DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, November, 2021.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 25 November, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1838

(Name from)

Bricklayer's Arms

Latest 1908

39 Fenchurch Street

Fancy Street Pigot's Directory 1840

Folkestone

 

Listed as Fancy Street in 1858 & 39 & 40 Fenchurch Street in from 1891 onwards.

This house was renamed from the "Jolly Sailor" around about 1838, by licensee John Pope, and continued under that name till its closure in 1908.

The license was refused in 1858 for some reason when George Kennett was licensee, but a license was obviously gained after this year.

The house remained as a common lodging house until its demolition in 1937.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday, 26 April, 1845. Price 5d.

FOLKESTONE INQUEST

On Monday last, an inquest was held at the “Bricklayer's Arms,” Fancy Street, before J. J. Bond, Esq., the coroner, and a respectable jury, on the body of Thomas Dorrell, who died on the previous day in consequence of an accident by falling from the new works into the harbour. The jury found “That the deceased's death had been accidentally caused by concussion of the brain, falling a height from the ground.”

 

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, Tuesday 12 June 1849.

Canterbury.

Important sale of the extensive Brewery of Messr's Flint, including 30 old established Inns and Public Houses, and other valuable property.

Mr. V. J., has received instructions to sell by auction, at the "Fountain Hotel," Canterbury, on Tuesday and Wednesday, 26th and 27th of June, at 12 o'clock each day, (in consequence of the death of the senior acting partner and the retirement of the surviving partners,) the valuable property known as Messrs. Flint's Brewery, in Stour Street, Canterbury, and the Inns, Public Houses, and other valuable property connected with theirwith. The first day sale on Tuesday, 26th June, 1849, will comprise the following property in and near the city.

Public houses.

Lot 1. The "City of Canterbury," situate on the road to Whitstable. Freehold.

Lot 2. The "George and Dragon," Westgate without, leasehold under Hind's charity for 17 years unexpired.

Lot 3. The "Three Compasses," Westgate within. Freehold.

Lot 4. The "Bell Inn" and Coach Office, in the High Street. Freehold.

Lot 5. The "Prince of Wales," St. Alphege Lane,. Freehold.

Lot 6. The "Weavers Arms," Broad Street, freehold and partly leasehold.

Lot 7. The "White Swan," Northgate. Leasehold under St. John's Hospital for a short term, at a ground rent.

Lot 8. The "Kings Head," Northgate. Freehold.

Lot 9. The "Swan Inn," at Sturry (close to the railway station). Freehold.

Lot 10. The "Ship," St. Martins Hill, freehold.

Lots 12. The "Star Commercial Inn and Tap," St George's, close to the Cattle market and Dane John. Freehold.

Lot 13. The "Blue Anchor," Old Dover Lane, near the Cattle market. Freehold.

Lot 14. The "Fleece Inn," High Street, opposite to the Corn market. Freehold.

Lot 28. Three neat Cottages opposite the Brewery, with large gardens extending to the river.

Lot 29. The "Two Brewers" public house and Spirit Warehouse, adjoining the last lot.

Lot 31. The "Black Dog" public house, Castle Street.

Lot 34. The "Duke's Head" Public House, Wincheap Street.

Lot 35. The "King's Head," Public House, Wincheap Street.

Lot 37. The "Royal Exchange," public house, Stour Street.

Lot 38. The "Kentish Arms," public house, and 5 cottages in Jewry Lane. Leasehold for a short term at a low rent.

Lot 40. The "Duke William," at Ickham, abiout five miles from Canterbury. Freehold.

Lot 41. The "Royal Oak Inn," at Deal. Freehold except a small portion.

Lot 42. The "King's Arms," Beach Street, Deal, and Cottage in the rear. leasehold for a short term, at a Ground rent.

Lot 43. The "Fleur De Lis," near the Railway Station, Dover. Leasehold for a term of 6 years, at a Ground rent of 3.

Lot 44. The "Two Brewers," Limekiln Street, Dover. leasehold for a term of 46 years, at a ground rent of 3.

Lot 45. The "Fountain Inn, adjoining the Market place at Dover. Freehold.

Lot 46. The "Lord Nelson," Radnor Street, near the harbour, Folkestone. Freehold.

Lot 47. The "Bricklayers Arms," Fancy Street, Folkestone. Freehold.

Lot 48. The "Castle Inn," at Sandgate. Leasehold for a short term, at a ground rent of 7s. 6d.

Lot 49. The "King's Head Hotel and Tap," at Margate. Freehold.

Lot 50. The "New Inn," at Elham, on the road to Hythe. Freehold.

Lot 51. The "King's Arms," at Milton near Sittingbourne. Freehold.

The Public Houses are for the most part in the occupation of unexceptionable tenants, and the majority of them are doing trades, both in beer and spirits, considerably above the average run of Country houses. (None of them have been beer shops; they're all old Licence Houses, with connections of long standing, thereby affording ample security for the permanency of the trade). The Premises generally are in a superior state of repair.

Particulars and Plans, price 1s. each, may be had of Messr's. Furleys and Mercer, Solicitors, Canterbury; at the "Fountain Hotel;" and of Mr. V. J. Collins, 3, Moorgate Street, London.

 

South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 18 February 1851.

Folkestone.

There was six publicans charged by the police with serving beer, &c., contrary to the law.

Mr. R. T. Brockman appeared for the watch committee. Mr. Delasaux of Canterbury for several of the defendants.

John Welch, "Bricklayers Arms," for a similar events, was find 1s. and costs.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 15 June, 1861. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

ASSAULTING WIFE

Thursday June 13th:- Before Captain Kennicott, William Major and James Tolputt, Esqs.

George Kennett was brought up on a warrant charged with assaulting his wife.

Ann Holness deposed that on last Saturday week she saw the prisoner push his wife out of doors, previously to which she had heard blows struck. The wife went home to her father's at Uphill, where she remains in a very precarious state.

Prisoner was admitted to bail until Saturday, the wife being too ill to attend.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 15 June, 1861. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT ON A WIFE

Thursday June 13th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Major, and J. Tolputt, Esqs.

George Kennett, brickmaker, and formerly landlord of the "Brickmaker`s Arms" (sic), Fancy Street, was charged with viciously assaulting his wife.

Ann Holness deposed that she lived in New Zealand, Folkestone, near to the prisoner's house. About half past seven o'clock of the evening of Saturday week (June 1st), she was outside the door of her house. She heard blows inside the prisoner's house, and heard the prisoner's wife call out “Oh don't”. Shortly afterwards the prisoner opened the door, took hold of his wife by the shoulder and pushed her into the street, calling to her to go and fetch a policeman, and when he came he would split his nose down with a poker. He looked as if he had been drinking.

Ann Hayward also heard the blows, and also heard the wife exclaim, “Oh don't kick me”.

The magistrates remanded the prisoner until Saturday, consenting to take bail, himself in 10, and one surety in 10. His brother became his surety, and he was liberated.

The poor woman, who is very ill from the effects of her husband's treatment, could not make her appearance at the court, and hence the remand.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 22 June, 1861. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

ASSAULTING WIFE

Saturday July 15th:- Before the Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Major. W.F. Browell and A.M. Leith, Esqs.

George Kennett was brought up on remand, charged under the 16th and 17th Victoria, with an aggravated assault on his wife.

Mr. Minter appeared for defendant.

Hannah Hayward deposed that she heard blows struck in the prisoner's house; heard complainant say “Oh, George, do not kick me”.

Harriett Kennett, who appeared very weak, and who was accommodated with a chair whilst giving her evidence, said she was the wife of defendant. On Saturday, between 7 and 8 in the evening, defendant came home, and without any provocation he thrashed me very much with a strap, and turned me out of doors. He struck me all over and kicked me; he was very spiteful. I went to my brother's house. I have been ill and nervous ever since. When defendant struck me he said he would be the death of me. I have had no medical advice, but medicine from Mr. Hammon.

Complainant was then cross-examined by Mr. Minter, who elicited from her that she had put on her bonnet and shawl after she was beaten, and that she walked as far as Arpinge afterwards, and that she spent some time on the road at the "Red Cow," with her brother, and that she had had a fit lately.

Mr. Minter then addressed the bench for the defendant, and submitted there was no evidence to substantiate the aggravated assault, but would not struggle against a conviction for common assault.

The Mayor said, after a short consultation with his brother magistrates, that they had taken a very lenient view of the case against defendant, and had come to the resolution to fine him 10s. and 11s. 6d. costs, and hoped it would be a warning to him for the future.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 22 June, 1861. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

ASSAULT ON A WIFE

Saturday June 15th:- Before the Mayor, Capt. Kennicott, R.N., and W. Major, W.F. Browell, J. Tolputt and A.M. Leith, Esqs.

George Kennett, (remanded on a charge of assaulting his wife), was brought up, and the evidence of his wife was taken. Mr. Minter appeared for the prisoner.

Harriett Kennett said she was the wife of the prisoner. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening of that day her husband came to her house in New Zealand. He thrashed her about very much with a strap, and turned her out of doors. He hit her all over with the strap, and kicked her very spitefully. He told her not to come back to the house any more, and she went to her brother's house. She was very ill and nervous after she got home. The marks of the blows were still on her person. Several times he declared he would be the death of her. She had since been living with her father at Uphill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter – She could not tell why her husband struck her. She had been suffering in her health from the blows received from her husband. When he turned her out of doors he took her violently by the shoulders. Her present weakness was caused by the beating she received. She was subject to fits, and sometimes fell down and bruised herself. In reply to Mr. Browell, witness stated she had had one of these fits lately.

Mr. Minter, addressing the bench, said that if the bench would take the case as a common assault, the prisoner would be willing to pay any fine that might be imposed, because no doubt he had put his wife out of the house; but if the bench deemed the case to be one coming under the provisions of the Act for Aggravated Assaults, he should call evidence to rebut the allegations of excessive violence.

The Bench then convicted the prisoner of a common assault, fining him 10s. with 11s 6d costs, or one month's imprisonment.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 12 December, 1863. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

DRUNK AND RIOTOUS

Tuesday December 8th: Before the Mayor, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer, Esq.

James Lennard was charged with being drunk and riotous in Seagate Street.

P.C. Hills said: This morning, about 2 o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming down Dover Street, hallooing and shouting. I asked him if he had any lodgings. He said he had had lodgings in the "Bricklayer's Arms." I told him to go to his lodgings. He did not go, and therefore took him into custody and brought him to the station. He was drunk and making a great noise.

Prisoner said in reply to the Mayor: I came from Yorkshire. I am a hatter by trade. I travel about and clean hats and old clothes. I can earn 4s. or 5s. per day when fully employed.

He was discharged with a caution.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 24 December, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

DRUNKENNESS and OBSCENITY

Wednesday December 21st:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt, Esq.

Elizabeth Cox was charged with drunkenness, rioting and obscenity.

P.C. Swain said he was called into the "Bricklayer's Arms" on Saturday last and requested by the landlord to remove the prisoner because she was making a disturbance in the house. Prisoner then left the house. She was drunk. He saw her later in Queen Square, and a quarter to one on Sunday morning she was in High Street, using very obscene language towards a man, and he took her into custody.

Fined 1s. or seven days' imprisonment for each offence.

 

From the Folkestone Express 7 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

At the annual sessions the granting of five licences was adjourned; The "Railway Tavern," the "Eagle Tavern" and the "Bricklayers Arms" on the ground of redundancy, the "Railway Hotel," Coolinge, because a conviction had been recorded against it, and the "Packet Boat," so that plans for alterations could be submitted to the Justices.

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 24 October, 1908.

EAST KENT LICENSING COMMITTEE. SUPPLEMENTAL MEETING AT CANTERBURY. COMPENSATION AWARDS.

The supplemental meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee met at the Sessions House, Longport, Canterbury, on Monday for the purpose of considering claims for compensation under the Licensing Act of 1904. Lord Harris presided, the other members of the Committee present being Lieut.-Colonel S. Newton-Dickenson, Messrs. F. H. Wilbee, H. Fitzwalter Plumptre, J. H. Monins. F. E. Burke, F. Cheesmsn, and A. Flint. The majority of the agreements as to terms of compensation between owners and tenants were signed, only four cases being referred to the Inland Revenue. The following agreements were signed:—

"Bricklayers’ Arms," Folkestone, G. Beer and Co. 1,125, J. Wormall 75.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

Last pub licensee had POPE John 1838-50 BastionsPigot's Directory 1840

WATCH Mr 1850-51 Bastions

WELCH John 1851 (age 29 in 1851Census) South Eastern Gazette

KENNETT George 1851-56 Bastions

KENNETT Charles 1856-59 Melville's 1858Bastions

BROMLEY Joseph 1859-67 Next pub licensee had (age 45 in 1861Census) Bastions

PEEL William 1867-72? Bastions

WHITING Ann Whiting (widow age 57 in 1881Census) 1871-84 BastionsPost Office Directory 1882

WHITING Joseph Allen 1884-1906 BastionsPost Office Directory 1891Kelly's 1899Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

WHITING Frances 1906-07 Bastions

WORMALD Joseph 1907-08 Bastions

 

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

South Eastern GazetteSouth Eastern Gazette

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

The following has kindly been researched and sent by Jan Pedersen and is still to be formatted.

 

Bricklayers` Arms, Great Fenchurch Street 1838 – 1908


Licensees

John Pope 1838 1850
Mr. Walch 1850 1852
Robert Winch 1852
George Kennett 1852 1856
Charles Kennett 1856 1858
William Wormwell 1858 1859
Joseph Bromley 1859 1867 To Dew Drop Inn
William Peel 1867 1872
Anne Whiting 1872 1884
Joseph Whiting 1884 1906
Frances Whiting 1906 1907
Joseph Wormald 1907 1908

Kentish Gazette 5 June 1849

Auction Extract:

Canterbury: Important sale of the extensive brewery of Messrs. Flint, including thirty old-established inns and public houses. Mr. V.J. Collier has received instructions to sell by auction, at the Fountain Hotel, Canterbury, on Tuesday and Wednesday, the 26th and 27th of June, at twelve o`clock each day (in consequence of the death of the senior acting Partner and the retirement of the surviving Partners), the valuable property known as Messrs. Flint`s Brewery, in Stour Street, Canterbury, and the inns, public houses, and other valuable property connected therewith.

The second day`s sale, on Wednesday, 27th June, will comprise the following property:

Lot 46 – The Lord Nelson, Radnor Street, near the harbour, Folkestone – Freehold
Lot 47 – The Bricklayers` Arms, Fancy Street, Folkestone - Freehold

The Public Houses are for the most part in the occupation of unexceptionable tenants, and the majority of them are doing trades, both in beer and spirits, considerably above the average run of country houses, (none of them here been beer-shops; they are old licensed houses, with connections of long standing, thereby affording ample security for the permanence of the trade.) The premises generally are in a superior state of repair.

Particulars and plans (price 1s. Each) may be had of Messrs. Furleys & Mercer Solicitors, Canterbury; at the Fountain Hotel; and of Mr. V. J. Collier, 3, Moorgate Street, London.

Kentish Gazette 3 July 1849

Messrs. Flint`s Property: The sale of the extensive property of Messrs. Flint, brewers, Stour Street, Canterbury, took place on Tuesday and Wednesday, at the Royal Fountain Hotel, under the able administration of Mr. V.J. Collier. The sale room was crowded by respectable company, and the competition for most of the lots was very keen. At the close the auctioneer received many compliments for the gentlemanly and straightforward manner in which he conducted the business throughout. The following is a statement of the result:

Second day`s sale:
Lot 46 Lord Nelson, Folkestone 300 Mr. Ash
Lot 47 Bricklayers` Arms, Folkestone Not sold

Southeastern Gazette 20 April 1852

Wednesday, April 14th: Before W. Major and S. Mackie Esqs.

The following licence was transferred: From John Welch, Bricklayers Arms, to Robert Winch, late of Barham

Note: Date for Welch is at variance with More Bastions, and no record of Winch.

Southeastern Gazette 27 February 1855

Local News

Petty Sessions: Before W. Major and Wm. Kelcey, Esqs.

George Kennett, landlord of the Bricklayer’s Arms, Fancy Street, was summoned for an assault on Wm. Hobday, a carpenter, on the morning of the 15th inst.

It appeared that the complainant, with several others, called at the above-named house about 1 o’clock, and after partaking of several glasses of brandy and water, a dispute arose respecting the payment of three glasses, when the landlord (who appeared a powerful man) took his coat off, tuoked up his shirt sleeves, and stating that if they did not pay him he would pay them, struck Hobday a severe blow on the eye and another on the side of the head, as he was sitting in his chair.

Several witnesses were called, clearly proving that the complainant had given no offence, and had paid for what he had as it came in.

The magistrates fined the defendant in the full penalty of 5, at the same time giving him a severe reprimand; being the landlord, it was his duty to have done all in his power to have prevented a breach of the peace, and he was given to understand that it would not be forgotten next licensing day.

Southeastern Gazette 10 August 1858

Local News

On Wednesday, George Kennett, of the Bricklayers’ Arms, Fancy Street, was charged with having his house open for the sale of beer at 11 o’clock a.m., on Sunday. Six persons were found in the tap-room, with a quart jug of beer, by police-constable Swain.

Fined 20s. and costs.

Southeastern Gazette 31 August 1858

Wednesday: Before the Mayor and J. Kelcey, Esq.

George Kennett, landlord of the Bricklayers’ Arms, Fancy Street, was summoned for refusing to admit police.

Sergeant Newman and constable Ovenden, who had gone to the house at 12 o’clock at night, in consequenece of having heard a noise of several persons talking inside.

He had incurred a penalty of 5, but the magistrates reduced it to 1 6s.

Folkestone Chronicle 2 October 1858

Wednesday September 29th:- Before the Mayor, G. Kennicott and W. Major esqs.

This was the adjourned licensing day. The licence of George Kennett, Bricklayer`s Arms, Fancy Street, was refused.

Southeastern Gazette 5 October 1858

Victuallers’ Licenses

At the sitting of the magistrates on Wednesday, the license of George Kennett, Bricklayer’s Arms, Fancy Street, was refused

Southeastern Gazette 26 October 1858

Local News

The licence of the Bricklayers’ Arms public-house, Fancy Street, which had been refused to Mr. Kennett by the magistrates at the adjourned licensing day, was now granted to William Wornwell, of Dover.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions. No mention of Wormwell.

Southeastern Gazette 22 February 1859

Local News

At the Petty Sessions on Wednesday, the licence of the, Brioklayer’s Arms, Fancy Street, was transferred from Wm. Wormwell to Joseph Bromley.

Note: No mention of Wormwell in More Bastions

Folkestone Chronicle 15 June 1861

Thursday June 13th:- Before Captain Kennicott, William Major and James Tolputt Esqs.

George Kennett was brought up on a warrant charged with assaulting his wife.

Ann Holness deposed that on last Saturday week she saw the prisoner push his wife out of doors, previously to which she had heard blows struck. The wife went home to her father`s at Uphill, where she remains in a very precarious state.

Prisoner was admitted to bail until Saturday, the wife being too ill to attend.

Note: Kennett was previously at Bricklayer`s Arms

Folkestone Observer 15 June 1861

Thursday June 13th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Major, and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Aggravated Assault On A Wife

George Kennett, brickmaker, and formerly landlord of the Brickmaker`s Arms (sic), Fancy Street, was charged with viciously assaulting his wife.

Ann Holness deposed that she lived in New Zealand, Folkestone, near to the prisoner`s house. About half past seven o`clock of the evening of Saturday week (June 1st), she was outside the door of her house. She heard blows inside the prisoner`s house, and heard the prisoner`s wife call out “Oh don`t”. Shortly afterwards the prisoner opened the door, took hold of his wife by the shoulder and pushed her into the street, calling to her to go and fetch a policeman, and when he came he would split his nose down with a poker. He looked as if he had been drinking.

Ann Hayward also heard the blows, and also heard the wife exclaim, “Oh don`t kick me”.

The magistrates remanded the prisoner until Saturday, consenting to take bail, himself in 10, and one surety in 10. His brother became his surety, and he was liberated.

The poor woman, who is very ill from the effects of her husband`s treatment, could not make her appearance at the court, and hence the remand.

Folkestone Chronicle 22 June 1861

Saturday July 15th:- Before the Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Major. W.F. Browell and A.M. Leith Esqs.

George Kennett was brought up on remand, charged under the 16th and 17th Victoria, with an aggravated assault on his wife.

Mr. Minter appeared for defendant.

Hannah Hayward deposed that she heard blows struck in the prisoner`s house; heard complainant say “Oh, George, do not kick me”.

Harriett Kennett, who appeared very weak, and who was accommodated with a chair whilst giving her evidence, said she was the wife of defendant. On Saturday, between 7 and 8 in the evening, defendant came home, and without any provocation he thrashed me very much with a strap, and turned me out of doors. He struck me all over and kicked me; he was very spiteful. I went to my brother`s house. I have been ill and nervous ever since. When defendant struck me he said he would be the death of me. I have had no medical advice, but medicine from Mr. Hammon.

Complainant was then cross-examined by Mr. Minter, who elicited from her that she had put on her bonnet and shawl after she was beaten, and that she walked as far as Arpinge afterwards, and that she spent some time on the road at the Red Cow, with her brother, and that she had had a fit lately.

Mr. Minter then addressed the bench for the defendant, and submitted there was no evidence to substantiate the aggravated assault, but would not struggle against a conviction for common assault.

The Mayor said, after a short consultation with his brother magistrates, that they had taken a very lenient view of the case against defendant, and had come to the resolution to fine him 10s. and 11s. 6d. costs, and hoped it would be a warning to him for the future.

Folkestone Observer 22 June 1861

Saturday June 15th:- Before the Mayor, Capt. Kennicott, R.N., and W. Major, W.F. Browell, J. Tolputt and A.M. Leith Esqs.

Assault on a wife

George Kennett, (remanded on a charge of assaulting his wife), was brought up, and the evidence of his wife was taken. Mr. Minter appeared for the prisoner.

Harriett Kennett said she was the wife of the prisoner. Between seven and eight o`clock in the evening of that day fortnight her husband came to her house in New Zealand. He thrashed her about very much with a strap, and turned her out of doors. He hit her all over with the strap, and kicked her very spitefully. He told her not to come back to the house any more, and she went to her brother`s house. She was very ill and nervous after she got home. The marks of the blows were still on her person. Several times he declared he would be the death of her. She had since been living with her father at Uphill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter – She could not tell why her husband struck her. She had been suffering in her health from the blows received from her husband. When he turned her out of doors he took her violently by the shoulders. Her present weakness was caused by the beating she received. She was subject to fits, and sometimes fell down and bruised herself. In reply to Mr. Browell, witness stated she had had one of these fits lately.

Mr. Minter, addressing the bench, said that if the bench would take the case as a common assault, the prisoner would be willing to pay any fine that might be imposed, because no doubt he had put his wife out of the house; but if the bench deemed the case to be one coming under the provisions of the Act for Aggravated Assaults, he should call evidence to rebut the allegations of excessive violence.

The Bench then convicted the prisoner of a common assault, fining him 10s. with 11s 6d costs, or one month`s imprisonment.

Folkestone Observer 12 December 1863

Tuesday December 8th: Before the Mayor, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esq.

James Lennard was charged with being drunk and riotous in Seagate Street.

P.C. Hills said: This morning, about 2 o`clock, I saw the prisoner coming down Dover Street, hallooing and shouting. I asked him if he had any lodgings. He said he had had lodgings in the Bricklayer`s Arms. I told him to go to his lodgings. He did not go, and therefore took him into custody and brought him to the station. He was drunk and making a great noise.

Prisoner said in reply to the Mayor: I came from Yorkshire. I am a hatter by trade. I travel about and clean hats and old clothes. I can earn 4s. or 5s. per day when fully employed.

He was discharged with a caution.

Folkestone Observer 24 December 1864

Wednesday December 21st:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

Elizabeth Cox was charged with drunkenness, rioting and obscenity.

P.C. Swain said he was called into the Bricklayer`s Arms on Saturday last and requested by the landlord to remove the prisoner because she was making a disturbance in the house. Prisoner then left the house. She was drunk. He saw her later in Queen Square, and a a quarter to one on Sunday morning she was in High Street, using very obscene language towards a man, and he took her into custody.

Fined 1s. or seven days` imprisonment for each offence.

Folkestone Observer 17 August 1866

Wednesday August 15th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

Henri Bertrand and Charles Soissons, well educated Frenchmen, who have lately been exhibiting in this neighbourhood, and very cleverly, in the line of the Brothers Davenport, were charged with breaking into the dwelling house of Jacob Wratten, at Stanford, on the 13th of August, and stealing sundry articles.

Mr. Olivier was sworn as interpreter.

P.C. Swain received information yesterday morning from the county police that there had been a robbery at a house in Stanford, and a quantity of wearing apparel taken, and while on duty in High Street, about eleven o`clock, he received information that a female had been offering a coat for sale. He went to the Bricklayers` Arms, bottom of Fancy Street, and found a female with a coat doubled up under her shawl. She said the coat had been given to her by a Frenchman to sell for 6s. The coat (produced) is of black cloth, has been worn, and answers to the description of a coat stolen at Stanford. He brought the woman to the police station, where she described her husband and the prisoner Soissons. Then went in search, and found the husband and the prisoner Soissons at the Radnor Arches, Radnor Street. Brought Soissons to the station, and then receiving further information, went in search of Bertrand and another man not in custody, and apprehended Bertrand on the down platform of the Junction Station. From information then received he took possession of a portion of the property produced, which had been placed by Bertrand, and another not apprehended, in the ticket room. Opened the parcel and found it to contain one coloured print dress usually worn by women working in the fields, 2 cotton napkins, 5 women`s nightdresses, a flannel shirt, 5 pillowcases, 6 chemises, 8 men`s shirts, 3 sheets, a white slop, a table cloth, 2 window blinds, and a pair of india rubber braces. A porter saw Bertrand in company with the man who left the parcel in the ticket room. On Bertrand was found a razor in a case. A pair of razors and spectacles were found on Soissons and he said they were not his.

Mary Braconier (an Englishwoman), wife of Eugene Braconier, picture maker, said she and her husband were lodging at the Oddfellows Arms. Had not before seen the other man. He handed a coat to Soissons, who gave it to witness, and said in very broken English she was to get 6s for it, or 5s, and bring it to him. Went with the coat to the Bricklayers` Arms, and offered it to the landlady, and in about five or ten minutes the policeman came and took her to the station. Never before saw the prisoner Bertrand.

Lydia Strover, wife of Henry Strover, carter, living in Tontine Street, and daughter of Jacob Wratten, Stanford, labourer, identified the coat as her father`s, and the other articles named in the policeman`s evidence, and also many other articles.

The bench deemed the evidence sufficient for detention, and sent the prisoners to Hythe, within which district the offence was commited.

(The prisoners were brought up at Hythe the next day and remanded)

Folkestone Observer 24 August 1866

County Police, Hythe

Saturday August 18th:- Before Thomas Denne Esq.

Henri Bertrand and Charles Soissons, on remand, were charged with stealing a quantity of wearing apparel from the dwelling house of Jacob Wratten, labourer, living at Stanford.

M. Olivier, of Folkestone, was sworn to interpret. The following evidence was then taken –

Prosecutor said: I am a labourer, living at Stanford. On the 13th inst., between seven and eight o`clock in the evening, on my return from work, I found my house had been broken open and everything was lying about the room in confusion, and a number of things gone. I identify the coat and two pair of trousers now produced as my property, and I believe the razors and spectacles are mine, but I don`t like to swear to them. My wife was in the house when I left to go to work in the morning.

Elizabeth Wratten, wife of the prosecutor, said: On the 13th inst. I left my cottage about 8 o`clock in the morning, after having locked it up. I returned with my husband in the evening and found the house in the state he has described it. I have missed many things. I identify the handkerchiefs and other articles produced as belonging to my husband. The spectacle case belongs to me, but I can`t swear that the spectacles are mine. I left all the things safe in the house when I left to go out in the morning.

Frederick Spicer said: I live at Folkestone, and am an assistant to Mr. Hart, pawnbroker. On Wednesday evening last I took in pawn the two pairs of trousers produced. The prisoners were not the men who pawned them. The same evening the prisoner Soissons came and offered the coat produced, and also a pair of spectacles like those produced.

The prisoner Soissons handed in a written defence to the magistrates stating that the things which he had in his possession had been handed over to him by his companion (one of the men not in custody) in presence of the woman Braconier and that he had not seen him since.

The magistrates dismissed the prisoner Bertrand, and committed the other prisoner for trial at the next East Kent Quarter Sessions.

Folkestone Observer 20 October 1866

East Kent Michaelmas Sessions

These sessions were held on Tuesday last before Sir Brooke Bridges, Bart., M.P. (Chairman)

Charles Soissons, 45, shoemaker, (one of the imitation Davenport Brothers) was indicted for stealing in a dwelling house two pairs of trousers, one handkerchief, and other articles, value about 5, the property of Jacob Wratten, at Stanford, on the 13th of August, 1866.

Mr. Biron prosecuted, and prisoner defended himself.

The accused is a Frenchman, and as he represented that he could not speak nor understand English, an interpreter was engaged to assist in conducting the trail. Prisoner on being informed that if he wished the jury might be composed of half foreigners, intimated that he had no desire to avail himself of that privilege.

Prosecutor and his wife gave evidence as to their leaving their house on the 13th of August between the hours of seven and eight, and on their return in the evening found that it had been broken open, and the articled above-named and described stolen therefrom, most of which produced and identified by them, consisting of shirts, chemises, shirts, and other linen, a coat, two pairs of trousers, a razor and case, a pair of spectacles and a pocket handkerchief.

William Fright, stationmaster at the Westenhanger railway station, stated that on the day named on the indictment he saw the prisoner, in company of another man of short stature, coming from the direction of prosecutor`s house at about half past two o`clock in the afternoon. Each had a large sized bundle, and they passed on to the road leading to Canterbury.

Joseph Clapson, police constable, saw the prisoner and another man, much shorter than the prisoner, each with bundles, pass near Seabrook at about half past four on the same day.

Frederick Spicer, assistant to Mr. Hart, pawnbroker at Folkestone, identified the prisoner as the person who brought the coat (now produced) to his master`s shop at about seven o`clock the same evening and wanted to pledge it, but witness declined taking it in.

Ingram Swain, a police officer from Folkestone, from information received respecting the robbery went in search of the parties suspected, and found a Frenchwoman, the wife of an itinerant picture seller attempting to effect the sale of the coat in question for 6s. Witness took possession of the coat and afterwards took the prisoner at the bar in custody on the charge of having stolen it, and on searching him found the razor and spectacles, and a new pocket handkerchief, partly hemmed, in his pocket. The razor and spectacle cases were sworn by the prosecutor and his wife, but they declined swearing to either the razor or spectacles, though they were both like those that had been stolen from their house. With respect to the handkerchief, Mrs. Wratten clearly identified it. She said she had partly hemmed it and placed it in her cotton box with the needle in in, and in that state it was found in the prisoner`s possession. The constable further stated that having ascertained that some bundles had been left at the railway station he went there, and found nearly all the articles of linen &c., now produced, with the exception of the coat and the two pairs of trousers, which had been pledged by the short man that had been seen in the prisoner`s company, but who had now absconded.

These were the main features of the evidence, and the prisoner being called upon for his defence told a long and very tedious story, but with considerable method, denying that he was near Westenhanger, but said he did carry a bundle in the evening for a woman, who gave him a small quantity of writing paper for his trouble; that he was asked to pledge the coat by the person described as the “short man”, and who gave him the razor, the spectacles, and the handkerchief.

Neither the Court, nor the Jury, believed this tale and he was found Guilty.

Prisoner was then charged with having been convicted at Maidstone in December, 1864, of passing counterfeit coin, and sentenced to 18 months imprisonment with hard labour. This he denied, and said he was never in Maidstone in his life, but he was fully identified as the person so convicted, and the court sentenced him to five years` penal servitude. He was described by the police authorities as one of a gang of foreigners that have been giving the police so much trouble for some time past, some of whom are in custody at Maidstone. One of them, it is believed, will prove to have been his companion in the depredations for which he is convicted It was very evident by his attention to the proceedings that he was well aware of all that was said in court, and was several times told that the bench was well satisfied that he understood and could speak the English language if he thought proper to do so.

On Wednesday Soissons was again called that his sentence might be altered. The prisoner on Tuesday gave a great deal of trouble by persisting that he did not understand English, which it was very evident was false.

The Chairman, now addressing him, said “Do you understand English?”, to which he very readily replied, amidst considerable laughter, “Oh, no, sir”. A gentleman in court then explained to him in French that his sentence would be altered from five years` penal servitude to seven years` penal servitude, the previous convictions proved against him not allowing of a shorter term than the latter period.

Folkestone Chronicle 15 May 1869

Tuesday May 11th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., J. Gambrill, and A.M. Leith esqs.

William Peel was summoned for assaulting John Bromley on the 30th April. Pleaded not guilty.

Mr. Minter appeared for plaintiff, but said the information was taken out without his advice, and as he knew the charge could not be substantiated, so as to bring it home to the defendant, by his (Mr. Minter`s) advice the summons would be withdrawn. He would, however, state the case to the Bench, who would probably tell the defendant that he must not allow anything of the kind to be done. Complainant had for many years occupied a room under the Bricklayer`s Arms in Fancy Street, as a workshop for shoemaking, and defendant, who keeps the Bricklayer`s Arms has lately felt annoyed because complainant has opened an opposition establishment, the Dew Drop Inn, a respectable house a little higher up, on the upper side of the street, and is jealous of the good business done by complainant. Complainant has, for some time, been annoyed at his work, and there was no moral doubt that defendant was the instigator of them. Sometimes chamber utensils were emptied down, so that the water would percolate through into the workshop. Another time a stream of boiling water would pour down onto complainant. It would be impossible to prove that defendant had committed these acts himself; he should ask permission to withdraw the summons, and advise complainant, if the annoyance continued, to sue defendant for damages in the County Court. He might remark that the parties had often been to the court before; complainant, always as complainant, preferring too seek protection from the Bench, rather than take the law into his own hands.

Defendant said he never saw complainant on 30th April. It was only a poor old woman had the misfortune to upset her tea pot.

The Bench told defendant he was undoubtedly the cause of the annoyance, and warned him to be careful.

Folkestone Observer 15 May 1869

Tuesday, May 11th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., J. Gambrill and A.M. Leith Esqs.

William Peel was charged with assaulting William Bromley on the 30th April.

It appeared that the defendant kept the Bricklayer`s Arms, Fancy Street, and the plaintiff hired a room below to carry on his trade as shoemaker. He had also recently opened a public house named the Dew Drop, in rivalry to the Bricklayer`s Arms. The complainant said defendant had emptied hot water &c. on the floor above, so that it dropped through into his shop beneath, but he brought forward no evidence.

Defendant said all that was done was the upsetting of a teapot on the fender by his wife.

The Bench dismissed the charge.

Folkestone Express 15 May 1869

Tuesday, April 11th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., A.M. Leith and J. Gambrill Esqs.

George Peel was charged with assaulting John Bromley on the 30th of April last.

Mr. Minter, who appeared for the complainant, said the summons had been taking out without consulting him, and he found, on looking over the evidence, that they would not be able to bring the charge home to the defendant. It appears that for many years the plaintiff has occupied a room under the Bricklayers` Arms, Fancy Street, which belongs to the defendant. Bromley has thought proper to open a house called The Dew Drop in the same street, and from that some sort of jealousy has existed between them, and there was no moral doubt that the defendant was the instigator, if not the actual perpetrator, of the offence for which he was summoned. While plaintiff has been at work in the said room, the contents of chamber utensils, and at other times hot water, have been poured down on him from the room above. This, no doubt, irritated the plaintiff, and he at once took out the summons. His (Mr. Minter`s) advice was to withdraw the summons, leaving it to the discretion of the Bench to tell the defendant that he is not entitled to do this thing himself, or allow others to do it, and he would advise the plaintiff that should the offence be repeated he must issue a summons against him in the County Court.

The defendant: It was only a poor old woman who had the misfortune to upset a teapot.

The Bench cautioned the defendant to be more careful in the future, and dismissed the summons.

Folkestone Observer 7 August 1869

Local Intelligence

Elizabeth Hare was brought up on a warrant on Tuesday, charged with threatening and assaulting Mary Ann Lee, and Mary Ann Lee was summoned for an assault on Mary Robertson. The assaults were committed at the Bricklayer`s Arms, Fancy Street, on the evening of Sunday last. Mrs. Lee entered the house to purchase a pint of beer about six o`clock, when, she stated, that Mrs. Hare assaulted her. Mrs. Hare and Mrs. Robertson both averred that Mrs. Lee was the aggressor. Several witnesses were called on both sides, and they included Mr. William Peel, the landlord of the house, and Mr. Lee, the husband of one of the defendants. The last witness stated that his wife was drunk, and she had been drinking in defendant`s house during the afternoon, beer being served to her during prohibited hours. The Bench bound both defendants over to keep the peace for three months in a sum of 10.

Note: It is unclear where Lee had been drinking from this report. No record of a Hare or Robertson is listed in More Bastions.

Folkestone Express 7 August 1869

Tuesday, August 3rd: Before J. Tolputt Esq., and Colonel Crespigny

Elizabeth Haze was charged with assaulting and threatening Mary Ann Lee on Sunday. Mr. Minter appeared for the plaintiff.

Plaintiff said she was the wife of Richard Lee, and lived in Fancy Street. On Sunday afternoon about half past five she went to Mr. Peel`s, at the Bricklayers` Arms, for a pint of beer. The defendant was standing at the bar drinking. She said “You`re come, Lady Lee”, and after calling her some bad names she knocked plaintiff backwards and gave her a black eye, and she hammered away for five minutes. Witness gave her no provocation. She followed plaintiff to her own house and took up a knife and threatened to murder her.

Prisoner said plaintiff scratched her face.

Mary Smith deposed to hearing plaintiff cry “Murder!” three times.

The prisoner called Frederick P. Swain, who said he was a shoemaker. He heard a little “jangling” and Mrs. Lee came and struck Mrs. Haze. Mrs. Lee struck the first blow.

By Mr. Minter: I heard no cries of “Murder!”. Mrs. Lee was drunk.

Mary Ann Robertson, wife of George Robertson, living in Fancy Street, said: Mrs. Lee came into the Bricklayers` Arms at one o`clock and insulted me, and the prisoner repeated that conduct at six o`clock. Mrs. Lee hit Mrs. Haze, and Mrs. Haze struck at Mrs. Lee, but did not hit her. Mrs. Lee called her husband in, and they all three had a scuffle. Mr. Peel put Mrs. Lee out of the house several times, but she would come in again. Mrs. Haze did not go to Mrs. Lee`s house, and there were no cries of “Murder!”.

By Mr. Minter: There was no knife taken up.

Mary Ann Lee was summoned by Mary Robertson for assaulting her.

Mary Robertson said on Sunday afternoon she was in Mr. Peel`s yard taking up the dinner, when Mrs. Lee came in and abused her. She came in again about six o`clock, and witness was waiting at the bar. She called her fearful names, and struck and scratched her face.

Elizabeth Haze deposed to the above.

Mr. Minter called Richard Lee, who said he went to the Bricklayers` Arms about six o`clock, when he found his wife on the floor, and Mrs. Roberston and Mrs. Haze pitching into her. Mrs. Haze followed them home and picked up a knife on the table, and said she would be the death of them. Witness took the knife away and put her out.

By the Bench: His wife was drunk. She had been drinking from three to six in the house. They drew her beer during the prohibited hours.

William Peel said he saw a scuffle in the passage of his house, and he put Mrs. Lee and Mrs, Haze out; did not see the beginning or end of it.

By Mr. Minter: Was in the bar from six to half past six.

The Bench ordered both defendants to be bound over to keep the peace, in a sum of 10, for three months.

Folkestone Chronicle 28 August 1869

Monday August 23rd: Before S. Eastes, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

William Peel, landlord of the Bricklayer`s Arms, Fancy Street, was summoned for maliciously injuring certain tools, the property of John Bromley, of the Dew Drop Inn, in the same street. Mr. Minter appeared for the complainant, and Mr. Creery, of Ashford, for the defendant.

Mr. Minter said the injury to the tools was small, but the annoyance, inconvenience, and damage, consequent on the conduct of defendant was considerable, and necessitated this application to the Bench. The facts of the case were that complainant rents, and has for several years past occupied a room under defendant`s house as a shoemaker`s shop, and as both parties keep similar establishments – lodging houses – with the same class of customers, there was a certain amount of rivalry between them. Plaintiff on going to his work has found the place flooded with water, the tools and work spoiled, and the room altogether uninhabitable, so that his men refused to work any longer, and his business was being destroyed. A few weeks ago defendant was summoned for pouring hot water through on the complainant, and the excuse was that an old woman had upset her teapot. The 51st sect. of the 24th and 25th Vic., cap. 97, rendered defendant liable to three or five years` penal servitude, or not less than two years` imprisonment with hard labour, and the 52nd sect., under which the information was laid, rendered him liable to a penalty of 5, or two months` imprisonment. He would only call sufficient evidence to justify the case, and ask for a remand, and a summons to be issued against James M`Donald, an important witness who had absconded.

Complainant said on the 18th instant he left his shop about nine o`clock in the evening, and on going to it next morning found the place soaked in water, work spoiled, and tools rusted. The expense of putting them right would be about 2s. The same thing had happened before.

Cross-examined: The tools cost about 12s. M`Donald was a tailor who lodged at his house before the 17th instant. He left and went to lodge at defendant`s. He had told him that he saw a man named Johnson turn on the tap of the boiler, and defendant said “Scald him out of it”. There were twenty others in the room. He had traced Johnson to Canterbury, and heard that he said he was not coming there to get paid for his time, when he could get pounds to stay away.

James Neale, a cordwainer who worked for complainant, deposed to the state of the workshop through the water that was continually running through from the room above, so that he refused to work any longer.

Mr. Minter then applied for an adjournment for a week, so as to procure M`Donald`s attendance. It would have been no use to call any of the others that were in the room, for they were strangers, and some of them were fined by the Bench the other day for annoying complainant.

The adjournment was granted, the question of costs being reserved.

Southeastern Gazette 30 August 1869

Annual Licensing Day.—A full bench of magistrates attended on Wednesday to grant renewals and hear fresh applications.

Several licenses were suspended owing to the complaints of the public, and the renewal of the licence of the Bricklayers’ Arms, kept by Mr. William Peel was refused altogether

Local News

William Peel, the landlord of the Bricklayers’ Arms, was summoned on Monday last by John Bromley, the landlord of the Dewdrop Inn, both houses being situated in Fancy Street. Mr. Minter appeared for plaintiff, and Mr. Creery for the defendant.

It appeared from the evidence that the plaintiff hired a room of the defendant to carry on his business as a shoemaker The room was let on a lease, but since the plaintiff had opened a beerhouse in opposition to the defendant, the latter had instituted a series of petty annoyances, such as pouring water down on the plaintiff from the room above. Plaintiff could not bring the charge home to the defendant, but got a lodger of his, named McDonald, to go and lodge at defendant’s house and watch what was going on. This lodger informed the plaintiff that Mr. Peel instigated a man to turn a tap on when the defendant was at work, hence the present proceedings.

It was now stated that the important witness to prove the case, McDonald, had kept out of the way, and it was surmised that he had been bribed to do so by the defendant or his friends. Mr. Minter applied for an adjournment on these grounds. Mr. Creery opposed, as he said it was a trumped-up charge, and if Mr. Bromley had intended to persevere he could have called other witnesses who were in the room at the time.

The magistrates, however, decided to grant an adjournment for a week.

Folkestone Observer 11 September 1869

Wednesday, September 8th: Before Capt. Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, A.M. Leith and W. Bateman Esqs.

William Peel, on remand, was again charged with doing damage to Mr. Bromley`s property.

The complainant applied for another adjournment as he had met with a severe accident and had been unable to procure the witness Johnson.

Mr. Towne, Margate, opposed the adjournment as he said the accident spoken of was caused by plaintiff`s own misconduce, and the accident had nothing to do with the case.

The Bench, after a consultation, said when a case was brought before them the means of proving the case must be procured. They now declined to adjourn and dismissed the case.

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Spirit License (Renewal)

William Peel, of the Bricklayers`Arms, Fancy Street, applied for a renewal of his license. Mr. Martin had received great complaints of this house, as it was the resort of thieves and other loose characters. The license was refused.

Folkestone Express 4 September 1869

Monday, 30th August: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

Wm. Peel, of the Bricklayers` Arms, and a tramp named Johnson, again appeared to answer a charge of pouring boiling water over him.

Mr. Minter, who appeared for the prosecutor, said owing to the absence of an important witness named James MacDonald, he must ask for a remand, and he would apply for a Bench warrant for him to be brought up, as he believed witness had either been bribed or intimidated. The case was accordingly adjourned till Wednesday next.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 September 1869

Police: During the week there have been some cases before the Bench, chiefly arising from the rivalry between the Dew Drop Inn and the Bricklayer`s Arms.

Folkestone Observer 11 September 1869

Thursday, September 9th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., and James Tolputt Esq.

Thomas Drew was charged with using threatening language to George Bromley on the 8th instant.

George Bromley said he lived at Dover, and was at his son`s house dining on Wednesday. When in the private room prisoner came in and said “What do you think about it now?”. His son said “I have nothing to say to you. The best thing for you to do is to leave the house”. He said he would not for his son or witness, and used most filthy language. When in the street he said he would knock witness`s brains out. On witness saying he would send for the police he used most filthy language. From these threats he went in bodily fear of prisoner. There was nothing said about a handkerchief. He did not know the man at all.

John Bromley, son of the last witness, gave corroborative evidence, adding that a man came across from Peel`s and threw a pint pot at his head some days ago. He put up his hand and cut his thumb frightfully.

The Bench said the offence was of so serious a nature that they must bind prisoner over to keep the peace in the sum of 5, and a householder in the sum of 5 for 3 months.

Folkestone Express 11 September 1869

Thursday, September 9th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

Thomas Drew, hatter, was charged with using threatening language towards Mr. George Bromley senr.

The prisoner said he was only charged with this out of spite.

Mr. Minter appeared for the prosecutor and detailed the circumstances of the case. It appeared that the prisoner had been lodging at Mr. Bromley`s, the Dew Drop, Fancy Street, and going home after the case had been heard on the previous day, the man went to Mr. Peel`s. He then came into Bromley`s while they were at dinner and used the language the witnesses would describe. There was no spite on Mr. Bromley`s part, as he was quite prepared to hear the decision of the court the previous day.

He called George Bromley senr., who said he lived at Dover, and was dining at his son`s house yesterday, when the prisoner came in and said “What do you think of it now?”. His son answered “I want nothing to say to you. The best thing you can do is to go out of my house”. He used most filthy language, and said he would not. He then went into the street, and said to witness he would knock his b---- brains out. He repeated this threat, and witness sent for a policeman. Not a word was said about a handkerchief. Witness did not know the man.

John Bromley was then sworn and deposed to the truth of the above statement. A man came from Mr. Peel`s house and threw a pot at his head a week ago. He warded it off with his hand and it cut his thumb in a very dangerous manner.

The Bench bound the prisoner over to keep the peace, himself in 5, and a householder in 5, for three months.

Folkestone Observer 14 July 1870

Saturday, July 9th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Clarke Esq.

Alice Bevan, a middle aged woman, was charged with stealing two sheets and two blankets, the property of William Peel, lodging house keeper, Fancy Street.

The complainant deposed that he lived at the Bricklayer`s Arms, Fancy Street. The prisoner had lodged in his house for two months. Last Thursday morning he missed the property produced, and on going to Mrs. Godden`s in High Street, he found the two sheets and one blanket, which he identified as his property. Mrs. Godden sent them to his house. The next day morning he went to Mrs. Hughes` house in High Street, and asked if she had bought anything. She showed him the other blanket, which he identified. He spoke to the prisoner the previous day, and she said she was guilty. He gave information to the police on Friday morning. About eleven o`clock P.C. Ovenden came to the Bricklayer`s Arms, and he went with him to the Dew Drop, where they found the prisoner, who was apprehended.

By the Bench: All the sheets were marked. He gave them up to P.C. Ovenden. The value of the property was 16s.

Mrs. Charlotte Andrews corroborated the last witness`s (her father`s) evidence.

Mrs. Harriett Godden said that she kept a second hand clothes shop in High Street. The prisoner came to her shop on Wednesday afternoon about two o`clock and offered two duplicates for sale. Witness asked her if they were her own. She said they were, and were for a blanket and two sheets. She (prisoner) went across and fetched them. The two sheets were pawned for 2s., and the blanket for the same amount. Witness gave her the money to get them, and 1s. 4d. in addition. On Thursday morning Mrs. Andrews came and identified the sheets. Her father came afterwards.

Mrs. Jane Hughes said that nearly a fortnight since the prisoner came to her shop with two duplicates of blankets. Witness gave her the money to fetch them, and 9d. for the duplicate, and 1d. for her trouble. Last Thursday she came again about ten or eleven, and brought another duplicate of a blanket which was pledged for 1s. 6d. Witness gave her 1s. 6d. for the blanket, 9d. for herself, 1d. for the trouble and d. interest. On Friday morning she gave the blanket up to Mr. Peel. The other two she had sold.

P.C. Ovenden deposed to apprehending the prisoner at the Dew Drop, Fancy Street. When h charged her the reply she made was “I shall say nothing at present”. After bringing her to the station he went and received two sheets and two blankets produced from Mr. Peel.

The prisoner pleaded guilty, and said she was sorry.

The Bench committed her for two months.

Folkestone Chronicle 16 July 1870

Saturday July 9th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Clark Esq.

Stealing from her lodgings.

Alice Bevan was charged with this offence by William Peel, lodging house keeper, Fancy Street. It appears that prisoner had lodged in complainant`s house two months, and on Thursday week two sheets and two blankets were missed. He made search for his lost property, and found the sheets and one blanket at Mrs. Godden`s, High Street, and the other blanket at Mrs. Hughes`, High Street.

P.C. Ovenden apprehended prisoner at the Dew Drop Inn.

Mrs. Godden said she gave 4s. for the sheets and blanket, and in answer to a question, prisoner said they were her own property.

Mrs. Hughes deposed to buying three duplicates of prisoner, and in answer to the Bench, prisoner pleaded Guilty and was sent to gaol for two months.

Folkestone Express 16 July 1870

Saturday, July 9th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Clark Esqs.

Alice Bevan, a dissipated looking woman, was charged with stealing two blankets and two sheets from a lodging house in Fancy Street, known as the Bricklayers` Arms.

William Peel, proprietor of the lodging house, said: The prisoner has lodged at my house for two months. I missed the things produced on Thursday morning. Found some of the property at Mrs. Godden`s, High Street, consisting of two sheets and a blanket. She showed them to me directly I asked her, and I identified them as my property, and she sent them to my house. I then went to Mrs. Hughes, who lives in High Street, just above Mrs. Godden`s. She keeps a second hand shop; she showed me a blanket and I identified it as my property. She gave me the blanket and I took it away with me. Mrs. Hughes has two other blankets which she has sold, and I can`t get them. I spoke to her yesterday at the Dew Drop. I had found her out on Thursday night. I gave information to the police yesterday morning. P,C, Ovenden came to me about eleven o`clock, and I went to the Dew Drop along with him and found the prisoner in front of the bar. The things are all marked with my name or the name of Cook. The things produced I believe to be my property. The value of the blankets is 10s., and the sheets 7s.

Mrs. Charlotte Andrews, the daughter of Mr. Peel, was called, and identified the property.

Mrs. Harriett Godden, second-hand clothes dealer, High Street, said: The prisoner came to my shop on Wednesday at two o`clock in the afternoon; she offered two duplicates for sale. I asked if they were her own, and she said “Yes”, and that they were on a blanket and two sheets. I gave her the money and told her to go and fetch them. The two sheets were pledged for 2s. and the blanket for 2s.’ the interest was 2d. I gave her 16d. in addition to the 4s. 2d. She has been here several times before.

Mrs. Jane Hughes, another dealer, in High Street, said: The prisoner came to my house nearly a fortnight ago with two duplicates of blankets pledged at Mr. Joseph`s; 1s. 6d. each they were pledged for. I gave her the money to fetch the things. I gave her 10d. in addition for the things. She told me her husband was very ill and she wanted the money to buy medicine. She had a medicine bottle in her hand at the time. I bought another one of her on Thursday in a similar way to the above; it was pledged at Mr. Joseph`s for 1s. 6d. and I gave her 10d. in addition for the blanket. I sold the first two blankets, but the last I gave up to Mr. Peel.

P.C. Ovenden deposed to taking the prisoner into custody at the Dew Drop. On being charged she said “I shall say nothing at present”.

The prisoner pleaded Guilty and was sorry for what she had done.

The Bench sentenced her to two months` imprisonment with hard labour.

Southeastern Gazette 18 July 1870

Local News

At the Police Court, on Saturday, Alice Bevan was charged with stealing two blankets and two sheets, the property of William Peel, a lodging-house keeper. The prosecutor stated that on the previous Thursday he missed the articles, and on going to Mrs. Godden’s and Mrs. Hughes, in High Street, to whom prisoner had sold them, he found them there. He gave her into custody.

Prisoner pleaded guilty, and was committed for three months’ hard labour.

Folkestone Chronicle 2 September 1871

Annual Licensing Day

Wednesday last was the Annual Licensing Day. The Magistrates on the Bench were The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Mr. Minter said he had come to apply for a spirit license on behalf of the Bricklayer`s Arms, but after the ruling of the Bench with respect to the Eagle, he should refrain from making the application.

Folkestone Express 28 October 1871

Inquest

On Wednesday morning an inquest was held at the Town Hall before J. Minter Esq., touching on the death of an infant child, the son of John Thomas Allen, a sweep, which took place under the following circumstances early on Sunday morning.

According to the evidence of the child`s parents, they lodged at the Bricklayer`s Arms, a lodging house in Fancy Street. On Saturday night they retired to rest, taking their child, two months old, to bed with them, and were soon both asleep. The mother fell asleep with the child lying upon her right arm, close to the breast, and she slept upon her right side. Mr. Allen rose early, without disturbing either his wife or child, and at half past six the mother awakened and found the child in the same position as when she went to sleep, but it was dead. It had not been unwell. According to the evidence of Dr. Tyson, he was called to see the body of the child at eleven o`clock on Sunday morning. It had evidently been dead several hours. There was not the slightest appearance of violence upon it. A mark or indentation was visible between the under lip and the chin, and the whole of the scalp was congested. The latter appearance, which showed death to have been sudden, disappeared in 24 hours. Not being able to account for the mark on the chin, he examined the breast of the mother, which was large, and found an appearance which corresponded with and accounted for the mark, and which showed the child to have been pressed to the breast. He believed the child died from suffocation, and the evidence of the mother confirmed his belief. He believed the child had been dead an hour or two hours before the mother awoke. It was a most imprudent thing of any mother to go to sleep with a child at the breast.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death by Suffocation.

Folkestone Express 5 April 1873

Tuesday, April 1st: Before The Mayor, J. Gambrill, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

James Mills, who said he was a blacksmith from Lambeth, was charged with being drunk and disorderly.

Superintendent Wishire said that about twelve o`clock on Monday night he saw prisoner in High Street, very drunk and shouting. He told him to be quiet, and asked him where he lived, to which prisoner replied “At the Bricklayers Arms”. On taking him there the landlord refused to take him in. Prisoner again commenced shouting and using bad language, and said his woman had been locked up. After he was placed in the cell he continued kicking at the door and swearing for an hour.

Prisoner muttered something about being employed at Sandgate Regatta, and maintained that he ought to be allowed to pass along the street, although drunk and making a disturbance, at the “bewitching hour”.

P.C. Keeler said he had taken prisoner to the old station several times.

Fined 7s. and 3s. 6d. costs, or seven days` hard labour. Locked up in default.

Folkestone Chronicle 16 June 1877

Saturday, June 9th: Before The Mayor and Alderman Caister.

Maria Ostenia, 7, Angelion Don, 8, Antonio Stavon, 13, and Antonio Ostenia, 13, were charged with begging in the Sandgate Road on the 8th inst.

The prisoners stated they were sent out by an Italian, to whom they gave the proceeds of their begging.

They were remanded until Monday.

Monday, June 11th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer Esq., and Alderman Caister.

Louie Suave, an Italian, was charged with having on the 8th inst. caused a child named Antonio Ostenia, 13 years of age, to beg in the Sandgate Road.

Prisoner pleaded not guilty. Louis Lyons acted as an interpreter.

Supt. Wilshere stated that he saw the boy Antonio playing a musical instrument, accompanied by the girl, Maria Ostenia, in the upper Sandgate Road. The children both solicited for money, which they received. He took the children to a police station and sent for an interpreter, and from the statement they made he obtained a warrant against prisoner. He apprehended him at Dover. He told him that the boy, Antonio, was accompanied by three younger children, and he replied “Yes, and they ought to be here before”. He found on him different sums of money, amounting in all to 30.

In answer to the Bench, Supt. Wilshere said that 6s. 7 1/2d. was found on the children.

Anne Whiting, landlady of the Bricklayers Arms, Fancy Street, said prisoner came to her house on Wednesday last for two beds, with another man and woman, and two children. They slept there on Wednesday and Thursday nights. On Friday morning when she came downstairs, the children in Court were seated round the table with the two men and women, and the other children. The prisoner was serving them with some bread and treacle. After breakfast he said he wanted to leave the children for one night while he went to Dover. She objected, but he said “They will be no trouble to you. They will come on to Dover to me tomorrow morning, and I will pay you their lodgings”, and he gave her 10d. They all went out together about half past eight o`clock.

John Salvator said prisoner had told him he came from Italy, and brought nine children with him.

The prisoner said he came from the same village as the children, and accompanied them to England to speak English for them.

Mr. Lyons, interpreter, instructed by the Magistrates, asked the prisoner if he wanted to call the father of the two children who were in Court, but he declined to do so.

The Mayor said it was against the law to send children out to beg. Children, it was well known, were farmed out from prisoner`s country for begging, and for playing musical instruments for the benefit of such persons as prisoner. Prisoner would be sentenced to 21 days` imprisonment with hard labour, and the expenses of his apprehension, conveyance to Dover, maintenance, and expenses of conviction would be paid out of the money found upon him.

Folkestone Express 16 June 1877

Monday, June 11th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer, and Alderman Caister.

Louie Suave, an Italian, respectably attired, was brought up in custody charged with having on the 8th inst. caused a child named Antonia Ostenia, of the age of thirteen years, to beg alms in the Upper Sandgate Road. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Louis Lyons was sworn as interpreter.

The four little children who were before the magistrates on Saturday were seated in front of the dock.

Superintendent Wilshere deposed: On Friday last I saw the boy, Antonia Ostenia, and the girl, Mira Ostenia, in the Upper Sandgate Road, the former playing a musical instrument, and the girl dancing around him. The boy touched his cap and held out his hand to passers-by, and the girl held out her hand and said something which I could not understand. Shortly after I saw the other boy, accompanied by the little boy, Angelion Don. The eldest boy was playing the accordion on the pavement and accosting passengers, and the little boy was going from shop to shop. I saw a lady give the eldest something, and then pass to the little one. I took them down to the police station and sent for an interpreter. From the statement they made I brought them before the Magistrates and obtained a warrant against Suave. I went to Dover and found that he had lodgings at the Red Lion Inn, that he had been in all day, but he had just gone out. When I apprehended him at the police station I asked him if he could speak English and he replied “Yes”. I read the warrant to him and told him that the boy Antonia was accompanied by three younger children. He said “Yes, and they ought to have been on before”. I told him they would not “be on” because they were detained at Folkestone, and he would have to go to them. I assisted in searching him, and found in a satchel 1s. 11d. and 4s., and in the belt which was around his waist next to his skin I found different sums of money packed up as they are now, altogether twelve parcels, and they amounted to about 30, 16 sovereigns, 20 francs and 10 half francs. I then told him he would have to come to Folkestone and answer to the charge of having sent them out to beg. He said “No, I pay for them”. In the train, after a conversation in some foreign language with a man I had with me, he said he did not want to be locked up, and he would give me a pound not to do so. I told him that was not enough, and he replied “You can keep all the money. I do not want to go to prison”.

The prisoner said that everything which the Superintendent had said was the truth.

Mr. Boarer: Does that amount include the money found on the children?

Superintendent Wilshere: No; 6s. 7d. in bronze was found upon the children, and then they had only been working two hours.

Ann Whiting deposed: I am the landlady of the Bricklayer`s Arms, Dover Street (sic). On Wednesday the prisoner came to my house and asked for two beds. There was another man, a woman, and two children with him. They all slept at my house on Wednesday and Thursday nights. On Friday morning when I came downstairs, the children now in Court were seated round the table with the two men and woman and the other children. Their breakfast things were on the table, and the prisoner was serving them with some bread and treacle. I believe I asked him where all the children came from, and he replied that they came in that morning and he was giving them their breakfast. After breakfast he said he wanted to leave the children for one night, while he went to Dover. I said I could not have the children left without anyone to take care of them. He said “They will be no trouble to you. They will come on to Dover to me tomorrow morning, and I will pay you their lodgings”, and he gave me 10d. They all went out together about half past eight o`clock, and I did not see anything more of them.

The prisoner had no question to ask the witness, but stated that the children came into the town on Thursday evening, and as neither of them could speak English, he acted for them and their parents in exchanging the money.

John Salvator stated that he had some conversation with the prisoner on Saturday, and Suave told him that he came from Italy, and that he brought nine children over to England with him.

The prisoner said he came from the same village in Italy as the children, and he accompanied the children because they could not speak English and he could a little.

Mr. Lyons, by the instruction of the Magistrates` Clerk, asked the prisoner if he wished to call the father of two of the children, who was in court. He declined to do so.

The Mayor said it was against the law for children to be sent out to beg, as it had been proved the prisoner had done. It was a well known fact that people of the prisoner`s country farmed children, and bring them to England for the purpose of begging, and to play musical instruments for the purpose of collecting money for such persons as the prisoner. And the Bench had no doubt that was the prisoner`s object in bringing the children to this country. The prisoner had had an opportunity of calling a witness to prove that he was not answerable in that case, but he had not done so. The Bench had decided to sentence the prisoner to twenty one days` imprisonment with hard labour, and the expenses of his apprehension, conveyance to Folkestone, maintenance and expenses of conviction would be paid out of the money found upon him.

Folkestone Express 23 November 1878

Monday, November 18th: Before Captain Carter, Alderman Caister, and Col. De Crespigny.

James Harmer was charged with being found drunk in Fenchurch Street, and also with refusing to quit the Bricklayers` Arms.

P.S. Smith said on Saturday night, between 10 and 11 he found the prisoner drunk and bleeding from the arm, which he had thrust through a window.

Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty to refusing to quit, as he was a lodger in the house.

He was fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days.

Folkestone Express 11 January 1879

Saturday, January 4th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, General Armstrong, R.W. Boarer and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

Henry Gatehouse, charged with being drunk and disorderly in Fenchurch Street, pleaded Guilty. P.C. Knowles said defendant was at the Bricklayers` Arms.

Defendant said himself and two others drank three pints of rum and two gallons of ale, and after that he could not recollect anything until he woke up and found his shirt tied round his neck.

He was fined 10s. and 8s. costs, or 14 days` hard labour.

Folkestone Express 11 December 1880

Thursday, December 9th: Before R.W. Boarer, General Armstrong, Capt. Crowe, Capt. Fletcher, and Ald. Banks.

William Clinton was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and assaulting P.C. Keeler.

Prisoner behaved in a very excitable manner in the dock.

P.C. Keeler said that shortly before two that morning he was on duty at the bottom of High Street. Prisoner passed him near Mr. Powell`s. He noticed that he had something bulky under his coat, and he therefore asked him what he was doing and where he was going. Prisoner immediately drew out a poker and struck witness a violent blow on the left arm, disabling it. He closed with the prisoner, seizing him with his right arm, and he then struck him another blow on the helmet with the poker. He threw prisoner down, and P.C. Smith coming to his assistance, they conveyed him to the station. Prisoner was very violent all the way, and was drunk.

Mr. Whiting, son of the landlady of the Bricklayers`Arms, said the prisoner had lodged there for three nights. He seemed to be labouring under some delusion. Whilst in their house he had scarcely anything but water and a few scraps of food other people gave him. The poker was taken from their kitchen.

The Bench, in sentencing the prisoner to four months` hard labour, remarked that if his mind was affected the prison authorities would deal with him. The charge of drunkenness was dismissed.

The weapon with which P.C. Keeler was struck was a heavy kitchen poker. He will be invalided for a time, and had it not been for the protection afforded by his helmet there is hardly a doubt that the blow on the head would have been fatal.

Folkestone Express 15 July 1882

Thursday, July 13th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer and M.J. Bell Esqs., and General Armstrong.

John Champion was charged with stealing a coat, value 4s., the property of Frederick Champion, his brother.

Prosecutor said he was a hawker, living at No. 2, Imperial Terrace, Foord. On Wednesday morning he missed a coat from behind the sitting room door, where he had hung it overnight. Prisoner slept in the room where the coat was hung, with witness. When witness woke up about nine o`clock, the coat was still there. Prisoner had been out, and just as witness was leaving the house he returned. About an hour afterwards witness went back, and met the prisoner coming out the door with the coat tucked under the one he was wearing. He told his sister to go after him and ask prisoner to give it up. About a quarter past one the prisoner was taken into custody by P.C. Kettle.

William Taylor, a pedlar, said he was at the Bricklayers` Arms on Wednesday morning, when prisoner came in with the coat produced on his arm, which he asked witness to buy for 2s. He said he belonged to the reserve and was called up and wanted to part with his things. Witness bought the coat for 2s. He afterwards gave it up to the police.

P.C. Kettle said the prisoner was given into custody by the first witness, at his father`s house. He said he had sold the coat for 2s., but would not say who he sold it to.

A second charge was then preferred against the prisoner of stealing a pair of trousers belonging to another brother. The evidence was of the same character.

The prisoner was convicted on both charges and sentenced to two months` with hard labour for each offence.

Folkestone Express 14 October 1882

Saturday, October 7th: Before R.W. Boarer and F. Boykett Esqs., Captain Crowe, General Armstrong, and Alderman Hoad.

John Gardner, a police constable in the borough force, was summoned for an assault on Amelia Lepper on the 1st October. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Mowll appeared for the complainant and Mr. Minter for the defendant.

Godfrey Lepper was charged with opening his house during prohibited hours, and Sarah Lepper with assaulting P.C. Gardner. They pleaded Not Guilty.

John Lepper, charged with resisting the police, also pleaded Not Guilty.

The whole of the cases arose out of the same circumstances, and the Bench decided to hear them together.

Amelia Lepper, the daughter of Godfrey Lepper, landlord of the George III in Fenchurch Street, said on Sunday, October 1st she went out of the house, across the road to Miss Hart`s, a dressmaker, to fetch a dress which was being altered for her. Miss Hart asked her to get some vinegar for pickling. Her father sold vinegar, and she fetched a pint, and afterwards some more. When she got to the door, a police constable took hold of her. She thought he was a tramp from the Bricklayers` Arms. He said that he wanted her. When he pulled her, the jug fell into the street and was broken. She struggled to get away and asked him what he wanted. He said she must go with him, as a police constable wanted her. She called out to her mother and brother, who both came. Her brother threatened to strike him, and he said “I am a police constable in disguise. Don`t strike me”. He went away and fetched another constable, and when he came back Miss Hart took out the pickled cabbage and vinegar in a can, and said “This is what she brought”.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter: I had been across about ten minutes before. I did not carry the jug under my apron. No-one came out of the house with me. There had not been two women come out of the house with jugs. Someone might have been in the house, but I should not know. I took a pint of vinegar across each time. Gardner did not say “What is in your jug?” He asked me for my name, and I said “Lepper”. I did not refuse to let him see what I had got. I did not deliberately throw the jug down and smash it. When they came back, and Miss Hart brought the vinegar, I did not hear the constable say “You are very clever to collect the vinegar after it has been spilt”. I saw mother push the constable in the road, before he wanted to search the house.

By Mr. Mowll: There were two lots of vinegar, one in the can, and the other lot was spilt.

Sarah Lepper, wife of Godfrey Lepper, said: My husband has held a license for 11 years. On Sunday morning I heard my daughter say “Here`s a tramp got hold of me”. I had the key of the bar in my pocket, and had it all the morning. When I got there I said “You dirty-looking Pikey, what are you doing with my daughter?” My son said “What are you doing with my sister?” and threatened to strike him, but he put up his hands and said that he was a police constable. The house had not been open.

By Mr. Minter: An old lady came into my house and took an empty jug in and out. An old gentleman did not come, nor an old lady, or a young lady. I don`t know how many people came, as we have a lot in on business matters. When the police constable in uniform came down, I asked him what was the matter, and he said “What is your name?”, and “Is that your daughter?” I said “What about it?” and he said “You have been serving beer”, and Miss Hart then brought out the vinegar. I did not say there was nothing the matter. I will swear that I said “That tramp has been dragging my daughter about the street”. He did not ask for admittance. I and my son did not prevent him coming in. I did not slap him in the face, but shoved him (defendant) in the head with my fist.

By Mr. Bradley: The vinegar was kept in the cellar, not in the bar.

John Godfrey Lepper, son of last witness, said: The first I heard of the case was that my mother called me, and I saw my sister lying against the post door. I threatened to strike the man who I thought was a tramp. I did not know he was a constable. From the time he left until he came back was two or three minutes.

By Mr. Minter: I found my sister lying on her side in the doorway, and my mother beside her. The constable was on the doorstep and had hold of her hand, trying to pull her up.

John Wettingstall, coal dealer, of Harvey Street, said: When I reaced Lepper`s I saw a navvy sort of man ill-treating a girl, as I thought. He had got hold of the girl round the shoulders. I heard the jug drop.

By Mr. Minter: I live not far from this house. I don`t go to Lepper`s. The girl was standing beside Hart`s door. He had his right arm round her neck. Miss Hart`s house is on the opposite side of the street. She got away from the policeman. He released her just off the kerb and he ran across and pulled her nearly down. He had hold of her round her neck at her mother`s door.

By Mr. Mowll: I have been a Good Templar for five years.

Godfrey Lepper, landlord of the George III, said: I have held a license eleven years without a complaint ever having been made against me. I was not in the house during Saturday night. The key of the bar is as a rule in my wife`s possession. We sell vinegar, which is kept in a cask.

Miss Hart was said to be ill, and the case was adjourned for a month for her attendance.

Folkestone Express 14 July 1883

Saturday, July 7th: Before Colonel de Crespigny, Alderman Caister, J. Fitness, J. Holden and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

Margaret Harrington was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Fenchurch Street, and also with breaking two panes of glass, value 15s. 6d., at the George III, on Friday, July 6th.

Mrs. Lepper, wife of the landlord of the George III public house, Fenchurch Street, said the prisoner went to the house on the previous evening a little before five o`clock. She went to the private bar and knocked, and asked if witness was Mrs. Lepper. She then said something about her daughter-in-law and slapped her face. She then shut the window. Prisoner then went across to the Bricklayers` Arms and fetched some beer. Another woman who was with prisoner took the glass from her, and as she was going into the house again she shut the door to keep her out and prisoner then smashed the windows. She was very drunk.

Henry Lepper, a son of the last witness, corroborated.

P.C. Knowles said that on the previous afternoon he saw the prisoner outside the George III. She was very drunk and shouting and made a great noise. He advised her to go away, but she swore at him. He then locked her up, having a “terrific job” to get her to the station. It was necessary to put her on a stretcher and strap her down.

The Bench fined the prisoner 5s. for being drunk and disorderly, and 4s. 6d. costs, and 15s. 6d. damage to windows, and 5s. fine and 5s. 6d. costs, or in default 14 days` hard labour.

Folkestone Express 24 January 1885

Monday: Before Captain Crowe, Captain Fletcher, and Captain Bell.

John Lewis pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly on licensed premises, the Bricklayers` Arms, and breaking panes of glass, to the value of 10s. In default of paying fine and costs, amounting to 20s., he was ordered to be imprisoned for 14 days.

Folkestone News 24 January 1885

Local News

A labouring man named John Lewis, a lodger at the Bricklayers` Arms, was brought before the Bench on Monday for being drunk on the premises and breaking 10s. worth of window glass. It appeared that he had always been well behaved before, and had been a teetotaller for a month, but had broken the pledge. He pleaded Guilty and was mulcted in the sum of 1 0s. 6d., including fines, costs and damages.

Folkestone Express 21 March 1885

Wednesday, March 18th: Before The Mayor, Captain Fletcher, Captain Crowe, and Alderman Hoad.

Michael O`Brien was charged with stealing a broom, value 1s., the property of Mr. W. Wightwick, on the 16th February.

A domestic servant in the employ of Mr. Wightwick said prisoner went to the back door of Mr. Wightwick`s house begging. She refused to give him anything. Next morning she missed a broom which had been standing outside the back door.

George Skelton, assistant to Mr. G.M. Smith, said the broom produced was purchased at their shop and sent to Mr. Wightwick`s. The selling price was 1s.

Joseph Allan Whiting, of the Bricklayers` Arms, Fenchurch Street, said the prisoner was staying at his house until about three weeks ago. He owed a trifle, and left the broom produced as a security. He did not notice any writing on the broom. Subsequently he gave the broom up to the police.

Sergeant Harman said he apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday afternoon at the City Police Station, Canterbury. When charged with stealing the broom he said he did not know anything about it.

Prisoner was sentenced to a month`s hard labour.

Folkestone Express 27 June 1885

Monday, June 22nd: Before The Mayor, Captain Carter, Alderman Caister and J. Fitness Esq.

Jane Summers, charged with being drunk and refusing to quit the Bricklayers` Arms when requested by the landlord, pleaded Guilty, and was fined 3s. and 3s. 6d. costs, or seven days`. The prisoner and her husband had been lodging at the house for a month, and went in on Saturday night drunk and made a disturbance.

John Summers, the husband of the last prisoner, was then charged with being drunk and disorderly in the Market Place on Saturday. He was found by Supt. Taylor sitting on the window sill of the police station. He roused him and he then became very abusive and said he would be locked up with his wife. His request was complied with, and with his wife he was detained in the cells on Sunday. He was fined 5s. and 3s. costs, and allowed a week to pay both his own and his wife`s fine.

Folkestone Express 15 May 1886

Saturday, May 8th: Before The Mayor, Captain Carter, and Alderman Caister.

Alfred Swinborne, described as a flower seller, was charged with stealing a watch, value 1, the property of William Watts.

Prosecutor said he lived at Canterbury. On Friday he saw the prisoner at the Raglan Tavern, Dover Road, and entrusted him with a pawn ticket and the money to go to Mr. Joseph`s and redeem a watch and take it to him. Prisoner did not return, and prosecutor gave information to the police. The watch produced was his.

By the prisoner: You were not drunk, nor was I.

Joseph Whiting, of the Bricklayers` Arms, Fenchurch Street, said the prisoner went to his house on Friday evening. He had been drinking, but was not drunk. He offered the watch produced for sale for half a sovereign. Witness told him he did not want it, and the prisoner went away. Prisoner said he had found the watch.

Sergeant Pay said he went in search of the prisoner and found him in Harbour Street. He told him the charge and took him into custody. Prisoner said he didn`t steal the watch. He took it out of pawn for a gentleman, and afterwards could not find him.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty and was sentenced to one month`s hard labour.

Folkestone Express 29 May 1886

Tuesday, May 25th: Before Dr. Bateman, Alderman Caister, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Jane Potter was charged with stealing four sheets, value 24s., the property of Joseph Whiting.

Constance Whiting, landlady of the Bricklayers` Arms, said the prisoner had lodged in her house for six months past and she occasionally employed her to do washing. Recently she missed some sheets from a cupboard in her bedroom. The bedroom door was left unlocked. P.C. Knowles produced the sheets, which witness identified as her property. She valued the six sheets at 24s.

Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms, said the prisoner had been lodging at his house, and as he suspected her when the sheets were missed he asked her to let him search her bundle, and he there saw some pawn tickets which referred to the sheets. He then sent for the police.

Emma Davis, a widow lodging at the Bricklayers` Arms, said she had been there about a fortnight, and on the second day she was there prisoner asked her to pawn one sheet, which she said was her own property, and told her to ask 1s. upon it. Witness took the sheet to Mr. Joseph and pawned it for 1s. in her own name. The second sheet she pawned on the 12th inst. for 9d.

P.C. Knowles said he apprehended the prisoner in a bedroom at the Bricklayers` Arms on the previous afternoon. He asked Mr. Whiting if he would give the prisoner into custody, and he said “Yes”. The prisoner said “I hope you won`t have me locked up, Mr. Whiting”, and he replied that he must.

Prisoner was then brought to the station.

Stephen Turner, assistant to Mr. Joseph, pawnbroker, proved the pledging of the sheets.

The Bench sentenced the prisoner to two months` hard labour.

Folkestone News 29 May 1886

Tuesday, May 26th: Before Dr. Bateman, Alderman Caister, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs.

Jane Potter was charged with stealing six sheets, of the value of 4s. each, the property of Mr. Whiting, on the 1st May.

Mrs. Whiting, landlady of the Bricklayers` Arms, said prisoner had lodged at her house and they occasionally employed her. Witness recently missed some sheets from a cupboard in her bedroom, put away for use when required. Prisoner had no reason for going to this bedroom. The sheets produced by P.C. Knowles were three of those missing. The value of the six sheets was 24s.

Joseph Whiting, landlord, said: Yesterday when I saw prisoner overhauling her own bundle in her own room, I asked her to let me look at her things, and then found some duplicate pawn tickets, but did not take them from prisoner. The tickets produced by Sergeant Ovenden relate to three of the sheets stolen.

Emma Davis, widow, lodging at the Bricklayers` Arms, knew the prisoner, who had asked her to pawn one sheet for a shilling. She had done so at Mr. Joseph`s in her own name. On the 12th she had pawned another sheet for 9d.

P.C. Knowles said that he apprehended the prisoner at the Bricklayers` Arms at half past one yesterday, in a back room where she was locked in. She said she hoped Mr. Whiting would not have her locked up. He took her into custody and brought her to the police station.

Rachael Sharpe, female searcher, proved finding the pawn tickets in prisoner`s purse.

Stephen Turner, pawnbroker`s assistant, knew the witness Davis, and the prisoner who had pawned the sheets produced.

At the conclusion of the evidence prisoner pleaded Guilty, and was sentenced to two months imprisonment with hard labour.

Folkestone Express 21 April 1888

Wednesday, April 18th: Before The Mayor, Surgeon General Gilbourne, Col. De Crespigny, J. Brooke and H.W. Poole Esqs.

James Furlong was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Fenchurch Street on Tuesday.

P.C. Smith said the defendant was stripped to his shirt, and with his hat off, and wanting to fight. His wife came out and he struck at her. He commenced to fight with a stranger, and witness, with the assistance of Mr. Whiting, of the Bricklayers` Arms, took him to the police station.

Defendant said he came from Chatham.

The Mayor: A nice importation from Chatham, you are. How old are you?

Defendant: Twenty one next August.

The Mayor: What are you? – A sailor.

The Mayor: A turnpike sailor, I suppose. You will be fined 5s., and 3s. 6d. costs, or seven days` hard labour.

James Noble was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Beach Street on the 14th inst. He pleaded Guilty, and said he “had a drop too much to drink, and like a good many more when they got a drop too much to drink, had too much to say”. (Laughter)

He was fined 5s. and 8s. costs, or 14 days`.

Folkestone Express 8 September 1888

Wednesday, September 5th: Before Alderman Banks and J. Holden Esq.

Henry Gossidge, who said he came from Satchwell Street, Leamington, was charged with wandering about the streets without visible means of subsistence.

P.C. Knowles said he saw the little boy near the bottom of High Street on Monday night. He said he had no home, and that he came to Folkestone three days before, with two organ grinders who had gone to Dover, turned him off. He told witness he came from Leamington. He took him to Mr. Whiting, at the Bricklayers` Arms, who said the Italians seemed to be very kind to him.

An order was made to commit the boy to the workhouse, from whence he would be sent to Leamington.

Holbein`s Visitors` List 29 May 1889

Inquest

On Thursday evening there were rumours in the town that a horse had bolted down Sandgate Hill and had thrown out of a carriage two ladies, the wives of officers in the Carabiniers. Later in the evening it was stated that one of the ladies was dead, and unfortunately rumour was, in this case, speaking only too truly. But the facts of the case will best be conveyed to our readers by the reproduction of the evidence tendered before the Borough Coroner (J. Minter Esq.) at the inquest, which was held at the Town Hall on Saturday at three o`clock, “to enquire touching the death of Agnes Mary Green”.

The Jury having been sworn and having chosen Mr. Frederick Petts as foreman, the Coroner said that Dr. Charles Lewis, who was a witness, had a most important case to attend, and he (the Coroner), would go out of the ordinary course and take the evidence before the Jury viewed the body.

Dr. Charles Lewis then deposed: I was called shortly before seven on Thursday evening to the residence of the deceased in Darnley Terrace, Sandgate, in consultation with Dr. Chubb, who was in attendance. I found the deceased insensible, and suffering from a fracture of the left side of the skull, about five or six inches in length. There was also a large wound near the right ear. The injuries were such as would be produced by a fall. I remained with deceased until her death. There was nothing that could possibly be done, and she died about 8.45.

The Jury then proceeded to Sandgate to view the body, and on their return to the Town Hall the following additional evidence was given.

William Barr: I am a groom in the employ of Mr. Dixon Green, who is a Lieutenant in the Carabiniers, and resides at 2, Chichester Villas, Sandgate. I identify the body which the jury have seen at that of my late mistress, Agnes Mary Green. On Thursday evening Mrs, Green, in company with the wife of Colonel Dennis, drove a mare in a dog cart to witness the Yeomanry sports in a field off Sandgate Road. Shortly after six o`clock we were returning; Mrs. Green was driving and I was on the back seat. Going down Sandgate Hill the whip was hanging over the reins and touched the mare, causing her to jump forward. I immediately jumped down, intending to get to the mare`s head, but before I could do so she had bolted and was galloping down the hill. I followed as quickly as possible and saw the mare swerve to the offside as if she was intending to pull up at the house, which she evidently knew. When she saw the wall she shot out again, but the wheel of the cart caught the wall and Mrs. Green was thrown out. I saw her fall. The mare galloped on through Sandgate. When I reached the place where Mrs. Green was lying, I found her insensible, and with blood flowing freely from her head and face. Some other men carried her into the house, and I ran off for a doctor. Mrs. Green had been in the habit of riding and driving for a good while. The mare was half-bred. She would not stand a whip, but was otherwise quiet.

Sidney Saunders, landlord of the East Cliff Tavern, said: On Thursday evening I was going across the footpath from the Leas into Sandgate, when I saw a dog cart in which there were two ladies, with a groom on the back seat. They were going down the hill at a gentle trot, when suddenly the mare plunged, but I could not see from what cause. The groom jumped down and rushed to the horse`s head, but the horse had galloped off before he could get to it. I went as fast as I could and saw the horse run over to the offside. The wheel of the cart caught the kerb, and the lady who had been driving was thrown against the wall. The lady was insensible and blood was flowing from her head and mouth. I lifted up her head, got a towel and some water, and washed her mouth out. Someone said that she lived a few doors below, and we then carried her into her house. Dr. Chubb was sent for and soon came.

Samuel Saunders, of the Belle Vue Tavern, and Joseph Whiting, of the Bricklayers` Arms, who were in company with the previous witness, having corroborated his evidence, the Coroner said he thought the jury would have no difficulty in coming to a decision.

A verdict was immediately returned of Accidental Death.

Folkestone Express 1 June 1889

Inquest

On Saturday afternoon an inquest was held at the Town Hall before J. Minter Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of Agnes Mary Green, who was killed on Thursday evening by being thrown from a dog cart.

Mr. Charles Lewis, surgeon, said: On Thursday evening, a little before seven o`clock, I was called to attend the deceased at her residence in Darnley Terrace, Sandgate, in consultation with Mr. Chubb, who was in attendance. I found her insensible, and suffering from a fracture of the left side of the skull some four or five inches in length. There was also a large wound near the right ear. She remained insensible until her deat, about an hour and a half after I left. She died from injuries to her head, which were such as would be produced by a fall. There was nothing which could be done to save her. She was evidently sinking when I first saw her.

William Barr, a groom, in the employment of Mr. Dixon Green, lieutenant in the Carabiniers, stationed at Shorncliffe, and residing at 2, Chichester Villas, Sandgate, identified the body viewed by the jury as that of Agnes Mary Green, wife of Lieut. Green, and said on Thursday, in company with the wife of Col. Dennis, she drove a mare in a dog cart to the sports in Sandgate Road. I was in attendance and riding on the back seat. About ten minutes past six in the evening we were returning, and on driving down Sandgate Hill, the deceased being driving, she accidentally hit the mare with the whip, which caused the mare to jump forward. I jumped down to get the mare`s head to steady her. Before I could get there the mare bolted and galloped down the hill. I followed, and saw the mare turn off, as if with the intention of pulling up at the house from which they started. She made for the wall on the off side. The mare saw the wall and shot out again. The cart collided against the kerb, and Mrs. Green was thrown out. I saw her fall between the wall and the wheel. The mare continued on through Sandgate, and on my arrival at the place where deceased laid on the path I noticed that she was insensible and blood was flowing very freely from her head and face. I ran off for the doctor, knowing I could not catch the mare. Deceased had been in the habit of riding and driving the mare for the past eight or nine months. It was half-bred, and would not stand the whip, otherwise she was quiet.

Sidney saunders, a publican, living at East Cliff, said: On Thursday, the 23rd May, I, with others, was walking across the footpath leading into Sandgate Road, and saw a dog cart, in which were two ladies and a groom. The horse was going at a gentle trot. I saw it make a plunge forward, and the groom get off the back of the trap and rush towards the horse`s head. Before he got up to it the horse had bolted. He then made a grasp at the trap, appeared to stumble, and the horse was gone. I ran as fast as I could. I saw the horse turn towards the kerb on the off side, and as the wheel caught the kerb, one of the ladies was pitched out against the wall. The horse went right away through Sandgate. I found deceased lying on the path, insensible, and blood flowing freely from the head and mouth. I lifted up her head, unfastened her bodice, and procured some water and washed her mouth. Someone came along and said the deceased lived a few doors off, and asked them to carry her indoors. They did so, and Dr. Chubb came. Samuel Saunders and Joseph Whiting were with me.

These two having given corroborative evidence, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Holbein`s Visitors` List 9 April 1890

Local News

Our daily papers should really try to be a little more accurate in some of their provincial reports. Only the other day it was stated that a London police officer had arrested a man in Folkestone for burglary, the fact being that P.S. Butcher, one of our own force, arrested the man, who was “wanted”, he having taken lodgings at the Bricklayers` Arms. Let us have honour paid when honour is due, even if we are only “little Folkestone”.

Folkestone Express 11 October 1890

Monday, October 6th: Before Capt. W. Carter, Aldermen Dunk and Pledge, J. Fitness, S. Penfold, and E.T. Wards Esqs.

Thomas Clayton, a young man of decent appearance, was charged with stealing 18s. in silver and bronze, the property of Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms.

Joseph Whiting said: I am landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms, in Fenchurch Street. Prisoner came to my house and slept there on Friday last. He was also there on Saturday about the house, sometimes in the kitchen and sometimes in the bar. He was there on Saturday evening. Just before, he said he was not going to stay as he had no money to pay for his bed. About seven o`clock he went out of the front door which leads to the bar. I left the bar about the same time as prisoner was leaving the bar and went to the back part of the house and left the bar unattended. When prisoner told me he had no money to pay for his bed he was in front of the bar. I was absent about a minute, and I went to the till to pay a girl for some fish, when I found I had been robbed. I had just before been to the till, and whatever had been taken was done between the time I was absent from the bar and my return. Prisoner could easily have got at the till by leaning over the counter. Prisoner came back and said he would pay for a bed, and for that of a friend. He went upstairs and I followed him, and saw him come back, and he paid me 1s. 6d. for his and another man`s bed and for some beer. I missed from my till about 15s. in bronze and about four or five shillings in silver. I never mentioned my loss until I gave him in charge about nine o`clock. I told prisoner then that it looked very suspicious on his part, and gave him in custody. Prisoner said nothing. P.C. Swift said “You will have to come along with me” and he replied “All right”.

Cross-examined by the prisoner: You had money on Friday night and changed money on Saturday morning. The time you paid for the bed was about nine o`clock. On Saturday morning you might have spent about 6d. or 8d. You told me when you left to take charge of the parcel until you returned.

George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance, said prisoner went to his house on Saturday evening. He was alone. He called for a small soda. There were other people in the bar. He treated people in the bar to the amount of 2s., which he paid for in coppers. He saw he had 2s. 6d. in silver with the coppers.

Jane Tritton said prisoner came to the bar of the Royal George on Saturday evening. Two men went with him. He called for drinks for himself and companions, which he paid for in coppers, to the amount of one shilling. He asked her if she would mind coppers. She said she was short of them, and gave him 2s. 6d. in silver for that amount of coppers.

Stephen Hall deposed to prisoner treating him, and his having a large quantity of coppers in his possession.

P.C. Swift, who apprehended the prisoner, said he asked him “How long have you been in the bar?” He replied “Oh, I don`t know. Anything wrong or anybody robbed?” He replied “Yes”. Prisoner said “What`s the charge?” and he told him and prisoner answered “All right”. On searching him he found on him 5s. and a halfpenny in bronze, and 2s. 6d. and two sixpenny pieces in silver. He was charged before the Superintendent in his presence and he replied “All right. It is true”.

Prisoner said he did not remember saying that.

In reply to a question, the constable said he was sober.

Prisoner elected to be tried by the Bench, and said that he had been hopping, and the money he had about him was what he had been paid. He denied that he told prosecutor that he had no money.

The Chairman told prisoner that the Bench considered him Guilty. Tradesmen must be protected in their business. It was a gross theft. He would be sent to gaol for six weeks` hard labour.

Folkestone Express 15 November 1890

County Court

Tuesday, November 11th: Before Judge Selfe

P. Upton v Robert Carter: Claim 3 1s. 9d. Defendant is a publican. Committed for 14 days. Order suspended for 28.

Note: Oddfellows Arms

Wednesday, November 12th: Before H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs., and Surgeon General Gilbourne.

Thomas Lister, a marine store dealer, was charged with committing a criminal assault on Emily Newing, and also with stealing two two shilling pieces from her on Tuesday evening.

Emily Newing, the wife of William Newing, a labourer, lodging at the Bricklayers` Arms, said the prisoner and his wife also lodged there. She met the prisoner about seven o`clock on Tuesday evening near the Globe, on The Bayle. Up to that time she had never spoken to him. He asked her to mind his bag for a few minutes, which she did. When he returned he asked her to go into the Globe and have something to drink. They each had two glasses of porter. They were in the house five or ten minutes and left together. He then dabe her goodnight and went towards High Street. She went down the Parade Steps. When she was halfway down the prisoner came behind her and threw her down. She had two two shilling pieces tied in her handkerchief, which prisoner took, and he then ran away up the steps.

Dr. Bateman stated that the prosecutrix was taken to him on the previous night at about 10.30. He examined her and saw nothing to lead him to suppose that the assault complained of had been committed.

P.C. Scott said he took the prisoner into custody for stealing two two shilling pieces, and when charged prisoner said “It`s a lie”. Up to the time prisoner was taken into custody the woman made no other statement. He searched the prisoner and found one two shilling piece, four shillings and some bronze.

Supt. Taylor having given evidence, the Bench called the prosecutrix to the front and said the story told was so improbable that they had no hesitation in dismissing both the charge of assault and theft.

Folkestone Chronicle 4 April 1891

Monday, March 30th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, Major Penfold, and W.G. Herbert Esq.

John Murray and Daniel Harford were charged with stealing two pairs of boots, valued at 15s. 6d., and the property of William Bull.

Charles Smitherman, a polisher, said he was in the Royal George Inn shortly before nine o`clock on Saturday evening, when the prisoner went into the bar and offered a pair of boots for sale. He asked witness if he knew where he could sell them, and he took them to Mr. Carter at the Oddfellows, but he would not buy them. He went back to the Royal George and found Murray waiting.

Joseph Whiting stated that Harford lodged at his house, the Bricklayer`s Arms, and on Saturday evening both prisoners called at his bar for some beer, but he refused to serve them.

Winifred Whiting identified Murray as the man who called at her uncle`s house on Saturday afternoon with a pair of elastic side boots. He waited until Harford came in and they both went out together.

P.C. Keeler deposed that he found Harford at 11, Fenchurch Street, a house hired by Mr. Whiting as a lodging house. Witness asked him if he had a pair of new boots, and he gave him the pair produced. He said he bought them at the Bricklayer`s Arms for 3s. 6d. from a man whom he did not know. Witness took him to the police station, and later on he went to the Marquis Of Lorne, where he found Murray in the bar. He had been drinking.

Both prisoners denied the charge. Murray stated that he bought the boots from a strange man and sold them to Harford.

Each prisoner was sentenced to one month`s hard labour.

Folkestone Express 4 April 1891

Monday, March 30th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, Major Penfold, and W.G. Herbert Esq.

John Murray and Daniel Harford were charged with stealing two pairs of boots, value 15s. 10d., the property of William Bull, of High Street.

Prosecutor said on Saturday night, about a quarter to nine, he missed a pair of boots from outside his shop. P.C. Swain called upon him and about five minutes after he was gone he missed a second pair.

Charles Smitherman, a polisher, said he was in the Royal George Inn about a quarter to nine on Saturday evening, when the prisoner Murray went in with a pair of boots and offered them for sale. Murray asked him if he knew where he could sell them. He took them to Mr. Carter at the Oddfellows, but he would not buy them. He returned to the George with the boots. Murray was still there. He thought one of the loops of the boots was broken.

Joseph A. Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers Arms, said Harford lodged in his house. Both prisoners went to his bar between seven and half past seven on Saturday evening. They called for beer but he refused to serve them.

Winifred Whiting said she recognised Murray as having gone to her uncle`s house about half past four on Saturday afternoon with a pair of new elastic side boots. He asked for Dan, meaning Harford, and she told him he was not at home. He waited until he came and they then went out into the back yard together.

P.C. Keeler said he went to No. 11, Fenchurch Street, a house hired by Whiting as a lodging house, and found Harford there. He asked i he had a pair of new boots, and he showed him those produced, saying he bought them from a man he did not know, whom he met at the Bricklayers Arms, and gave 3s. 6d. for them. Witness took him into custody, and when charged by Sergt. Ovenden he made no reply. About half past eleven he went to the Marquis Of Lorne, in Radnor Street, and found Murray in the taproom asleep. He had been drinking. When charged at the police station with stealing two pairs of boots he made no reply.

Prisoners elected to be tried by the Magistrates. Harford pleaded Not Guilty, and Murray Not Guilty. Murray said he bought the boots of a man and sold them to Harford.

The Bench convicted both prisoners and sentenced them to a month`s hard labour.

Sandgate Visitors` List 26 March 1892

Local News

At the Police Court at Hythe on Thursday, before Dr. Lovegrove, four hawkers, named John Berry, Thomas Page, John Jones, and Samuel Perry, all belonging to Dover, with the exception of Page, who hails from Folkestone, were charged with stealing silver and coppers to the value of 16s., the monies of Mr. T.H. Goddard, greengrocer, of High Street, Sandgate, on the 23rd inst.

Prosecutor said on the previous morning he was called to the back of his premises, and was there engaged from seven to ten minutes. On returning to the front shop he discovered his till was empty, with the exception of a threepenny piece and a penny. The till was closed but not locked. He saw the contents of the till about five minutes before he left the shop; there was about 9s. in silver and 6s. in copper. He also missed a small tin of potted meat from the window. He did not know the prisoners. He gave information to the police.

William Bryant, manager to Mr. Young, bootmaker, said that at about half past ten on the previous morning he had occasion to go to the Post Office, and he noticed two of the prisoners and three other man outside the Fleur de Lis public house. He afterwards saw them with two other men. He then started to clean the outside of the windows of his shop, which was next door to Mr. Goddard`s, and the prisoners John Berry and Page were outside, and to the best of his belief he saw Berry go into Mr. Goddard`s shop with a basket of primroses. He came out and went towards Folkestone by the Lower Road.

P.C. Field said he was on duty on the previous day, and from information he received went to Folkestone. He went to several public houses, and about four o`clock saw the prisoner Page outside the Leas Hotel with a basket of primroses. He told him he wanted him to go to the police station with him, and he said he was in Sandgate in the morning, and went into a public house to change a shilling. When they got to the police station he told him he had brought him there to make enquiries about a till robbery at Sandgate. Page said it was not him, but he stood outside the shop while another man went in. He gave him a description of the other man, and said he lodged at the Bricklayers Arms. He went there and took two other men to the station, but Page could not identify either of them. He afterwards took Page with him to the Bricklayers Arms. They went into a room, and Page pointed out the prisoner John Berry as the man who went into the shop. Berry denied it, and said he was not in Sandgate at all. He arrested him, and took them both to the Seabrook police station and charged them with the offence. Berry again denied it, but Page repeated his statement that Berry was the man who went into the shop.

Police Sergeant Styles said the two prisoners, John Jones and Samuel Berry, were brought to the Seabrook police station about half past ten that morning by one of the Folkestone police. He charged them with the other two prisoners respecting the till robbery. They both said they were in Sandgate on the previous morning, but knew nothing of the robbery. They also said that the prisoner John Berry was not there at all. He told them what Page had said, and the last-named again repeated his statement in their presence. Coming along from the police station, John Berry said it was a man named Prescott.

In defence, the prisoner John Berry called James Giles, another hawker, who said Berry was not in Sandgate at all on Wednesday, he was with him in Folkestone. They left the Bricklayers Arms about half past ten, and went on to the Leas hawking primrose roots for two or three hours. All the prisoners lodged at the Bricklayers Arms. Page left the house in company with John Jones, Samuel Berry, and a man named Prescott. He did not see any of them till the afternoon.

In cross-examination by Superintendent Maxted, witness said he did not pass the police station at Seabrook on Wednesday morning, but he did on Tuesday, and stopped a person outside who had ivy and primroses. He was positive he did not pass on Wednesday.

The prisoners were all remanded till Saturday.

Sandgate Visitors` List 2 April 1892

Local News

At the Hythe Police Court on Saturday, four hawkers, named John Berry, Thomas Page, John Jones, and Sampson Berry, were brought up on remand charged with stealing about 15s. in money and a tin of potted meat, valued at 1s., from the shop of Mr. T.H. Goddard, grocer, High Street, Sandgate. The prisoners John and Sampson Berry were defended by Mr. Watts, solicitor.

The evidence given on the previous Thursday having been read, William Bryant, cross-examined by Mr. Watts, said he was positive he saw John Berry about 10.30 outside of the Fleur de Lis with the prisoner Page, before the robbery took place. He knew him well by sight, having seen him pass through Sandgate on several occasions. He was wearing a red and black Guernsey. He could not swear to the prisoner Sampson Berry.

Police Constable Field, cross-examined, said he searched the prisoners Page and John Berry at the Folkestone police station. On Page he found a small tin box containing two sixpences, one threepenny piece, a penny and a halfpenny; on Berry he found sixpence and a pedlar`s certificate. He gave the money back and took them to the Seabrook police station. He did not know Page had a weak intellect, neither did he know the names of the two boys he first arrested; they were given to the sergeant at the police station. One of them was wearing a blue and white striped Guernsey.

Police sergeant Styles, cross-examined, said the prisoners Jones and Sampson Berry were brought to the Seabrook police station by one of the Folkestone police. He re-charged them there. They were not arrested on information given by Page.

James Davis, a labourer, said he was at work on the sea wall at Battery Point on the previous Wednesday, and he saw the prisoners John Berry and Page pass at about half past ten in the morning. They were going towards Sandgate from Hythe. Berry was wearing a striped Guernsey, he believed it was red and black. He was positive they were the two men. He was at work in the road, and they passed close by him. He could not help observing them. He recognised Berry by his face, as well as the Guernsey. He was taken to the police station on the previous day, and identified them. He did not see the other two prisoners.

William Flisher, proprietor of the Fleur de Lis public house, said the prisoner Page came into his house about 10.30 on the previous Wednesday morning, and asked for change for a shilling. He also asked for a pint of beer and tendered a shilling; he gave a sixpence, a threepenny piece and a penny change. He took the beer outside to another man resembling John Berry. He did not see the other two prisoners. He identified Page and John Berry at the police station.

Mr. Watts said there was not a word of evidence against Sampson Berry or Jones, and he asked that they might be discharged.

Sampson Berry and Jones were then discharged.

Mr. Watts, continuing, said with regard to John Berry, he should urge it was a case of mistaken identity. He called James Giles, who again adhered to his statement that Berry was not in Sandgate on the previous Wednesday. He understood the evidence he was giving; he was speaking the truth.

Patrick Harrington and John Maskell, both of whom lodged at the Bricklayers Arms, also gave evidence that Berry was in Folkestone at the time the robbery was committed.

Both prisoners were remanded till the Petty Sessions on Thursday, when they were again brought up, and the case dismissed, there not being sufficient evidence to convict.

Southeastern Gazette 7 August 1894

Inquest

On Thursday morning James Watson, about 60 years of age, living at 14, Fenchurch Street, Folkestone, was found by his wife partially hanging from a rope attached to a banister over the staircase. She endeavoured to move him without avail, and Mr. Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers’ Arms opposite, ran across with a knife and cut him down. Watson was then alive, but he died in about three minutes. The deceased had been harbour pilot at Folkestone for a very long period, and was landlord of the Victoria Inn, South Street, for some 20 years.

Folkestone Chronicle 29 March 1895

Local News

At the Borough Police Court on Thursday, Rose Ann and Joseph Boyers, vagrants, were charged with stealing two coats, the property of Frederick George Mercer and Albert Edward Mercer, from 17. Alexandra Gardens, on Tuesday evening.

P.S. Harman gave evidence in support of the charge, showing he had traced one of the coats to the Bricklayers` Arms, Fenchurch Street, and the other from information supplied by the landlady – Mrs. Whiting – to Dover. He arrested prisoners on the previous evening. When arrested the woman said she was innocent of the charge, and was having tea when the male prisoner brought the coats in. The man said no-one had seen him steal the coats, and he had bought them.

Eli Clark, labourer, staying at the Bricklayers` Arms, said he had seen the prisoners in the kitchen at the house on Tuesday night, when they offered a brown coat for sale. Afterwards prisoners offered it for sale in the bar. The garment produced was (he thought) the one offered. Witness bought it for two shillings. He asked prisoners how the coat came into their possession, and was told by both of them that they got their living dealing in second hand clothes.

Further evidence was give to show the female prisoner had endeavoured to get a shilling advanced on the coat by the landlord of the house, and sold the second garment to a Dover street musician who was getting a glass of beer at the public house.

The coats were identified by their owners, who each valued their property at 15s.

In answer to the Clerk, the male prisoner said the woman was his wife, being married to him a Leicester twenty three years ago. She was accordingly discharged. The man made the excuse that he had bought the coats for three shillings, but afterwards pleaded Guilty, and was sentenced to 28 days` imprisonment with hard labour.

Folkestone Express 30 March 1895

Local News

On Thursday, at Folkestone Police Court, before J. Holden, J. Fitness, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Pledge Esqs., Joseph Boys, and elderly man, and his wife, were charged with stealing two overcoats, each of the value of 15s., the property of Mr. Frederick George Mercer, and Mr. Alfred Edward Mercer, brothers, residing at 17, Alexandra Gardens.

The prosecutors stated that they saw their garments safe in the hall at seven o`clock on Tuesday evening, and missed them at 8.30 on Wednesday morning.

Sergeant Harman apprehended the prisoners at the Bricklayers` Arms, and the evidence of Eli Clark, a labourer lodging there, and of Mrs. Whiting, the landlord`s wife showed that the prisoners offered the coats in the house for sale, saying they were dealers in second hand clothing.

The man said his wife had nothing to do with the matter. He bought the coats of a man for 3s. each. In reply to the Magistrates` Clerk, Boys said he was married to the woman at Christ Church, Leicester, 23 years ago. Thereupon Mr. Bradley said the law would presume the wife acted under the coercion of her husband, and she was entitled to be discharged.

The male prisoner at first pleaded Not Guilty, but withdrew that plea, and was sentenced to 14 days` hard labour for each theft, one sentence to follow the other.

Folkestone Herald 30 March 1895

Police Court Record

John and Rose Royer, man and wife, age 50 and 52 respectively, were brought up in custody at the Folkestone Police Court on Thursday morning, charged with having stolen two coats from No. 17, Alexandra Gardens, the property of Mr. Fredk. and Mr. Albert Mercer.

It appeared from the evidence of P.S. Harman that on the previous day he had apprehended the woman at the Bricklayers` Arms, Great Fenchurch Street, and that on taking her to the police station, the male prisoner was in custody. Both were charged by Supt. Taylor, when the woman protested her innocence and the man alleged that he had bought the coats.

From the evidence of Mrs. Whiting, of the Bricklayers` Arms, it appeared that the prisoners came there and offered the coats for sale to several people who were in the parlour. Witness lent 2s. to a customer who wanted to buy one of the coats, and the female prisoner had the money. The male prisoner sold the coat to another man.

A street musician named Collins, from Dover, proved that he bought one of the coats for 2s.

The woman was ultimately discharged. The man pleaded Guilty, and was committed with hard labour for 14 days on each offence, the sentences to be consecutive.

Folkestone Chronicle 7 June 1895

Local News

A shocking and abominable incident occurred in Bradstone Road on Monday evening last at about seven o`clock, just at the time when the members of the local branch of the Salvation Army, attended by between one and two hundred young people and others, were about to start their usual parade of the streets in the lower end of the town.

A middle aged man and woman, both roughly dressed, were noticed coming up the road in a state of intoxication. The man was very much the worse for liquor, and the woman evidently was violently and passionately raging in consequence of the drink she had taken, and was determined upon making a quarrel. She carried a basket, but in such a careless manner as to let some of it`s contents – a piece of bacon of about three pounds weight – roll out of it on to the ground. During the outburst of temper the man kept asking her “Why don`t you go home?” This seemed to enrage the drunken woman all the more, and she put down her basket, saying, in foul terms, that she would show him what sort of a woman she was, and then proceeded to scratch his face, using both hands to effect her purpose. The man laughed stupidly at this treatment, and pushed the woman away, doubling up his fists as if to strike her, though never apparently losing his temper, when the woman put her hand into the basket she had alongwith her, and pulled out a knife from it. She then made a repeated attack upon her companion with the weapon, stabbing him several times upon the face and forehead, blood streaming from his features, until compelled to desist by a number of men who stood around, and who proceeded to take the pair to the police station, when they came across P.C. Woods, who took the woman into custody.

The man`s wounds were attended to by Dr. Bateman, who pronounced the injuries not to be of a serious character, and only skin deep. The knife with which they were caused was a blunt weapon, with which it would not be easy to inflict a serious stab.

According to the woman`s story she had lived for seven or eight months in the town, where she has obtained employment as a laundress. Her name is Mary Young, and the man is called George Franklin. He is a labourer, but seldom works, and has been living in the common lodging house, the Bricklayers` Arms. Formerly she had lived with Franklin, who had got to know that she was living in Folkestone, and had followed her to this town. On Saturday the two set off together and went to Dover, thence to Deal, returning here on Monday. At the commencement of the jaunt the woman had 7, representing her little savings for some time past. When the couple arrived home, the whole of this amount had been expended. The man was determined upon following her to her lodgings, and had succeeded in preying upon the fears of the woman to such an extent as to tempt her in her frenzy of drunken passion to make the attack upon him described above.

Young was charged at the Borough Police Court on Tuesday morning with the assault named, but when the name of the prosecutor, George Franklin, was called out there was no response.

Superintendent Taylor said the man had called at the police station, saying he should not appear to give evidence. Franklin had since left the town.

Mr. Wightwick (who presided): Have you been living with him?

Prisoner: Yes, that has caused the trouble. He would follow me to my lodgings, and would come with me.

Mr. Wightwick: As no-one appears against you, you are discharged.

Folkestone Express 22 June 1895

Tuesday, June 18th: Before G. Spurgen and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

William Henry Joiner was charged with stealing a pair of boots, two shirts, and other articles, the property of Charles Henry Blanche. The prosecutor and prisoner are both members of the K.A. Militia.

Prosecutor, a labourer, said he was paid off on Saturday, the 15th. He left Dover for Shorncliffe at about half past eleven. He had with him a bundle of wearing apparel. He put it underneath the seat. Prisoner was in the carriage, and four or five other men. At first prisoner sat opposite to him, but afterwards shifted his seat. He (prosecutor) went to sleep and woke up at Folkestone Junction. The train had stopped and prisoner had gone. He went on to Shorncliffe and got out there. He looked for his parcel, but could not find it. On Monday, a man named Smith took him a pair of boots, which he identified as his property. The bundle contained a pair of boots, four shirts, and two flannel cholera belts. On Monday night, Smith gave two of the shirts to Sergeant Lilley. The value of the whole contents of the bundle was 15s.

Thomas Smith, of 9. The Narrows, said he saw the prisoner at the Bricklayers` Arms, and he asked him to buy two shirts and a pair of boots for 4s. He bought them for 3s. Prisoner said he bought them and gave 14d. for them. He sold one shirt for 1s. to Harry Gardner. He knew the prosecutor, and recognised the boots as belonging to him. He took the boots to him and asked him if he sold them.

Sergeant Lilley said he arrested the prisoner, who said the sergeant-major asked him to look after the prosecutor, who was drunk. On the way from Dover prosecutor asked him to buy the bundle for 2s. and he bought it for 1s. 2d. Prosecutor denied this statement.

Prisoner repeated the story to the Magistrates. When he heard it stated that he was accused of stealing the things, he went to the Bricklayers` Arms and courted investigation.

The Magistrates thought that prisoner stole the articles, and fined him 20s., or 14 days`.

Folkestone Express 11 April 1896

Thursday, April 9th: Before W. Wightwick, J. Fitness, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Eliza Standing was charged with stealing a silver watch, value 2 10s. 0d. from the person of John Kelly.

Prosecutor, a gunner in the 20th Field Battery, stationed at Shorncliffe, said on Thursday night he met the prisoner behind the Pleasure Gardens, and they walked together for a time. She left him, and five minutes after he missed his watch. He gave information to the police, and afterwards went to the Bricklayers` Arms, and while they were there the prisoner entered and he pointed her out to the landlady, Mrs. Whiting, as a woman who had stolen his watch. Mrs. Whiting brought the watch out to him.

Prisoner: You gave me the watch.

Prisoner said he did not. He gave her a little match box.

Frances Whiting, wife of Joseph Whiting, said prisoner and her husband lodged together at the Bricklayers` Arms. While the constable and prosecutor were talking, the prisoner entered by the back door and then went out again to another house. They followed her to No. 13, Fenchurch Street, where the constable stopped her in the passage. Witness picked up the watch in the passage, near where the prisoner had been standing.

P.C. Dunster said about nine o`clock on Wednesday he went with prosecutor to the Bricklayers` Arms. Prisoner entered by the back door with a man, and they went into the bar. Prosecutor pointed her out to him as the woman who had stolen his watch. She looked round and saw him and hurried out of the front door to No. 13, and witness, Mrs. Whiting, and prosecutor followed her. She rushed into the passage, and just as she got in witness heard something drop on to the floor. Mrs. Whiting produced a light, and the watch produced was found in the passage. He charged her with stealing the watch, and she replied “I don`t know anything about it”.

When charged at the police station, she said the prosecutor gave her the watch.

Prisoner elected to be tried summarily, and pleaded Not Guilty, saying the prosecutor gave her the watch.

The Bench decided to fine her 10s. or seven days`, and ordered the watch to be given to Kelly.

Folkestone Herald 16 October 1897

Local News

On Thursday, a man named George Watson, staying at the Bricklayers` Arms, was engaged at work on the sea wall in putting down some rails, some men above him being unloading timber. A couple of planks caught him across the loins, and he was badly bruised and taken to the Victoria Hospital, where he is progressing favourably.

Folkestone Chronicle 6 November 1897

Tuesday, November 2nd: Before The Mayor, Messrs. J. Holden, J. Fitness, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Pledge.

James Fry, labourer, was charged with refusing to quit the Bricklayers` Arms, Fenchurch Street, when requested.

Mr. Stainer prosecuted on behalf of the Licensed Victuallers` Association, and asked for an exemplary penalty.

Mrs. Whiting, the landlady of the public house, said she asked defendant to leave as he was drunk. He refused to do so, and used obscene language.

Her husband corroborated, and P.C. Scott proved the arrest.

It appeared, however, that defendant was at the time of the arrest outside the house, and the case was therefore dismissed.

Folkestone Express 6 November 1897

Tuesday, November 2nd: Before The Mayor, J. Holden, J. Fitness, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Pledge Esqs.

James Fry, labourer, was charged with refusing to quit the Bricklayers` Arms, Fenchurch Street, when requested.

Mr. Stainer appeared for the Licensed Victuallers` Association, who had received many complaints from publicans about their being troubled by drunken labourers. He asked for an exemplary sentence.

Mrs. Whiting, landlady of the Bricklayers` Arms, said that prisoner came into her bar on November 1st at 11 a.m. As he was drunk, she asked him to leave, but instead of doing so he used obscene language and refused. She asked his name and address, and as he would not give them, she sent for a constable to arrest him.

Joseph Whiting, the landlord, corroborated.

P.C. Scott stated that he was called to the house, and as prisoner would not give his name and addfress he took him into custody.

The Mayor: Was he inside the bar when you arrested him?

Witness: No, sir. On the step.

The Mayor: The lower step or the upper one?

Witness: The lower one.

The Mayor: Then there is no case if he was off the premises.

The case was dismissed.

Folkestone Chronicle 6 August 1898

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Tuesday evening, touching the death of Pierce Laurence Pain.

Pierce Bradford Pain, 151, Catherine Road, East Ham, labourer, said deceased was his father, and was 63 years of age. He lived at 4, St. John`s Street, and was a stonemason. Witness last saw him at East Ham at Whitsuntide. He suffered very much with his breath. Witness was to have spent the holiday with him, but when he wrote some three weeks since to arrange, his letter was returned marked “Gone away”. The deceased had been a heavy drinker, and had been drinking a great deal during the past month.

P.C. Simpson said he found the deceased at ten minutes past eleven on Saturday night, sitting on the pavement by the Bricklayers` Arms, in Fenchurch Street. In reply to witness, he said “I shall be all right presently. I`ve been like this several times”. He said he had been drinking sloe gin for the diarrhoea. He was not drunk. Mr. Whiting, the landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms, came out and said “I`ve a room here. He can go in there if he likes”. Witness took deceased in and laid him on the floor, placing a pillow under his head. Witness went in later, and deceased said he was better. He did not appear to have been injured in any way.

Mr. Peter Hemsley, Relieving Officer of the Elham Union, stated that he was called by the police on the previous day to the Bricklayers` Arms, and went down at 9.30. The deceased complained of diarrhoea, and said he had been laying out on the beach, rough. He had no means and no home. He did not appear to be very bad, and his voice was quite strong. A woman in the house said she had taken him in some breakfast. Witness sent a note to Dr. Barrett to visit the man and give a certificate for his removal to the Workhouse. Shortly afterwards witness heard that the man was dead. Deceased made no complaint, and did not appear to want anything.

Mr. William Peard Barrett, a surgeon, practicing in Folkestone, the Medical Officer for Folkestone District of the Elham Union, said he visited the Bricklayers` Arms shortly after one o`clock, and found the man had been dead since eleven. He examined the body, but found no marks of violence. He made no post mortem. He was of opinion he died from heart failure due to heavy drinking and exposure.

The jury brought in a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Folkestone Herald 6 August 1898

Inquest

On Tuesday evening an inquest was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr. Minter) at the Town Hall touching the death of Pierce Lawrence Paine. The circumstances are detailed in the evidence given below.

Pierce Radford Paine, son of deceased, deposed that he lived at 151, Catherine Road, East Ham, Essex. He was a labourer. Deceased was about 63 years old, and lodged at 4, St. John`s Street. That was the address he wrote to from London. He was a stonemason. He identified the body as that of his father, who, he said, had suffered with his breathing.

P.C. Simpson deposed that at 10 past 11 on Sunday night he found deceased in a sitting position on the pavement in front of the Bricklayers` Arms. His head rested against the front of the house. Witness asked what was the matter. Deceased replied “I shall be all right presently. I have been like this before, several times”. He said he had been drinking sloe gin for diarrhoea. Mr. Whiting, the landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms, said he had a room, which deceased could go into if he liked. He was taken into a room and laid down, with a pillow under his head. Witness went in again about 11.40, and deceased said he was better now. Witness reported it to P.S. Swift. Deceased made no complaint.

Mr. Peter Hemsley, Relieving Officer for the Elham Union, deposed that at 6 o`clock the previous morning he was called by the police. He was taken into a house next to the Bricklayers` Arms. Witness went at 9.30, and saw the deceased. He complained of diarrhoea. He said he had been “laying out rough”. Deceased was lying on the floor, with a pillow under his head. He said he had no means. He complained of having a touch of diarrhoea. Witness said it was laid down that a doctor should see the patient before being removed. Witness sent a note to Dr. Barrett. Witness made no complaint of ill-treatment.

Dr. William Peard Barrett deposed that he was Medical Officer of the Folkestone District of the Elham Union. The previous day he received a note from Mr. Hemsley requesting him to visit deceased at the Bricklayers` Arms. Witness reached there just after 1 o`clock. The man had been dead since 11 o`clock. Witness found no marks of violence. In his opinion death was due to heart failure, caused by exposure and heavy drinking.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Folkestone Express 25 February 1899

Thursday, February 23rd: Before Captain Carter, Colonel Westropp, and J. Hoad, J. Pledge, T.J. Vaughan, J. Holden, J. Stainer, and W. Medhurst Esqs.

George Petts was charged with stealing 6 3s. 6d., the money of Adam York, a valet, staying at the Metropole Hotel.

Frederick Masters, a decorator, living at Linden Crescent, said he was entrusted on Monday with a note to deliver to a certain commission agent. He saw prisoner at the Metropole Hotel, and asked him to deliver the note.

The witness gave his evidence reluctantly, and had to be threatened that he would be committed before he stated who the note was for, and then he said it was to Mr. Whiting, of the Bricklayers` Arms.

Witness then proceeded with his evidence, from which it appeared that he afterwards gave the accused 6 3s. 6d. to deliver to Adam York.

In answer to the prisoner, witness said he received 25s. from him with which to back a horse, and he gave it to Whiting.

Mr. Bradley: Why didn`t you say so before? You ought to be ashamed of yourself for the way in which you stand there and give your evidence.

Prisoner said he backed a horse called Black Lion, and the witness simply handed the money over to him.

Adam York said all he knew of the matter was that the prisoner had 6 of his money and ran away with it.

Mr. Bradley said there was no case against the man, and he ought not to have been taken into custody. He should have been summoned.

The prisoner was dismissed.

Folkestone Express 17 February 1900

Monday, February 12th: Before J. Banks, J. Fitness and W. Wightwick Esqs., and Colonel Hamilton.

Fredk. Frost was charged with being in the unlawful possession of nine military blankets.

Detective Officer Burniston said at 20 minutes to one on Saturday he saw the prisoner in Little Fenchurch Street with a sackful of something which appeared heavy, and going into the Bricklayers` Arms. Witness waited a few minutes, and then followed prisoner in, and saw him taking six blankets out of the sack. They were marked “W.D.”, and the broad arrow. He said to prisoner “Well, Frost, what have you got this time?” He made no reply. He asked him where he got the blankets from, and he said “I bought them this morning about 10 o`clock off a man at Cheriton, and gave him 4s. for them. I don`t know who he is, and have never seen him before”. Later on he went to prisoner`s house, No. 7, Norris Place,, where his mother handed him three more blankets, and made a statement respecting them. He took them to the polic station and showed them to the prisoner, who said “They are mine”. He told him that his mother said he took the blankets home on the previous evening, and took six of them out in the morning in a sack. Prisoner said “That`s a lie”. He charged prisoner with being found in unlawful possession of the nine blankets, the property of the War Department. He replied “I bought those three yesterday, and those six this morning off the same man at Cheriton”.

George Shirley, barrack warder at Shorncliffe Camp, identified the blankets as War Department property. The value of the nine was 2.

The prisoner said he bought them of a young man who said he bought them in the barracks. He gave 4s. for six and 2s. for three.

The Bench imposed a fine of 3, or in default one month`s imprisonment.

Folkestone Herald 17 February 1900

Folkestone Police Court

On Monday last Frederick Frost was charged with being in unlawful possession of nine blankets, the property of the military authorities, on Saturday night. Defendant said that he was Guilty of having the blankets.

Detective Burniston deposed that at twenty minutes to one on Saturday he was in Little Fenchurch Street, where he saw the defendant carrying a full sack, which appeared to be heavy. He followed him down the street, and saw him go in at the back entrance of a public house. Witness watched a few minutes and then went in himself. In the yard he saw the defendant putting the six blankets (produced) out of the sack he was carrying. They were marked with the arrow. He said to him “Well, Frost, what have you got this time?” He made no reply. Seeing the broad arrow and the stamp “W.D.” he asked where defendant got them from. Defendant said “I bought them this morning about ten o`clock of a man at Cheriton. I gave him 4s. for them. I don`t know where he is. I have never seen him before”. He brought the defendant and the property to the police station, and, later on, went to the defendant`s house, where his mother handed witness three more blankets marked in the same way, making a statement respecting them. Witness brought them to the police station and showed them to defendant. He said “Yes, they are mine”. Witness subsequently charged him with being found in unlawful possession of the property, and he replied “I bought those three yesterday (meaning what his mother handed witness), and these six (found in his possession) this morning of the same man at Cheriton. I don`t know who he is”.

George Shirley, barracks wardsman, deposed that he had seen the blankets, and he identified them as War Department property by the letters. The value of the nine was about 2.

Defendant said that he did not know that there was anything wrong. He had bought them from a young fellow who said that he had just purchased them in the barrack himself. He asked 4s. for the six. He bought the other three from the man on Friday, giving 2s. for them.

The Clerk to the Magistrates (Mr. H.B. Bradley): Do you call him as a witness?

Defendant: I have not got any witnesses, sir.

The Chairman said that the evidence was very clear against defendant, and he would be fined 3, or a month`s imprisonment, no time being allowed for payment.

Folkestone Chronicle 18 May 1901

Monday, May 13th: Before Messrs. Pledge, Peden, Vaughan, and Stainer, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

George Gunner and Joseph Hemborough were jointly charged with stealing a pair of trousers, the property of S. and W. Joseph, tailors, etc., of Tontine Street.

Detective Sergeant Burniston deposed that on Saturday night, at 10.55, he went to the Bricklayers` Arms lodging house. In the back yard, behind the dustbin, he found a new pair of trousers (produced), and close by them was a clothier`s ticket, numbered and marked 5s. 11d. He took possession of the trousers. Later in the evening he returned to the Bricklayers` Arms, and in consequence of what the landlady told him he went to the Lower Sandgate Road, where he found Hemborough asleep. Witness woke him and said “I shall charge you with stealing from the outside of the shop in Tontine Street a pair of trousers, the property of Messrs. Joseph”.

Prisoner: He is telling a pack of lies. I hope he may drop dead.

Witness, continuing, said he cautioned the prisoner, who said “I met the other man in London, and only came in the town today. You want to look after the thin man”. Witness brought him to the station, and on Sunday evening charged the men jointly. Both replied that it was the first time they had seen the trousers. Previous to the arrests witness had seen prisoners together with another man. When Gunner was arrested, the other two ran down Tontine Street. He then followed Hemborough to the Bricklayers` Arms and searched him, but found nothing at that time in connection with the charge.

Isabella Susannah Carden, employed at the Bricklayers` Arms, said that while in the scullery of the Bricklayers` Arms on Saturday evening she saw the prisoners come into the yard. Gunner had something on his arm, which looked like a dark article of clothing. She heard one of the prisoners say to the other “Why did you not put them on?” Ultimately she saw them stop about five minutes by the dustbin.

At this point the Magistrates expressed the opinion that the evidence was not sufficient to convict, and Hemborough (who looked very much surprised) was discharged.

The Magistrates` Clerk (to Hemborough): Look here, you are discharged, because there is not sufficient evidence. There may be another charge against you before the day is out. I should advise you to leave the town.

Hemborough: Yes, sir. Thank you.

(Gunner had earlier been sentenced to two months` hard labour for theft of clothing and a bag)

Folkestone Express 18 May 1901

Monday, May 13th: Before Alderman J. Pledge, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, and T.J. Vaughan, J. Stainer, and G. Peden Esqs.

George Gunner and Joseph Hemborough were jointly charged with stealing a pair of trousers, the property of Messrs. Joseph Bros. They pleaded Not Guilty.

Det. Sergeant Burniston said about 10.55 o`clock on Saturday he went to the Bricklayers` Arms lodging house, and he there searched the premises. In the back yard, behind the dustbin, he found a new pair of trousers (produced) and a ticket, which bore the price 5s. 11d., and a private mark. He took them to the police station, where they were identified by Messrs. Joseph. At 1.55 p.m., from what the servant at the lodging house told him, he went in search of the prisoner Hemborough, and found him asleep on the Lower Sandgate Road. He charged him with the theft, and after cautioning him, he answered “I met the other man in London. We both walked down together. We only came in on Friday evening. You ought to look after the other man”. He took him to the police station, and charged them together, and they both replied “It is the first time I have seen those trousers”. Witness was in Tontine Street about 10.30 p.m., and he saw the two prisoners in company with another man. They stopped outside Vickery`s boot shop, and they both looked suspicious. When prisoner Gunner was arrested by P.C. Wellar the other two prisoners ran away, and witness followed and searched the prisoner Hemborough in the Bricklayers` Arms, and found nothing on him.

Isabella Susannah Carden, servant to Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms, said about 8.10 on Saturday evening she was in teh scullery, where she saw the two prisoners coming from the lodgers` kitchen, and they went into the street. About ten minutes afterwards they returned, and the prisoner had some article which was dark, and appeared to be like a pair of trousers, on his arm. He said to his companion “Why didn`t you put them on?” They went into the house and subsequently returned with the trousers on his arm. They went to the dustbin and stopped there about five minutes.

The Bench here dismissed the case owing to insufficient evidence.

Folkestone Herald 18 May 1901

Monday, May 13th: Before Alderman J. Pledge, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and Messrs. Stainer and Peden.

George Gunner and Joseph Hemborough were charged with having stolen a pair of trousers from the shop occupied by Messrs. Joseph, 11, Tontine Street.

Det. Sergeant Burniston said at 10.55 on Saturday night he went to the Bricklayers` Arms lodging house and searched the premises. In the back yard, behind the dustbin, he found the pair of trousers produced, to which a clothier`s ticket was attached. He returned later and searched for prisoner, but did not find him, but at 1.55 on Sunday morning he found him asleep in the Lower Sandgate Road. He awoke him and told him he would be charged, to which he replied “I met the other man in London, and we came down together. We only came into the town on Friday evening. You want to look after the other man”. In reply to the charged at the police station both prisoners replied “It is the first time I have seen them trousers”. When Gunner was arrested Hamborough and another man ran down Tontine Street. Witness followed him then to the Bricklayers` Arms and searched him, but found nothing on him connected with the charge.

Isabella Susannah Carden, servant to Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms, said at 8.10 on Saturday evening she saw the two prisoners coming from the lodgers` kitchen together. About ten minutes after, they came back to the house, and Gunner had something dark, which looked like a pair of trousers, hanging over his arm. When in the kitchen Gunner held up the trousers and said to Hamborough “Why didn`t you put them on?” Then they went into the yard and stopped about five minutes by the dustbin, afterwards going into the street.

Both prisoners denied that they knew anything about the trousers.

The Chairman said the Magistrates thought there was not sufficient evidence to convict, and they would therefore dismiss the case.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 January 1902

Inquest

An inquest was held on Monday into the death of Isaac Henry Gale, a man well known in East Folkestone as the trumpeter in the 17th Lancers (Death or Glory Boys), who sounded the charge at Ulandi in the Zulu war.

Joseph Whiting said: I am the landlord of the Bricklayers` Arms public house, Fenchurch Street. I identify the body as that of Isaac Gale. He was about 49 or 50 years of age, and lived with me at a cottage adjoining the Bricklayers` Arms. He shared a bedroom with a companion of his. He depended principally on a pension, and did other casual work. He drew his pension on the 1st of January. It was about 5. The last time I saw deceased was about 11 o`clock on Friday night. Before going to be I went to look round, and found deceased on the bed, fully dressed. I thought he had been enjoying himself too much. I have had occasion to speak to Gale more than once in connection with taking too much to drink. On Saturday morning, between eight and nine o`clock, deceased`s bedmate came and reported to me that Gale was dead.

By the Chief Constable: I tried to rouse the deceased, but he did not take much notice. I thought he had been drinking too freely and was in a deep slumber. I had seen deceased drunk before, but he did not seem any different than on other occasions.

By Dr. Barrett: I could not say whether deceased always snored when he was drunk.

Sarah Betts said: I live at 20, Great Fenchurch Street, and am the wife of George Betts, a fisherman. I have known Gale a long time. I saw him between twelve and one on Friday. He was coming up Great Fenchurch Street. To me he appeared to have been drinking. He was staggering from one side to the other and fell upon the back of his head. I went to his assistance. I had seen deceased drunk before several times. I asked a passer-by to help me pick Gale up. I could then smell his breath, which was very strong of drink. When picked up, Gale said “Thank you very much for picking me up; thank you all round”. He also said “I`ve had some drink, I know”. He did not complain about his fall; he staggered along beside the wall and went indoors.

By Dr. Barrett: He only had about 10 yards to walk to the house from the place where he fell.

Arthur Stokes said: I live at 13, Fenchurch Street, and am a labourer. I help Mr. Whiting at times. I knew the deceased well. The first time I saw him on Friday was at 9.30 p.m. I was going round the rooms, and upon going into deceased`s apartment I found him lying between the two beds. He was on his side asleep and snoring. I called for assistance to help him on to the bed. A man named John Thomas came and gave me the required assistance. We put him on the bed, and I did not see him again until the following morning. I had seen him drunk before, and thought he was so on this occasion. On Saturday morning, between 8 and 9, I went into deceased`s room and found him dead. He was on the bed, and I at once went and told Mr. Whiting.

Harry Pope said: I live at No. 16a, Fenchurch Street, and I shared a bedroom with Gale. On Friday I saw him about one o`clock. I met him in the street. He was sitting on the window ledge of a shop. He aid to me “Hello, Popey”, and I went on. He had had a little to drink, quite sufficient to let me know he was moderately “full”. We have slept together for about two years. He always had been a drinker. When I got home that night it was twenty minutes to two. I struck a match and looked at him. He was on the bed with his clothes on. I had seen him once before with his clothes on at night time. Deceased stopped snoring about a quarter or half past two. I looked over my shoulder when I woke about 8.30 and found that Gale was dead.

Dr. W.P. Barrett said: I have today made a post mortem examination on deceased. I found a large clot of blood covering about one third of the left side of the brain. I also examined the organs of the body and found strong indications of heart disease and disease of the main arteries. The liver was small and very hard. I formed the opinion that the man died from what we usually term apoplexy. He had been drinking, but that was not the actual cause of death, but had accelerated death.

The jury found that deceased had died from apoplexy, accelerated by excessive drinking.

Folkestone Express 11 January 1902

Local News

On Saturday morning the death of Isaac Henry Gale, who was formerly a trumpeter in the 17th Lancers - better known as the “Death or Glory Boys” – took place at the Bricklayers Arms. The deceased is said to have sounded the charge at Ulundi in the Zulu War. He had given way to excessive drinking of late, which brought on apoplexy, and he died at the early age of 50 years.

Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, who identified the deceased, said he was 50 years of age, and he was formerly trumpeter in the 17th Lancers. He had been in Folkestone for 12 years. He died at a cottage adjoining his house, where he shared a bedroom with another man. He supported himself by means of his Army pension, and he drew 5 on January 1st. On Friday evening, about 11 o`clock, witness saw him fully dressed on the bed, and his appearance showed he had been drinking heavily. He did not think he required medical assistance. The deceased died on the following morning about eight a.m.

In answer to the Chief Constable, witness said he tried to rouse deceased, but he was in a collapsed state of intoxication, and was snoring rather heavily. There was no drink in the room.

Sarah Jane Betts, of 20, Great Fenchurch Street, said on Friday, between 12 and 1 o`clock, she saw the deceased stagger and fall backwards on his head. He was staggering from one side to the other, and he suddenly fell backwards on to the stone pavement. She had seen deceased drunk before, and he staggered in just the same manner. She called to a person, who helped him home. Deceased smelt strong of drink.

Arthur Stokes, of 13, Fenchurch Street, labourer, said he knew the deceased, and an Friday, about 9.30 p.m., he saw him on the floor in a drunken state in his bedroom. With the assistance of a man named John Thomas he was put on to the bed. The next morning between eight and nine o`clock he went to wake him up and found he was dead.

Harry Pope, a “lumper”, said he lived at the cottage adjacent to the Bricklayers Arms, and shared a bedroom with the deceased. He saw him drunk, sitting on the pavement in Dover Street on Friday morning. Witness went to bed about two o`clock next morning and the deceased was snoring very loudly. He was outside his bed with his clothes on. Witness went to bed and woke up at 8.30 a.m. He saw deceased was dead, but to assure himself he said to deceased “Aren`t you going to get up? You`ve been there since yesterday”, but he received no reply.

Dr. W.P. Barrett said he had made a post mortem examination of deceased`s body, and he found he had a large clot of blood on the left side of the brain, extending to a little way on the right side. Deceased also had heart disease; the liver was affected, and the arteries were diseased. He formed the opinion that he had died from apoplexy.

The Coroner: Would the fall in any way cause the clot of blood on the brain?

Witness: I think not. Haemorrhage must have been coming on, which was no doubt accelerated by drink. Probably it was a combination of both.

A verdict of “Apoplexy brought on by excessive drinking” was returned by the jury.

Folkestone Herald 11 January 1902

Inquest

An inquest was held on Monday afternoon on the body of an Army pensioner names Isaac Harvey Gale, who has had a lodging at the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, for a number of years.

Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, said deceased, who was about fifty years of age, had been lodging at his house about twelve or fourteen years. He shared a bedroom with another man in a cottage adjoining the Bricklayers Arms, but had his meals in the house. He did casual work, but depended principally on his pension for his means of living. On the 1st January he drew his pension, which would be about 5. At 11 o`clock on Friday night witness saw him lying on his bed with his clothes on, and thought he had been enjoying himself too much. He was generally of sober habits, but occasionally he indulged too much. When witness went into the room he was lying on the bed and snoring. He thought deceased had been indulging too freely. Next morning witness was told that Gale was dead.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve): Did you try to rouse him?

Witness: We tried to rouse him, but he did not seem to take the interest I should have liked.

The Chief Constable: You did not think he was bad enough to have a doctor?

Witness: No.

Dr. Barrett: Did he always snore when he was drunk?

Witness: I could not say, as I had not taken much notice.

Mrs. Betts, wife of George Betts, fisherman, of 20, Great Fenchurch Street, said she had known Gale some time. Betwoon 12 and 1 o`clock on Friday morning she saw him coming up Fenchurch Street. He was staggering from one side of the pavement to the other, and fell whilst she was watching him. Witness assisted him to the door, and he thanked her for so doing, at the same time saying “I`ve had some drink”.

Arthur Stokes, labourer, of 13, Fenchurch Street, Folkestone, said he had known deceased for some years. He looked after the rooms for Mr. Whiting. Part of his duties was to look round the rooms two or three times during the day. At 9.30 on Friday night he went into deceased`s bedroom and saw him lying on the floor between the two beds. He was snoring, and witness got him on to the bed with assistance. He had seen deceased in the same condition before. Next morning witness went to call the lodgers as usual, and found Gale lying dead on the bed.

Harry Pope deposed that he shared a bedroom with Gale. He worked on the boats as a “lumper”. He saw Gale on Friday dinnertime. He looked then as if he had been drinking. Witness had shared the room with deceased two years. Deceased snored heavy regularly. Witness went home between one and two o`clock in the morning on Saturday, and saw deceased lying snoring on the bed with his clothes on. About 2.30 deceased stopped snoring. At 8.30 in the morning witness got up, and on looking at deceased said “You`re dead, Ike, I expect”. He spoke to deceased, but getting no reply, reported to Stokes that he was dead.

Dr. Barrett said he had made a post mortem examination, and found a large clot of blood on the left side of the brain. He also found signs of extensive heart disease. He formed the opinion that death was due to what was called apoplexy, accelerated by rupture of blood vessel and heart disease. Nothing could have been done for him had medical assistance been called.

A verdict that death was due to apoplexy, brought on by excessive drinking, was returned.

Folkestone Chronicle 10 May 1902

Tuesday, May 6th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, G.I. Swoffer, and Alderman Salter.

Frederick Holmes and Alfred Charles Dalton, giving an address at the Bricklayers Arms, were charged in being concerned in stealing 29 feet of lead piping, weighing 59 lbs., and valued at 9s. Holmes was undefended, but Dalton was represented by Mr. G. Haines, who appeared at the request of Mr. Dalton senior, a respected trader of Margate.

Fredk. Vant, a carpenter in the employ of Mr. Steven Vant, and employed on an uncompleted house in Kingsnorth Gardens, said that on the lawn beside the house was a coil of new lead water piping, connected to the inside fittings but not to the main outside. At eight o`clock the previous morning he saw the lead, but about twelve o`clock was told that some of it had been cut off. Going down to the Castle public house he found it in a bag upon the ground outside the house. He waited until the prisoners came out. Holmes picked up the bag and placed it upon his shoulder, and both prisoners went across the road to the Red Cow. Holmes laid the bag down outside and prisoners went inside. They came out in about 15 minutes. Holmes again picked up the bag and carried it along Black Bull Road, Dalton accompanying him. They went to Mr. Baker`s, marine store dealer, Canterbury Road. Witness followed, and heard Holmes offering the lead for sale, describing it as “some old lead”. On seeing it, Mr. Baker said he could not buy it. Holmes added that he had bought the lead from a house close to the Wampach. Dalton said nothing. Witness then went forward and said to Holmes “You have stolen that lead from a house in Kingsnorth Gardens”. Holmes replied “Where? I do not know Kingsnorth Gardens. I have bought it and paid for it”. Witness said “That is lucky for you”. Dalton still said nothing. Sergt. Dunster came forward, and witness gave the men in charge. Witness identified the piping produced.

William Haines, a rag and bone collector, said that on the previous morning while on his round near the Central Station, at about a quarter to 12, he met the prisoner going through the railway arch, in the direction of Kingsnorth Gardens, or to the top of the town. Dalton was carrying a bag. Shortly afterwards he was in Kingsnorth Gardens, when he again saw the prisoners, coming from the top end, where there is a house in the course of erection. Dalton was still carrying the bag, but it seemed bulky, whereas when he first saw the men it was empty.

Police Sergt. Dunster proved the arrest. Vant, he said, having identified the piping at Mr. Baker`s, Dalton ran away up Canterbury Road, through James Street, into a meadow. Witness overtook him and brought him back to where Holmes was standing. The two were charged together, and Holmes (pointing to Dalton) replied “He can tell you where he got it”. At the police station he found on Holmes two knives, and on Dalton six keys.

By Mr. Haines: Dalton had also 6s. 5d. upon him, and Holmes one farthing.

The prisoners both pleaded Not Guilty.

Holmes preferred to make a statement instead of giving evidence on oath. He said that he did not know where Dalton got the lead from. He was calling at one set of houses and Dalton at the other. When he got to the bottom of the street, Dalton said that he had got some lead. He (Holmes) replied “You had best let that alone”. He admitted that afterwards he assisted to carry the lead, but declared that he did not steal it.

Mr. Haines then put Dalton into the box. He said: I was formerly a greengrocer living at Dover. On Sunday morning, at 8.50, I left Dover with my wife and child, my home having been sold up. I had a little money with me when I came to Folkestone, and I took rooms at the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street. I first saw Holmes there on Sunday afternoon, but did not speak to him until yesterday. From a conversation I had, I understood that there was going to be a fight outside the town, so I asked Holmes if I could go out with him. He agreed, and we went out together. We then had no bag. The fight did not come off. I had thought of getting some oranges at Wilson`s, but it came on to rain and Holmes suggested to me that he could earn some money “totting” if he had some coppers. I told him that I would let him have some money and we would share the profit. Holmes went to Baker`s and got three bags.

Holmes (interposing):They were three of my own bags. I had left them on Saturday.

Dalton (continuing): I carried one bag, and Holmes two. The little knife produced is mine; the big one I know nothing about. I cannot account for how it came into my possession. I do not remember seeing any new building in Kingsnorth Gardens. I was standing at the corner of Kingsnorth Gardens, when Holmes came along and gave me the bag to carry. I said “What have you got there?”, and he replied “All right. I found the bag to be heavy, dropped it, and found it to contain lead”. I did not say anything to Holmes about it, as I did not think. If Holmes said that I knew all about it, I did not remember. I was too far gone, having had too much to drink. I did not go into any house in Kingsnorth Gardens, as Holmes was collecting there. I have been a greengrocer, and I am afraid that it was owing to drink that I was sold out. Before having the lead in my possession I should say that we had had five or six pints each.

Cross-examined by Holmes: I was standing at the corner of the road when you brought me the lead. I was drunk; you were not.

Holmes (triumphantly): Then I ought to know what I was doing, gentlemen.

By the Chief Constable: I did not borrow the big knife from a man, so far as I can remember, and I am quite sure that I did not use it to cut the lead off.

Holmes: He borrowed the knife from me.

The Chief Constable said that seeing the turn the evidence had taken he should like to call another witness.

The Deputy Clerk: You have closed your case, and to call a witness now would be contrary to all procedure.

The Chief Constable: But I did not anticipate that Dalton would make such a statement, and I would like the matter cleared up, as there is a witness who actually saw him cut the lead off.

The Chairman decided that the case for the prosecution was closed.

The Chief Constable then said that there was no previous conviction against Dalton, who was the son of a respectable tradesman of Margate, but Holmes had undergone one or two trifling convictions.

Mr. Haines then addressed the Bench in mitigation, and urged Dalton`s past good character, asking the Bench to extend the provisions of the First Offenders` Act to him.

The Chairman, addressing Holmes, commented upon this not being his first conviction, and sentenced him to six weeks` hard labour. Then, turning to Dalton, he said that he, not having any previous conviction, would be sentenced to one month`s hard labour.

Upon the pronouncement of the sentence Dalton seemed dazed. His grey-headed father sobbed loudly, and his wife, with a young baby in her arms, cried hysterically.

Mr. Bickers, the Police Court Missionary, did all in his power to soften the blow upon those who, through no fault of their own, were placed in such a painful position.

At the conclusion of the case, Haines was commended for giving such valuable information and straightforward evidence.

Folkestone Herald 10 May 1902

Tuesday, May 6th: Before Mr. Wightwick, Mr. Swoffer, Alderman Salter, and Mr. W.G. Herbert.

Frederick Holmes and Alfred Chas. Dalton were charged with stealing 29ft. of lead piping, the property of Mr. Vant. Mr. Haines appeared for Dalton.

Fred. Vant, a carpenter, in the employ of Mr. A. Vant, said he was at work on Monday, at Kingsnorth Gardens. The coil of piping was connected with the fittings, but was not on the water main. He missed it about twelve o`clock. He then went down by the Castle Inn, and he saw a bag containing the lead lying outside. When prisoners came out he followed them to the Red Cow, and afterwards to aker`s marine stores, in Canterbury Road. Holmes offered the lead to Baker for sale, but Baker would not buy it. Witness went forward and said that Holmes had taken the lead from Kingsnorth Gardens. He replied that he had bought it and paid for it. Witness identified the piping produced.

William Hayes, a rag and bone dealer, deposed that he was on his rounds near the Central Station, when he met the prisoners going under the railway arch. He saw them shortly afterwards coming away from Kingsnorth Gardens, Dalton carrying a bag similar to the one produced.

P.S. Dunster said that on Monday he went to Baker`s marine stores, and saw prisoners and Vant there. Dalton ran away when witness spoke to them about the piping. Witness overtook him and brought him back. He then charged prisoners with stealing the piping. Holes replied, pointing to Dalton “He can tell you where he got it”. When he searched the prisoners he found two knives on Dalton.

Both prisoners pleaded Not Guilty.

The prisoner Dalton, who elected to give evidence on oath, said that he came from Dover to Folkestone on Sunday morning with his wife and child, and stayed at the Bricklayers Arms. On Monday Holmes and he went out. Holmes said that if he had some money he could earn more by “touting”. Witness agreed to provide the money, and go half profits. Witness went one road, and Holmes went another. Holmes came along with the bag carrying the piping, and asked him to carry it. Witness afterwards saw what was in the bag, but did not ask any questions. They had been drinking all the morning. He did not know how the large pen-knife came in his possession. It did not belong to him.

The Chief Constable proved previous convictions against Holmes.

Holmes was sentenced to six weeks` hard labour and Dalton to a month.

Folkestone Chronicle 23 August 1902

Monday, August 18th: Before Messrs. J. Banks, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Herbert John Jeffrey, and Annie Jeffrey, his wife, were charged with stealing one mattress, two blankets, one sheet, two metal teapots, and one pair of boots, the property of some person or persons unknown.

Detective Sergeant A.W. Burniston said: About 10 p.m. last evening, accompanied by P.C. Sharp, I went to the Bricklayers Arms, in Fenchurch Street. I was directed to a bedroom which was in the occupation of the two prisoners, who were then in bed. I informed the male prisoner that I was a police officer, and that I wished to ask him a few questions about a pair of boots which that morning he had sold in the kitchen. At the same time I observed a sack of horsehair standing at the side of the prisoner`s bed. On looking under the bed I found two more sacks filled with horsehair. In another sack, which was in the room, I found two blankets, one sheet, and miscellaneous articles of clothing. Beside the sack was some pewter, which had formed part of two metal teapots. I then asked the male prisoner where he got the horsehair from, and he replied that he had bought the mattress from a lady in the West End of the town for 1s. 6d. I questioned him as to where the house was situated, and he told me that he was a stranger to the town. I told him that I was not satisfied with his statement, and he replied “Just to prove to you that I have bought the mattress, I will take you to the west end of town and show you where I bought it”. Later I took him to the West End, and we walked about until two o`clock this morning looking for the house. Prisoner then said “I cannot find the house, and I do not know who the person was”. I then said to prisoner “I shall charge you with stealing the mattress”. I cautioned him, and he replied “I did not steal it; I bought it”. Subsequently I returned with the male prisoner to the Bricklayers Arms, and told him and the female prisoner that I should charge them with stealing the articles mentioned in the charge. The male prisoner then said “I broke into a house in the West End and stole the mattress, two blankets, two teapots, and one pair of boots. My wife does not know anything about it”. The female prisoner then said “My husband brought the things home, but he did not tell me where he got them from”. I then went and examined a house in Trinity Gardens, and found that the area door had been broken open, and in the chimney I found the pair of boots (produced).

The prisoner: I never said that I had broken into the house. I said that I had found the back door open.

Sergeant Burniston: Prisoner said he had broken into the house. He did nor say that he had found the back door open.

Isabella Susannah Carden, a woman employed as a servant at the Bricklayers Arms, said the accused came to the house about four days previous to the arrest. On Saturday evening, between eight and nine o`clock, she was in the pantry, when she saw the male prisoner carrying something, and upon asking him what he had there, received the reply that it was a mattress he had got for someone.

On the application of the Chief Constable the prisoners were remanded until Monday.

Folkestone Express 23 August 1902

Monday, August 18th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W. Wightwick, G.I. Swoffer, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Herbert John Jeffrey and Annie Jeffrey were charged with larceny.

Det. Burniston said about 10 o`clock on Sunday night, accompanied by P.C. Sharp, he went to the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, where he saw the prisoners in bed. Witness told the male prisoner he was a police officer, and wanted to ask some questions about some boots he had sold in the kitchen. Witness saw a sack containing horsehair standing beside the bed. On looking under the bed he found two other sacks containing horsehair and a further sack contained two blankets, one sheet, and other clothing. There was also a bundle in the room which contained two broken metal teapots. When asked where he obtained the articles, prisoner replied “I bought the mattress in the West End. I gave 1s. 6d. for it”. When questioned as to the person, prisoner said “I am a stranger here”. When told that his statement was not satisfactory, prisoner replied “To prove that I bought it, I will take you to the west end and show you the house”. He then dressed himself, and they went to the west end. They walked about until two o`clock for the house. Prisoner said “I can`t find the house. I don`t know who the person was”. Witness then said he would charge him with stealing the mattress, and cautioned him. Witness brought him to the police station, and later on went to the Bricklayers Arms boarding and arrested the woman. They were charged at the police station with stealing a mattress, two blankets, one sheet, a pair of boots and two metal teapots, the property of some person unknown. The male prisoner said “I broke into a house in the West End and stole a mattress, one sheet, two blankets, two teapots and a pair of boots. My wife does not know anything about it”. The wife said “My husband brought the things home. He did not tell me where he got them”. Witness went to 3, Trinity Gardens, and found the area door had been forced open and the furniture of the room thrown about. The caretaker had since identified the articles at the police station as the property of his employer.

Isabella Carden, employed at the Bricklayers Arms, said the prisoner had been staying at the house about four days. On Saturday evening she was standing in the pantry and saw the male prisoner come in between 8 and 9 o`clock. He was carrying something large covered with a sheet. Witness asked him what he had, and he replied “A mattress I had to get for someone”. Prisoner then took it upstairs. The female prisoner came into the yard just behind her husband.

The Superintendent asked for a week`s remand, and it was granted by the Bench.

Folkestone Herald 23 August 1902

Monday, August 18th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Alderman Herbert, Mr. W. Wightwick, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Herbert John Jeffrey and Annie Jeffrey were charged with larceny.

Detective Burniston gave evidence as to going to the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, and seeing the prisoners in bed. There were sacks of horsehair in the room, and blankets, a sheet, etc., and a bundle containing two broken metal teapots. Prisoner said he bought the mattress at a house in the West End. Witness and prisoner went to the West End to see the house where it was bought, but prisoner said he could not find it. Prisoners were charged with stealing a mattress, two blankets, one sheet, a pair of boots, and two metal teapots. The male prisoner said he broke into a house, but his wife knew nothing about it. Witness went to 3, Trinity Gardens, and found the area door forced and the furniture thrown about. The caretaker had since identified the property.

Isabella Carden, of the Bricklayers Arms, gave evidence as to seeing the male prisoner come in with a large bundle covered with a sheet. The female prisoner entered afterwards.

Prisoners were remanded for a week on the application of the Superintendent.

Folkestone Chronicle 30 August 1902

Monday, August 25th: Before Alderman Banks, Messrs. Wightwick, Herbert, Swoffer, and Salter, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Herbert John Jeffrey and Annie Jeffrey, his wife, were brought up on remand charged with stealing a quantity of horsehair (from a mattress), two metal teapots, two sheets, a blanket, and a pair of boots, the property of Miss Campbell, from an uninhabited house, No. 3, Trinity Gardens.

The evidence given on the previous Monday was read over, this proving the arrest of the prisoners at the Bricklayers Arms by Detective Sergeant Burniston, who found in their possession three sacks containing the stolen property.

Mr. Minter, who appeared for Miss Campbell, said that owing to a communication from the doctor at Canterbury relating to the female prisoner`s condition, he would ask that she be discharged.

In this course the Bench acquiesced.

Albert Carden was then called. He said he was at the Bricklayers Arms on Sunday week, when he saw the male prisoner, who asked him if he wanted to buy a pair of boots, and wanted 2s. for them. Witness said he had not got 2s., and gave prisoner 1s. 6d. and a silk handkerchief for the boots, which, later, he showed to Detective Sergeant Burniston. Witness had asked the prisoner whether he had stolen the boots.

Mr. Minter: Why did you do that?

Witness: You see, people do steal boots. (Laughter)

William James Pope, in the employ of Miss Campbell, proved locking up No. 3, Trinity Gardens on the night of the 18th, and the next morning finding a door burst open and the mattress and other articles missing. He could not identify the teapots, but the marks (presumably dust marks) in the cupboard showed where they were taken from, and they were of the same material as the broken up parts now produced.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty, and said he was very sorry. He was out of work and took the things to provide for his wife`s coming illness.

The Chairman: One month`s hard labour. If the house had been occupied you would have been treated far differently.

Prisoner, with evident relief: Thank you, sir.

Folkestone Express 30 August 1902

Monday, August 25th: Before Aldermen Banks and Salter, Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Herbert John Jeffrey and Annie Jeffrey were brought up on remand charged with larceny.

The Superintendent said he had received a letter from the doctor of the gaol stating the woman`s condition.

Mr. Minter appeared for the owner of the property and did not wish to press the charge. He would therefore withdraw the charge against her.

The Bench granted this application.

Albert Carden said he was at the Bricklayers Arms about nine o`clock on Sunday morning when the prisoner asked him to buy a pair of boots. Witness asked him if they were stolen and he replied “No”.

Mr. Minter: What made you ask that? – Because people steal things and want to sell them.

Witness said prisoner asked him two shillings for them. Witness gave 1s. 6d. and a silk handkerchief for the boots. He afterwards showed the detective where they were.

William Charles Pope said on riday, the 15th inst., the premises, 3, Trinity Gardens were secure. On the 18th inst., from something said to him, witness went to the house. The door had been burst open, the rooms were disturbed, and several things were missing.

Prisoner was sentenced to one month`s hard labour.

Folkestone Herald 11 October 1902

Tuesday, October 7th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. Carpenter.

Margaret Harrison was charged with having been drunk and disorderly.

P.C. Lawrence gave evidence, and stated that the previous evening he was in Fenchurch Street, near the Bricklayers Arms, and he saw the prisoner drunk and shouting. He requested her to go away and she refused. He then took her to the police station, and charged her with being drunk and disorderly. She replied “Now I have got a bed”.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty and said she was very sorry.

The Chairman said to her that if she would promise to leave the town at once, they would discharge her.

Prisoner gave her word and was therefore discharged.

Folkestone Chronicle 7 March 1903

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

On Wednesday morning the large hall at the Folkestone Town hall was crowded to excess by temperance people, publicans, “trade” sympathisers, and some hundreds of the neutral public, to witness the anticipated legal combat over licensing matters in the borough. The Court presented a very animated appearance. On the Bench were Mr. W. Wightwick, Colonel Hamilton, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. J. Pledge, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Mr. C.J. Pursey. Facing the Bench were a noble array of legal luminaries, including Mr. Lewis Glyn K.C., and Mr. Percival Hughes, instructed respectively by Mr. Martin Mowll and Mr. G. Haines, to represent the applicants in the cases of opposed old licences; Mr. Thomas Matthew and Mr. Thorn Drury, instructed by Mr. Minter, representing new applicants; and Mr. Montague Bradley, solicitor, who held a watching brief for the Temperance Council. The Chief Constable, Mr. Harry Reeve, was present conducting the opposition. These gentlemen were flanked by the Press on one side, and on the other by either the principals or representatives of the various breweries having interests in the town, such as Messrs. Leney, Mackeson, Nalder and Colyer, Flint, G. Beer, etc.

The Chairman, in opening the Court, said that 23 full licences stood adjourned since the previous Court. Since the adjournment, enquiries had been made, and from those enquiries the Chief Constable was instructed to persevere in the objection against nine houses, viz.: The Providence, Mr. Arthur F. East; Marquis Of Lorne, Wm. R. Heritage; Granville, Charles Partridge; Victoria, Alfred Skinner; Tramway, Fredk. Skinner; Hope, Stephen J. Smith; Star, Ernest Tearall; Bricklayers Arms, Joseph A. Whiting; and Blue Anchor, Walter Whiting. From a recent inspection of those houses, however, the Bench had decided to withdraw the objections against the Victoria, the Hope, and the Blue Anchor, and proceed with the remainder. Regarding the 17 houses which would that day have their licences renewed without opposition, the Bench had decided to deal with them at the 1904 Sessions according to the then ruling circumstances. The Bench desired to warn Mrs. Brett, of the Swan Hotel, as to her husband`s conduct of the business. In the cases of the London And Paris, the Imperial Hotel, the Mechanics Arms, and those houses against which convictions were recorded, it was the desire of the Bench to warn the various landlords that any further breach of the licensing laws would place their licences seriously in jeopardy. With respect to the Imperial Tap (sic), the Castle, and those houses which had been originally objected to for structural alterations to be made, the Bench now renewed the licences on the condition that the order made as to the various alterations should be carried out in 14 days. It was the wish of the Bench that the general warning should also apply to the beerhouses under the Act of 1869.

Coming to the licences in the old portion of the town, the Bench were of opinion that they were out of all proportion to the population, and it was the purpose of the Bench to obtain information before the 1904 Sessions which would lead to their reduction. In the meantime, the Bench invited the brewers and owners to co-operate with the Magistrates in arriving at the mode of the reduction. Failing that, the Justices would take the matter into their own hands, and, he hoped, arrive at conclusions on a fair and equitable basis. (Hear, hear)

Mr. Lewis Glyn K.C. at once asked the Bench to withdraw their opposition to all the opposed licences this year. With the whole of his learned friends, he thought he was right in saying that in view of legislation in the coming year it would be fairer to the Trade to wait until 1904 before taking any drastic action. He would submit that because a neighbourhood happened to be congested, it was hardly fair to take away one man`s living and to hand it over to another, which such a proceeding practically meant.

The Chairman said the Bench would note Counsel`s observations, but the applications must proceed in the usual way.

The Bricklayers Arms

In opposing this house Inspector Lilley was called, and examined by the Chief Constable. He said that the class of people using the common lodging house were mainly composed of those who tramped from town to town. He had known the house 19 years, and very few genuine working men frequented it as lodgers. The class of lodgers who did use the house included thieves and bad characters. In his experience he had known people arrested on the premises, both for local charges and for other forces. Within a radius of 200 yards of the Bricklayers Arms he had counted 19 licensed houses. The back door was within seven paces of the George III in Fenchurch Street.

Mr. Hughes: Have you known tramps to stay at the house one single night?

Witness: Yes.

Mr. Hughes: Can you swear to any one person or one particular night?

Witness: No, I am speaking from general experience.

Mr. Hughes: In your experience I suppose you have seen people arrested on other licensed premises?

Witness: Yes.

Mr. Glyn, representing the brewer, said that his clients would follow any suggestion in relation to the common lodging house which the Bench might think well to make.

Inspector Pearson proved the house was registered as a common lodging house.

By Mr. Hughes: The conditions of the Sanitary Laws were duly observed.

A little girl of 12 was called, who seemed very nervous and frightened.

Mr. Hughes at once objected to her evidence.

The Chairman asked the child where she would go if she did not speak the truth, and the reply was “To prison”. Upon that the Chairman decided not to hear the evidence.

Fredk. Barton said he knew the Bricklayers Arms, and had taken betting slips and sometimes money to the house many times. He gave the papers to the landlord, the landlady, or the son.

Mr. Glyn objected. No notice of this class of evidence, he said, had been given. A betting case was for another Court to try. If the alleged betting had been adjudicated upon then the evidence could be given. As it was, it was simply general evidence, and not satisfactory.

The evidence, however, was allowed to proceed.

Barton said he tad taken the notes for some years, and on occasions had taken money back to the sender.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hughes, witness admitted that he was rather near-sighted; he, however, must have seen the notes, as he wrote out many of them himself. He had also taken cheques to be changed for the sender of the slips.

Mr. Hughes: I suggest to you that you were told, when you took the notes, cheques, or documents, that you were to take them to the private house on the other side of the road. You know there is a private house there?

Witness: I know that, but I was not told to go there.

Mr. Hughes: Now, did you not go to the public house because you could get a glass to drink? (Laughter)

Witness: No, sir; I`m a semi teetotaller. (Loud laughter)

What do you mean by that?

A counsel (sotto voce): He means that he has meals all day. (Laughter)

Mr. Glyn submitted that there had been no prosecution of any sort, and no evidence of betting on the premises which could be accepted. To accept such evidence as had been called would be unfair to owner and to tenant. Because a person carried papers from one person to another was not legal evidence of betting. In his experience he had never heard such grounds of objection put forward. There had been no prosecution; consequently no prima facie case existed. (Applause)

The Chairman: There is no evidence of betting.

Mr. Glyn: Then that only leaves the question of the common lodging house. We will undertake to do away with that, and we will guarantee proper accommodation for the public.

Mr. Hughes gave the same undertaking.

The Bench consulted for about two minutes, and the Chairman said on that understanding the licence would be renewed. (Applause)

Folkestone Express 7 March 1903

Wednesday, March 4th: Before W. Wightwick, Col. Hamilton, Col. Westropp, E.T. Ward, J. Pledge, W.G. Herbert, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

It will be remembered that at the last sessions the Justices ordered notices of opposition to be given to nine licence holders, namely:- the Providence, the Marquis Of Lorne, the Victoria, the Tramway, the Hope, the Star, the Bricklayers Arms, and the Blue Anchor.

Several other applications were adjourned, and in some cases plans were ordered to be submitted. The notices of opposition to the Victoria, the Hope, and the Blue Anchor were afterwards, by direction of the Bench, withdrawn.

The flowing counsel were engaged:- Mr. Lewis Glyn, K.C., instructed by Mr. Mowll, Mr. Percival Hughes, instructed by Mr. G.W. Haines, representing the Folkestone Licensed Victuallers` Association; Mr. G. Thorn Drury and Mr. Theodore Matthew, instructed by Mr. Minter; and Mr. Drake was briefed in the matter of the Blue Anchor, which was not in the end opposed. Mr. Bradley, of Dover, representing the Folkestone Temperance Party and Mr. W. Mowll opposed the applications for the two new licences.

The Chairman said before the commenced business, he would, by direction of the Magistrates, read to the gentlemen present what they proposed doing. At the General Annual Licensing Meeting they directed the Chief Constable to give notice to the owners of nine houses. Since then they had inspected those houses, with the result that they had directed the Chief Constable to withdraw the notices of objection served upon the owners of the Victoria, the Hope, and the Blue Anchor. The other objections would be proceeded with. As regarded the remaining houses, they decided to renew the licences, but the Chairman referred to those cases where there had been convictions, and warned the licence holders to be careful in future. Certain structural alterations were ordered to be made at the Packet Boat, the Brewery Tap, the Castle Inn, the Lifeboat, and the Prince Of Wales.

The Licensing Justices expressed the opinion that the number of houses licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors now existing in the borough, especially in that part of the town near the harbour, is out of all proportion to the population, and the Justices proposed between now and the Licensing Sessions of 1904 to gain information and determine what reduction shall then be made. Meanwhile the owners of licensed houses were invited to agree amongst themselves to voluntarily surrender a substantial number of licences in the borough in 1904, and submit the result of their united action to the Licensing Justices. Failing a satisfactory voluntary reduction, the Justices would in the exercise of their discretion in a fair and equitable spirit decide what reduction should then be made.

Mr. Glyn, who said he was instructed on behalf of Messrs. Nalder and Colyer, thanked the Magistrates for the statement as to the course they intended to adopt, and said he was going to throw out a suggestion that it would be fairer under the circumstances if the renewals which still stood over for hearing should also stand adjourned until the Annual General Licensing Meeting of next year. The principal ground of complaint, so far as he gathered, was that the houses were not wanted. He contended that it would not be fair, for instance, to take away one of the six licences which were to be opposed.

The Chairman, however, said the Magistrates decided to hear all the evidence.

The Bricklayers Arms

Inspector Lilley, in this case, said he had visited the house several times, and found very few genuine working men lodging there. Formerly the house was frequented by bad characters and thieves. He had arrested several persons on the premises himself, who had either been convicted at this police Court or were wanted elsewhere. He also stated the number of houses in the same locality and their distance from the Bricklayers Arms.

In answer to Mr. Hughes, he said the house was registered as a common lodging house. He could not say of his own knowledge that persons only stayed there for a single night. He had arrested people in other licensed houses in the town, and those licences were still in existence.

Mr. John Pearson proved that the house was registered as a common lodging house.

A little girl, aged 12, was called as a witness, but after testing her knowledge as to the nature of an oath, her answer to the question as to what would happen if she did not speak the truth being “I should go to prison”, the justices declined to have her sworn.

Fredk. Barton, who described himself as a Parish Clerk, of 29, Dover Street, said he had taken betting slips to the house for a Mr. Crisp, of Linden Villas, and taken money back to him. He knew the slips of paper had reference to horses, because he wrote them himself for Mr. Crisp.

Mr. Glyn said if anything turned on those written slips, they must be put in. He asked that the evidence be struck out, and further, if the evidence was accepted, that a note should be taken of his objection, as it was contrary to the rules of evidence.

Eventually the Bench decided not to accept the evidence.

Mr. Glyn said there was no other question except the old ground of not wanted. He could not tell them verbally what the trade was, but would hand it in to the Bench if they pleased. It was a large trade. They were prepared to do away with the common lodging house. They would provide separate bedrooms, and also make any required alteration in the matter of the bar and an opening to it from an adjoining room, and have a fence erected to close an objectionable entrance.

The Chairman said on those undertakings the licence would be granted.

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1903

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

The Adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held in the Town hall on Wednesday. In view of the opposition by the police to a number of the existing licences extraordinary interest was evinced in the meeting, and when the proceedings commenced at eleven o`clock in the morning there was a very large attendance, the “trade” being numerously represented. Representatives of the Folkestone Temperance Council and religious bodies in the town were also present, prominent amongst them being Mr. J. Lynn, Mrs. Stuart, and the Rev. J.C. Carlile. Prior to the commencement of business the Licensing Justices held a private meeting amongst themselves. When the doors were thrown open to the public there was a tremendous rush for seats. The Justices present were the following:- Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Mr. J. Pledge, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

Before proceeding with the business, the Chairman announced that at the Annual Licensing Meeting the Justices adjourned the renewal of 23 full licences and five on beer licences, and directed the Chief Constable to give notice of objection to the owners of the licences of the following nine houses:- Providence (Arthur F. East); Marquis Of Lorne (William R. Heritage); Granville (Charles Partridge); Victoria (Alfred Skinner); Tramway (Frederick Skinner); Hope (Stephen J. Smith); Star (Ernest Tearall); Bricklayers Arms (Joseph A. Whiting); and Blue Anchor (Walter Whiting). Since the former sessions the Justices had inspected all the houses objected to, and considered the course which they ought to pursue with respect to the same, with the result that they had directed the Chief Constable to withdraw the notices of objection served by him with respect of the Victoria, Hope, and Blue Anchor, and to persist in the opposition to the following:- Providence, Marquis Of Lorne, Granville, Tramway, Star, and Bricklayers Arms. As regarded the remaining 15 full licences and five beer licences they would renew the same this year, and deal with them next year according to the circumstances.

The five beerhouses on licences were granted before the 1st May, 1869, and had been continuously renewed since that date, therefore they could not refuse to renew the licences, except upon one of the four grounds set out in Section 8 of the Wine and Beerhouses Act, 1869.

The Licensing Justices were of opinion that the number of licences for the sale of intoxicating liquors now existing in the Borough of Folkestone, especially in that part of the old town near the immediate neighbourhood of the Harbour, was out of all proportion to the population, and they proposed, between now and the General Annual Licensing Meeting of 1904, to obtain information on various matters to enable them to determine what reduction should be made in the number of licences. Meanwhile they invited the owners of licensed premises to meet and agree among themselves for the voluntary surrender, at the General Licensing Meeting of 1904, of a substantial number of licences in the Borough, and submit their united action to the Licensing Justices. Failing satisfactory proposals for voluntary reduction by the owners, the Licensing Justices would, in the exercise of their discretionary powers decide, in a fair and reasonable spirit, what reduction should then be made.

At this stage Mr. Lewis Glyn K.C. (instructed by Mr. Mowll, solicitor, Dover), who represented the brewers, suggested that, under the circumstances, the opposition to all the licences in the borough should be postponed until the Annual Licensing Meeting next year.

The Chairman: We want to hear the cases first.

Mr. Glyn: i think it would be fairer to the “trade” to postpone the consideration of this also till next year. In the meantime any structural alterations which are required, the brewers, in conjunction with the tenants, will have an opportunity of doing what is required.

The Justices decided that the cases must proceed.

Consideration of the applications for the renewal of licences to which objection was taken by the police was then proceeded with.

With regard to the Bricklayers Arms, the next case taken, Inspector Swift stated that during the last 19 years very few genuine working men had visited the house, a large percentage of the lodgers being bad characters. He had arrested several persons at the house himself, and had known many others who had been arrested on the premises, or known to be living there at the time of arrest, and who had been convicted at Folkestone or “wanted” by other forces. Within a radius of 208 paces there were 189 other licensed houses.

Mr. Wightwick: What do you mean by “bad characters”?

Inspector Swift: Well, when they get a few pence they get drunk, become a nuisance to the public, and have to be locked up.

Mr. Glyn protested against the evidence on the ground that they were not charged with improper conduct.

Inspector Pearson stated that the house was registered as a common lodging house, with accommodation for 22 persons.

In reply to Mr. Hughes, the Inspector stated that the bye-laws relating to common lodging houses were satisfactorily carried out in the house.

A little girl, 12 years of age, was called as a witness by the police, but the Justices, after a protest had been raised by Mr. Glyn, declined to accept her evidence.

Frederick Barton, an old man, said he knew the Bricklayers Arms, and had taken slips of paper relating to betting to the house on behalf of another man, and the slips were received by the landlord, his wife, and son.

Asked the reason why he knew the slips had a relation to betting, witness replied “Because I have written the slips myself, and so know what is on them.

Mr. Glyn at this point objected to this evidence being entertained, and asked the Bench to take note of the objection, as the evidence was illegal. Mr. Hughes also objected on behalf of the tenant. Considering that that was not a Court, but simply to discuss the question of licences, such evidence was not admissible.

The Chairman said they would take note of the objection.

Continuing, witness said he had aken money back to the house.

Answering Mr. Hughes, he said he knew applicant had a house on the opposite side of the road.

Mr. Hughes: I suggest you were told to take it to that house, and that is where you had taken it on several occasions.

Witness: that is the first time I have heard such a thing mentioned.

If you are told to take a cheque, document, or note of any sort to Mr. Whiting would it not be proper for you to take it to his private house? Were not those your instructions?

Witness: No.

Was it because you wanted a glass of ale at the same time? – No. I am a semi teetotaller. (Laughter)

What is a semi teetotaller? – One who does not take drink between meals. (Renewed laughter)

Witness was being further questioned by the Chief Constable regarding slips of paper, when Mr. Glyn gain raised an objection to the evidence being received. No warning had been issued, or any prosecution brought against them for betting, and at the last moment it was suggested that betting was allowed on the premises. If betting was allowed, why not prosecute? How could they say, upon the statement of the last witness, that betting was allowed? They could not convict a man for betting unless there was proper evidence. Personally – and he had had a good deal of experience in licensing – he had never heard such grounds of objection, where there had been no prosecution of any kind whatever, and yet a suggestion of this sort was allowed.

The Justices having decided not to admit any further evidence on that point, Mr. Glyn observed that, as in the other case, they would do away with the common lodging house, and provide proper accommodation for the public, and as to the question of one bed in each room, he thought there would be no difficulty about that.

After a brief consultation with his colleagues, Mr. Wightwick said that, subject to such undertaking being given, the licence would be granted.

Folkestone Express 11 April 1903

Wednesday, April 8th: Before Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W. Wightwick, E.T. Ward, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Mr. Mowll, of Dover, made an application on behalf of the owners of the Bricklayers Arms for the approval of plans. He said at the annual licensing sessions they undertook to do away with the lodging house. To do that necessitated certain alterations to the ground floor of the premises. They proposed to shut off communication with the back portion of the premises, and so do away with the lodging house.

The Magistrates approved the plans.

Folkestone Herald 11 April 1903

Wednesday, April 8th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, G.I. Swoffer, and E.T. Ward.

Mr. Mowll, solicitor, Dover, applied on behalf of the owner of the Bricklayers Arms for the sanction of the Bench to certain alterations to be executed on licensed premises. At the Annual Licensing Sessions, he said, they undertook to do away with the lodging house altogether, which necessitated alterations in the ground floor plan of the premises. They now proposed to shut off all communication whatever with the back premises, and also to do away with the lodging house.

Sanctioned.

Folkestone Daily News 28 November 1905

Local News

We regret to have to announce the death of Mr. Joseph Whiting, of the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street. He had long been suffering from a malignant disease, and had been under treatment for it at the Victoria Hospital. At one time it was hoped that he might be cured, but of late his case seemed hopeless.

He was a thoroughly good-natured man, and his business brought him into contact with the very poor, every one of whom had a good word for him. He was one of those who did good by stealth, and many of his good actions were naturally very little heard of. He leaves a wife and family to mourn his loss.

We, with all who knew him, beg to offer them our sincere sympathy.

Folkestone Express 2 December 1905

Local News

We regret to state that Mr. Joseph Whiting, for many years the proprietor of the Bricklayers Arms Inn, Fenchurch Street, died on Sunday after a long illness, dropsy and heart disease being the causes of his death. He was very highly respected among a large circle of acquaintances. The funeral took place at the Cemetery on Thursday afternoon.

Folkestone Daily News 24 January 1906

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. E.T. Ward, R.J. Linton, T.J. Vaughan, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, and Major Leggett.

On the application of Mr. A. Atkinson, the transfer of the licence of the Bricklayers Arms, held for 20 years by the late Mr. Joseph Whiting, was granted to his widow.

Folkestone Chronicle 27 January 1906

Wednesday, January 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor Carpenter, Aldermen T.J. Vaughan and W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggatt and Mr. Linton.

The following licensed premises were transferred:- The Bricklayers Arms to Mrs. Whiting, the widow of the late Mr. Joseph Whiting.

The Chief Constable said that Mr. Joseph Whiting had held the licence for 20 years without a single complaint.

Folkestone Express 27 January 1906

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, E.T. Ward, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

Mr. Atkinson appeared on behalf of Mrs. J. Whiting, and applied for the transfer of the Bricklayers Arms, which licence was previously held by her husband, the late Mr. J. Whiting. The Magistrates granted the request.

Folkestone Daily News 20 June 1906

Wednesday, June 20th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Leggett, and Pursey.

John William Ayre was charged with assaulting a man named Maxted, a journeyman butcher, in the employ of Durban Bros.

Complainant deposed that he saw the prisoner scuffling with another man near the Bricklayers Arms. Suddenly he felt a sharp prick in the left side of the chest. On opening his coat he discovered that he had been stabbed. Without taking off his clothes he went to Dr. Linnington. He was stabbed by prisoner. After the wound had been dressed he handed the clothes (produced) to Inspector Burniston.

J.W. Whiting, of the Bricklayers Arms, deposed that he knew the prisoner, and saw him at 11.15 on Tuesday night outside No. 13, Fenchurch Street. He had a trowel in his hand, and was using obscene language. The prisoner threatened to hit witness with the trowel. A man named Stokes, in the employ of his mother, helped witness to turn him out of No. 13. Prisoner was very abusive. Mr. Maxted came up and entered the house, and helped Stokes to eject him. Witness saw prisoner move his arm, and heard Maxted shout out “I am stabbed. I am going to the hospital”. Prisoner was given into custody.

Arthur Stokes, barman at the Bricklayers Arms, deposed that he saw the prisoner on Tuesday night. The accused took a bedroom at No. 13, Fenchurch Street. About 11.15 he was standing outside using bad language, and witness told him to clear off as he could not have his lodgings. Prisoner remained on the curb, and then tried to go in No. 13. With the assistance of Mr. Maxted and Mr. Whiting, witness got him out. Whilst on the doorstep, witness heard Maxted shout out “I`m stabbed”.

P.C. Taylor deposed that he was called to the Bricklayers Arms at 11.30 on Tuesday night. Prisoner was standing in the middle of the street, and Mrs. Whiting, pointing to him, said he had stabbed a man named Maxted, who had gone to the hospital. Witness took him into custody. Prisoner said nothing. When in High Street witness saw the prisoner had his right hand in his trousers pocket, and asked him what he had there. Prisoner replied “A knife”. Witness took it from him. It was shut, but there was blood on it. He told prisoner so, and he replied that he did not think so. Witness charged him at the police station with unlawfully wounding Maxted by stabbing him in the chest, and he replied “I shall say no more about it”.

Dr. Linnington deposed that the complainant Maxted come to his house at 11.45 on Tuesday night. His clothes were saturated with blood, and there were also cuts in the clothes. There was a small punctured wound in front of the left shoulder, near the main artery, which was bleeding freely. The wound was an oblong (sic) one, two inches deep, and one of the small veins was divided. The blow had been a weak one, and the wound was not a dangerous one. It could not have been caused by the trowel, but might have been caused by the knife.

Prisoner said he was under the influence of drink and had taken a bedroom at the Bricklayers Arms. Someone told him to clear out, and he said “Give me my thing and I will”. He said he would give me a ---- good hiding. Two or three made a rush for me and we had an up and downer in the doorway. There were two or three on to me. I did not know what did happen, but I never used any knife, although I had a knife in my pocket, which I gave to the constable, who said it had blood on it. I replied that I did not think so. He said something about stabbing, and I said I knew nothing about it.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

Folkestone Express 23 June 1906

Local News

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday a serious charge of maliciously wounding was dealt with by the Magistrates, John William Ayre being arraigned for stabbing James William Maxted, a butcher.

James William Maxted, a journeyman butcher, residing at 13, Abbot Road, said at quarter past eleven he was walking up Fenchurch Street when he saw a scuffle with two men, so he ran to see what was the matter. The prisoner was one of the men who were on the pavement opposite the Bricklayers Arms. The men were rolling on the ground. As soon as he got there he felt a sharp prick in the chest on the left side. He threw his coat open and discovered he had been stabbed. He found the instrument had punctures his coat, shirt and vest. He went straight away to Dr. Linnington, who dressed the wound. The prisoner stabbed him. After the wound had been dressed he handed his clothing (produced) to Det. Sergt. Burniston. The cuts in the coat, shirt and vest would be directly over the hole.

Prisoner here stated he knew nothing about it.

Joseph William Whiting said he assisted his brother in carrying on the business of the Bricklayers Arms. He knew the prisoner, who he saw about a quarter past eleven the previous night opposite No. 13, Fenchurch Street. He was using obscene language, so he told him to clear out of the street. The prisoner had a trowel in his hand, and threatened to hit witness over the head with it. Prisoner then sat down on the pavement. A man named Stokes then came up, and he went to pull the prisoner out of No. 13, Fenchurch Street, and witness went to his assistance. He offered assistance, and used obscene language. Maxted came up while that was going on. He entered the house to go to Stokes` assistance, and in the struggle he saw the prisoner move his arm, and Maxted then shouted out “I am stabbed”. Witness did not see anything in the prisoner`s hand. Maxted went away, and a police constable came and took the prisoner with him.

Arthur Stokes, a barman in the employ of Mrs. Whiting, said he knew the prisoner, who took a bedroom at No. 13, Fenchurch Street, which was the property of Mrs. Whiting. At a quarter past eleven he saw the prisoner outside the house. He was using bad language, and witness told him to clear off. He remained on the kerb for a time, and then tried to get into the house. However, witness would not let him in, and on account of the struggle Maxted came to his assistance. Witness soon after heard Maxted call out “I`m stabbed”.

P.C. Taylor said about 11.30 the previous night he was called to the Bricklayers Arms, where he saw Mrs. Whiting. She pointed to the prisoner, who was standing in the street, and said “This man has stabbed a man named James William Maxted, who has gone to the hospital”. Witness told him he should take him to the police station. He took him into custody, and on the way up High Street, witness noticed his right hand in his right hand coat pocket. He asked him what he had got in his pocket, and he replied “A knife”. Witness took the knife produced from his, which was shut. He examined it and on the blade found some wet blood. Witness said to him “There is some wet blood on this knife”, and prisoner replied “I don`t think so”. Later on he charged him at the police station with unlawfully and maliciously wounding Maxted by stabbing him in the breast with a knife. He replied “I shall say no more about it”.

Dr. Linnington said Maxted came to his house at 11.45 the previous night, and he saw his clothes on the left shoulder were saturated with blood, while some blood was in his boots. On removing the coat, shirt, and vest, he found a small punctured wound bleeding freely in front of the left shoulder directly over the main artery. On examining the wound he found it went obliquely downwards for two inches, and had divided one of the smaller veins, just missing the large vessel. Maxted was very faint, so he gave him some restoratives. If the wound had been a straight one it would have divided the main artery, and that would have been a serious matter. The wound was not a dangerous one, but was in a dangerous place. It might have been caused by the knife produced. It could not have been caused by the trowel.

Prisoner said he was under the influence of drink the previous night, and he could not distinctly remember what did occur. He went up to the Bricklayers Arms and left his bag there. He had a drink or two and went out. He returned at eleven o`clock and asked for a bed. The man said “I will go and see the missus”. He came back and said “Clear out of it”, and he (the prisoner) replied “All right, I will clear out if you give me my things”. There was a crowd outside and someone said “Give him a ---- good hiding”. Two or three of them made a rush for him. They had an up and down he supposed, and in the doorway there were two or three on to him. They got messing about, and he did not know what happened. He knew he used no knife. When he got up he heard nothing about anyone being stabbed. The policeman came up, and he was taken to the police station.

The prisoner was then committed to the Quarter Sessions, bail being offered, himself in a surety of 20, and one surety of 20, or two sureties of 10.

Folkestone Herald 23 June 1906

Wednesday, June 20th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. G.W. Pursey, and Major Leggett.

John Wm. Ayres was charged with unlawfully and maliciously stabbing John Wm. Maxted, a journeyman butcher.

Prosecutor, who appeared in Court with a bandaged arm, stated that late the previous evening he was walking in Fenchurch Street, when he saw a scuffle between two men, who were rolling on the ground together opposite the Bricklayers Arms. Prisoner was one of them. He went to see what was the matter, as he heard someone shout, and as soon as he got there he felt a sharp prick on the left side of his chest. He threw his coat open, and discovered that he had been stabbed. He went straight to Dr. Linnington, who dressed the wound. The man who stabbed him was the prisoner. After the affair he handed the bloodstained coat, shirt, and vest (produced) through which the knife had pierced to S.S. Burniston.

Prisoner here interrupted, stating that he knew nothing about it.

Joseph Wm. Whiting, who stated that he assisted his mother at the Bricklayers Arms, deposed that he did not know where the prisoner was lodging. He saw the accused at 11.15 the previous night outside No. 13, Fenchurch Street, which belonged to his mother, and was opposite her house. Ayres was using obscene language. He told him to clear out of the street, and prisoner threatened him with a trowel he had in his hand.

Prisoner (interrupting): I did not.

Witness, continuing, said prisoner then sat down on the kerb opposite No. 13. Arthur Stokes, who was in his mother`s employ, then came up and tried to move prisoner, who was very abusive, from the door. Whilst this was going on Maxted came along and tried to assist Stokes, who was scuffling with the prisoner. Witness saw the accused move his arm forward, and Maxted shouted out “I am stabbed, and I am going to the Hospital”. He did not see anything in the prisoner`s hand. Maxted then went away, and the prisoner was detained until the arrival of a constable, who took him in charge.

Arthur Stokes, a barman at the Bricklayers Arms, stated that he knew the prisoner as having taken a bedroom the previous night at No. 13, Fenchurch Street. He otherwise corroborated the evidence of the last witness.

P.C. Taylor deposed that when in Harbour Street the previous night at 11.30, he was called to the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, where he saw Mrs. Whiting, who pointed to the prisoner and said “This man has stabbed a man named John William Maxted, who has gone to the Hospital”. He said to the prisoner in Mrs. Whiting`s presence “I shall take you to the police station”, and he thereupon took him into custody. On the way up the High Street to the station he noticed that the prisoner had his right hand in the pocket of his jacket. He asked him what he had got in his pocket. Accused replied “A knife”. Witness then took the knife (produced) from him, examined it, and found wet blood on it. He told the prisoner there were new blood stains on the knife, and in reply Ayres said “I don`t think so”. Later, at the station, he charged prisoner with wounding Maxted by stabbing him in the breast with a knife. He replied “I shall say no more about it”. When first arrested he said “I`ll go quietly to the station”.

Dr. W.W. Linnington deposed that at 11.45 the previous night he was called up by Maxted, and saw him with his friend in the consulting room. He saw that his clothes on the left shoulder were saturated with blood. Blood was on his coat, under-vest, and boots. On removing the coat, shirt, and vest, he found a small punctured wound on the left shoulder, directly over the main artery. The wound was bleeding freely. On examining it he found that it ran obliquely downwards for two inches, and had divided one of the smaller veins, but missed the large vessel. Maxted was very faint, so he gave him a restorative, and sent him home half an hour afterwards in a cab. The blow had evidently been an oblique one. If it had been straight it would, probably, have divided the main artery. It was not anything like a fatal wound, although in a dangerous place. The wound might have been caused by the knife produced, but certainly not with the trowel (also produced).

Prisoner made a statement to the effect that the previous night he was under the influence of drink, and could not distinctly say what did occur.He came in the previous day and took a bed at the Bricklayers Arms. He had a drink or two, went out, and went back again just after eleven to go to bed. The witness Whiting would not let him go in, and told him to clear out somewhere. He replied that he would do so if they let him have his things. Whiting said “Before he goes, give him a ---- good hiding”. He supposed he had a scuffle in the doorway, with two or three on to him. They got “messing about”, and he did not know what did happen, but he “knew he never used no knife”. He did not know anything about anybody being stabbed. When he got up a policeman came. When he got to the station he went to sleep. They charged him with stabbing. He knew nothing about it.

Prisoner was committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions, being offered bail, himself in the sum of 20, and one surety of 20, or two of 10 each.

Folkestone Daily News 7 July 1906

Quarter Sessions

Saturday July 7th: J. Lewis Coward Esq.

John William Ayre was charged with wounding a man named Maxted by stabbing him with a knife.

This case, according to our report of the proceeding before the Magistrates, when the prisoner was committed for trial, disclosed that the accused was a labouring mechanic travelling on the road in search of a job. He came into the town and engaged a bed from Mrs. Whiting, landlady of the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, who has cottages on the opposite side of the road, which she lets out as common lodging houses. It appeared that he went out, obtained some drink, and returned. Mrs. Whiting`s son and the caretaker refused to let him go in, and a scuffle ensued, in the course of which Maxted, a butcher`s manager, intervened and went to the assistance of Mr. Whiting. In the melee Maxted felt what he described as a prick, and found, on unfastening his coat, that he had been stabbed. He at once went to the Victoria Hospital and had the wound dressed.

Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Weigall prosecuted and, at the request of the Recorder, Mr. Dickens defended.

Mr. Weigall, in a brief opening statement, described the circumstances leading up to the charge. He said that on the night of the 19th of June accused, who, it appeared, was in his cups, was in Fenchurch Street beside No. 13, opposite the Bricklayers Arms, a public house owned by Mrs. Whiting. The man used obscene language. A man named Stokes asked him to go away. It appeared accused refused, and there was a scuffle, in which Stokes and young Whiting engaged with the prisoner. In the course of the struggle Maxted came up and assisted Stokes. Almost immediately Maxted shouted out “I am stabbed; I am off to the hospital”.

The first witness called was James William Maxted, who repeated the evidence given by him at the police court, but deviated very considerably from the evidence given by him before the Magistrates.

Joseph Whiting, a son of the landlady of the Bricklayers Arms, gave his evidence in a most unsatisfactory manner. He contradicted himself on so many occasions that Mr. Dickens, for the prisoner, almost declined to cross-examine him. He first stated that he did not know who No. 13, Fenchurch Street belonged to. Then he admitted that it was one of the lodging houses carried on in connection with the Bricklayers Arms. Then he said he took a trowel from the prisoner, but this he afterwards denied.

A man named Stokes, a barman at the Briclayers Arms, deposed that prisoner hired a bed at No. 13, for which he paid 6d. When the prisoner returned at night, for some reason or other they refused to let him have the bed, and gave him the 6d. back, which caused the squabble.

The evidence of P.C. Johnson and Dr. Linnington was the same as given before the justices.

Mr. Dickens made a very able defence, and the Recorder summed up.

The jury returned a verdict of Guilty, but recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of the very great provocation he had received.

The Recorder, in an impressive address, bound the prisoner over in his own recognisance in the sum of 20 to be of good behaviour for the next six months.

This was received with great applause in Court, which was immediately suppressed.

Folkestone Express 14 July 1906

Quarter Sessions

Saturday, July 7th: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

A true bill was returned against John William Ayres, a bricklayer, who was charged with unlawfully and maliciously wounding James William Maxted on June 19th. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Weigall prosecuted, and Mr. Dicken defended.

In opening the case, Mr. Weigall said when the prisoner was charged before the Magistrates he said he was under the influence of drink, and because of that influence he got into that row. He denied using the knife. In his (Mr. Weigall`s) there was no doubt that Ayres got quarrelsome in his cups.

John William Maxted, a butcher, residing at 13, Abbott Road, described how on going home at eleven o`clock at night he saw the prisoner and a man named Stokes scuffling on the pavement. He went to the latter`s assistance and got between them, trying to separate them. As he went between them he felt a sharp blow on the shoulder, and a hot rush of blood on the side. He shouted “I`m stabbed”, and he went immediately to Dr. Linnington. The prisoner stabbed him.

The Recorder: Show us how he struck you.

The witness: He made a straight drive at me. I do not think he meant the blow for me.

Joseph William Whiting spoke to ordering the prisoner out of Fenchurch Street because he used bad language. This witness, in the course of his evidence, repeatedly contradicted himself.

A man named Stokes, in the employ of Mrs. Whiting, of Bricklayers Arms, stated that the prisoner had taken a room at No. 13, Fenchurch Street. They had a “jangle” with the prisoner, and they rolled into the doorway of the house. Maxted came up and parted them, and witness heard him immediately call out “I`m stabbed”. The reason Ayres was told to go was because he used bad language.

The Recorder: I am afraid the morals of Fenchurch Street would have been shocked had he slept there that night.

P.C. Taylor gave evidence of the arrest of the prisoner, in whose pocket he said he found a knife on the blade of which there was some wet blood.

Dr. Linnington described the wound received by Maxted as a punctured wound. He further informed the Court that if the knife had gone directly inwards it would have been fatal or nearly fatal. It might have been caused by the knife produced, but not by the trowel.

Prisoner went into the witness box, and said he came to Folkestone the same day. He paid 6d. for a bed at the house in Fenchurch Street. He had never been in trouble before anywhere, and he had a clean sheet. On June 19th he did have a drop too much. Two or three of them started bullying him, so he said “Let me have my things, and I will go”. Whiting came round and pushed him about, and when he was given his bundle someone said “Give him a ---- good hiding”. He was knocked onto the doorway and he had three or four on to him. He did not remember Maxted. He certainly did not stab anyone with a knife. He usually picked his teeth with the knife.

Cross-examined, he said he did not see any wet blood on the knife when the constable took it from him.

Mr. Dickens commented upon the contradictory evidence given by some of the witnesses, and also upon the fact that Maxted, when before the Magistrates, did not say who stabbed him.

P.C. Taylor was re-called, and said the man had been drinking very heavily.

The jury, after deliberating for a short time, said they found the prisoner Guilty under great provocation. They also recommended him very strongly to mercy.

The Recorder said the jury had found the prisoner Guilty of using the knife. It was a dirty, beastly, un-English thing. He had done such as they did not approve of in that borough. They were very free at the Quarter Sessions from people as cowardly as the prisoner appeared to have been, although under great provocation. He had a horror of the knife. Round the south coast they did not have knives drawn, whatever they did at Birmingham, from whence the prisoner came. When they fought they did so with their fists. Had he thought fit to have expressed his contrition for the crime and pleaded Guilty, and thrown himself on the mercy of the Court, he would have received the most merciful consideration a man could have received. Although he had thought fit to deny the charge, and although he believed that the prisoner was fuddled and fuzzled with drink, he was of opinion that he did not know what he was about. He (the Recorder) intended to give him another chance. He hoped the course he was going to adopt would be a lesson to him for the rest of his life. The prisoner might think himself very lucky indeed that he was before a merciful judge and jury. He was not going to make a felon of him. He was going to have him bound over to be of good behaviour for six months, and he hoped it would be a lesson to him to the end of his days.

Folkestone Herald 14 July 1906

Quarter Sessions

Saturday, July 7th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

John William Ayres was indicted for unlawfully and maliciously wounding James William Maxted on the 19th June. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. L.A. Weigall prosecuted, and Mr. Dickens, at the request of the Recorder, undertook the defence.

Mr. Weigall said that on the 19th June prisoner was using obscene language at the top of Fenchurch Street. Several people remonstrated with him, and in the end some, including Mr. Stokes, went to move him away. Mr. Maxted was passing, and went to the assistance of Mr. Stokes, after which he found himself stabbed. Before the Court prisoner denied using a knife, but said that he was drawn into a quarrel, and was under the influence of drink.

James Wm. Maxted, a butcher, of 13, Abbott Road, stated that on the night of the 19th June he was walking up Fenchurch Street when he saw a scuffle on the pavement between Mr. Stokes and the prisoner. It was opposite the Bricklayers Arms. Knowing Stokes, he went between the two men, and tried to separate them. As he did so he felt a blow on the shoulder, and feeling a prick and rush of blood he went off to Dr. Linnington`s. A man named Whiting was there, but was not fighting.

In reply to the Recorder, witness said that he did not see how the prisoner stabbed him. He knew it was a deliberate blow, but he did not think it was meant for him.

Joseph Wm. Whiting, an assistant at the Bricklayers Arms, deposed that he heard the prisoner using obscene language outside No. 13, Fenchurch Street. He went to him, and told him to clear out of the street. Prisoner said “I won`t go for nobody”. Prisoner then added that he would hit witness over the head with a trowel. Witness said nothing, and prisoner then sat down on the pavement. After a while accused got up, and fell in the doorway of No. 13. Stokes saw him and went to pull him out. There was a struggle. Maxted went to the assistance of Stokes. Witness then saw the prisoner strike out at Mr. Maxted, but witness saw nothing in his hand. The trowel had already been taken from the prisoner into the Bricklayers Arms, but witness did not know who took it away.

Cross-examined: No. 13 was his mother`s property, and was let to a weekly tenant. It was a fact that the prisoner had engaged a bed in one of the houses in that street for a week. Witness was 19 years of age. He told prisoner to clear out of the street because he was using obscene language. The prisoner had a right to be in a house in that street.

Arthur Stokes, a barman at the Bricklayers Arms, said that the prisoner had taken a room at No. 13, Fenchurch Street. Accused was outside there that night kicking up a row. Witness told him to clear off, and prisoner said “Give me my bundle, and I will”. Witness went away, as prisoner kept on using obscene language. After a while witness went back to the prisoner, and there was a scuffle. During that time the witness Maxted came up and separated them. Witness then heard Maxted say that he was stabbed and was going to the hospital.

P.C. Taylor proved being called to the Bricklayers Arms by Mrs. Whiting, who said that the prisoner had stabbed Maxted. Witness took him into custody. On the way to the station, witness found that the prisoner had a knife in his hand. At the station witness examined the knife, and saw that there was some wet blood on it. Prisoner denied that he had stabbed Maxted.

Dr. Wm. Linnington described the wound to Maxted. It was a punctured wound, and had it gone further in it would have been very serious, if not fatal. As it was, it caused considerable loss of blood. The wound might have been caused by the knife, but certainly not by the trowel.

Prisoner, on oath, said that on the day in question he arrived at Folkestone, and went to Fenchurch Street, and asked for a bed. He paid 6d. for it, and then went out. He was a bricklayer by trade, and had never been in trouble of any sort before. He had had a little too much to drink that night. When he went back that night he was bullied by some of the men. Whiting told him to clear out, and he offered to go when he got the things. There was a struggle, and several of them began to push him about. Eventually he was taken to the police station. As to the blood on the knife, he could only suggest that it had got on there through him picking his teeth.

Cross-examined: He believed that all the men were setting upon him, and if he had struck them it would have been with his fist.

The jury found the prisoner Guilty, but recommended him to mercy, believing that the act was committed under great provocation.

The Recorder: John William Ayres, the jury have found you guilty of using the knife, and it is a dirty, beastly, un-English thing that you have done. It is such a thing that we don`t do in this borough, or in any other. In this borough we are very free, at our Quarter Sessions, from anybody as cowardly as you seem to have been, although I agree there was provocation. I have a horror of the knife, and so have we all here, and round the south coast we don`t have knives drawn when we fight, no matter what they do at Birmingham, or wherever you come from. If we fight we fight with our fists. I agree with the jury, and had you thought fit to express your contrition for the crime, and pleaded Guilty, and thrown yourself on the mercy of the Court, you would have received the most merciful consideration any man could have received. Although you have thought fit to deny this charge, and although I believe you did not know what you were about, I intend to give consideration to the recommendation of the jury, and I hope this will be a lesson to you for the rest of your life. You may think yourself lucky that you are before a merciful judge and a merciful jury. I have a strong dislike of making felons of men for a first offence. I will have you bound over to be of good behaviour for six months, and I hope it will be a lesson to you for the rest of your life. You stood in the gravest peril in doing what you did, and I hope I am not doing wrong in taking into consideration the recommendation of the jury, and the dictates of my conscience, which is always towards dealing leniently.

Folkestone Daily News 23 February 1907

Saturday, February 23rd: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Ward, Fynmore, and Ames.

The licence of the Bricklayers Arms was transferred from Mrs. Whiting to Joseph Wonald (sic).

Folkestone Daily News 27 February 1907

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Leggett, Boyd, and Linton.

The licence of the Bricklayers Arms was transferred from Mrs. Whiting to Joseph Wornald.

Folkestone Express 2 March 1907

Saturday, February 23rd: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, E.T. Ward and T. Ames Esqs.

The licence of the Bricklayers Arms was temporarily transferred from Mrs. Whiting to Mr. Wormall.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Major Leggatt, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd Esqs.

The following licence was transferred: The Bricklayers Arms, from Mrs. Whiting to Mr. J. Wormall.

Folkestone Herald 2 March 1907

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, Councillor G. Boyd, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Bricklayers Arms was transferred from Mrs. Whiting to Mr. Joseph Wormold.

Folkestone Daily News 4 March 1907

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 4th: Before Messrs. Ward, Fynmore, Linton, Boyd, Herbert, Pursey, Carpenter, Leggett, and Hamilton.

The transfers of the licences of the Bricklayers Arms and The Raglan were confirmed.

Folkestone Express 9 March 1907

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

The adjourned licensing sessions were held on Monday at the Police Court, when the principal business to be considered was whether or not the five licences should be referred to the East Kent Licensing Committee for compensation. The Licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., while other justices present were Major Leggett, Mr. G. Boyd, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The licences of the Raglan and the Bricklayers Arms, which had been temporarily transferred since the annual licensing meeting, were confirmed by the Justices.

Folkestone Herald 9 March 1907

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and G. Boyd, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer.

An application was made by the licensee of the Bricklayers Arms for the renewal of the licence, which was transferred since the annual meeting, this being granted.

Folkestone Herald 6 April 1907

Tuesday, April 2nd: Before The Mayor, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Councillor Boyd, and Messrs. J. Stainer, G. Hawksley, and R.J. Linton.

Henry Ratcliffe pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly in Fenchurch Street the previous evening.

P.C. H. Johnson deposed to seeing prisoner outside the Bricklayers Arms about 9.40 the previous evening, drunk and disorderly.

Sergt. Osborne gave corroborative evidence as to prisoner being drunk when brought to the station.

Prisoner said he had been down to Newchurch that day to get some cresses to sell. He got back home about three o`clock, and fund his children filthy and dirty, and no fire in the house. He asked where their mother was, and was told she had gone out shortly after he had that morning. He went into the Bricklayers Arms about five o`clock with some cresses, as a blind, to see if she was there. He did not see her, but when he went in there later, about eight o`clock, he saw her there drunk, with a baby in her arms, and turned her out. He himself was no more drunk than a child just born. He called it a rascally shame, he did.

The Chief Constable said prisoner had been brought up six times, and convicted four times, being let off on the last two occasions. If he complained of the conduct of his wife, there was no doubt he had brought her to it.

Fourteen days` hard labour, without the option of a fine.

Folkestone Daily News 5 February 1908

Annual Licensing Sessions

The Annual Licensing Sessions were held on Wednesday. The Magistrates present were Messrs. Ward, Herbert, Stainer, Linton, and Leggett.

Mr. James Kent applied for a full licence for the Morehall Hotel, and also for a beer off licence for the Morehall Hotel.

The Chief Constable read his annual report, which the Chairman said was very gratifying and satisfactory.

The following licences were under consideration: Railway Inn, Bricklayers Arms, Eagle Tavern, Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, and Packet Boat.

The licences of the Railway Inn, Bricklayers Arms, Eagle Tavern, Packet Boat, and Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, were adjourned till March 2nd.

Folkestone Express 8 February 1908

Annual Licensing Meeting

Wednesday, February 5th: Before E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Superintendent`s Report

This report was read by Mr. Harry Reeve, as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 129 premises licensed for the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz.; Full licences, 78; beer “on”, 9; beer “off”, 6; beer and spirit dealers, 15; grocers &c., 11; chemists, 7; confectioners, 3; total 129. This gives an average, according to the census of 1901, of one licence to every 237 persons, or one “on” licence to every 352 persons. At the last annual meeting, one “off” licence for the sale of wines and spirits was not renewed as the business had been discontinued by the licence holder. One new licence for the sale of cider and sweets was granted, and three new licences for the sale of wines were granted to chemists. At the adjourned annual licensing meeting, held in March, five “on” licences (four full and one beer) were referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy. One full licence was renewed at the preliminary meeting of the Committee, and at the principal meeting three of the licences were refused and one renewed. The licences which were refused were the Queen`s Head, Beach Street, Channel Inn, High Street, and the Perseverance beerhouse, Dover Street. Compensation was paid in the cases of the Queen`s Head and Channel Inn, and the premises were closed on the 28th of December last. In the case of the Perseverance Inn, the amount of compensation has not yet been settled; a provisional renewal of the licence will, therefore, be required until the amount of compensation has been determined. There are two houses licensed by the Inland Revenue authorities for the sale of beer in quantities not less than 4 gallons, also to sell wines and spirits in single bottles. These licences can be granted by the Inland Revenue authorities without a Magistrates` certificate, but only for premises used exclusively for the sale of intoxicating liquors. Since the last annual licensing meeting 13 of the licences have been transferred; one licence was transferred twice. Eleven occasion licences were granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 31 extensions of the usual time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises. During the year ended 31st December last, 125 persons (110 males and 15 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 113 were convicted and 12 discharged. This is a decrease of six persons proceeded against, as compared with 1906, and a decrease of 58 persons when compared with 1905. Three licence holders have been proceeded against for permitting drunkenness on their licensed premises; only one conviction was recorded by the Magistrates, but this was afterwards quashed on appeal by the Recorder at Quarter Sessions. One licence holder, who was convicted just previous to the last annual licensing meeting for an offence under Section 16 of the Licensing Act, 1872, appealed to Quarter Sessions, but the conviction was affirmed at the Borough Sessions held on the 5th April last. I beg to suggest that the consideration of the renewal of this licence, the Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, be deferred till the adjourned meeting. I have no objection to offer to the renewal of any of the other licences on the ground of misconduct, the houses generally being conducted in a satisfactory manner. The order made by the Bench at the last annual licensing meeting, that all automatic gaming machines were to be removed from licensed houses, was at once complied with by the licensees. Eleven clubs, where intoxicating liquor is sold, are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. I would respectfully suggest that the Committee again refer the renewal of some of the licences in the congested area to the Compensation Committee to be dealt with under the provisions of the 1904 Act. I have received notices of four applications to be made at these Sessions for new licences, viz.; one full licence and three beer “off””.

The consideration of granting licences to the following licensed houses was referred to the adjourned licensing sessions; Railway Inn, Beach Street; Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, and Eagle Tavern, High Street, which are to be opposed. The licences of the Railway Hotel, Coolinge Lane, and the Packet Boat, Radnor Street, were adjourned.

Folkestone Herald 8 February 1908

Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 5th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Councillor G. Boyd, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Messrs. J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, and R.J. Linton.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Harry Reeve) read his report. (For which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said that it was a very satisfactory report. The Bench were glad that there was a decrease in drunkenness in the borough, and also that as a rule all the houses in the borough were well conducted.

The various licensees then came forward for their renewals.

The Magistrates formally gave notice that the granting of the following licence would be deferred till the adjourned licensing meeting, and that in the meantime notice of opposition would be served:-

The Bricklayers Arms Inn, Fenchurch Street, Folkestone; lessee Mr. Joseph Wormald.

Folkestone Daily News 2 March 1908

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 2nd: Before Messrs. Ward, Carpenter, Herbert, Leggett, Fynmore, Linton, Boyd, and Stainer.

Bricklayers Arms

Mr. Mowll appeared on behalf of the owners and tenant (Mr. Joseph Wormald).

The Chief Constable said the licence was opposed on the grounds of redundancy. According to the area selected there were 915 houses, with a population of 4,575. Within that area there were 34 on licensed houses, 29 being full licences, and 5 beer. Then there were 8 other licensed houses where intoxicants were sold, bringing the total up to 42. That meant one licence for every 21 houses, or one licence to every 108 persons. For the borough at large there were 86 on licences, and 42 other licences – 128 altogether. Within the area in which the Bricklayers Arms is situated there were also two registered clubs with 757 members. The present licensee obtained the transfer in February, 1907, the rateable value of the house being 36, and the owners Messrs. Beer and Co. There were three doors leading into the house from Fenchurch Street, and there was a small yard at the rear leading into Little Fenchurch Street, directly opposite the George III. Within a radius of 150 yards there are 13 other on licensed houses, while within a radius of 250 yards there were 26. There was practically no trade done at the Bricklayers Arms, and in his opinion the licence was unnecessary.

Detective Burniston corroborated the statements of the Chief Constable as to the trade of the house, and said it catered for a very inferior class of customers. On one occasion the landlord had told him that he hoped the house would be put back for compensation as he did not get a living. The brewers paid the spirit licence, and if he held the licence till February of this year he would be between 80 and 90 out of pocket.

Mr. Mowll said he knew great consideration was given by the Bench as to the particular house to be put back. However, his clients would not object, under the circumstances, to the licence being put back.

This course was adopted.

Folkestone Express 7 March 1908

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

The adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough took place on Monday, when the licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Hamilton, and J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd. At the annual sessions the granting of five licences was adjourned; The Railway Tavern, the Eagle Tavern and the Bricklayers Arms on the ground of redundancy, the Railway Hotel, Coolinge, because a conviction had been recorded against it, and the Packet Boat, so that plans for alterations could be submitted to the Justices.

The Bricklayers Arms

Mr. Joseph Wormald applied for the licence of the Bricklayers Arms to be granted to him. Mr. Martin Mowll appeared for the owners and the tenants.

Chief Constable Reeve said the opposition to the house was on the ground that it was not required. He produced a plan on which he had marked out the congested area. Within that area there were 915 houses, with a population approximately of 4,575, giving an average of five to a house. Within that area there were thirty four licensed houses, twenty seven fully licensed and five beer on. There were also eight other premises holding various licences for sale by retail, making a total of 42 premises licensed within that area, being a proportion of one licence to twenty one houses, and of one to every 108 persons. There was also one on licensed house to every 26 houses, and one for every 134 persons. For the borough at large there were 86 on licences and 42 other licensed premises, making a total of 128 premises licensed for the sale of drink by retail. That worked out at one licence to every 239 persons, or one on licence to every 356 persons. There were also within the area two registered clubs, with a total membership of 757. During the past year there were 125 cases of drunkenness dealt with by the borough Magistrates, and he found that 56 of them arose from the congested area. The Bricklayers Arms was situate in Fenchurch Street, at the corner of Little Fenchurch Street. Mr. Wormald obtained the licence on February 27th, 1907, and the registered owners were Messrs. G. Beer & Co., Canterbury. The rateable value of the house was 36. There were three doors to the house opening from Fenchurch Street, one into a small bottle and jug department, and the other into a saloon bar. Behind the saloon bar there was another room called the bar parlour, which looked out of the back of the house. There was a small yard at the rear of the house, with a door opening into Fenchurch Street, directly opposite the George III, another fully licensed house. Within a radius of 150 yards there were thirteen other on licensed houses, and within a radius of 200 yards there were twenty six other on licensed houses. He knew the house very well and at the present time there was practically no trade done there. In his opinion the licence was unnecessary for the needs of the neighbourhood. The small trade done was with an inferior class of custom than was done at the George III.

Det. Sergt. Burniston said he was familiar with the public houses in Folkestone and frequently visited them in the course of his duties. He had visited the Bricklayers Arms almost every day since the present tenant had had the licence. With regard to the amount of trade that was done, it was very small indeed. On January 29th he visited the house, and he then saw the tenant and had a conversation with him. He (the landlord) said “I hope the house will be put back for compensation. I do not get a living; the brewers pay the spirit licence. By February 23rd, a year since I held it, I shall be between 80 and 90 out of pocket”. He (witness) considered the house was not necessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

Mr. Mowll said he had not cross-examined the witnesses because he knew that considerable thought was exercised in considering which houses should be opposed. His clients were sorry that particular house should be selected. A substantial trade was done there, and one which they should be very sorry to lose. Having regard to the attention that was given to the licences, and the fact that there was no doubt in that area some houses must be done away with, his clients would submit to the notice and they did not propose to contest the question. The fact that the present tenant appeared to have a rather poor view of the situation might, as they knew, depend principally upon himself. One fact which spoke volumes was that from 1884 until the present tenant went into occupation the licence was held by Mrs. Whiting and her late husband without change of tenancy. During that time the house was well conducted, and they made a very satisfactory livelihood from it.

The Chairman announced that the Magistrates had decided to refer the licence to Canterbury.

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1908

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Councillor G. Boyd, Col. Fynmore, Col. Hamilton, Messrs, W.G. Herbert, and J. Stainer.

The adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held at the Town Hall on Monday morning, when the licences of three houses, the Railway Inn, Beach Street (Beer and Co.), the Eagle, High Street (Style and Winch), and the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street (Ash and Co.), were referred to the Compensation Authority for East Kent.

The Bricklayers Arms

The case of the Bricklayers Arms was the first house to be taken, the notice of opposition having been served on the ground of redundancy. Mr. Martin Mowll appeared for the owners.

The Chief Constable submitted a plan showing what he termed the congested area, and also the whole of the licensed houses in the borough. Within that congested area there were 915 houses, with a population, approximate, of 4,575, giving an average of five to a house. Within that area there were 34 licensed houses, 29 being full licensed houses and 5 beer “on”. There were also 8 other premises holding various licences for the sale by retail, making a total of 42 premises licensed within the area, and a proportion of one licence to every 21 houses, or 108 persons, and one on licence to every 26 houses, or every 134 persons. For the borough at large there were 86 on licences and 42 other licences, giving a total of 128 premises licensed for the sale of drink by retail. That did not include the Perseverance, which would be closed shortly. The borough statistics, according to the census of 1901, showed a proportion of one licence to every 239 persons, or one on licence to every 356 persons. There were also within that congested area 2 registered clubs, with a total membership of 757. During the past year there were 125 cases of drunkenness dealt with by the Borough Justices, and 56 arose from the small congested area. The house in question was situate in Fenchurch Street, at the corner of Little Fenchurch Street, and the present licensee was Mr. Joseph Wormald, who obtained the transfer of the house on 27th February, 1907. The registered owners were Messrs. G. Beer and Co., of Canterbury, and the rateable value was 36. There were three doors to the house opening from Fenchurch Street, one into the public bar, one into a small bottle and jug department, and the other into a saloon bar. Behind the saloon bar was another room, called the bar parlour, and that looked into the back garden. There was a small yard at the rear of the house, with a door leading into Little Fenchurch Street, directly opposite the fully licensed house called George the Third. Within a radius of 150 yards there were 13 other on licensed houses, and within a radius of 200 yards there were 26 others. He knew the house very well, and at the present time there was practically no trade whatever done there. In his opinion the licence was quite unnecessary for the needs of that neighbourhood. The small trade that was done was with a much inferior class of customer to that using the George the Third.

Detective Sergeant Burnistion said that in the course of his duties he frequently visited the public houses of Folkestone. He had often visited the house, and during the last twelve months he had been there almost every day. With regard to the amount of trade done it was very small indeed. On the 29th January he visited the house, and he saw the tenant. In the course of conversation the landlord said “I hope the house will e put back for compensation. I do not get a living. The brewers pay the spirit licence. By February 23rd, when I shall have held the licence twelve months, I shall be between 80 and 90 out of pocket”. Witness did not think the house necessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

Mr. Mowll said he had not thought it necessary or advisable to cross-examine, as very considerable thought and attention were given as to which cases should be put back. His clients were sorry that the case should be put back, as a fairly substantial trade was done, but they would not contest the case. From 1884 until the present tenant went into the house the licence was held by Mr. and Mrs. Whiting without a change. That spoke volumes, and it was a fact that they made a very satisfactory living.

The Bench referred the licence.

Folkestone Express 11 July 1908

East Kent Licensing

At the Licensing Committee`s sitting at Canterbury on Thursday, the three licences referred by the local justices, namely the Eagle Tavern, High Street, the Railway Tavern, Beach Street, and the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, were considered, and the Court decided not to renew any of them. They will be dealt with by the Compensation Committee.

Folkestone Herald 11 July 1908

Local News

The principal meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee was held at Canterbury on Thursday, when Lord Harris presided.

The following Folkestone houses came up for decision: The Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, Folkestone, an alehouse, belonging to Messrs. G. Beer and Co. Mr. Joseph Wormold tenant; the Railway Inn, Beach Street, Folkestone, alehouse, belonging to Messrs. Ash and Co. Mr. William Hopkins tenant; The Eagle, High Street, Folkestone, a beerhouse (ante 1869), belonging to Messrs. Style and Winch. Mr. William Henry White tenant.

Of these the following were allowed to go to compensation without opposition: The Bricklayers Arms and the Eagle.

Folkestone Herald 17 October 1908

Monday, October 12th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Messrs. R.J. Linton, J. Stainer, and W.G. Herbert.

George Watson pleaded Guilty to stealing two pairs of boots.

Detective Sergt. Burniston deposed that at 9.20 p.m. on Saturday last he called at Mr. Bainbridge`s shop in Tontine Street, and in consequence of what he was told he made inquiries. About ten minutes later he saw the prisoner at the door of the Bricklayers Arms in Fenchurch Street. Accused had under his arm a parcel tied with string. Witness asked what the parcel contained, and the prisoner replied “Find out”. He took the parcel and found it contained a pair of boots. Witness told the prisoner that he would charge him with stealing the boots, and took him into custody. Having handed the accused over to P.C. Adams, witness went to Mr. Bainbridge, who identified the boots, and afterwards he went to the police station and charged the prisoner, who made no reply. He then noticed that the prisoner was wearing a new pair of hobnail boots. On being asked where he got them, he replied “Bought them; find out”. Witness took them off and conveyed them to the West End Boot Company`s shop, where Mr. Osborne, the manager, identified them. Witness went to the police station and charged the prisoner, who made no reply.

Thomas Bainbridge said that he was a bootmaker, of 39 Tontine Street. He hung several pairs of boots out on a ledgeway just outside the shop on the previous Saturday morning. Later in the day he found one pair missing. They were afterwards brought to him by Sergt. Burniston. He valued them at 4s. 11d.

George Osborne observed that on Saturday morning he hung several pairs of boots on an iron rail outside his shop in Tontine Street. At about 5.30 he missed a pair of hobnailed boots (produced). They were brought to him later by Sergt. Burniston. He valued them at 5s. 4d.

Prisoner said that he had been drinking very considerably lately. His home was at Hastings. He was, however, doing a little wandering about the country. He was by trade a painter.

He was sentenced to 21 days` hard labour.

Folkestone Express 24 October 1908

East Kent Licensing

At a meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee on Monday, many cases were dealt with.

In the case of the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street, Folkestone, of which Mr. J. Wormald is the tenant, and Messrs. Beer and Co., of Canterbury, the registered owners, Mr. A.K. Mowll, who appeared for both parties, stated that it had been agreed to accept 1,200, of which 1,125 would go to the brewers, and 75 to clear a discharge to the tenant.

Folkestone Herald 24 October 1908

East Kent Licensing

A supplementary meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee was held at the Sessions House, at Canterbury, on Monday, when Lord Harris presided. The following Folkestone houses were considered for compensation:-

Bricklayers Arms

An alehouse in Fenchurch Street; Mr. Joseph Wormald, tenant; Messrs. G. Beer and Co., owners.

Mr. A.K. Mowll appeared for the landlords & tenant, and said both parties agreed to the compensation being fixed at 1,200, including fixtures, the owners to receive 1,125, and the tenant 75, and a clear discharge.

Folkestone Express 17 January 1931

Obituary

The funeral took place in the Cheriton Road Cemetery yesterday (Thursday) afternoon of Mrs. Frances Jane Whiting, widow of Mr. Joseph Allen Whiting, who for many years was the licensee of the old Bricklayer`s Arms, Fenchurch Street.

The deceased lady, who was 65 years of age, had been in indifferent health for some time, and passed away early in Monday afternoon. She was well known and greatly respected, and the news of her death will be received with feelings of profound regret, particularly by the older inhabitants of the town. Mrs. Whiting was of a very kindly disposition, and she will be much missed by those whom she helped in times of need during the 45 years she resided at the old Bricklayer`s Arms. Mrs. Whiting`s husband died 26 years ago, and Mrs. Whiting has remained in residence at the old Bricklayer`s Arms ever since. This old building has been occupied by the family for over 63 years.

Folkestone Herald 17 January 1931

Obituary

We regret to record the death on Tuesday of Mrs. F.J. Whiting, wife of the late Mr. Joseph Alan Whiting, former licensee of the old Bricklayers Arms in Great Fenchurch Street, at her house at 12, Great Fenchurch Street, at the age of 65.

Mr. and Mrs. Whiting were widely known and respected during the time when the old hostel was in existence. Mrs Whiting will be remembered for her great kindness of heart to those in need during the 43 years in which she held the establishment.

The funeral took place at the Folkestone Cemetery on Thursday.

Folkestone Express 21 August 1937

Obituary

It is with deep regret that we record the death on Thursday in last week of Mr. Joseph William Whiting, at his residence, 2, Spring Terrace, Folkestone, at the age of 50 years.

He was the eldest son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Whiting, of the Bricklayers Arms, in Fenchurch Street. In 1907 he joined the Royal Horse Artillery and saw active service in India, Gallipoli and France. During his period in France he received several wounds of a serious nature and in 1919 he was discharged. He obtained the post of usher at the Grand Hotel and continued there for sixteen years, until failing health forced him to retire and since then his health declined.

The funeral took place on Monday at the Folkestone Cemetery at Hawkinge.

Folkestone Herald 21 August 1937

Obituary

The death occurred on Thursday of last week, after, a long illness, of Mr. Joseph William Whiting, 50, of 2, Spring Terrace, Folkestone.

Mr. Whiting served for a long time in the Army. At the outbreak of the War he was in India, whence he went to the Dardanelles. From there he was sent to France where he was severely wounded and invalided home. Since the War he had been an usher at the Grand Hotel until his illness three years ago.

The funeral took place on Monday at Hawkinge Cemetery.

 

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