls, whom I know to be common prostitutes, in defendant's house. Two were at the door, and one in the passage. I went again the same afternoon about five o'clock, and saw the same girls there. I went into the house that afternoon, and cautioned defendant's wife. Two of the girls had been in the house 12 months. I have often cautioned defendant's wife, and my men have cautioned defendant. I have had many complaints from the neighbours of the conduct of soldiers and girls at the window. The street is very narrow, and a very public thoroughfare. The house is a very bad house.

P.C. Reynolds said: I know defendant's house. Prostitutes are kept there. I cautioned defendant himself and his wife on Tuesday evening last. Soldiers and sailors visit the house, mostly soldiers. Complaints have been made to my by the neighbours about the girls. I have had complaints lately. Some of the girls have been there about twelve months.

The Bench fined the defendant 3, and 11s. costs, and in default two months' imprisonment.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 July 1867.

Local News.

Thomas Frodsham, of the Marquis Of Granby Inn, was summoned for harbouring loose characters in his house, and was fined 3 and costs, or two months' imprisonment.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

BAKER John to Dec/1849

CHEESWORTH Samuel Dec/1849-Oct/50

HILLS George Castle Oct-1850-51+ (age 33 in 1851Census)

FRODSHAM Samuel 1861-68 Bastions

SMITH Robert Poole 1868-69

 

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