DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, December, 2021.

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 21 December, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1869

(Name from)

Eagle Tavern

Latest 1909

52 High Street

Folkestone

 

Formerly the "Marquis of Granby."

 

Folkestone Observer 29 August 1868.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott, and Alderman Tolputt.

This was a special session for granting alehouse licenses, and the various licensed victuallers attended for the renewal of their licenses, the whole of which were granted, with one exception which was suspended for a fortnight, until the adjourned licensing day.

Robert Poole Smith applied for a license for the Eagle public house, late the Marquis Of Granby, High Street.

Note: No mention of this in More Bastions. Date for name change also differs.

After hearing the evidence for and against the application the court was cleared, and on the re-admission of the public the Mayor said the Magistrates were unanimous in refusing the application, inasmuch as there was no necessity for it. They did not wish to make free trade of this matter, and he thought the Bench would carry out this course in future, and not grant any licenses unless the houses were actually required.

 

Folkestone Express 29 August 1868.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott, and Alderman Tolputt.

The licensing day was held at the Town Hall on Wednesday.

Fresh Application:

R.P. Smith, of the Marquis Of Granby, High Street, applied for a license for his house.

Note: Smith is not listed in More Bastions.

 

Mr. Minter called the attention of the Bench to the fact that at Liverpool the magistrates granted licenses to every respectable applicant, and the houses there were of a good class and character. He did not think this ought to be a question of necessity, but one of respectability.

After a short consultation, the Mayor stated that the magistrates were unanimous in refusing the application. They did not see any necessity in the application, and they wished it to be understood that they will not grant licenses without the necessity is shown.

 

Southeastern Gazette 31 August 1868.

Local News.

The annual licensing day was held on Wednesday. There were two new applications for licenses, George Burgess, Richmond Tavern, Harvey Square, and R. P. Smith, Marquis of Granby, High Street, but they were refused.

 

Folkestone Express 20 February 1869.

Monday, February 15th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and Alderman Tolputt.

William Newman was charged with being drunk and creating an obstruction in High Street.

P.C. Sharpe said: On Saturday evening I was on duty in High Street about half past seven o'clock, when I saw the prisoner opposite the Eagle Tavern, and a lot of people round him. I told him to go away, and he said he had fought for his Queen and country and didn't care for no-one. I pressed him to go away, and as he would not I took him into custody to clear the street.

The prisoner said he was quite drunk and did not know anything about it. He had come here to see some of his old comrades and they had a drop together. He had served in the Crimea, and had been in the army altogether 17 years and 10 months, in the 52nd and 56th Regiments.

The Bench discharged him on promising to leave the town.

 

Folkestone Express 20 November 1869.

Wednesday, November 17th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Clark Esqs.

Alfred Thorne, proprietor of the Eagle beerhouse, High Street, was summoned for keeping a disorderly house. Defendant was unable to attend, owing to illness; his wife appeared in answer to the summons.

P,C, Swain was on duty in High Street on the night of the 11th, and visited the Eagle beerhouse in High Street about half past ten o'clock, when he saw several loose characters in the tap room. He had cautioned the defendant previously in the presence of his wife. The house had been complained of by the neighbours, as they left the house drunk and noisy.

P.S. Reynolds deposed to the above facts. He visited the house in company with P.C. Swain the same evening. The complaints of neighbours have been about the noise.

On the part of defendant it was stated that he was entirely ignorant of the character of the females in the room.

William Sinclair was called for the defence. He stated that he had seen nothing improper in the conduct of the people present on the occasion referred to.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined the defendant 40s. and 12s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 November 1869.

Tuesday, November 22nd: Before the Mayor, W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.

John Sinclair, a tailor, was charged with feloniously stealing one coat, value 1 2s. 6d., the property of Messrs. Hart, in High Street, on the 22nd inst.

Thomas Clark, carpenter, of No. 1, Beach Street, said: Yesterday afternoon, about 3 o'clock, I was at my garret window, and saw prisoner come across Tontine Street. He stumbled at the corner, and that attracted my attention, so I watched him up the street. He appeared to be intoxicated. I can see Messrs. Hart's shop in High Street. When prisoner arrived opposite that shop, I saw him reach up his hand and take a coat from a nail on the window outside the shop. He put the coat on his arm, and walked up High Street as far as the Eagle, where he went in. I then gave information at Messrs. Hart's shop, and went to the Eagle. I found prisoner sitting in front of the bar. He had not the coat with him. I called the landlord aside and told him of the theft. I went back to Messrs. Hart's, and while I was gone, the prisoner left the house. I gave information to the police.

Ellen Thorpe, wife of Alfred Thorpe, keeper of the Eagle beerhouse, High Street, said: risoner has lodged at our house for some little time. He came in yesterday afternoon about 5 minutes past 3 o'clock. He was not lodging there at the time. He had something on his arm, which he took into a back room, and asked me to take care of for him. He then went into the bar and sat down. When Mr. Hart came in afterwards and asked, I said prisoner had brought a coat in. Mr. Thorpe gave it up to Mr. Hart. I did not touch it.

By the Bench: Prisoner was not sober.

Alfred Henochsberg said: I manage the outfitting business for Hart & Co. Yesterday about 3 o'clock I was in the High Street shop. Was called outside by the first witness, Mr. Clark. In consequence of what he said, I instituted enquiries, and found a macintosh coat was missing from outside the shop window. It's value was 22s 6d. Clark went to the Eagle, and on his return I went back with him and a policeman, but prisoner was gone up the street. We followed him, and when we caught him I asked what he had done with the coat. He denied knowing anything about it, and I gave him into custody. I returned to the Eagle, and received the coat from the landlady. I recognise prisoner as a man who worked for us about a fortnight ago, under another name – Hartnup. I recognise the coat by the tickets on it as the property of Philip Hart. I also identify the coat by its make.

P.C. Hills said: Yesterday afternoon I accompanied last witness to the Eagle, and afterwards up High Street, and prisoner was given into my custody by the last witness. I charged him with stealing the waterproof coat from Mr. Hart's shop, and he said he knew nothing about it. On getting to the police station I again charged him, and he made the same reply. I then received the coat produced from the last witness. When prisoner saw the coat, he said “I did take that – it was done in a drunken spree”. He was in liquor at the time.

Mr. Henochsberg said they had no wish to press the case, as prisoner was drunk.

By the Bench: I knew very little of the prisoner. He was sober while he worked for the firm, about a week. They took him on a perfect stranger.

Prisoner pleaded guilty, and asked that leniency might be shown him. He was in liquor, or he should have scorned such an action.

Mr. Martin said prisoner had not been keeping good company or good hours since he had been in Folkestone.

The Bench convicted the prisoner, and sentenced him to 3 months' hard labour.

Note: More Bastions lists licensee as Thorne.

 

Folkestone Express 27 November 1869.

Tuesday, November 23rd: Before The Mayor, W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Sinclair Hartnup, alias William Sinclair, a tailor, was charged with stealing a macintosh coat from outside P. Hart & Co.'s shop, High Street.

Thomas Clark said: I live at No. 1, Beach Street. On Monday afternoon about three o'clock I was standing at a window in my house, when I saw the prisoner cross Tontine Street to High Street. He attracted my notice because he stumbled and I thought he looked intoxicated. As he passed Mr. Hart's shop in High Street I saw him put up his right hand and take a coat from a nail. He then put the coat across his left arm and walked up the street, and went into the Eagle Inn. I immediately went across to Mr. Hart's and saw Mr. Henochsberg. I asked him if he had lost a coat. He enquired of a boy and he said there was a coat missing from outside the shop. I then went up to the Eagle, where I saw the prisoner sitting in front of the bar. I did not say anything to him, nor did I see the coat. I spoke to the landlord privately and informed him that the prisoner had taken the coat. I then returned to Mr. Hart's shop, and during that time the prisoner left the public house and walked up the street.

Mrs. Ellen Thorne, wife of Alfred Thorne, said: I know the prisoner by his lodging at our house for three nights. He came in about three o'clock yesterday afternoon. He had something on his arm, and he afterwards asked me to take care of a coat for him till he came back. I saw the coat was a wet macintosh. He put it down in the parlour, and then sat down in the front bar. The last witness then came into the house, and remained there five minutes. A short time after, Mr. Henochsberg came in, and he gave him the coat.

By the Bench: The prisoner was not sober when he brought the coat.

Mr. Henochsberg said: I was in the shop yesterday about three o'clock when Mr. Clark came in. In consequence of what he told me I found a macintosh was missing. It had been hanging outside on the window. Mr. Clark then went up to the Eagle, and I looked out for a policeman. I went up the street with P.C. Hills and I pointed out the prisoner to him. We stopped him at the top of the street, and I asked him what he had done with the coat. He replied “I know nothing about a coat”. I then told Hills to take him into custody. I immediately returned to the Eagle and saw the landlord, and his wife brought out the coat. I immediately recognised it by the ticket attached to it. It is the property of Mr. Phillip Hart, and is valued at 22s. 6d. I know the coat by the make as well. The prisoner is a man that worked for us under the name of Hartnup.

P.C. Hills deposed to taking the prisoner into custody and charging him, when he replied he knew nothing about it. On being shown the coat at the station he said “I did take it. It was a drunken spree”.

Mr. Henochsberg said he did not wish to press the charge; he was a perfect stranger in the town.

The prisoner (crying) pleaded Guilty to the charge. He said he was under the influence of drink at the time or he should not have committed the offence.

The Bench sentenced him to three months with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Observer 6 January 1870.

Transfer of License.

Wednesday, January 5th: Before R.W. Boarer, C. Doridant, C. Dashwood, J. Clark and J. Gambrill sqs.

Mr. John Wallis applied for the transfer of the Eagle Tap, formerly the Marquis Of Granby. In answer to Mr. Gambrill, Supt. Martin said the house had been shut up four or five days; the last landlord, a man named Thorn, was fined and left the house. Mr. Boarer said that the house had had such a very bad name that the proprietor had done wisely to change it. Supt. Martin stated that Mr. Wallis had kept licensed houses in the town before – The North Foreland and The Pavilion Shades – and had conducted them very well; there had never been a complaint against him. The transfer was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 January 1870.

Wednesday, January 5th: Before C. Doridant, R.W. Boarer, J. Gambrill, C.H. dashwood and J. Clark esqs.

John Wallis applied for a transfer of the beer certificate of the Eagle, High Street, which was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 8 January 1870.

Granting Licenses.

Wednesday, January 5th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer, C. Dashwood, J. Clarke, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

John Wallis applied for power to sell beer at the Eagle Tavern, High Street. The application was granted.

Note: This date differs from information in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 9 July 1870.

Transfer of License.

Wednesday, July 6th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman, and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Eagle Beerhouse: On an application for the transfer of the license of this house, the Magistrates were afraid that they had no power to transfer a license more than once during the year, and as this house had been already transferred they could not grant the application.

 

Folkestone Observer 25 August 1870.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Kennicott R.N., R. Boarer, J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith and C.H. Dashwood Esqs.

Robert Fisher made an application for the renewal of his license to the Eagle Tavern, High Street. The Inspector said he had no complaint to make against the man, but the house had always been a nuisance. License granted with a caution.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1870.

This was the annual licensing day.

Wednesday August 24th: Before the Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N., J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith and C.E. Dashwood Esqs.

Robert Fisher of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, asked to have his license renewed. The superintendent said many complained against the house, although he had nothing to say against it. The license was granted, and applicant cautioned.

 

Folkestone Express 27 August 1870.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Kennicott, J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith and C.H. Dashwood Esqs.

The Eagle, High Street: Mr. Robert Fisher applied for a beer license. After some hesitation the license was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 September 1871.

Annual Licensing Day.

Wednesday last was the Annual Licensing Day. The Magistrates on the Bench were The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Before the ordinary business was transacted, Mr. Creery, who appeared for the landlord of the Eagle public house, High Street, applied for a spirit license. He said that some years ago this house had a license, and had been conducted in a respectable manner. The license, however, had not been renewed, and had lapsed in consequence of the old landlord not appearing before the Bench on the licensing day. The Act of Parliament made special reference to those who suffered from the neglect of previous landlords, and enabled the Bench to renew the license on an application being made to them. His client was a most respectable man, and he simply asked for a renewal of the license, which for two or three years had not been asked for.

Mr. Hart said that he did not think the present case came within the meaning of the Act, which was framed for a specific purpose. Landlords sometimes left a house neglecting to renew the license, with the object of injuring the owners, and it was to meet that case that the Act was framed. The license for this house had been allowed to lapse, and no-one had applied for renewal until now, and under those circumstances the magistrates were justified in refusing the license.

The Bench declined to grant the application.

 

Southeastern Gazette 5 September 1871.

Local News.

At the annual licensing meeting on Wednesday last, Mr. Creery, of Ashford, applied for a spirit license for a house called the Eagle, in High Street, Folkestone, belonging to Messrs. Holmes and Style, brewers, Maidstone, and occupied by a person named Fisher, and in opening the case he stated that a nice point of law might arise. The house in question had been a licensed house for many years until about 1868, when the tenant, from some unaccountable cause, allowed the license to lapse, and it remained without one to the present time. The house had lately been fitted up in very good style, as a refreshment bar, and a good deal of money laid out upon it, and it had been let to a very respectable tenant, who formerly served as a colour sergeant in the army. The point of law was this: under the recent Act of Parliament (34 and 35, Vic., cap. 88), the Justices cannot grant any new license, otherwise than by way of renewal, or in pursuance of Sec. 14 of the old Act of 9 Geo. IV., which enacts that “where a person duly licensed shall remove from or yield up possession of a house, or shall neglect to apply for a continuance of such license, it shall be lawful for the justices to grant to the new tenant or occupier, a license which shall continue in force only until the 5th of April or the 10th of October, then next ensuing, as the case may be.” Mr. Creery read through the various clauses in the Acts, and contended that the present application came within the meaning of the 14th Sec. of the old Act, and was therefore exempted from the provisions of the recent Act, but the Justices, on the advice of their clerk, held that the old Act was not intended to apply to a case of this kind, and refused the license.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 October 1873.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before R. W. Boarer Esq., and Col. De Crespigny.

Mary Fisher was summoned for assaulting Marshal Tutt on the 2nd inst. Mr.Wightwick appeared for defendant, and Mr. Minter for complainant.

George Marshal Tutt, landlord of the Fountain Inn, High Street, said the defendant lived in the Eagle Tavern, nearly opposite his house, and on the 2nd of October she came to him and said “Can I speak to you?”. He replied “Certainly you can”. She asked him to step outside the house, but this he declined to do. She came into the passage and said “You have a child here”, and accused him of telling her mother not to come into defendant's house. He did not wish for any words, and told her to leave the premises. She declined to do so, and made use of very bad language. He put his hand on her shoulder and told her to leave, when she said “Don't handle me” and struck him twice with both hands; also kicked him on the knee, and he put her out of the door, not using more force than was necessary. She flew at him again, and knocked his hat across the road. Her mother took her away. He had received many annoyances from her, and complained to the police. From her conduct he feared she would do him some injury.

In cross-examination witness said defendant had complained about the reports he had circulated concerning her, but he had done nothing of the kind.

Thomas Bayley corroborated this evidence, and defendant was fined 1 and 10s. costs, or in default 14 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express 11 October 1873.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq., and Col. De Crespigny.

Mary Fisher, of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was summoned for assaulting George Marshall Tutt of the Fountain Inn in the same street.

Mr. Minter appeared for complainant and briefly opened the case.

Complainant said: Defendant lives at the Eagle Tavern, nearly opposite to my house. At seven o'clock in the evening on the 2nd October I was standing in my passage, just behind my front door. Defendant came in and said “Can I speak to you?” I replied “Certainly you can”. She then said “Will you step across to my house?” I said “Certainly not. You must speak to me here”. She then came into my passage, past my wife, and said “You have a girl here nursing your baby”. I said “What of that?” She replied “Did you tell her mother not to let her come to my house?” I said “Certainly not. I don't want to have any words with you. I would rather we should be good friends”, and asked her to leave my premises. She said she should go when she liked. I put my hand on her shoulder and told her I did not want anything to do with her. She called me names which I cannot repeat, which caused me to put my hand on her shoulder. She turned round and said “Don't you meddle with me”, and struck me twice on the mouth with both her hands, and kicked me twice on the knees. I then pushed her out of the door, using only necessary force to do so. She flew at me again and missed my face, and knocked my hat across the road. Her language was awful. Her mother came and took her away. I have received annoyance from her for some time, and complained to the police several times. I am fearful that she will do me some injury.

By Mr. Wightwick, who appeared for defendant: I have kept the Fountain about fifteen months, and previously kept a public house at Dover about eleven months. A week ago defendant sent a prostitute to annoy me; I heard her do so. I don't know that complainant has complained of my putting about scandalous reports concerning her during the last fortnight. I have not made reports about her house. She kicked me with her right leg on my left knee first, and then with her left leg on my right knee. I did not strike her.

Re-examined: Defendant has been continually helloing after me and my wife in the streets. I told Superintendent Wilshere of her conduct and he told me if it occurred again to summon her, and to turn her out of my house.

By Mr. Wightwick: She called after me “Who stole the clock?”

Thomas Bailey corroborated complainant's evidence.

Mr. Wightwick said the Bench would have no difficulty in coming to the conclusion that it was a paltry case. Complainant and defendant kept two public houses and possibly there was a little jealousy between them. Defendant had kept the Eagle four years and has never had a complaint before the Magistrates. If there was a disturbance in a public house, which was open to the world, it was the landlord's duty to call the police, and complainant had really committed an assault by pushing defendant out of his house. If it had been a private house he would have been justified in doing so. Defendant, being a woman, was quite justified on striking complainant in her own defence.

The Bench said they had no doubt an assault had been committed, and complainant was justified in putting defendant out of his house, notwithstanding what Mr. Wightwick had said to the contrary. Defendant must pay a fine of 1 and 9s. 6d. costs.

Mr. Wightwick said he could produce a case in support of what he had stated.

Mrs. Fisher paid the money, and said she went to complainant about a report he had circulated with reference to an illness she had.

Note: Dates for both parties' tenure at their houses is at variance with information in More Bastions.

 

Southeastern Gazette 14 October 1873.

Local News.

At the Police Court, on Wednesday, before R. W. Boarer, Esq., and Colonel de Crespigny, Mary Fisher, landlady of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was charged with assaulting Geo. Marshall Tutt, landlord of the Fountain Inn, High- Street, on the 2nd inst. Mr. Minter appeared for the complainant, and Mr. Wightwick for the defendant.

George M. Tutt said: On the 2nd inst., at seven o’clock in the evening, I was standing just within my front door, when defendant came up and said, “Can I speak to you?” I replied, “Certainly.” She said, “You have a child here nursing the baby.” I said, “Is that anything to you?” and she said, “But do not tell her mother not to come to my house.” I replied, “I said no such thing,” and that I did not wish to have any words, and asked her to leave, putting my hand on her shoulder. She turned, round and said, “Don’t you handle me,” and struck me twice in the mouth with both hands and kicked me on the knee. I then pushed her out. She “flew” at me again, and knocked my hat across the road. I have been receiving annoyances from her for some time.

Mr. Thomas Bailey having corroborated this evidence, the defendant was fined 1 and 10s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 27 December 1873.

Wednesday, December 24th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

Ellen Hill was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street.

Prisoner, on being called to plead, said: I was not drunk. I was only skylarking.

P.C. Keeler said he saw prisoner and some men and prostitutes come out of the Clarendon Hotel about twelve o'clock on Tuesday night. They stood talking in the street some time, and he desired them to disperse. Prisoner was drunk and he told her to get away two or three times, and as she refused and made use of bad language he locked her up.

Superintendent Wilshere said he saw the prisoner on the steps of the Eagle public house about a quarter before nine on Wednesday night. She was drunk and had her arms round a sailor's neck and was kissing him. He told her to go away, which she did.

Prisoner said: I was not tight, but only skylarking. I had a glass or two on account of a young friend going to be married next day.

Fined 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

As prisoner was being removed she turned to the Bench and said “I wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 December 1873.

Local News.

Ellen Hill was fined 5s. and 3s. 6d. costs, for being drunk in Tontine Street, at midnight on Tuesday.

P.C. Keeler proved the charge, and Supt. Wilshere added that he saw prisoner about a quarter before nine the same evening drunk, with her arms round a sailor’s neck, kissing him on the steps at the Eagle public-house.

As prisoner could not pay the money she was removed into custody, wishing the bench a “Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year,” and declaring she was not drunk, but was only “skylarking ” in anticipation of young friend being married on the following day.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 August 1874.

Licensing Day.

The annual brewsters' licensing day was held on Wednesday last. The magistrates on the Bench were The Mayor, J. Tolputt, and W. Bateman Esqs. In consequence of the bad character given to the house, the license was taken away from the Eagle, in High Street.

 

Folkestone Express 29 August 1874.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before The Mayor, W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.

The seventy four licensed victuallers, twelve beershop keepers and twenty three grocers and wine merchants had their licenses renewed, with the exception of those named.

The Eagle beershop: The Superintendent opposed the renewal of the license to Thomas Fisher on the ground that he knowingly allowed his house to be the habitual resort of prostitutes.

P.C. Ovenden deposed to having visited the house several times and found soldiers, sailors and prostitutes assembled in the bar and in a room. He had cautioned the landlord, who said they were there for refreshments. He had paid second visits within an hour and still found them there.

Mrs. Fisher asked if she were to ask women whether they were prostitutes when they came in for a glass of ale. She said it was “no good” cross-examining witness.

Sergt. Reynolds said he had visited the Eagle many times up to Sunday last, and found a great number of prostitutes there every evening. He called Mrs. Fisher's attention to it and she turned round and abused him, and told him to go and look at other people's houses.

In cross-examination witness said he had heard rows in the house frequently.

Applicant said she did not wish to say anything; she conducted the house as well as she could.

The Mayor said it seemed applicant did not profit from the caution given by the magistrates on a former occasion, and as the house seemed to be conducted very badly the magistrates unanimously refused to renew the license.

 

Southeastern Gazette 29 August 1874.

Annual Licensing Day.

At the annual licensing, on Wednesday, most of the licences were renewed.

The licence of the Eagle beerhouse, High Street, was refused, it having been proved that it it the habitual resort of women of bad character.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 September 1874.

Brewster Session.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before W. Wightwick Esq.

The application for the renewal of the license to the Eagle was granted, as the old landlord had been ejected, and a respectable tenant, Mr. John Stevenson, who had been in the service of the coastguard twenty two years had taken his place.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1874.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

This being the day for hearing the adjourned applications for licenses, the following was disposed of:

The Eagle Beerhouse: Mr. Mowll, in supporting the application of John Stevenson for the renewal of the license of the Eagle beerhouse, High Street, formerly held by Thomas Fisher, remarked that the Bench had very properly come to the conclusion that Fisher was not a fit and proper person to hold the license, but Messrs. Holmes and Styles, of Maidstone, the owners of the house, had got rid of Fisher as soon as they discovered that the house had been improperly conducted, which was not until the license had been refused to Fisher. They had succeeded in obtaining a respectable tenant in the person of the applicant, and he had every confidence in asking the Bench to renew the license to him.

Mr. John Holmes said they let the Eagle four years ago to Fisher after making very stringent inquiries as to his character. They had had no intimation that the house had been badly conducted, or they should have ejected him at once, which they did as soon as they discovered the fact. They had been in the trade 26 years and held about 200 licenses, and never lost one, because they exercised the most scrupulous care in their selection of tenants.

Mr. Alfred Harris, agent to Messrs. Holmes and Co., said he engaged Fisher, who had a very respectable character at the time, being a pensioner from the army. He had visited the house once a week and had never seen any bad practices there. If he had he should have reported the fact.

The license was granted, The Mayor remarking that the Magistrates felt sure that Messrs. Holmes and Co. did not know that the house was improperly conducted.

 

Southeastern Gazette 26 September 1874.

Adjourned Licensing Meeting.

The licence of the Eagle, High Street, which had been refused to Thomas Fisher, was granted to John Stevenson. The whole of the licences have now been renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 23 January 1875.

Wednesday, January 20th: Before Col. De Crespigny and J. Clark Esq.

The license of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was transferred from John Stevenson to George Marshall Tutt.

Note: This transfer does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 22 May 1875.

County Court.

Saturday, May 15th: Before G. Russell Esq.

In the judgement summons case of Edward Wilkinson against George Marshall Tutt of the Eagle, in High Street, it was stated that the defendant had not paid under the order, and he was committed forthwith for fourteen days.

 

Folkestone Express 29 April 1876.

Wednesday, April 26th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

The license of the Eagle Inn, High Street, was transferred from John Stevenson to William Baker.

 

Folkestone Express 4 January 1879.

Shortly before eight o'clock on Saturday morning the body of a man was seen lying in the inner harbour, having apparently been left there by the receding tide. On examination it proved to be that of a plasterer, a comparative stranger in the town – in fact his name was found out almost accidentally to be Henry Dickenson, whose home would appear to have been at Peckham, in Surrey. He was known to a soldier at the camp, and a day or two ago had been there to see him. The soldier gave the address of a friend who knew a friend of the deceased's relatives, and a telegram was sent to request him to acquaint them with the occurrence. An inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Town Hall, when the following evidence was given:

James Jordan, landlord of the Queen's Head Inn, identified the body as that of a man whose name he believed to be Henry Dickenson, and who was at his house about half past eight o'clock on Friday night. He had known him as a frequenter of the house for a few days, but did not know where he lived. Witness saw him go out with a baked potato can belonging to a man named Brand, for the purpose of going into the streets to sell them. There was no fire in the can. Deceased was sober.

John Freeman Hall, a mariner, living in East Street, said a little before eight that morning, James May, a fisherman, went to him and said there was a man drowned in the harbour. He went directly to the east side of the tramway, and on crossing the metals he saw the body lying by the side of the steamer Maud, to the west of the Pent Stream. The potato can and a knife were near the body, which was lying face downwards on the mud.

P.C. James Knowles said about eight o'clock that morning he went to the harbour. He saw deceased lying face downwards on the mud, close to the steamer Maud in the inner harbour. He procured a stretcher, and with assistance placed the body on it. Deceased was dead and cold. He was lying five or six yards from the edge of the slipway leading down to the sluice, with his head to the east, and a knife was lying nearer the corner. He should think deceased fell over when the water was up. The can was lying near the quay opposite the Pavilion. They put the body in the tan house and searched it, but only found a comb and a piece of a pencil.

Hall was recalled and said it would have been high tide about two o'clock. There would have been no water in the inner harbour at nine, as the tide only then began to flow.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said he had examined the body, and found no marks of violence, scratches, or bruises. Deceased had been dead some hours. The hands and face were covered with mud, and the clothing was soaked with water. In his opinion death was caused by drowning.

Henry Stone, a plasterer, living in North Street, said he had known deceased for about a fortnight. He was a plasterer, and came from Margate. He believed he belonged to Peckham. He said his name was Harry Dickenson, and that he was known to a soldier at the camp. Deceased told him that he had work to go to on Monday if the frost broke up. Witness last saw deceased at ten minutes to eleven on Friday night. He had previously seen him just before nine. He said he was going to lodge at the Eagle in High Street. When he saw him at just before eleven he had had something to drink, but was sober. Witness found deceased's boot in a boat in the harbour. He wore no stockings.

Hall explained that when the body was found, it only had one shoe on. The other was picked up and placed in the boat.

The jury, in the absence of any evidence to show how deceased came in the harbour, returned a verdict of “Found Drowned”.

 

Folkestone Express 25 August 1883.

Annual Licensing Day.

Wednesday, August 22nd: Before R.W. Boarer, F. Boykett, W.J. Jeffreason, and J. Clark Esqs., and Alderman Caister.

The ordinary business of renewing licenses having been concluded, the following application was heard:

The Eagle Tavern.

Mr. Minter, on behalf of James Dove, applied for a full license for the Eagle Tavern, High Street. He explained that the house formerly had a full license, which was lost through the negligence of a former tenant. The premises had been restored recently.

Mr. Mowll opposed on behalf of the owner of the Fountain, and said the license was lost seven or eight years ago.

Superintendent Taylor also opposed on the ground that there was no necessity for the license.

The Bench refused the application.

 

Southeastern Gazette 27 August 1883.

Local News.

Licensing Business.

At the Police Court on Wednesday, before F. Boykettt, R.W. Bearer, T. Caister, and J. Clark, Esqs., the annual licensing session was held.

An application for a full licence for the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 3 November 1883.

Monday, October 29th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, Alderman Hoad, M.J. Bell and A.M. Watkin Esqs.

Henry Bailey, labourer, was charged with rescuing a prisoner from the custody of P.C. Knowles, and further with resisting the police in the execution of their duty.

P.C. Knowles said he was on duty on Saturday about eight o'clock in Tontine Street. There was a disorderly mob there of 700 or 800 people shouting and hooting. He saw a man there whom he did not know, who was throwing his arms up and appeared to be acting as a leader, and he arrested him for disorderly conduct. The crowd then came round him, and the prisoner with others dragged him out of his hands and took him down Tontine Street. He saw no more of him that evening. Last night he saw the prisoner Bailey in the Eagle, High Street, and charged him with the rescue and took him to the police station.

Prisoner in defence said he did not know anything about it. He had had a little drink.

The Mayor said they were very serious charges against him, and for rescuing a prisoner he could be sent to the assizes and would be liable to two years' imprisonment. The Bench would take that course if any similar case was brought before them, but on the present occasion, for the resistance to the police, he would be sent to prison for one month with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 15 December 1883.

Wednesday, December 12th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Samuel Barker was charged with obtaining a horse and cart by false pretences from William Swan.

Mr. Minter prosecuted, and Mr. Martin Mowll defended.

Prosecutor said he was a labourer, living at Postling, and on the 5th of December he owned a pony and cart. He came into Folkestone on that day, and put up at the New Inn. Had not seen the defendant previously. He saw him at the New Inn stables, and afterwards at the bar. Witness was going to “chop” his horse and cart with a man named Stone, and he was waiting for Stone to come. Defendant told him Stone would not come back, he told him “straight”, and it was no use his waiting. Between three and four o'clock he told defendant that he would sell the lot and go to work again. He said he wanted 7 for it. Baker said he would give 5. He refused to sell it for 5, but afterwards told the defendant he could have it for 5 5s. Defendant said he would have it, and if witness would go with him he would pay him. They went to the Harvey Inn, and defendant asked if someone was in. The landlord said “No”. Defendant then took 10s. out of his pocket and gave it to witness, saying he would go out and get the remainder. He told Baker he was not going to have the horse and cart without the money. He replied “O h, you needn't be afraid of your money. You come along with me”. They went together to a public house in Dover Street, where defendant said he could “get a bit of money”. He said he was the owner of houses, and had lots of property. Then they went to the Eagle Tavern, High Street, where defendant had a paper written out (two or three scraps of paper were put in). He told witness he would pay at ten o'clock the next morning. Witness still refused to let him have the horse and cart. In the presence of the landlord, Baker said he was the owner of houses, and believing that statement was true, he allowed him to take the horse and cart, and defendant promised to pay him at ten o'clock the next morning. Witness went to defendant's house at Foord at ten o'clock the next morning and saw defendant's wife, but defendant was not at home. He could neither find defendant nor his pony and cart. He searched about the town for him that day and the next, and then went to the police.

Cross-examined: I came to Folkestone with the intention of “chopping” the pony away with a man named Stone, a horse dealer, of Dover, whom I saw the day before. The 10s. was paid me at the Harvey, and the agreement was drawn up at the Eagle Tavern by the landlord. It was drawn up to show Baker would have to pay me 4 15s. on the next day. I made an entry in my pocket book. I saw the police on Thursday morning. A policeman told me I must summons him. I believe I told the policeman that Baker said he had property.

Re-examined: I should not have parted with the horse and cart if Baker had not said he was the owner of houses. I proposed to come to your office. Baker said you closed at four o'clock. The sergeant of police told him the character Baker bore.

Sergeant Ovenden said he had known Baker about ten years. Never heard of his having any house property. Could not say whether the furniture in his house belonged to him.

By the Court: Defendant is a dealer in ducks, horses, rags and bones, and bottles.

Mr. Minter asked the Bench to commit the prisoner for trial on the evidence.

Mr. Mowll contended that there had not been a prima facie case made out, but that on the contrary, the complainant, a dealer, sold his property to another dealer, and that there was not the slightest possible cause for saying the defendant had been guilty of a criminal act.

The Magistrates' Clerk said if the defendant did not intend to pay for the property, and if all those papers were a mere trick, then it was a case of larceny.

The Bench decided to commit the prisoner for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1884.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, January 5th: Before W. Frederick Laxton Esq.

Samuel Baker was indicted for obtaining by false pretences a horse and cart and harness, value 5 5s., from Wm. Swan, at Folkestone on the 5th December. Mr. Denman prosecuted, and the prisoner was undefended. The case was heard so recently before the magistrates that it is only necessary now to give a summary of the evidence.

William Swan, a labourer, living at Postling, stated that he came into Folkestone on the 5th December and put up at the New Inn, where he expected to meet a man named Stone, who had arranged to buy his horse and cart. Stone did not come, but he saw Baker, who said Stone would not be back, and asked him what he wanted for the horse and cart. He asked 7. Prisoner said he would give him 5, but afterwards offered 5 5s. Prosecutor agreed to sell for that amount. They went together to the Harvey Hotel, where prisoner gave him 10s. He told him that he need not be afraid about his money – that he owned lots of houses round about there, and had plenty of money. He wanted prisoner to go to Mr. Minter's office and get an agreement drawn up. Prisoner replied “Mr. Minter shuts up at four o'clock”. They afterwards went to the Eagle Tavern, where the landlord wrote a memorandum in prosecutor's pocket book to the effect that prisoner would pay the balance at ten o'clock the next morning. He believed that prisoner was the owner of houses, or would not have consented to part with the horse and cart. The next morning at ten o'clock he returned to Folkestone, and went to prisoner's house at Foord. His wife said he had gone down town. The money was not there. He searched all round the town for prisoner, but could not find him. He never received the money, nor had he seen the horse and cart since. He gave information to the police.

In reply to prisoner, witness said he did not order Mr. Back to hand the horse over to him. Prisoner paid for the stabling. He went three times to his house on the 6th, and again on the following day, and delivered a bill. He told him not to pay his sister, but told prisoner's wife he would take part of the money and leave the rest for a week or two.

Sergeant Ovenden was called, and in reply to Mr. Denman he said he had known prisoner for about ten years as a dealer in bottles, rags and bones, &c., going round with a cart. Never heard that prisoner had any property.

In reply to prisoner, witness said he had never known him to be before the magistrates.

Prisoner alleged that he bought the horse and cart, paid a deposit, and agreed to pay the balance in a few days.

At the close of the case, the Deputy Recorder asked Mr. Glyn if he had no evidence to negative the statement by the prisoner that he had lots of houses. It was quite possible that he had property which the police sergeant knew nothing of.

Mr. Glyn replied that if it were true that the man had houses it would be very easy for him to rebut the charge of false pretences.

The Deputy Recorder said it was a question whether he ought not to withdraw the charge and direct the jury to return a verdict of Not Guilty. However, in deference to Mr. Glyn, he would allow the case to go to the jury. He then summed up strongly in the prisoner's favour, pointing out that it was possible the prisoner had property, and it was not necessary that it should be situated in Folkestone. They must be careful not to allow a Criminal Court to become a Court for collecting or enforcing the payment of debts, because the prosecutor could recover the balance of his money in the County Court. Further, he referred to the fact that the prisoner, who had been known to the police for ten years, had nothing against his character, and that, considering his avocation was that of a dealer, a class of men likely to be thrown into contact with the police, it was very much in his favour.

The jury, however, retired for a few minutes, and returned with a verdict of Guilty.

Two previous convictions at the East Kent Quarter Sessions were then proved against the prisoner, and it appeared that on that occasion there was a prior conviction. This was in July, 1873, and prisoner then went in the name of Henry George, and was sentenced to six months' hard labour.

Superintendent Taylor said he had known the prisoner two or three years, and had had repeated complaints about him. He associated with three or four other persons who frequented fairs and markets in the neighbourhood to get hold of weak-minded people to swindle them out of their goods in such a manner as to evade the criminal law.

The Deputy Recorder, in sentencing the prisoner, said the facts of the case as just stated were not known to him, and perhaps it was quite right that a judge should not know them until after the prisoner was convicted. But the jury had found him guilty after having carefully considered their verdict, which they had not arrived at hastily. There was no doubt that the countryman parted with his property on the faith of the misrepresentations he had made, and the law held that to be an offence. Unfortunately for the prisoner, that was not his first offence. He did not pay particular heed to the statements of Superintendent Taylor, but there was the record against him, that he was convicted at the East Kent Sessions in July, 1873, and there was a conviction, it appeared, previous to that, and he was sentenced to six months imprisonment. Therefore that was the third offence known against him. Of course such cases must be severely dealt with. It was an unfortunate thing for the prisoner's family, but the law must take it's course without contemplating what would be the effects on a man's family. He had consulted the magistrates on the Bench and they quite concurred that it was his duty to pass a sentence of twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour.

The Court then rose.

 

Folkestone News 12 January 1884.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, January 7th: Before W.F. Laxton Esq.

Samuel Baker was charged with on the 5th December obtaining by false pretences a horse and cart, value 5 5s., from William Swan, with intent to defraud. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Denman, who appeared on behalf of the prosecution, addressed the jury.

Mr. Swan was then examined, and said he was a labourer at Postling. On the 5th December he had a pony and cart, and brought them into Folkestone. He went to the New Inn with the intention of meeting a man of the name of Stone, about twelve o'clock. He saw the prisoner there, but he did not know him before. Prisoner said Stone would not be back that day. Witness told the prisoner he was waiting for Stone. Witness saw prisoner again in the afternoon, and told him he should sell the horse and cart and go to work again. Prisoner was then at the New Inn stables, and said he would buy the things. Witness said he wanted 7 for them, and prisoner said he should only give 5. Witness refused to sell them for that price, and he afterwards came to the agreement to sell them for five guineas, whereupon prisoner bought them and said “Come along with me, and I will get the money”. They then went to the Harvey Inn, and prisoner asked for someone, but the party was not there. Prisoner then gave witness 10s., but witness said he should not have the horse and cart without the money. They then went into a public house in Dover Street, and when they got into the street again prisoner said “You need not be afraid of me, for I am the owner of houses all round here”. Witness then wanted to go to Mr. Minter's office to get an agreement drawn up, but prisoner said Mr. Minter shut up his office at four o'clock, and that it was no use going there. They then went to the Eagle Tavern in High Street, where they had a paper written out by the landlord. Prisoner signed it, and witness wrote a line at the bottom saying “the remainder on the sixth”. Prisoner promised to pay the balance at ten o'clock the next morning. Witness then let the prisoner have the horse and cart as he believed prisoner was the owner of houses and property. If it had not been for that belief he would not have allowed prisoner to have the things. Witness went to prisoner's house next morning, but prisoner was out and had left no money. Witness went at ten o'clock, the time fixed for the payment of the balance. Witness went about the town to find him, and returned to prisoner's house again about twelve o'clock. Witness never got either the money or his horse and cart. Witness gave information to the police. Witness again went on Friday, two days afterwards, with the bill. Prisoner paid the stabling of the horse to Mr. Back.

In reply to prisoner, witness said defendant's wife told him the prisoner was gone to Dover to sell the cart. Witness told the prisoner's wife that he would take a part of the money, and leave the rest for a week or two if they did not cause him any trouble. Witness did not call at prisoner's house again. Prisoner asked if he should leave the money with his (witness's) sister, Mrs. Bisco, but witness told him not to pay anyone but himself. Witness said he should not call at the house again.

Sergeant Ovenden, on being sworn, said he had known the prisoner about ten years. He was a dealer, dealing in poultry, bottles, rags, bones, iron, and such things. Prisoner went about with a cart, and lived at 7, Castle Terrace, Foord. Witness never heard that he was the owner of property. Witness had no recollection of prisoner having been before the Folkestone Bench of Magistrates.

Prisoner then addressed the Court, and said he bought the things of Swan, paid him a deposit, agreeing to pay the remainder in a few days. On the following morning prisoner waited till the time when he had promised the money, a quarter to ten, and then went out to look for Swan. He meant to pay the money. He did not say he had property in the town.

The Judge then summed up the evidence, stating that he thought the charge of false pretences had not been fully proved.

The jury, after retiring for a short time, returned a verdict of Guilty.

The prisoner was then asked by the Clerk of the Peace if he were the same man as one Henry George, who was indicted at Canterbury in July, 1873, for larceny in regard to two offences.

The prisoner replied that he was.

Supt. Taylor stated that he wished to give evidence as to the prisoner's character, and on being sworn said he had known the prisoner for between two or three years, and had repeatedly had complaints made to him by persons whom prisoner and some others had swindled. They got people to part with their goods in such a manner as to evade the criminal law.

The Judge, addressing the prisoner, said unfortunately for him it was not the first offence he had committed. It was recorded against him that he was charged at the East Kent Quarter Sessions of the Peace, at Canterbury, in July, 1873, with two offences, and was sent to gaol for six months for each offence, therefore the present was the third offence known against him. He (the Judge) should sentence him to twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 17 May 1884.

Advertisement.

To Let, the Eagle Tavern, High Street, Folkestone. Apply to T.J. Harrison, Auctioneer and Valuer, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1884.

Local News.

The landlord of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, has sustained a severe loss through the dishonesty of a “visitor” who has stayed at his house, and who has decamped with about 36. Suspicion attaches to a man, who gave the name of Richardson, who had access to the upper rooms, and who suddenly disappeared. A man answering his description left on the day of the robbery by the Boulogne steamer.

 

Folkestone Express 1 November 1884.

Wednesday, October 29th: Before Captain Crowe, F. Boykett and A.M. Watkin Esqs.

Transfer Of Licence.

The licence of the Eagle, High Street, was transferred to George Hopkins.

Note: No record of Hopkins at Eagle in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 4 April 1885.

Saturday, March 28th: Before The Mayor, Captain Fletcher, Alderman Hoad, and F. Boykett Esq.

A man who gave the name of Smith, and who said he had no home, but had worked in Folkestone some time since, was charged with breaking a square of plate glass, value 50s., the property of the landlord of the Eagle Tavern, High Street. It appeared the prisoner went into the house and begged of the people in the bar. He was drunk, and the landlord requested him to leave, upon which he deliberately thrust his hand through the glass, and attempted to break a second one.

Prisoner said he had no money, and could not get a bed. If he had not been locked up, he should have walked the streets all night.

In default of paying 2 18s. 6d. he was sentenced to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 July 1887.

Saturday, July 16th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, Surgeon Major Gilbourne, General Armstrong, J. Brook, W. Wightwick, H.W. Poole and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

John Hawes, the landlord of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was charged with keeping his house open during prohibited hours on the night of the 5th of July.

P.S. Butcher said about ten minutes past twelve on the morning in question he was on duty in company with P.C.s Scott and Smith in High Street, when he saw a light in the window above the bar of the Eagle Tavern, and heard some people talking. Witness knocked at the door and the landlord answered it. Witness went in and found two soldiers there. He asked them what they were doing, but they made no reply. Witness then asked the soldiers if they had passes, and they produced them. The soldiers were named Clay and Lambert. Witness then told the landlord to go into the other room, and he and Scott would follow him. P.C. Scott then brought another soldier to witness, named Richards. Witness went into the small room at the back of the bar and found two quart pewter pots and several glasses standing on the table. The two pots contained malt liquor. Witness then went up a flight of steps to the back kitchen, where he found another soldier – Corporal McCagney – sitting in company with a female. The landlord was present. He asked the soldier what he was doing there, and the landlord said he was courting his daughter. There were six quart pewter pots standing on the table, and three glasses. One pot was full of malt liquor, one was three-quarters full, and the other was empty. Witness went up another flight of stairs, where he heard some people talking in a room. He tried the door. It was fastened and he asked the landlord if he might go into the room. The landlord said he had not got the key, and said he would go downstairs to fetch it. Soon afterwards he came up again and said he had lost the key. Witness asked him if he refuse to allow him to look into the room, and the landlord answered “Yes, I do”. Witness was told that there were a dozen people in the room. Another soldier was found on the premises, but a summons had not been served on him because he was away. Witness told the landlord that he should report the case, but he did not make any reply.

P.C. James William Scott said he was on duty in High Street about ten minutes past twelve on the morning in question. He was in company with P.C. Smith and Sergt. Butcher. He saw a light in the window over the bar of the Eagle Tavern. He accompanied Sergt. Butcher to the door, which was opened by the landlord, and he there saw all that the last witness had stated.

The defendant, who did not appear, was fined 5 and 10s. costs, or in default of payment one month's imprisonment. The money was paid.

Corporal McCagney, and Privates John Clay, Joshua Lambert, and Randolph Richards, belonging to the King's Royal Rifles at Shorncliffe, were then summoned for being on the licensed premises of the above defendant during prohibited hours.

Sergt. Butcher proved the charge against the defendants.

McCagney, in defence, said he wished the Bench to understand that he was not in company with the other three men, nor did he even know that they were in the house. If he had been aware that they were on the premises he should have done his duty by telling them to go. The reason he went there himself was that he was courting the landlord's daughter. (Laughter)

Colonel De Crespigny said the Bench were of opinion that Corporal McCagney was not amongst the other defendants, and he would therefore be discharged. The other two would be fined 1s. each, or in default they would be sentenced to three days' imprisonment. The Bench had dealt leniently with them, but if they came before them again the consequences would be more serious. The money was paid.

 

Folkestone Express 23 July 1887.

Saturday, July 16th: Before General Armstrong C.B., Col. De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, J.H. Brooke, H.W. Poole and W. Wighwick Esqs.

John Hawes, landlord of the Eagle Tavern, in High Street, was summoned for having his house open during prohibited hours.

Sergt. Butcher said on Tuesday, about ten minutes past twelve he was on duty in High Street with P.C.s Scott and Smith. He saw a light in teh window of the Eagle Tavern. The landlord opened the door to let two soldiers out, and he entered the house. He asked the soldiers if they had passes, and they produced them. He went to a small room at the back of the bar, and found two quart pots and three glasses on the table. One of the pots was half full of liquor. He went to a back kitchen upstairs, and found a corporal and a female sitting there. He said he was courting her – she was the landlord's daughter. The landlord said that was correct. In another room over the bar he found six other pots and four glasses. One pot was full and another three parts full of malt liquor, but there was no-one in the room. He went to another room, which was locked, and the landlord refused him leave to enter it. One of the four men told him there were about a dozen men upstairs. He told the landlord he should report the case, and he made no reply.

P.C. Scott gave corroborative evidence.

The defendant, who was not present and was not represented, was fined 5 and 10s. costs, or in default one month.

Corporal John McCagney, Privates Joshua Lambert, John Clay and Randolph Richards, all belonging to the King's Royal Rifles, were charged with being on the premises on the 5th July.

Supt. Taylor said he did not press for a heavy penalty.

The corporal said he was courting the landlord's daughter. He did not go for the purpose of drinking. He asked the Bench to consider his position.

General Armstrong: Why do you go at that hour in the night? (Laughter)

The Bench dismissed the charge against McCagney, and fined the other three defendants 1s. each.

The defendant Hawes came into court at this time, and appeared surprised that his case had been disposed of. He was told that the 5 was only half the penalty which might have been imposed.

 

Folkestone Express 25 August 1888.

Saturday, August 18th: Before The Mayor, Captain Carter, J. Holden, J. Fitness, J. Clarke, and E.T. Ward Esqs.

James Harris pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly. He was also charged with resisting P.C. Dunster in the execution of his duty, to which he pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Dunster said at eleven o'clock on Tuesday night he saw the prisoner leave the Eagle Tavern, High Street. He used abusive language to Boat Inspector Brice. He was very drunk and violent, and they were obliged to “cuff” him. While they were doing so he struck and kicked witness.

Brice said the prisoner had stopped him earlier in the evening and asked for a copper. He was drunk then, and went into the Eagle Tavern. He called Dunster's attention to defendant.

Defendant said he was very sorry, and he had made up his mind to drink no more. He had been wounded in the head in the Zulu War. He admitted that he was really mad with drink.

The Bench fined him 5s. and 4s. 8d. costs for each offence, or 14 days' hard labour in default.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 November 1895.

Police Court Record.

On Tuesday, before the Mayor and a full Bench, Benedict Sindstadt, aged 22, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in High Street, and with refusing to quit licensed premises.

P.C. Reed stated that on the previous evening at 9 o'clock, the landlord of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, called witness in to eject the prisoner, who was drunk. When prisoner was taken outside he made a great disturbance, causing a crowd to gather around. On three previous occasions witness had to speak to prisoner.

Mr. Hawes, landlord of the Eagle Tavern, said the prisoner came to his house drunk and he could not stand. Witness asked him to leave, but he would not.

Prisoner said he had been on a ship at Newcastle, and he fell from aloft. The owner of the ship wrote a letter, which prisoner produced, saying that they would take him again when he was better. If the Magistrates would let him off, he would go to sea at once.

The Bench dismissed the case, on condition that the prisoner went to sea.

 

Folkestone Express 24 July 1897.

Saturday, July 17th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Pledge and Spurgen, T.J. Vaughan, J. Holden, and J. Fitness Esqs.

The licence of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was transferred to Mr. Beaton.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 July 1897.

Police Court Reports.

On Saturday last – the Mayor (Alderman Banks) presiding – a transfer of licence for the Eagle Tavern was granted to Mr. William Beeton.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 August 1897.

Police Court Record.

On Wednesday – Captain Willoughby Carter presiding – transfer licence was granted to Mr. Beeton, Eagle Tavern, High Street.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 January 1899.

Licence Transfer.

Wednesday, January 18th: Before Messrs. Willoughby Carter, Pledge, Vaughan and Holden.

The Eagle, High Street, to Mrs. Eliza Beaden, widow of the late Mr. Beaden, who previously held the licence.

 

Folkestone Express 21 January 1899.

Wednesday, January 18th: Before Capt. Carter, James Pledge, John Holden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

Mr. G.W. Haines applied on behalf of Mrs. Beeton, widow of the late landlord, for a transfer of the licence of the Eagle Tavern, High Street. Granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 January 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday last transfer was granted to the following: Mrs. Beaton, Eagle Tavern.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 21 January 1899.

Wednesday, January 18th: Before Captain Willoughby Carter, J. Pledge, J. Holden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

On the application of Mr. Haines, the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was transferred to Eliza Beden (sic).

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 14th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Mr. C.J. Pursey and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

The transfer of the licence of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was allowed to stand over, as the regulation for sending in the agreement seven days before the application had not been complied with.

 

Folkestone Express 17 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 14th: Before Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W. Wightwick, G.I. Swoffer and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The transfer of the Eagle Tavern from Mrs. Beaton to William Giles was adjourned as the brewers had not forwarded a copy of their agreement seven days before the application.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 14th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, G.I. Swoffer, C.J. Pursey, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

An application for the transfer of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, from Mrs. Beeton to William Giles was adjourned.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 October 1903.

Saturday, October 24th: Before Alderman Banks, Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. W.G. Herbert, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Application was made for the transfer of the Eagle Tavern to a man named Giles. Mr. Herbert objected to the transfer, as Giles had been in receipt of poor relief for the past nine months.

Mr. Minter pointed out that the man would remain indefinitely on the parish unless he were allowed this chance of supporting himself.

His son-in-law came forward to guarantee the rent and money enough to carry on the business.

The application, which was only for temporary authority, was then granted.

 

Folkestone Express 31 October 1903.

Saturday, October 24th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W. Wightwick, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Mr. Minter made an application for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Eagle Tavern from Mrs. Beaton to William Giles, and explained that the case was adjourned from the special sessions in consequence of the brewers' agreement not having been lodged with the Justices' Clerk seven days before the sessions. The applicant had for 17 years held the licence of the Gun Tavern, and had never had a complaint lodged against him.

Mr. Herbert: How is Giles in a position to pay 20 a year rent, seeing that until recently he was an inmate of the Elham Union?

Mr. Minter: You have received an anonymous letter, but as a Guardian you ought to be thankful for the relief of the rates. His son-in-law has come forward with money to relieve him of anything that might be against him.

Mr. Bradley: Poverty would not disqualify him if he is a fit and proper person to have charge.

Mr. Herbert: It appears as though the real licensee is Clark.

Mr. Minter: At that rate, then, no licence holder is allowed to borrow money?

Temporary authority was granted by the Bench.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 October 1903.

Saturday, October 24th: Before Aldermen J. Banks and W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. W. Wightwick.

On the application of Mr. J. Minter, the licence of the Eagle Tavern was temporarily transferred from Mrs. Beeton to Mr. William Giles.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 5 December 1903.

Wednesday, December 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

The licence of the Eagle Inn was transferred from Eliza Beeton to William Giles (on the application of Mr. J. Minter, solicitor).

 

Folkestone Express 5 December 1903.

Wednesday, December 2nd: Before Colonel Westropp and E.T. Ward Esq.

The licence of the Eagle was transferred from Eliza Beeton to William Giles.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 December 1903.

Wednesday, December 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

The licence of the Eagle Tavern, High Street was transferred from Eliza Beeton to William Giles.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 July 1905.

Local News.

There is a popular idea that a soldier can be had for 1s. (the old recruiting fee), but P.C. Minter can tell an entirely different tale. That astute constable, with the assistance of Lieut. Col. Hamilton, has put the price up to 1. The only difference is this. When the man enlists the country used to present him with a shilling, but when he deserts and is taken back again, the country consider he is then worth 1, and immediately proceed to hand that amount over to the finder of the truant. Only in this case it is not the country, but the man himself who has to pay for the bonus of being arrested.

At the police court on Thursday, William James Nelson was charged with being a deserter from the South Lancashire Regiment, stationed at Shorncliffe Camp. Accused pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Minter said: Shortly before eleven o'clock last night the prisoner passed me in High Street. Noticing he had a military appearance I said to him “What are you doing out, dressed like this for?” He said “Like what?” I said “You are a soldier”. He said “Yes; an officer's servant”. I said “What officer?” He said “A captain”, and then correcting himself said “A lieutenant in charge of the detail at Shorncliffe”. Knowing that an officer would not let a soldier come out in such clothes (untidy civilian), I said “I do not believe you. We will see the Military Police, and if they are satisfied I will let you go”. On the way to the station we did not see the Military Police, so I took him to the station and charged him. He said “I am a soldier. I am a cook to the detail”. I asked him where he got the clothes from, and he replied “They are those which I was arrested in for desertion last March. I put them on this afternoon as my uniform was dirty. I just came out to get a drink. I left barracks about 2.30 today. I am only absent. You might let me go”. When charged he gave the name of J.W. Dolan, No. 5970.

Accused said that the constable's evidence was right, with the exception that he first attracted the constable's attention by asking him the way to The Eagle. He meant to return to barracks, or he would not have been in High Street. He considered he was absent, and not a deserter.

An officer present from accused's regiment said that he did not know much about the man, who had only been with the detail as cook for about a week. He deserted on the 15th of November, 1903.

The Chairman: The prisoner will be handed over to an escort to be dealt with by the military authorities.

The Chief Constable: I don't know whether your Worships consider this a case for reward?

The Chair (Lieut. Col. Hamilton): Yes. We recommend that the constable be paid 1.

 

Folkestone Express 30 December 1905.

Tuesday, December 26th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, G. Spurgen and T. Ames Esqs.

Henry Minter, of the Buffs, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in High Street on Saturday evening, and further with assaulting P.C. Harry Johnson in the execution of his duty.

P.C. Johnson said at 8.20 on Saturday evening he was called to High Street, where he saw prisoner surrounded by a crowd of people. He was very drunk and in a fighting attitude, and making use of most abusive language. He entered the Eagle public house in High Street, and witness asked him to leave. Prisoner refused, and as witness made an attempt to eject him, he struck witness a violent blow in the mouth. With the assistance of P.C. Kettle, witness handcuffed Minter and brought him to the police station.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days', for being drunk and disorderly, while the charge of assault was dismissed.

The money was paid by an officer of the regiment.

 

Folkestone Daily News 28 February 1906.

Wednesday, February 28th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, T. Ames, W.G. Herbert, and Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore.

The transfer of the licence of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was granted to Mr. William Henry White, from Mr. T. Giles. The new tenant had held the licences of the Chatham Arms and the Bricklayers Arms, Ramsgate, the licence of the latter having been suppressed last year.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 March 1906.

Wednesday, Fevruary 28th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lt. Col. Fynmore, Messrs. J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, C. Ames, and W. Linton.

The licence of the Eagle beerhouse, High Street, was transferred from Fredk. Giles to Mr. Wm. Henry White. The new tenant, it was explained, had held licences at Ramsgate, the Chatham Arms beerhouse and the Bricklayers Arms, the latter until it was extinguished under the Compensation Clause of the Licensing Act.

 

Folkestone Express 3 March 1906.

Wednesday, February 28th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and T. Ames, W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

The following licence was temporarily transferred: the Eagle Inn, High Street, from Mr. W. Giles to Mr. W.H. White.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 March 1906.

Wednesday, February 28th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, and Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames.

A special sessions for the transfer of ale house licences was held. The licence of the Eagle Inn, High Street, was transferred to Mr. Wm. Henry White.

 

Folkestone Daily News 11 April 1906.

Wednesday, April 11th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, R.J. Linton, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Mr. W.H. White was granted the transfer of the licence of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, from Mr. W. Giles.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 April 1906.

On Wednesday morning, at the Borough Police Court, Mr. E.T. Ward presiding, the ordinary business was preceded by a special licensing sessions, in which the licence of the Eagle, High Street, was transferred from Mr. W. Giles to Mr. W.H. White.

 

Folkestone Express 14 April 1906.

Wednesday, April 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and R.J. Linton Esq.

The following licence was transferred: The Eagle Tavern, from William Giles to William Henry White.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 April 1906.

Wednesday, April 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Mr. E.T. Ward and Mr. R.J. Linton.

A special session for the transfer of alehouse licences was held. Application was made and granted as follows: The licence of the Eagle Tavern to Wm. Henry White.

 

Folkestone Express 17 November 1906.

Local News.

Mr. W.H. White, the landlord of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, and also a gunner in the 1st C.P.R.V.A. (Vols), was on Monday, at Ramsgate Drill Hall, presented with a long service medal.

 

Folkestone Daily News 7 September 1907.

Saturday, September 7th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Vaughan, Ames, and Carpenter.

Henry Nelson Scrace was charged with stealing a coat.

Edward Williams deposed that he was a labourer, and lodged at the Eagle Tavern in High Street. He gave evidence as to laying his coat on a seat in the bar and then went to have his tea, and on returning about an hour afterwards the coat was gone. He gave information to the police. He valued the coat at 3s.

Winifred Kate White, of the Eagle Tavern, said that prisoner came into the bar and she served him with a half pint of beer, and the coat was then lying on the seat. She then went out, and when she returned the prisoner and coat was gone.

P.C. Allen deposed that from information he went to a lodging house in Radnor Street with Williams, and there saw the coat hanging on a peg, and Williams identified it as his property, and a woman named Stamford stated that prisoner had hung it up with some wire, &c. The constable saw Scrace and charged him with stealing the coat.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty and preferred to be dealt with summarily, and the Magistrates sentenced him to 21 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 14 September 1907.

Saturday, September 7th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, W.C. Carpenter and T. Ames Esqs.

Henry Nelson Scrase, an elderly man, was charged with stealing an overcoat.

Edward Woodhams said he was a labourer, and lodged at the Eagle Tavern, High Street. Between six and seven o'clock on Friday evening he was in the bar. He had his overcoat with him, which was lying on a seat. He remained in the bar for about half an hour, and then went into the kitchen to have some tea. When he returned to the bar the coat which he left lying on the seat was gone. He gave information to the police. Shortly afterwards he accompanied P.C. Allen to 14, Radnor Street, a common lodging house, where he was shown the coat produced, which he identified as his property. The value was 3s.

Winifred Kate White said she lived at the Eagle Tavern, High Street. Her father was the landlord, and she assisted in the business. Prisoner, she believed, came into the bar between six and seven o'clock, and witness served him with a pint of beer. He had some articles like those produced. Witness subsequently left the bar, and the coat was then lying on a seat. When she returned prisoner was gone, and also the coat. About eight o'clock she went to the police station, where she identified prisoner, whom, to the best of her belief, was the man who was in the bar.

Harriett Stamford said about seven o'clock the previous evening she was in the kitchen of 14, Radnor Street, where she saw prisoner. He had the coat produced and some wirework. He hung them on a peg and then went out. While he was gone P.C. Allen came in. She could not say whether the coat was there before prisoner came in.

P.C. Allen said at ten minutes to seven, from information he received from the prosecutor, Woodhams, he went to 14, Radnor Street. In the kitchen he saw a coat hanging on the same peg as the wirework produced. He showed it to Woodhams, who identified it as his property. Witness took possession of the coat, and at eight o'clock he again went to 14, Radnor Street, where he saw prisoner. The witness Stamford, pointing to the prisoner, said “That's the man that brought that coat in”. Prisoner said he did not know anything about the coat, and had missed a coat himself from the peg during the evening. Witness brought him to the police station, where he was identified by Miss White.

Scrase pleaded Guilty, and was sentenced to twenty one days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 September 1907.

Saturday, September 7th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Mr. T. Ames.

Harry Nelson Scrase was charged with stealing a coat from the Eagle Tavern, High Street, the previous day.

Edward Woodhams, a labourer, living at the Eagle Tavern, said that at about six o'clock the previous evening he went into the bar with the coat, and put it down on a seat. He remained in the bar for half an hour, and then went into the kitchen for his tea, leaving the coat on a seat in the bar. He was in the kitchen till about 7 o'clock, and on returning to the bar found his coat gone. He gave information to the police, and shortly afterwards went with a constable to a common lodging house in Radnor Street. He was then shown a coat (produced), which he identified as his property; he valued it at 3s.

Winifred Kate White, daughter of the landlord of the Eagle Tavern, said she assisted her father in the business. Prisoner came into the bar between six and seven o'clock, and witness served him with half a pint of beer. He was in the bar when she went out, but was gone when she came back. The coat was on a seat when prisoner came in, and when she returned it was gone. About 8.30 p.m. she went to the police station, and there identified the prisoner.

A woman named Stamford, who had been staying at the common lodging house, 14, Radnor Street, said that defendant came into the kitchen of the house about 7.30 p.m. the previous evening with some wire work and the coat; afterwards he went out. While he was gone P.C. Allen came in, and she saw him take the coat. In answer to prisoner, witness said she could not say whether prisoner merely shifted the coat from one peg to another.

P.C. Allen deposed that at 6.50 p.m. the previous evening, from information received, he went to the kitchen of 14, Radnor Street, and saw the coat hanging on the same peg as the wire was. He showed Woodhams the coat, and he identified it as his property. He took possession of it, and at 8 o'clock again went to the kitchen of the house, where he saw the prisoner. The last witness said to him, in prisoner's presence “That is the man (pointing to prisoner) that brought that coat in and hung it upon the peg, the same coat as you took away just now”. Prisoner said “I don't know anything about the coat”. Witness said “The coat has been identified as one stolen from the public bar of the Eagle Tavern this evening”. Before that the prisoner had said that he had missed a coat from his peg during the evening. He brought him to the police station, where he was identified by Miss White as the man she saw in the bar of the Eagle Tavern. When charged prisoner again said he did not know anything about the coat.

Scrase elected to be dealt with summarily, and on being formally charged, pleaded Guilty, although he did not seem to know the significance of this admission. He was sent to prison for 21 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 February 1908.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Annual Licensing Sessions were held on Wednesday. The Magistrates present were Messrs. Ward, Herbert, Stainer, Linton, and Leggett.

Mr. James Kent applied for a full licence for the Morehall Hotel, and also for a beer off licence for the Morehall Hotel.

The Chief Constable read his annual report, which the Chairman said was very gratifying and satisfactory.

The following licences were under consideration: Railway Inn, Bricklayers Arms, Eagle Tavern, Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, and Packet Boat.

The licences of the Railway Inn, Bricklayers Arms, Eagle Tavern, Packet Boat, and Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, were adjourned till March 2nd.

 

Folkestone Express 8 February 1908.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, February 5th: Before E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Superintendent's Report.

This report was read by Mr. Harry Reeve, as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 129 premises licensed for the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz.; Full licences, 78; beer “on”, 9; beer “off”, 6; beer and spirit dealers, 15; grocers &c., 11; chemists, 7; confectioners, 3; total 129. This gives an average, according to the census of 1901, of one licence to every 237 persons, or one “on” licence to every 352 persons. At the last annual meeting, one “off” licence for the sale of wines and spirits was not renewed as the business had been discontinued by the licence holder. One new licence for the sale of cider and sweets was granted, and three new licences for the sale of wines were granted to chemists. At the adjourned annual licensing meeting, held in March, five “on” licences (four full and one beer) were referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy. One full licence was renewed at the preliminary meeting of the Committee, and at the principal meeting three of the licences were refused and one renewed. The licences which were refused were the Queen's Head, Beach Street, Channel Inn, High Street, and the Perseverance beerhouse, Dover Street. Compensation was paid in the cases of the Queen's Head and Channel Inn, and the premises were closed on the 28th of December last. In the case of the Perseverance Inn, the amount of compensation has not yet been settled; a provisional renewal of the licence will, therefore, be required until the amount of compensation has been determined. There are two houses licensed by the Inland Revenue authorities for the sale of beer in quantities not less than 4 gallons, also to sell wines and spirits in single bottles. These licences can be granted by the Inland Revenue authorities without a Magistrates' certificate, but only for premises used exclusively for the sale of intoxicating liquors. Since the last annual licensing meeting 13 of the licences have been transferred; one licence was transferred twice. Eleven occasion licences were granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 31 extensions of the usual time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises. During the year ended 31st December last, 125 persons (110 males and 15 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 113 were convicted and 12 discharged. This is a decrease of six persons proceeded against, as compared with 1906, and a decrease of 58 persons when compared with 1905. Three licence holders have been proceeded against for permitting drunkenness on their licensed premises; only one conviction was recorded by the Magistrates, but this was afterwards quashed on appeal by the Recorder at Quarter Sessions. One licence holder, who was convicted just previous to the last annual licensing meeting for an offence under Section 16 of the Licensing Act, 1872, appealed to Quarter Sessions, but the conviction was affirmed at the Borough Sessions held on the 5th April last. I beg to suggest that the consideration of the renewal of this licence, the Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, be deferred till the adjourned meeting. I have no objection to offer to the renewal of any of the other licences on the ground of misconduct, the houses generally being conducted in a satisfactory manner. The order made by the Bench at the last annual licensing meeting, that all automatic gaming machines were to be removed from licensed houses, was at once complied with by the licensees. Eleven clubs, where intoxicating liquor is sold, are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. I would respectfully suggest that the Committee again refer the renewal of some of the licences in the congested area to the Compensation Committee to be dealt with under the provisions of the 1904 Act. I have received notices of four applications to be made at these Sessions for new licences, viz.; one full licence and three beer “off””.

The consideration of granting licences to the following licensed houses was referred to the adjourned licensing sessions; Railway Inn, Beach Street; Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, and Eagle Tavern, High Street, which are to be opposed. The licences of the Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, and the Packet Boat, Radnor Street, were adjourned.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 February 1908.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 5th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Councillor G. Boyd, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Messrs. J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, and R.J. Linton.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Harry Reeve) read his report. (For which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said that it was a very satisfactory report. The Bench were glad that there was a decrease in drunkenness in the borough, and also that as a rule all the houses in the borough were well conducted.

The various licensees then came forward for their renewals.

The Magistrates formally gave notice that the granting of the following licence would be deferred till the adjourned licensing meeting, and that in the meantime notice of opposition would be served:-

The Eagle Tavern, High Street, Folkestone; lessee Mr. William Henry White.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 2nd: Before Messrs. Ward, Carpenter, Herbert, Leggett, Fynmore, Linton, Boyd, and Stainer.

The Eagle Inn, High Street.

Mr. De Wet appeared for the owners and tenant (William Henry White).

The Chief Constable said the house was a fully licensed one, and had held a licence since 1869. The owners were Messrs. Style and Winch, of Maidstone, and the rateable value was 35. His objection to the licence was that it was not required. The house was badly adapted for the convenience of customers. The nearest licensed house to the Eagle was the Earl Grey, 82 yards away. The pavement in front of the Eagle was only 2ft. to 2ft. 3in. wide, and there was really no trade to the house. Within a radius of 200 yards there were 25 other fully licensed houses. He visited the house on the 27th February last, and the landlady told him her husband had gone out to earn a few shillings, and although the house had been open from 7 in the morning till 12.30 she had taken only 3d.

In reply to Mr. De Wet, the Chief Constable said that he did not see how any other accommodation could be provided.

P.C. Simpson said he had visited the house on several occasions. On the last occasion he served the landlord with a summons for not paying his Poor Rate. When the summons came on for hearing, the tenant was allowed a month to pay, but eventually a distress warrant was issued. Witness had also served him with a summons for the non-payment of the General Rate, and an order was made for payment forthwith. On the 28th January of this year Mrs. White called at the police station and asked for the total amount of rates owing, as the owners of the house were going to pay them.

In reply to Mr. De Wet, witness said trade was better before the present tenant took over the house.

Mr. De Wet said the trade had fallen off simply owing to Mr. White not being a suitable tenant. Mrs. Beeton was prepared to take the licence.

The Chairman said the objection was on the grounds of redundancy.

Mr. De Wet said this was the only house the owners had in Folkestone.

The Chairman said they could not help that.

The Bench decided to refer the case.

 

From the Folkestone Express 7 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

At the annual sessions the granting of five licences was adjourned; The "Railway Tavern," the "Eagle Tavern" and the "Bricklayers Arms" on the ground of redundancy, the "Railway Hotel," Coolinge, because a conviction had been recorded against it, and the "Packet Boat," so that plans for alterations could be submitted to the Justices.

 

Folkestone Express 7 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough took place on Monday, when the licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Hamilton, and J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd. At the annual sessions the granting of five licences was adjourned; The Railway Tavern, the Eagle Tavern and the Bricklayers Arms on the ground of redundancy, the Railway Hotel, Coolinge, because a conviction had been recorded against it, and the Packet Boat, so that plans for alterations could be submitted to the Justices.

The Eagle Inn.

The Eagle Inn, the tenant of which was William Henry White, was next considered.

The Chief Constable said the opposition was on the ground that it was not necessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood. He put in the figures dealing with the congested area. The house was an ante-69 beerhouse, with a wine licence, situate in High Street. The present tenant obtained a transfer of the licence on April 27th, 1906, and the registered owners were Messrs. Style and Winch, Maidstone. The rateable value of the house was 32. There were two entrances to the house from High Street. The bar was divided into two compartments, with one entrance to each compartment. There was no other accommodation for the public. There was a small room behind the bar, which was used as a living room by the licensee. That room was dark and required artificial light. There were three licensed houses in High Street, the nearest being the Earl Grey, 82 yards away. The pavement in front of the house was only from two feet to two feet three inches wide. The urinal opened directly off the footpath. The accommodation for the public was inferior to that of the nearest licensed houses, and as he passed the house several times a day he had noticed there was really no trade to the house. Within a radius of 200 yards there were 25 other licensed houses. He visited the house at 2.30 p.m. on February 27th, and there was no-one but the landlady on the premises. She informed him that her husband had gone out to get some work to earn a few shillings, and although the house had been opened since seven o'clock, up to the time of his visit she had taken 3d. He had no doubt that the licence was unnecessary.

Cross-examined by Mr. De Wet, Mr. Reeve said he could not see where any further accommodation could be provided on the premises. The bar was well lighted. No-one could use the urinal without obtaining the key from someone in the bar. He had seen Mrs. Beeton, who had previously had the licence, and who said she was going to apply for the transfer of the licence, but was going to wait to see the result of the proceedings.

P.C. Simpson said he had had occasion to visit the house many times since White had been the tenant. On November 11th last he visited the house for the purpose of serving the tenant with a summons for poor rate. On November 21st he was in the Court when White appeared in answer to the summons. He complained to the Magistrates that he was unable to pay it, and also that the collector would not take it by instalments. He was allowed a month for payment, and afterwards a distress warrant was to be issued. On November 23rd he served the tenant with a summons for non-payment of General Rate. On December 12th an order for payment forthwith was made by the Magistrates, as no-one appeared in answer to the summons. On December 20th he served the order, and in that case a distress warrant was afterwards issued. On January 28th Mrs. White called at the police station and asked him if he would tell her the amount owing on the General Rate, as her husband was going to Maidstone to see the brewers, who would pay the rates for him. She had previously got the amount of the Poor Rate owing from the collector. On February 1st he went to the house with Mr. Cooper to levy the distress for the Poor Rate and the tenant paid the money. He particularly wanted a receipt, so that he could send it on to the brewers. He then produced the distress for the General Rate, and told him that the amount for which he was going to levy was 1 13s. 2d. He said he would pay him if he would give him a receipt, so that he could show it to the brewers. On one occasion White said trade was pretty bad. He (witness) knew the house, and considering the requirements of the neighbourhood, he did not consider it necessary. So far as his observations were concerned, there was really no trade to the house.

Cross-examined by Mr. De Wet, witness said that Mrs. Beeton did a much better trade than what the present tenant did. Possibly Mrs. Beeton was more attractive to her customers than what Mr. White was.

Mr. De Wet said there was no doubt Mr. White was not well fitted for the particular trade of the house. Mrs. Beeton, who was the holder of the licence of the Lifeboat, was willing to take the house again.

The Magistrates retired for a short time. On their return into Court the Chairman announced that they had decided to refer both the Railway Tavern and the Eagle Tavern to Canterbury.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Councillor G. Boyd, Col. Fynmore, Col. Hamilton, Messrs, W.G. Herbert, and J. Stainer.

The adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held at the Town Hall on Monday morning, when the licences of three houses, the Railway Inn, Beach Street (Beer and Co.), the Eagle, High Street (Style and Winch), and the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street (Ash and Co.), were referred to the Compensation Authority for East Kent.

The Eagle Inn.

The case of the Eagle Inn, High Street, was next taken. Mr. De Wet appeared for the owners.

The Chief Constable said that the house was objected to for the same reasons as the previous ones. The licence in question was an 1869 beerhouse, and had a wine licence. It was situated in High Street, and the present tenant was Mr. Henry White, who obtained the transfer in April, 1906. The registered owners were Messrs. Style and Winch, and the rateable value was 32. There were two entrances from the High Street, but only one bar, which was divided into two compartments. There was no other accommodation for the public. A small room behind the bar was used by the licensee as a living room. That room was dark, and required artificial light. There were three licensed houses in High Street, the nearest being the Earl Grey, which was 82 yards away. The pavement in front of the house was 2 ft. to 2 ft. 3 in. wide. The urinal opened directly off the footway. The public accommodation was inferior to that of the nearest licensed houses, and as he passed the house several times a day all the year round, he had noticed for some time past there was little or really no trade to the house. Within a radius of 200 yards there were 25 other on licensed houses. He visited the house at 12.30 p.m. on the 27th February, and there was nobody but the landlady on the premises, and she informed him that her husband, who was the landlord, had gone out to get some work to earn a few shillings, and although the house had been opened from 7 a.m. that day, until the time of witness's visit she had taken only 3d. He had no doubt in his mind that the house was unnecessary.

Cross-examined by Mr. De Wet: He could not suggest any way by which sufficient accommodation could be obtained. He thought the actual front bars were properly lighted. The pavement varied in width from two feet to 2 ft. 3 in., and he thought that belonged to the public. The urinal could not be used by anybody but a customer. He was aware that a Mrs. Beeton was at one time landlady of the premises, and she had said that she was anxious to make an application for a transfer to her again, but she would wait till the result of those proceedings.

Detective Simpson deposed that since the premises had been in the occupation of Mr. White he had had occasion several times to visit them. On the 11th November he entered to serve the landlord with a summons for non payment of the poor rate. On the 21st November witness was in Court when the defendant told the Bench, in answer to that summons, that he was unable to pay the amount, and complained that the collector would not take it by instalments. The result was that a month was allowed for payment, and afterwards a distress warrant was issued. On the 23rd November witness served him with another summons, that time for non payment of the general rate. On the 12th December the landlord did not appear in answer to the summons, and an order for payment forthwith was served on the 30th December. In that case a distress warrant was afterwards issued. On the 28th January Mrs. White called at the police station, and asked what amount was owing on the distress warrant for the general rate, as her husband was going to Maidstone to see the brewers, and they were going to pay the rates. He told her the amount that was owing. On February 1st witness went with the Overseer to levy a distress. He saw the tenant, who paid the money, and wanted a receipt from the Overseer, saying that he had to send it on to the brewers. When the distress warrant for the general rate was served on him for 1 13s. 2d., he said he would pay witness if he would give him the receipt , as he had to show the brewers that it was paid. On one occasion White said that trade was very bad. Witness did not think the house necessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood, while there was practically no trade there at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. De Wet: He had known the house for 15 years, and during the time of the last tenant a better trade was being done as was the case now. He could not say that it was due to the personality of the licensee.

Mr. Bradley: It means that Mrs. Beeton was more attractive to her customers than Mr. White. (Laughter)

Witness could not provide a reason, and added that Mr. White was not the only tenant of the house since Mrs. Beeton left.

Mr. De Wet asserted that Mr. White was not fitted for the trade. When Mrs. Beeton had the house the trade was good, and she was quite prepared to go back into the house, and, if the licence was renewed, she would take the house on.

No evidence was called.

The Bench then considered the cases of the Railway Inn and the Eagle, and on their return the Chairman announced that the cases would be referred to the Compensation Authority at Canterbury.

 

Folkestone Express 11 July 1908.

East Kent Licensing.

At the Licensing Committee's sitting at Canterbury on Thursday, the three licences referred by the local justices, namely the Eagle Tavern, High Street, the Railway Tavern, Beach Street, and the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, were considered, and the Court decided not to renew any of them. They will be dealt with by the Compensation Committee.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 July 1908.

Local News.

The principal meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee was held at Canterbury on Thursday, when Lord Harris presided.

The following Folkestone houses came up for decision: The Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, Folkestone, an alehouse, belonging to Messrs. G. Beer and Co. Mr. Joseph Wormold tenant; the Railway Inn, Beach Street, Folkestone, alehouse, belonging to Messrs. Ash and Co. Mr. William Hopkins tenant; The Eagle, High Street, Folkestone, a beerhouse (ante 1869), belonging to Messrs. Style and Winch. Mr. William Henry White tenant.

Of these the following were allowed to go to compensation without opposition: The Bricklayers Arms and the Eagle.

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 24 October, 1908.

EAST KENT LICENSING COMMITTEE. SUPPLEMENTAL MEETING AT CANTERBURY. COMPENSATION AWARDS.

The supplemental meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee met at the Sessions House, Longport, Canterbury, on Monday for the purpose of considering claims for compensation under the Licensing Act of 1904. Lord Harris presided, the other members of the Committee present being Lieut.-Colonel S. Newton-Dickenson, Messrs. F. H. Wilbee, H. Fitzwalter Plumptre, J. H. Monins. F. E. Burke, F. Cheesmsn, and A. Flint. The majority of the agreements as to terms of compensation between owners and tenants were signed, only four cases being referred to the Inland Revenue.

The following cases were referred to Inland Revenue:—

"Eagle," Folkestone, Messrs. Style and Winch, Ltd., W. H. White.

 

Folkestone Express 24 October 1908.

East Kent Licensing.

At a meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee on Monday, many cases were dealt with.

In the case of the Eagle, High Street, Folkestone, and ante 1869 house, of which Mr. W.H. White is the tenant, and Messrs. Style and Winch Ltd. the registered owners, the parties asked for 633, but the Committee could not see any justification for allowing such a large sum, and they referred the matter to the Commissioners of Inland Revenue for adjustment. Mr. Cobb, the Committee's advisor, offers 300 as a reasonable amount for compensation.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 October 1908.

East Kent Licensing.

A supplementary meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee was held at the Sessions House, at Canterbury, on Monday, when Lord Harris presided. The following Folkestone houses were considered for compensation:-

The Eagle.

An ante 1869 beerhouse in High Street; Mr. William Henry White, tenant; Messrs. Style and Winch Ltd., owners.

The representative of the brewers said that a total of 633 had been suggested as compensation

Lord Harris: I don't think we can agree to your figures.

Mr. W.E.R. Randall, valuer, of Chatham, said he had valued this property. The average trade for the past five years he put at 105. This, at 11s. a barrel, made 57 15s. He had calculated that on a twelve years' purchase, and this came to 693. In regard to trade fittings, he had included certain fittings belonging to the owners at 120. The cost of conversion of the house he put at 180, and he put an eighteen years' purchase of the rental (20 a year) at 360. This was High Street property, and not in the slums. This made a grand total of 1,353. He put the estimated value, after conversion, of the gross assessable value at 40 per annum; and this, on an eighteen years' purchase, produced 720. Therefore he considered the amount payable for compensation should be 633 to the owners and tenant combined.

The Chairman: Why have you taken a twelve years' purchase at 11s. per barrel – both top prices?

Mr. Randall: This, my Lord, is a first class house in the High Street of Folkestone. It was a house not likely to get into trouble. If it had been a house in the slums I should have put it at 10s. a barrel, on about an eight years' purchase, but this is a house in a very respectable neighbourhood. I might mention also that there is a wine licence attached.

Later in the sitting Lord Harris said the Committee could not award what was claimed.

The Clerk (Mr. Prosser): Mr. Cobb says 300.

The representative of the brewers said they were willing to take 500.

Lord Harris: We cannot award that, or see any justification for it. You must fight it out with the Commissioners of Inland Revenue.

 

Folkestone Express 6 February 1909.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 3rd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Major Leggett, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Messrs. J. Stainer, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, C. Jenner, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) read his annual report as follows:- Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 125 premises licensed for the sail by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz.:- Full licences 76; beer “on” 7; beer “off” 6; beer and spirit dealers 15; grocers, etc. 11; chemists 7; confectioners 3, total 125. This gives an average according to the Census of 1901 of one licence to every 245 persons, or one “on” licence to every 369 persons.

At the adjourned licensing meeting last year three licences (two full and one beer) were referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy, and refused renewal by that Committee on the 9th July last.

Two of the houses, the Railway Inn, Beach Street, and the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street were closed after the payment of compensation on 28th September last.

The amount of compensation in the case of the other licence refused, viz., The Eagle, High Street, has not yet been settled. A provisional renewal of the licence will, therefore, be necessary, although the house has been closed for the sale of intoxicating drink since October last, the Excise licence, which expired on the 10th of that month, not having been renewed.

There are two houses licensed by the Inland Revenue Authorities for the sale of beer, wines and spirits, in certain quantities, off the premises, under the provisions of the Excise Acts, for which no Magistrates' certificate is required.

Since the last annual licensing meeting twelve of the licences have been transferred; one licence was transferred twice.

Three occasional licences were granted for the sale of drink on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 40 extensions of the usual time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises.

During the year ended 31st December last 107 persons (86 males and 21 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 101 were convicted and six discharged. This is a decrease of 18 persons as compared with the preceding year. Of those proceeded against, 29 were residents, 17 non-residents, 48 of no fixed abode, and 13 were soldiers.

Two licence holders were proceeded against and convicted during the year, viz.:- Permitting drunkenness – fined 40s. and costs 11s.; selling beer to person when drunk – fined 20s. and costs 11s.

In the former case the house has since been closed under the provisions of the Compensation Act.

Fourteen clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902.

There are sixteen places licensed for music and dancing and two for public billiard playing.

I have no objection to offer to the renewal of the present licences on the ground of misconduct, the houses generally being conducted in a satisfactory manner.

I have received notice of four applications to be made at these sessions for new licences, viz.:- one full licence, two beer “off”, and one billiard licence.

I am, Gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeves, Chief Constable.

The granting of the licences to the Wonder Tavern and the Eagle Inn were referred to the adjourned licensing sessions to be held on March 3rd.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 February 1909.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 3rd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, Councillor C. Jenner, Messrs. J. Stainer, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, G. Boyd, R.J. Linton, and R.J. Fynmore. Messrs. Boyd, Stainer and Jenner did not adjudicate.

The Chief Constable read his report (see Folkestone Express for details).

The applicants for the renewal of old licences then came forward, and received their certificates. All were granted with the exception of the Wonder Tavern, Beach Street, held by Mr. Coln (sic), and the Eagle Inn, High Street, held by Mr. W.H. White. Both there were referred to the Adjourned Licensing Sessions, which will take place on Wednesday, March 3rd. In the case of the Eagle Inn the licence was refused last year by the Committee, and the presentation in referring to the adjourned sessions is simply to enable the amount of compensation to be fixed.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 April 1909.

East Kent Licensing Authority.

Among the awards that came before Lord Harris and other Licensing Justices sitting at Canterbury on Tuesday, and made by the Commissioners of Inland Revenue, was that in respect of the Eagle, Folkestone.

In this case the Commissioners fixed the award at 300, as compared with Mr. Cobb's recommendation of 370.

Mr. Prosser stated that there was an agreement between all parties concerned that the owners should receive 210, and the tenant 90.

The Committee confirmed the agreement.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

THORNE Alfred 1869 Bastions

Last pub licensee had WALLIS John 1869-70 Bastions

FISHER Robert 1870-73 (age 46 in 1871Census) Bastions (Also of "Black Bull")

FISHER Thomas 1871-74 (age 40 in 1871Census) Bastions

STEVENSON John 1874-76 Bastions

Last pub licensee had BAKER William 1876-83 Bastions

DOVE James 1883 Bastions

FOLLETT George 1883-84 Bastions

MORELY Edwin 1884 Bastions

HOPKINS George 1884 Bastions

Last pub licensee had HAWES James 1884-97 Bastions

Last pub licensee had BEATON William 1897-99 Bastions

BEATON Elizabeth 1899-1903 Next pub licensee had Bastions

CLARKE Alfred 1902-03 Bastions

Last pub licensee had GILES William 1903-06 Bastions

WHITE William H 1906-09 Bastions

 

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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