DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, November, 2021.

Page Updated:- Saturday, 20 November, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1828-

(Name from)

Red Cow

Open 2020+

138 Foord Road

Folkestone

01303 252477

https://whatpub.com/red-cow

Red Cow 1880

Above showing the "Red Cow" circa 1860.

Red Cow circa 1910

Above photo circa 1910.

Red Cow 1983

Above photo taken and sent by Chris Excell, 9 January 1983.

Red Cow Red Cow bar

Above photos date unknown.

Red Cow 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Red Cow, Folkestone 2009 Red Cow, Folkestone 2009 Red Cow Sign, Folkestone 2009

Above photographs by Paul Skelton, 5 July 2009.

Red Cow 2012

Above photo kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

 

The "Red Cow" is in the district of Foord, once a separate village and was retailing beer in the seventeenth century, it was known for a time as the "Plough." A health-giving chalybeate spring, rising nearby, was an attraction for visitors to the humble fishing-port, and must have brought much trade to the inn.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, Wednesday, 29 June to Saturday 2 July, 1768. Price 2d

FOLKESTONE, JUNE 19th, 1768

Notice is hereby given, That the ANNUAL MEETING of the UNION-SOCIETY at FOLKESTONE will be held at the Sign of the “RED COW,” in Folkestone, on Monday the 11th of July next, when and where the members of the said Society are desired to meet by Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in order to proceed to Church to hear a SERMON preached by the Reverend Mr. Langhorne, after which to return to the said House, where a DINNER will be provided.

AND WHEREAS it hath been represented to the said Society, that sundry Persons would have entered for the said Society if the Age of FORTY Years had not been reduced to THIRTY-FIVE; Therefore it is ORDERED, that for the future, any sound and healthy Person not above Forty Years of Age, whose Residence is not above Thirty-five Miles from the said Town, by paying the usual Entrance, may be admitted a Member thereof.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 October 1857. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

Quarter Sessions

Thursday October 8th :- Before C. Harewood esq., Judge of the County Court, the Mayor, W. Major, J. Kelcey, G. Kennicott and W. Bateman esqs.

John Leigh, carpenter, pleaded not guilty to a charge of breaking into the "Red Cow" public house, and stealing some wearing apparel, on the 24th July, the property of Mr. Prebble. The prisoner pleaded guilty to another charge of stealing a pair of trousers, the property of Mr. Harris, tailor, High Street.

The first case was as follows: - The prisoner offered a pair of trousers and two pairs of boot for sale at a low price; this raised suspicion. It was afterwards discovered that the "Red Cow" had been broken into, and the property sold by the prisoner was identified by the prosecutor. The prisoner was also seen about 3 o'clock in the morning, by a man who was putting out the street lamps, going in the direction of the "Red Cow".

The jury returned a verdict of Guilty. The Recorder sentenced the prisoner to 6 months hard labour for this offence, and 3 months hard labour for stealing the trousers. This prisoner has since turned out to be a ticket-of-leave man.

 

A ticket of leave was a document of parole issued to convicts who had shown they could now be trusted with some freedoms. Originally the ticket was issued in Britain and later adopted by the United States, Canada and Ireland.

The ticket system began in 1853 when prisoners transported from the United Kingdom to Australia, and subsequently other colonies, who had served a period of probation and shown by their good behaviour that they could be allowed certain freedoms. Once granted a ticket of leave, a convict was permitted to seek employment within a specified district but could not leave the district without the permission of the government or the district's resident magistrate. Each change of employer or district was recorded on the ticket.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 6 February 1858. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

Wednesday June 3rd:-

Extract from Town Council Meeting.

The Mayor alluded to a committee meeting which had taken place, and read a report (which, although irregular, had been adopted), from the surveyor respecting the costs for the improvements at Foord. The report recommended the laying down a 14 inch drain, pulling down and widening the bridge, and building a wall in lieu of the present fence near the "Red Cow". The estimated cost was £23 11s.

Alderman Kennicott here said he had seen Mr. Poulter, the owner of the "Red Cow", who had requested that he might have an additional wall in lieu of the fence at present standing on the south side of his house; if that was built for him, he should have no objection to the fence being removed, nor of giving up the land required.

Mr. Jinkings observed that it appeared to him to be very selfish on the part of Mr. Poulter; to ask for such an addition to the offer already made him; the proposed alteration would be of great benefit to his property, and he for one should not vote for anything of the kind.

Mr. Gambrill asked if the surveyor could tell him the cost of the bridge and drain irrespective of the wall.

The surveyor in answer said the wall would be about £6.

Mr. Jinkings moved that the minutes of the committee be confirmed, thus virtually negativing the proposal of Alderman Kennicott.

The Mayor then said he had caused tenders to be put in for the labour in taking down and rebuilding the present bridge, laying the proposed drain, and building the proposed wall – the parties tendering, to fin mortar and the cement required. When opened, there appeared one from Mr. C. Foreman £26; Mr. W Green £28 2s. 6d.; Mr. T. Field £40; Mr. Henry Unwin £24 11s. After the opening of the tenders, the discussion of the question between Mr. Poulter and the Corporation was resumed. Mr. Tite argued that Mr. Poulter`s offer was a liberal one and ought to be accepted.

Mr. Gambrill differed with Mr. Tite, and moved that Mr. Unwin`s offer be accepted, but that the surveyor arrange with him respecting the difference, supposing the wall was not built. Alderman Kennicott begged them to consider that Mr. Poulter`s offer was a liberal one – he was of opinion it ought to be accepted. After some further desultory conversation, Mr. Cobb seconded Mr. Gambrill's motion, which was carried.

“In the course of the discussion it came out, that the dispute was that Mr. Poulter, not satisfied with having a new wall to his gardens in front of the cottages parallel with the road, also required one in front of the "Red Cow", in lieu of the wooden fence, which the Corporation, very properly, did not think themselves justified in allowing”.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 29 October, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

STEALING A BLANKET

Friday October 28th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt, Esq.

Louisa Austin, the dissipated wife of a barrister, was place in the dock charged with stealing a blanket, value 5s.

William Fordred, labourer, living near the "Black Bull" in Foord Lane, said the prisoner was a lodger in his house. Yesterday, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, a policeman brought a blanket to him – the blanket now produced, and marked W.F. – which was his property. He did not authorise the prisoner to get the blanket washed, or to do anything with it. She took it away without his knowledge.

Jane Down, wife of Henry Down, residing at the "Black Bull" cottage, saw prisoner yesterday afternoon, shortly after two o'clock, turn from the road into Mr. Jinkings' meadow, and there pull up her dress and take something from underneath it. She then left the field, and went into witness's garden to fetch her hat, which had blown off. Witness went up to her and told her to go out of the garden, and then she saw that prisoner had a blanket, and said to her “You have a blanket”. Prisoner said “No. I have a petticoat”. Witness repeated “It is a blanket”. Prisoner put the blanket under her arm and went down the road, away from prosecutor's house.

Cross-examined: You did not say it was a blanket, and you were going to get it washed.

Patrick Holtum, K.C.C., yesterday afternoon, about two o'clock, returning to his station at Swingfield Minnis, was told by several persons that a woman in the "Red Cow" had stolen a blanket. Witness went to the inn, and found the prisoner there, and charged her with the theft. The prisoner had the blanket, produced, under her left arm, and said she only brought it out to be washed. He took the prisoner to the prosecutor's house, and he identified the same as his property.

Cross-examined: You did not say to Mrs. Prebble in my presence “How could I steal the blanket when I asked you to get it washed?”

William Fordred re-examined: Prisoner had been exactly a month with him. He never authorised her to get it washed, and he never sent her with anything to get washed.

Prisoner: I told him I would get it washed, and he said “Never mind. Keep the money in your pocket”.

Fordred: She took it without my knowledge.

Captain Kennicott: How many times has the prisoner been before the bench?

The Clerk: I think this is the ninth time within the year. (To prisoner) The charge against you is that you took one blanket, the property of William Fordred, of the value of 5s.

Prisoner: I have to say that two more witnesses are to come before I am tried. There are two witnesses to come here – Mrs. Prebble, and the woman I asked to dry it. I have been living long enough in that man's house to have taken his mark out if I had wanted to steal it. There are two more witnesses to come, and I must have them. I am not going to be branded as a thief.

Captain Kennicott: You are an incorrigible character and we can't correct you. We will send you for trial.

Mr. Tolputt: You have been already a great expense to the town.

Prisoner: I don't mind going for trial. I am not afraid.

The Bench then committed her for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

 

Information received from Steve says December 2012 says the premises is being operated as an Enterprise Tenancy to Joseph Daniels, a Dover man, former Eurotunnel employee.

Chief Cleaner is currently Alexandra Rose.

 

From the Dover Mercury, 29 November 2017. By Sean Axtell

Murder inquiry launched after landlord found dead.

A murder probe has been launched after a well-known pub landlord was found shot dead, sending shock waves throughout the community.

Tributes have been paid to former Dover man Joe Daniels, who was found dead at the Red Cow pub in Foord Road, Folkestone, on Wednesday last week.

Joe Daniels

Police investigating the 58-year-old’s death are appealing for dashboard camera footage from motorists who may have been passing the pub - near the junction of Black Bull Road - between 8am and 11.30am.

Mr Daniel’s grief-stricken partner, Milena Goff, posted on Face-book on Friday: “My heart is broken.

“Why would anyone want to hurt this beautiful man?

“Our future taken, I have no words for this evil person who has done this to my beautiful Joe.

“Please, if anyone saw or heard anything, please contact the police.

“Our family is broken.”

Detectives say they had “not ruled out third-party involvement” in Mr Daniels’ death.

Officers say they found Mr Daniels unresponsive in his pub at 11.30am with gunshot wounds. A police cordon was put up before officers announced he had died at the scene.

A firearm was also recovered from the property.

Flowers and a candle have been left outside the pub.

Online tributes have been pouring in to Mr Daniels, describing him as a “one of a kind”.

One person, believed to be a family member, wrote on our Facebook page: “Heartbroken to say the least. Thinking of all our family right now.

“Our Joe was your typical Mr Nice Guy. Was loved by all in our family, and will be sorely missed by each and everyone of us.”

Jo Huntley said: “ Rest in peace Joe. You were one of a kind.” Noelle Gunton said: “He was a true gent with a wonderful sense of humour and will be sorely missed.”

Tommy Neill added: “Such sad news, rest in peace big man. “You where a real gent.

“Many a laugh we had in Harry’s club. God bless, sleep sound friend.”

Mr Daniels is believed to have come from Dover and previously worked for Eurotunnel before taking over the 17th century bar in Folkestone.

Senior investigating officer Det Ch Insp Richard Vickery said: “We are continuing to carry out enquiries into the circumstances behind Mr Daniels’ death and cannot yet rule out any third-party involvement.

“I would strongly encourage anyone who saw or heard anything suspicious in the area to call the appeal line urgently.” The investigation is being led by the Kent and Essex Serious Crime Directorate.

Anyone with information is asked to call 01843 222289 quoting reference 22-0452, or Kent Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111.

From the Dover Mercury, 6 December 2017.

Driver could have information into landlord’s murder.

White transit seen parked outside pub.

Police are hunting the driver of a white transit-style van in connection with the murder of a popular pub landlord originally from Dover.

The vehicle was seen parked outside the Red Cow pub in Foord Road, Folkestone, where Joe Daniels, 58, was found shot dead on the morning of Wednesday, November 22.

Joe Daniels, 58, was found shot dead at the Red Cow.

Police issued the new appeal yesterday (Tuesday) as the hunt for Mr Daniels’ killer continues.

Senior investigating officer detective, Ch Insp Richard Vickery, said: “There is no suggestion the driver of the van has done anything wrong but the van was parked there just before the incident happened and we are hopeful he may have seen or heard something that could aid our investigation.

“We would like to thank all those people who have called us so far and provided us with information including dash-cam footage.

“As we continue our inquiries into the circumstances behind Mr Daniels’ death, we would really like to hear from anyone else would may have information.”

The driver is described as white, heavily built, between 30 and 50 years old, 5ft 10in tall and having short dark brown hair.

No arrests have yet been made in connection with Mr Daniels’ death.

Murder detectives have already appealed for dashcam footage from motorists who may have been passing the pub - near the junction of Black Bull Road - between 8am and 11.30am on November 22.

Officers found Mr Daniels unresponsive in his pub, where a firearm was recovered, at 11.30am.

A police cordon was put up before officers announced he had died at the scene.

The 17th century pub remains closed and under police cordon.

Floral tributes and a candle were left outside the pub.

The investigation is being led by the Kent and Essex serious crime directorate.

 

Any further information or indeed photographs would be appreciated. Please email me at the address below.

This page is still to be updated.

 

From the https://www.kentonline.co.uk By Sean Axtell, 6 July 2018.

Red Cow pub reopens after landlord found shot inside.

The "broken-hearted" partner of a landlord shot dead in his pub has told of her grief after the venue re-opened.

Milena Goff found partner Joe Daniels, 58, unresponsive inside his Red Cow pub in Foord Road, Folkestone, just before 11.30am on November 22 last year.

Police said he suffered an injury consistent with a gunshot after he was pronounced dead at the scene, where a firearm was also discovered.

Milina Goff & Joe Daniels 2017

Milena Goff has spoken of her grief over the murder of partner Joe Daniels.

Ms Goff said: “We are all broken-hearted. I will never be able to erase the image of finding Joe murdered.

“I will never forget Joe’s humour, he was so funny, he would talk to anyone, and knowing that he would not want me feeling sad is sometimes all that keeps me going – he would want me smiling.

“We had some brilliant times at the Red Cow, it was like an extended family, I’m absolutely devastated.

“I understand the pub needs to make money, it’s a business but it’s very raw, it feels too early for the pub to reopen, it has added to the grief.”

Eight months after the Liverpudlian’s death, new landlords Craft Union Pub Company opened the Red Cow’s doors for business.

The decor has been revamped inside with new flooring and brighter colours.

Red Cow 2018

The Red Cow pub has re-opened with a new look.

The outside has been brushed up with grey and black paint and a new sign has been installed on the front.

A spokesman for Craft Union said: “We are delighted to be taking over the Red Cow, Folkestone which opened on June 29.

“We believe the British pub plays a vital role in the lives of its customers and our philosophy at Craft Union is to put brilliant pubs back at the heart of local communities.

“We are committed to nurturing this by investing in the pub by ensuring that we retain the tradition and the heritage alongside improving the quality of the community offer.

“As such, we have invested in the garden area which will very much remain available to the public when we re-open.”

Ms Goff said walking past the pub is a major trigger for grief and the thought of that Mr Daniels's killer is at large "makes her feel ill".

Joe Daniels

Joe Daniels was shot dead inside his Red Cow pub in November.

“Unfortunately someone murdered my husband and someone is accountable.

“Knowing someone is still at large makes me feel ill.

“I want to appeal to people to make sure they don’t forget what happened.

“It needs to be kept in people's memories. Someone out there knows something about what happened that day.

“I just want someone to come forward and at least myself and Joe’s family can have some form of closure.”

A police murder probe is ongoing amid appeals for dashcam footage and witnesses.

Detectives arrested a 23-year-old man from Canterbury earlier this year and he was released pending further inquiries.

A police spokeswoman said the force had no further updates: “On Wednesday, January 31, a 23-year-old man from Canterbury was arrested in connection with the incident and remains under investigation. At this stage no further arrests have been made, however inquiries remain ongoing."

Witnesses or anyone with information that has not yet been in touch can call the appeal line on 01303 289600, quoting reference 22-0453.

 

From the https://www.kentonline.co.uk By Sam Williams, 1 March 2020.

Two men in court following death of Red Cow landlord Joe Daniels, from Folkestone.

Two men have appeared in court charged with firearms offences relating to the fatal shooting of a pub landlord in Folkestone.

Joe Daniels, 58, was found unresponsive inside the Red Cow pub, in Foord Road, on Wednesday, November 22, 2017.

He had suffered an injury consistent with a gunshot wound and was pronounced dead at the scene, where a firearm was also recovered.

Since the incident, detectives have carried out extensive inquiries and appealed for witnesses to come forward with information.

Officers reviewed more than 1000 hours of CCTV and dashcam footage, took more than 350 statements and seized more than 1,200 items.

In January 2018 and February 2019 two men were arrested in connection with the incident.

Both men, aged 25, appeared at Margate Magistrates’ Court charged with firearms offences last month.

But police say neither man is being "investigated in relation to Mr Daniels' death".

Red Cow cordoned off

The pub was taped off after the shooting.

Eli Smith, of Valley Road, Canterbury, was charged with two counts of selling a prohibited weapon, possession of a firearm without a certificate, possession of ammunition for a firearm without a certificate and converting an imitation firearm into a firearm.

The second man, Robin Ling, was charged with two counts of selling a prohibited weapon, being concerned in the supply of class B drugs and conspiring to supply class B drugs.

They will next appear at Canterbury Crown Court on Monday.

Det Ch Insp Richard Vickery, from the Kent and Essex Serious Crime Directorate, said: "The tragic death of Mr Daniels remains unsolved and our thoughts are with his family, who we have kept updated throughout our enquiries.

"Over the past two years we have reviewed more than 1,000 hours of CCTV and dashcam footage.

"We have also taken more than 350 statements, searched houses and seized more than 1,200 items, many of which have been forensically examined.

"The two people who have been charged with firearms offences are no longer being investigated in relation to Mr Daniels' death and have been eliminated from this part of our enquiries.

"Whilst there is no new update for this part of our investigation, I would like to thank all those people who have come forward to assist us with information so far."

The inquest into Mr Daniel's death took place today.

 

From the Dover Express, Thursday 19 March, 2020. By Stela Gineva.

Joe Daniels was £100k in debt when he was shot dead in pub.

A POPULAR landlord who was shot in the chest in his own pub had been in more than £100,000 worth of debt, an inquest heard.

Joe Daniels, 58, was found dead at his Foord Road pub, the "Red Cow," in Folkestone on Wednesday, November 22, 2017, at around 11.30am.

An inquest into his death was held last week at Archbishops Palace in Maidstone, and it heard how Mr. Daniels' life was taken by his own gun.

Financial reports read to the court showed that Mr. Daniels had been in debt to his friends, racking up a sum of around £37,000.Assistant coroner Katrina Hepburn led the hearing where evidence was heard from Det Sgt Shelley Chantler.

Mr. Daniels, a dad of one, had moved from Liverpool to Kent decades before and lived above the pub in which he ran. The inquest heard how the day before his death, on November 21, he confided in his hairdresser who had come to cut his hair. He said he had concerns about seeing someone in the pub's garden as he wasn't sure who they were.

But his concerns were not deemed to be serious as he did not contact the police over what he saw.

The inquest also heard that a friend came to visit him at home, where Mr. Daniels reportedly showed him two guns which were in his possession.

That evening Ms. Goff came to visit him, they had a Chinese takeaway and then she stayed the night, leaving the following morning (November 22).

Mr. Daniels had said he had a meeting with someone called Vincent from the brewery of his pub the next morning. The lease, which was up for renewal, had been with a brewery which had supplied him with the beers he sold.

Following the claimed meeting, Mr. Daniels phoned Ms. Goff saying that it had been 'brilliant!' He then made plans to meet her in the town centre at 11am the same day.

A later inquiry revealed that the brewery did not have a meeting with Mr. Daniels that day and they didn't have anyone named Vincent working for them.

Ms. Goff became concerned when Mr. Daniels did not turn up at the time they had agreed.

She tried calling and texting him, before making her way to the pub to check that he is okay.

At the same time, David Ashford, a friend of Mr. Daniels' made his way to the pub in his vehicle and noticed Ms. Goff was walking that way too.

When the two arrived, it was Ms. Goff who let Mr. Ashford in as she had a key-to the property. What concerned Ms. Goff on entering the property was that the door which led to the residential property upstairs had been left ajar, the coroners court heard. Mr. Daniels usually locked that door.

The pair then discovered Mr. Daniels' unresponsive body by the back door next to the pub's conservatory. He was found facedown with a pistol and casing left next to his head.

Police and ambulance services were called to the premises, but he was declared dead at 12.17pm.

Despite an extensive investigation by the police, it was not possible to work out whether anyone had made their way into the pub. On the basis of the evidence, the police tried to establish whether he was shot by someone unknown with the firearm, whether he was shot by someone he knew, or whether he shot himself intentionally or by accident.

Joe Daniels

A suicide was deemed unlikely as Mr. Daniels had been making mid to long-term plans for the future. He did not have a history of mental illness and there was no note left on the premises. But it was noted that he had a huge amount of debt amounting to more than £100,000. He had been repaying it "as and when he could."

A later financial report showed that he owed his friends alone a sum in the region of £37,000. His friends were not aware of the full extent of his financial situation but were not worried that he would be unable to repay his debts.

He was struggling to maintain the pub, having made a profit of less than £18,000 over the previous year.

Assistant coroner Hepburn said: "The gun which was used was his own gun and own ammunition.

"Either he pulled the trigger or someone else did. I cannot say who pulled the trigger or why.

"I have no evidence before me that it was his intention to take his own life. Was this an accidental discharge of the firearm? I cannot say."

Unlawful killing, suicide and misadventure were all ruled out by the coroner in the absence of evidence.

Mr. Daniels was described as very popular and very well liked, often the life and soul of the party.

 

LICENSEE LIST

LISTED Thomas Pay 1741+ Bastions

CRESSEY William 1756-78+ Bastions

BRANN William 1792-1806 Next pub licensee had Bastions

HOLLINGWORTH Edward 1806-07 Bastions

SHORTER John 1807-09 Bastions

OVENDEN John 1809-11 Bastions

HOLMES William 1811-16 Bastions Ex Pack Horse

POPE John 1816-20 Bastions To Jolly Sailor (2)

BARKER James 1820-23 Bastions

QUESTED James 1823-25+ Pigot's Directory 1823 Briefly Renamed Plough

GOODBURN Richard 1830s-46 Pigot's Directory 1840Bagshaw's Directory 1847

GOODBURN John 1846-55 Bastions

PREBBLE William 1855-Dec/57 Folkestone ChronicleMelville's 1858

PREBBLE Mrs Charlotte Dec/1857-83 (age 46 in 1861Census) Folkestone ChroniclePost Office Directory 1862Post Office Directory 1874Bastions

CLIMSON Charles 1883 Bastions

BUCKELL Charles 1883-84 Bastions

JORDAN Alfred Jordan & Mary 1884-90 BastionsPost Office Directory 1891

JORDAN Mary Ann Mrs 1890-1905 (widow age 47 in 1901Census) Kelly's 1899Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

SAVAGE Herbert 1905-11 Bastions

SAVAGE Mrs (widow) 1911-12 Bastions

SUMMERFIELD George 1913 Post Office Directory 1913 From Royal Standard

Last pub licensee had COLLAR William Henry 1917-30 Post Office Directory 1922Bastions

CORK Henry William 1930-42+ (age 52 in 1938) Kelly's 1934Post Office Directory 1938 From George III

MILES John 1942 Bastions

MILES Alice 1942-53 Bastions

COOK Frederick 1953-64 Bastions

SWANN Derek 1964-70 Bastions

BIGGS Geoffrey 1970-83 Bastions From Foresters Arms

BIGGS Joan 1983-88 Bastions

Last pub licensee had MUSK Barry 1988-92 Next pub licensee had Bastions

TANSEY James & Mary 1992-96 Bastions

BENNETT Louis & Mary 1996-2000 Bastions

BENNETT Louis & Patrick , HUNTLEY Casey, CHAMBERS Paul 2000-04+ Bastions

BENNETT Louis Jun 2001-2012

DANIELS Joseph & JONES Teresa 2012-22/Nov/17 (Joe dec'd)

 

Pigot's Directory 1823From the Pigot's Directory 1823

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

The following has kindly been researched and sent by Jan Pedersen and is still to be formatted.

 

Red Cow, Foord Road c1682 – Present

Licensees

Thomas Pay Listed 1741
William Cressey c1756 c1779
William Brann c1792 1807 To Fleur De Lis
Edward Hollingworth 1807 1807
John Shorter 1807 1810
John Ovenden 1810 1811
William Holmes 1811 1816 Ex Pack Horse
John Pope 1816 1820 To Jolly Sailor (2)
James Barker 1820 1823
James Quested 1823 1825 Briefly Renamed Plough
Richard Goodburn 1830s 1846
John Goodburn 1846 1855
William Prebble 1855 1857
Charlotte Prebble 1857 1883
Charles Climson 1883 1883
Charles Buckell 1883 1884
Alfred Jordan and Mary Jordan 1884 1889
Mary Jordan 1889 1905
Herbert Savage 1905 1911
Mrs. Herbert Savage 1911 1912
George Summerfield 1912 1917 From Royal Standard
William Collar 1917 1929 From Royal Oak (1)
Arthur McIlveen (or McIlbean) 1929 1930
Henry (William?) Cork 1930 1942
John Miles 1942 1942
Alice Miles 1942 1953
Frederick Cook 1953 1964
Derek Swann 1964 1970
Geoffrey Biggs 1970 1983 From Foresters Arms
Joan Biggs 1983 1988
Barry Musk 1988 1992 To Imperial
James Tansey and Mary Tansey 1992 1996
Louis Bennett and Mary Bennett 1996 2000
Louis Bennett, Casey Huntley, Patrick Bennett and Paul Chambers 2000 2004 +

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811


General Sessions 27 April 1767

Before John Hague (Mayor), Mr. John Jordan, Mr. Thomas Baker, Mr. John Baker, and Mr. Thomas Rolfe.

James Lipscomb, Ric Coveney, John Milton the elder, John Milton the younger, Henry Barber, Thomas Golder, George Parker, Cassell Burwell, and Samuel Wicks were fined ¾ each for continuing drinking and tippling in an alehouse in the township, which fines were paid to the poor.

Elizabeth Pilcher, widow, Jane Fox, widow, Anne Gittens, widow, and William Cressey were fined 10/- apiece for suffering persons to continue drinking and tippling in their houses, which fines were given to the poor.

Notes: Elizabeth Pilcher PROBABLY widow of at King`s Arms. Not listed in More Bastions. Jane Fox, Five Bells. Anne Gittens, North Foreland. William Cressey, Red Cow.

Kentish Gazette 29 June 1768

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of the Union Society at Folkestone will be held at the sign of the Red Cow in Folkestone, on Monday, the 11th of July next, when and where the members of the said Society are desired to meet by Ten o`clock in the forenoon, in order to proceed to Church to hear a sermon preached by the Reverend Mr. Langhorne,, after which to return to the said house, where a dinner will be provided. And whereas it hath been represented to the said Society, that sundry persons would have entered into the said Society if the age of Forty Years had not been reduced to Thirty Five, therefore it is ordered for the future, any sound and healthy persons not above Forty Years of age, whose residence is not above Thirty Five miles from the said Town, by paying the usual entrance, may be admitted a Member thereof.

Kentish Gazette 3 July 1776

Advertisement

Folkestone Union Society

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of this Society will be held at the sign of the Red Cow on Monday, the 8th instant, when any person, not exceeding the age of forty years, being approved of, may be admitted a member, paying Twenty Shillings entrance.

It is requested that those members, who can conveniently, will attend.

Dinner at One O`Clock.

N.B. The Society hath a stock of Eleven Hundred Pounds, and a probability of its increasing.

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811


General Sessions 26 June 1777

Wm. Cressey, Benham Beecrot, Rob Martin and Mary Gittens, victuallers, were fined 6/8 apiece for having short measures in their custody.

Notes: William Cressey, Red Cow. Robert Martin, Chequers. Mary Gittens, Privateer.

Kentish Gazette 20 June 1778

Folkestone Union Society

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of the said Society will be holden at the sign of the Red Cow, in this town. On Monday, the 6th of July next, when any person, desirous to become a Member thereof, being under the age of forty years, residing within twenty five miles of the said town, and approved by a majority of the Members then present, may be admitted on paying the usual entrance of twenty shillings.

This Society is possessed of a large and improving capital.

June 23rd, 1778

Kentish Gazette 6 October 1807

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To be sold by private contract:

All the Freehold Messuage or Tenement, called or known by the name or sign of the Red Cow, with the stable and buildings thereto belonging, and about hnlf an acre, more or less, of pasture land adjoining the same; situate and being within the liberty of the town of Folkestone now in the occupation of William Brann, who has notice to quit on the 11th inst. - The land tax is redeemed.

For further particulars apply to Mr. Reynolds, attorney, Folkestone.

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811

General Sessions 13 October 1807

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), John Minter, Joseph Sladen, John Castle, John Gill, John Bateman and James Major.

The licence of the Red Cow was transferred to Edward Hollingsworth.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811

General Sessions 8 December 1807

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), John Minter, Joseph Sladen, John Castle, John Bateman and James Major.

The licence of the Red Cow was transferred to John Shorter.

Southeastern Gazette 2 January 1855

Local News

The following licence was transferred. The Red Cow from John Goodban to William Prebble

Southeastern Gazette 28 July 1857

Local News

Robbery.—On Thursday night some person entered a window at the Red Cow Inn, Foord, and stole the clothes belonging to a lad sleeping in the room. On Friday evening a man walked into Mr. Harris’s ship in High-street. A lady, seeing him come out with what appeared to be cloth, informed Mrs. Harris, who went into the Earl Grey public-house, and there found the man, whom she collared, and from under his coat she drew a new pair of trousers and a cap. Mrs. Harris, although resisted by the fellow, walked him down to the station-house, and gave him in charge of the police. The cap proved to belong to the lad at the Red Cow.

Folkestone Chronicle 10 October 1857

Quarter Sessions
Thursday October 8th :- Before C. Harewood esq., Judge of the County Court, the Mayor, W. Major, J. Kelcey, G. Kennicott and W. Bateman esqs.

John Leigh, carpenter, pleaded not guilty to a charge of breaking into the Red Cow public house, and stealing some wearing apparel, on the 24th July, the property of Mr. Prebble. The prisoner pleaded guilty to another charge of stealing a pair of trousers, the property of Mr. Harris, tailor, High Street.

The first case was as follows: - The prisoner offered a pair of trousers and two pairs of boot for sale at a low price; this raised suspicion. It was afterwards discovered that the Red Cow had been broken into, and the property sold by the prisoner was identified by the prosecutor. The prisoner was also seen about 3 o`clock in the morning, by a man who was putting out the street lamps, going in the direction of the Red Cow.

The jury returned a verdict of Guilty. The Recorder sentenced the prisoner to 6 months hard labour for this offence, and 3 months hard labour for stealing the trousers. This prisoner has since turned out to be a ticket-of-leave man.

Folkestone Chronicle 19 December 1857

Wednesday December 16th:- Before R. W. Boarer esq., and G. Kennicott esq.

Special Sessions for transferring licences.

The licence of the Red Cow was transferred from William Prebble, deceased, to his widow, Charlotte Prebble.

Southeastern Gazette 22 December 1857

Wednesday: Before R.W. Boarer and G. Kennicott Esqs.

The licence of the Red Cow was transferred from William Prebble, deceased, to his widow, Charlotte Prebble

Folkestone Chronicle 6 February 1858

Wednesday June 3rd:-

Extract from Town Council Meeting

The Mayor alluded to a committee meeting which had taken place, and read a report (which, although irregular, had been adopted), from the surveyor respecting the costs for the improvements at Foord. The report recommended the laying down a 14 inch drain, pulling down and widening the bridge, and building a wall in lieu of the present fence near the Red Cow. The estimated cost was £23 11s.

Alderman Kennicott here said he had seen Mr. Poulter, the owner of the Red Cow, who had requested that he might have an additional wall in lieu of the fence at present standing on the south side of his house; if that was built for him, he should have no objection to the fence being removed, nor of giving up the land required.

Mr. Jinkings observed that it appeared to him to be very selfish on the part of Mr. Poulter; to ask for such an addition to the offer already made him; the proposed alteration would be of great benefit to his property, and he for one should not vote for anything of the kind.

Mr. Gambrill asked if the surveyor could tell him the cost of the bridge and drain irrespective of the wall.

The surveyor in answer said the wall would be about £6.

Mr. Jinkings moved that the minutes of the committee be confirmed, thus virtually negativing the proposal of Alderman Kennicott.

The Mayor then said he had caused tenders to be put in for the labour in taking down and rebuilding the present bridge, laying the proposed drain, and building the proposed wall – the parties tendering, to fin mortar and the cement required. When opened, there appeared one from Mr. C. Foreman £26; Mr. W Green £28 2s. 6d.; Mt. T. Field £40; Mr. Henry Unwin £24 11s. After the opening of the tenders, the discussion of the question between Mr. Poulter and the Corporation was resumed. Mr. Tite argued that Mr. Poulter`s offer was a liberal one and ought to be accepted.

Mr. Gambrill differed with Mr. Tite, and moved that Mr. Unwin`s offer be accepted, but that the surveyor arrange with him respecting the difference, supposing the wall was not built. Alderman Kennicott begged them to consider that Mr. Poulter`s offer was a liberal one – he was of opinion it ought to be accepted. After some further desultory conversation, Mr. Cobb seconded Mr. Gambrill`s motion, which was carried.

“In the course of the discussion it came out, that the dispute was that Mr. Poulter, not satisfied with having a new wall to his gardens in front of the cottages parallel with the road, also required one in front of the Red Cow, in lieu of the wooden fence, which the Corporation, very properly, did not think themselves justified in allowing”.

Southeastern Gazette 9 February 1858

Local News

The council met on Wednesday. Present, the Mayor, Aldermen Tolputt and Kennicott; Councillors Gambrill, Cobb, Hunt Jefferey, Boorne, Caister, Pledge, Fagg, Meikle, Jinkings, Major, and Baker.

Capt. Kennicott said that he had seen Mr. Poulter, of Dover, the owner of the Red Cow public-house, at Foord, and he was willing to give up the land required, if the corporation would build a wall in front of his house.

Mr. Jinkings objected to the corporation doing anything of the kind, as what they proposed to do was for the improvement of Mr. Poulter’s property; it was most illiberal on his part to require them to do it, and he for one would not vote for it, although he was desirous to see the work properly done.

The tenders for the work were then opened, and were as follows:—For laying down drain and building a wall and rebuilding bridge, the corporation to find materials, except lime and cement:—Wm. Green, Foord £28 2s. 6d.; Chas. Foreman, Folkestone, £26; Thomas Field, ditto, £40 ; Henry Unwin, £24 11s.

Mr. Jinkings thought that the surveyor should deduct the cost of the wall, and only do the bridge and drain.

Mr. Gambrill thought Mr. Poulter would then see that they could do without it.

Capt. Kennicott differed from Mr. Jinkings, as Mr. Poulter offered to give up 40ft. of ground, and they ought to carry out the proposal he had made.

Mr. Tite considered it a liberal offer from Mr. Poulter, and he should move that the proposal be accepted. It was, however, explained to Mr. Tite, that Mr. Poulter wanted a dwarf wall in front of his house, in addition to the north wall, whereupon it was resolved to carry out the work, omitting the fence and walls, and the contract of Mr. Unwin (being lowest) was accepted.

Southeastern Gazette 9 March 1858

Local News

The council met on Wednesday last. Present, the Mayor, Aldermen Tolputt, Kennicott, and Gardner ; Councillors Tite, Tolputt, Jefferey (Walton,) Jefferey (Coolinge,) Boorne, Gambrill, Baker, Fagg, Major, Pledge, Meikle, Jinkings, Banks, Caister, and Cobb.

Alterations at Foord. Alderman Capt. Kennicott made some observation on the treatment of Mr. Poulter, the owner of the Red Cow public-house at Foord, stating that if the corporation proceeded with the pulling down the bridge, Mr. Poulter would stop them. He proposed that the work as estimated be done forthwith. Mr. Jinkings seconded it, and it was carried by 11 to 4.

Folkestone Observer 29 October 1864

Friday October 28th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

Louisa Austin, the dissipated wife of a barrister, was place in the dock charged with stealing a blanket, value 5s.

William Fordred, labourer, living near the Black Bull in Foord Lane, said the prisoner was a lodger in his house. Yesterday, between three and four o`clock in the afternoon, a policeman brought a blanket to him – the blanket now produced, and marked W.F. – which was his property. He did not authorise the prisoner to get the blanket washed, or to do anything with it. She took it away without his knowledge.

Jane Down, wife of Henry Down, residing at the Black Bull cottage, saw prisoner yesterday afternoon, shortly after two o`clock, turn from the road into Mr. Jinkings` meadow, and there pull up her dress and take something from underneath it. She then left the field, and went into witness`s garden to fetch her hat, which had blown off. Witness went up to her and told her to go out of the garden, and then she saw that prisoner had a blanket, and said to her “You have a blanket”. Prisoner said “No. I have a petticoat”. Witness repeated “It is a blanket”. Prisoner put the blanket under her arm and went down the road, away from prosecutor`s house.

Cross-examined: You did not say it was a blanket, and you were going to get it washed.

Patrick Holtum, K.C.C., yesterday afternoon, about two o`clock, returning to his station at Swingfield Minnis, was told by several persons that a woman in the Red Cow had stolen a blanket. Witness went to the inn, and found the prisoner there, and charged her with the theft. The prisoner had the blanket, produced, under her left arm, and said she only brought it out to be washed. He took the prisoner to the prosecutor`s house, and he identified the same as his property.

Cross-examined: You did not say to Mrs. Prebble in my presence “How could I steal the blanket when I asked you to get it washed?”.

William Fordred re-examined: Prisoner had been exactly a month with him. He never authorised her to get it washed, and he never sent her with anything to get washed.

Prisoner: I told him I would get it washed, and he said “Never mind. Keep the money in your pocket”.

Fordred: She took it without my knowledge.

Captain Kennicott: How many times has the prisoner been before the bench?

The Clerk: I think this is the ninth time within the year. (To prisoner) The charge against you is that you took one blanket, the property of William Fordred, of the value of 5s.

Prisoner: I have to say that two more witnesses are to come before I am tried. There are two witnesses to come here – Mrs. Prebble, and the woman I asked to dry it. I have been living long enough in that man`s house to have taken his mark out if I had wanted to steal it. There are two more witnesses to come, and I must have them. I am not going to be branded as a thief.

Captain Kennicott: You are an incorrigible character and we can`t correct you. We will send you for trial.

Mr. Tolputt: You have been already a great expense to the town.

Prisoner: I don`t mind going for trial. I am not afraid.

The bench then committed her for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

Folkestone Observer 7 January 1865

Quarter Sessions

Tuesday January 3rd:- Before J.J. Lonsdale

The Grand Jury ignored the bill against Louisa Austin, charged with stealing one blanket, the property of William Fordred, at Folkestone on October 27th 1864.

Southeastern Gazette 26 October 1874

County Court

This court was held on Saturday last before G. Russell, Esq., Judge.

Charlotte Prebble, Red Lion Inn (sic), sued Mr. George Brickman, auctioneer, for £1 11s. 1d,, for refreshments supplied to his supporters at the municipal election of 1878, when Mr. Brickman was a candidate for the North Ward.

Plaintiff put in a letter which she had received from Mr. Brickman, in which he said he did not hold himself responsible for what had been supplied, but if a subscription were made he would pay his part.

His Honour said that Mr. Brickman had repudiated his liability, and gave a nonsuit.

Folkestone Express 31 October 1874

County Court

Saturday, October 24th: Before G. Russell Esq.

Charlotte Prebble, Red Cow Inn, Foord v George Brickman: This was a claim for £1 11s. 1d. for refreshments supplied to defendant`s supporters when a candidate for the office of Councillor for the North Ward in November last.

Mr. Mowll for plaintiff, and Mr. Minter for defendant.

Mr. W. Prebble, plaintiff`s son, said the refreshments were supplied to defendant`s supporters, who were at his house. The beer was fetched from the bar in defendant`s name, on the order of Mr. Rye, who worked for the South Eastern railway Company. He had received a letter from defendant, who said he did not consider himself responsible for the acts of the committee, but if a subscription were got up he would buy his part, and he thought plaintiff ought to be paid by somebody. He paid for what he had himself.

His Honour: Who gave the order?

Plaintiff: Defendant was in the room when the order was given. Rye came to the bar and ordered the beer. I have seen defendant several times about it, and he wanted me to see the committee.

Mr. Mowll submitted that there was sufficient in the order to show a joint liability.

His Honour: But defendant says in his note “I do not hold myself responsible”, which is a distinct repudiation. There must be a nonsuit.

Folkestone Chronicle 3 July 1875

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Red Cow Inn, on Wednesday evening last, before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr. Vaughan was foreman, on the body of Frederick Hogben, aged 13, employed as a plasterer`s assistant under Mr. Clemmans, builder, and who met with his death by falling from a scaffolding. The following evidence was adduced: Mr. Charles Lewis, M.R.C.S., stated that deceased was brought to his house on Tuesday evening. He was suffering from injuries to the head, produced by a fall, and he died from those injuries shortly before eleven o`clock the same evening. The only external injury was a slight scalp wound, and the cause of death was compression of the brain. Mr. Henry Clemmans said he was engaged in a contract to build new billiard and dining rooms and to make other additions to the West Cliff Hotel. Deceased was employed by him as a hawkboy, serving the plasterers. About a quarter past 7 on Tuesday night the men were at work, and he was standing on the lawn about 50 feet from them, when he heard a shout and a thud, and saw deceased, who had fallen through a scaffold on to a stone landing ten feet below. He was quite insensible. Only a plasterer named Dilwell was on the scaffold at the time.

By the Foreman: Deceased had been in my employ about three months. I don`t know if he had done similar work before. He began work at 6 a.m.

The Foreman: Deceased was only thirteen. It seems a long time for a lad of that age to work.

Witness: It`s the first night they worked late. It is usual for lads to perform similar work.

Alfred Dilwell, plasterer, of 8, Alexandra Mews, stated that he and deceased were plastering the outside wall of a drawing room at the West Cliff Hotel. Deceased was serving him with cement. They were standing on a scaffold 16 feet from the ground, but there was a stone landing 10 feet below the scaffold. The scaffold was a properly constructed, substantial, and strong a one as he had ever worked upon, and was, as usual, about 14 inches from the work, so as to complete it. A piece of stack pipe lay level with the boards next the opening. Three or four feet above the scaffold was a low parapet. While he was using the cement, deceased slipped and fell. Deceased was behind him, and he supposed he was reaching over the parapet for a tool he (witness) had asked for. He must have trod on the piece of piping, which rolled over and slipped off. He was a very quick boy, and witness had had to caution him once or twice of moving so fast on the boards. The boy fell on his back, and called out “Oh, dear”. Another labourer picked him up. He was insensible.

Corroborative evidence having been given by Alfred Holland, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Folkestone Express 3 July 1875

Inquest

A fatal accident occurred to a lad named Frederick Hogben, aged 13, employed as a plasterer`s assistant under Mr. Clemmans, on Wednesday evening. Some extensive additions are being made to the West Cliff Hotel by Mr. Clemmans, and the deceased was standing on a scaffold above a stone passage. The work was being finished by the plasterers, and a space was therefore left between the wall and the boarding of the scaffold. Deceased, who was a quick, active lad, stepped forward to hand a tool to the plasterer with whom he was working, and slipped through this opening, alighting on his head. He was removed to Mr. Lewis`s surgery and from thence to his home, but died the same night from the injuries received.

An inquest was held on the body at the Red Cow Inn on Wednesday evening, before John Minter Esq., Coroner for the Borough, and a respectable jury.

The jury having viewed the body, which lay in a house in Palmerston Cottages, the following evidence was taken to.

Mr. Charles Lewis, M.R.C.S. deposed: The deceased, Frederick Hogben, was brought to my house in West Cliff Gardens last evening at half past seven by H. Clemmans. The boy was suffering from injuries to the head, produced (as I believe) by a fall. He died from these injuries shortly before eleven o`clock the same evening. When I saw him he was not conscious, and he never regained his consciousness. I examined the deceased. The only external injury was a slight scalp wound. The cause of death was compression of the brain.

Mary Croucher: I am the wife of Henry Croucher, tailor, 4, Station Cottages. The deceased was my brother; he was thirteen years of age.

Mr. Henry Clemmans: I am a builder and contractor, living at Folkestone. Have a contract to build new billiard and dining rooms and made other additions to the West Cliff Hotel. Deceased was employed by me as a hawk-boy, serving the plasterers. About a quarter past seven last night the men were at work. I was standing on the lawn about 50 feet from them, when I heard a shout and a thud, and saw deceased, who had fallen through a scaffold on to a stone landing ten feet below. He was quite insensible. Only a plasterer named Dixwell was on the scaffold at the time.

By the Formen: Deceased had been in my employ about three months. I don`t know whether he had done similar work before. He began work at 6 a.m.

The Foreman: Deceased was only thirteen. It seems a long time for a lad of that age to work.

Witness: It`s the first night they worked late. It is usual for lads to perform similar work.

Alfred Dixwell, plasterer, of 8, Alexandra Mews: I work for Mr. Clemmans. Last night, about this time (7.15), we were plastering the outside wall of a drawing room at the West Cliff Hotel. Deceased was serving me with Portland cement. We were standing on a scaffold 16 feet from the ground, but there was a stone landing 10 feet below the scaffold. The scaffold was as properly constructed, substantial, and strong a one as ever I worked upon, and was, as usual, about 14 inches from the work, so as to complete it. A piece of stack pipe lay level with the boards, next the opening. Three or four feet above the scaffold was a low parapet. While I was using the cement, deceased slipped and fell. Deceased was behind me, and I suppose he was reaching over the parapet for a tool I had asked for. He mist have trod on the piece of piping, which rolled over and slipped off. He was a very quick boy, and I had had to caution him once or twice of moving so fast on the boards. The boy fell on his back, and called out “Oh, dear”. Another labourer picked him up; he was insensible.

Mr. Clemmans, re-called: It is necessary to leave the opening between the wall and the scaffolding while the plasterers are at work. It is a usual thing, and the boy must have known of it.

Alfred Holland, a bricklayer`s labourer, of 27, Queen Street: I was at work at the West Cliff Hotel last night. While kneeling on the outside of the scaffolding removing a cord I saw the deceased fall through the opening. He fell legs first, and then turned, falling upon his head. I picked him up; he was groaning. I carried him to Mr. Lewis`s, and he was sent home in a fly.

The jury at once returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Folkestone Chronicle 6 December 1879

Wednesday, December 3rd: Before Capt. Fletcher, R.W. Boarer, J. Banks, and W.J. Bell Esqs.

Charles Brown was charged with being drunk and disorderly on licensed premises on the pervious day, Dec. 2nd, and refusing to quit the Red Cow when requested to do so.

From the evidence of William Prebble, the landlady`s son, it appears that defendant came to the house drunk, and asked for a bottle of ginger ale (a teetotal drink) about two in the afternoon. He continued singing, swearing, and making a disturbance, and would not go out or desist, so he sent for the police.

Supt. Wilshere deposed to being sent for, but defendant was then at the Castle Inn. He sent for Mr. Prebble, who identified him, and witness took him in custody.

Supt. Ovenden deposed to seeing defendant at the station. He refused to give his name, and was bailed out.

Mr. Minter, in an able defence, stated that the charge could not be sustained, as he would prove that defendant was sober at the time alluded to, and he called Mr. Unwin, builder, his employer, Thomas Allen, John Vye, and William Burvill, who all positively swore that defendant was sober at the hour named.

The Bench dismissed both cases against defendant.

Folkestone Express 6 December 1879

Wednesday, December 3rd: Before R.W. Boarer Esq., Captain Fletcher, Alderman Banks, M.J. Bell Esq.

Joseph Brown, a labourer, of New Bridge Street, was with being drunk and disorderly on licensed premises, and with refusing to quit the Red Cow public house on the 2nd inst. Mr. Minter appeared for the defendant.

William Prebble, son of the landlady of the Red Cow, said the defendant went there about two o`clock in the afternoon. He was drunk, and made a disturbance by shouting, and several persons in the bar tried to get rid of him, but he refused to go. Witness therefore sent for a policeman.

Superintendent Wilshere said he was called by last witness, but when he arrived at the Red Cow the house was clear. He went in search of the defendant, who refused to give his name, and was taken into custody and afterwards admitted to bail.

Henry Unwin was called for the defence and said defendant was in his employ. He saw him about two o`clock on Tuesday, and he was then sober, but the men were unable to work on account of the frost.

Several other witnesses were called, who said defendant was not drunk, and the charges were dismissed.

Folkestone Express 27 October 1883

Saturday, October 20th: Before R.W. Boarer, J. Clark and F. Boykett Esqs., and Colonel De Crespigny.

The license of the Red Cow, Foord, was temporarily transferred to William Brickell, and the Eagle, High Street, to George Follett.

Note: More Bastions lists the transfer as Charles Buckell.

Folkestone Chronicle 20 December 1884

Tuesday, December 16th: Before The Mayor, Dr. Bateman, Ald. Aister, J. Fitness, and J. Holden Esqs.

Sarah Goodchild, wife of a labourer, was charged with stealing from the Red Cow, Foord, on the 15th inst., a cane bottomed stool, the property of Alfred Jordan.

From the evidence of P.C. Sharpe, it appears that whilst on duty at the police station on Monday evening, prisoner came in with the stool, and said she had stolen it. The landlord of the Red Cow and his daughter deposed to her being there that evening, and asked for a pint of beer, with which she was served.

In answer to the Chairman`s enquiry as to whether the prisoner`s husband was in Court, a labourer came forward and claimed prisoner as his wife. The woman, in reply to the charge, pleaded guilty, and told a most pitiable story of the ill-usage she had been subjected to from the hands of her husband. She said that she took the stool purposely because she had no comfort at home, and she was wretched and miserable. She took it because she wanted to get locked up, as she could not stop out of doors and would not go home. On Sunday her husband held her against the wall and afterwards kneeled on her. She had only one girl, and they had taken her away, and she had not seen her for eighteen months. She had five children, the youngest being eight months old. The husband was questioned by the Bench and said that he did not think his wife was quite right in her head, as she acted in a very strange way, but his answers were of a very callous character, and his behaviour such as to suggest that he had been drinking.

The prisoner was then charged with stealing 3s., the money of Stephen Oliver. This charge resting upon frivolous evidence the Bench dismissed the case, but for the other offence sentenced her to 14 days` imprisonment. The woman asked that she might take her baby to prison with her, but was told that this would not be permitted.

The Mayor then called the prisoner`s husband before him, and said that the Bench were of opinion that much of the trouble that had fallen upon the prisoner was due to his ill-treatment of her, and warned him that if any charge of ill-treatment was preferred against him he would be severely punished.

Folkestone Express 20 December 1884

Tuesday, December 16th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, W. Bateman, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Sarah Goodchild, a married woman, was charged with stealing a stool, the property of Mr. Alfred Jordan, landlord of the Red Cow Inn, Foord.

P.C. Sharp said on the previous day the woman went to the police station with the stool, saying she had stolen it, and requesting to be taken into custody. She made a statement complaining of the systematic ill-treatment of her husband and his family.

Edith Jordan, daughter of the prosecutor, said she remembered the prisoner going into the bar and having two glasses of beer. The bar was so constructed that she could not see if anyone took anything away.

The prisoner said she was driven to do what she did by her husband`s ill-treatment.

The husband alleged that she was not right in her mind, and that she had threatened to make away with them.

There was a second charge against the prisoner, of stealing 3s. in money, the property of Stephen Oliver.

The wife of the prosecutor, living in Bradstone Road, said she had known the prisoner for several years. On the previous morning she went to her house and asked her if she was not going to stand half a pint of beer. She said if she did she would have to take it out of her rent. She went for some beer, leaving Mrs. Goodchild and her little boy in the house. Mrs. Goodchild was there when she came back and helped to drink the beer. At one o`clock she went to get the money to pay the landlord, and then missed 3s. Prisoner had seen her take down a saucer containing money. No-one else had been in the house.

In reply to the prisoner, witness said she went with her to the Brewery Tap, where she had some rum. While they were gone the door was shut, but not locked.

For the first offence the prisoner was sentenced to 14 days` hard labour, and the second charge was dismissed.

Her husband was called up, and the Mayor told him the magistrates had every reason to believe a good deal of the woman`s misconduct had been brought about by his scandalous behaviour and his ill-treatment of her. As her husband, he was bound to protect her, but there was not the slightest doubt he had been the means of bringing her into the disgraceful position in which she was then placed. They warned him that if at any time a charge was made against him of ill-treating his wife he would be severely punished.

The man, who appeared to be nearly drunk, flippantly replied “Thank you. I am much obliged to you, sir”.

Folkestone News 20 December 1884

Tuesday, December 16th: Before The Mayor, Mr. J. Fitness, Dr. Bateman, Alderman Caister and Mr. J. Holden.

Sarah Goodchild, a married woman, was charged with stealing a cane-bottomed chair from the Red Cow on the previous day.

P.C. Sharp deposed that the woman came into the police station on the previous evening about six o`clock with the chair produced, stating that she had stolen it from the Red Cow, and wanted to be locked up. She was consequently detained and charged.

Edith Jordan, daughter of the landlord of the Red Cow, said prisoner had a pint of beer there and went out. Witness did not see her take anything out.

Alfred Philip Jordan identified the chair as his property, and valued it at 4s. 6d. He explained that prisoner might easily have stolen the chair without being seen, as it stood near the door.

Henry Goodchild, prisoner`s husband, was called, and was apparently in liquor. He said “A pretty girl, you are!”

Prisoner: It was all through you. In defence she said she took the chair in order to be locked up. Her home was comfortless, and she was miserable. Her children had been taken away from her and taught to do all sorts of bad things against her. She would not go home, and in order not to be left in the streets all night she committed the theft. On the previous day her husband cruelly assaulted her. She did not know why she was ill-treated, but they said she was mad.

Dr. Bateman: You told me your head was affected.

Prisoner said her head was very bad at times.

Goodchild said that what his wife said was a “lot of lies” and that she had threatened the lives of his children. She said he was the “first to go”.

The magistrates were unable to make the witness explain what he meant.

Prisoner was further charged with stealing 3s. from the cottage of Stephen Olive, but the evidence was so imperfect that they dismissed it.

The magistrates were of opinion that the woman had been ill-treated, but as that did not justify theft they sentenced her to fourteen days` hard labour.

Her husband was reprimanded and cautioned.

Folkestone Express 14 December 1889

Wednesday, December 11th: Before Alderman Banks, Surgeon General Gilbourne, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, F. Boykett and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Transfer

The licence of the Red Cow Inn was transferred to Mrs. M.A. Jordan.

Note: This transfer is at variance with date in More Bastions.

Folkestone Express 26 December 1891

Wednesday, December 23rd: Before Aldermen Sherwood, Pledge and Dunk, J. Fitness and E. Ward Esqs.

Iden Pritchard, gardener, was summoned for stealing two heath plants, value 2s., from a greenhouse belonging to George Pilcher. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Prosecutor, a florist, having premises in Dover Road, said defendant had been in his employment as working gardener for more than 18 months. He left a week ago last Saturday. Since defendant left he had missed plants from his premises, and among them were three heaths of the kind produced, from a greenhouse. He missed the heaths on Friday, 18th. Defendant was in the house on the Wednesday or Thursday previous, saying he wanted to buy some shrubs, but he went away without buying anything. When he missed the plants he gave information to the police. There were nine plants of this sort in the greenhouse. He could swear positively to one of those produced, as it was peculiar in it`s appearance, and he had tried to sell it to a customer a few days ago. They were also of an uncommon size to be flowering so freely. The value was 1s. each.

By defendant: I bought twelve plants of a nurseryman, and sold three. The nurseryman had plenty more of the same sort, and he served the trade. The greenhouses were not kept locked. I have had reasons to suspect you have taken goods. You were formerly a very useful man, but latterly you have given way to drink and been careless. I do not remember having given you a good recommendation lately.

Alice Maud Mary Jordan, of the Red Cow Inn, said the defendant went to her mother`s house on Thursday with Christmas Trees and two plants. She recognised one of the heaths. Defendant asked her to buy it, and she did, paying 9d. for it. She knew defendant as a customer.

Mary Ann Maple, wife of Thomas Maple, of the Honest Lawyer, Belle Vue Street, said the defendant went to that house with one plant on Thursday evening. He asked 1s. for it, and she bought it of him for 6d. She knew him as a customer.

William Jenner, a lad in the service of the prosecutor, said he saw the defendant on Wednesday evening at ten minutes to ten, outside the garden gate in Dover Road, walking to and from.

Thomas Alfred Tutt, another lad in the prosecutor`s employ, said he saw the defendant about ten o`clock on Wednesday evening go into the Belle Vue with a Christmas tree in his hand. Witness saw him again on Thursday evening near St. John Street with a plant like those produced in his hand.

Prosecutor was re-called, and said the garden was approached by gates. The larger one was locked, but not the smaller one. Mr. Wilson had a right of way to his premises there. The greenhouse was not fastened in any way.

Defendant said he bought the plants from a hawker, but did not know his name.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined defendant 10s., 2s. the value of the plants, and 18s. costs, or 14 days` hard labour, telling him he was liable to be imprisoned for six months.

The Bench recommended Mr. Pilcher to keep his premises locked in future.

Folkestone Chronicle 30 April 1898

Saturday, April 23rd: Before Messrs. J. Pledge, G. Spurgen, and T.J. Vaughan.

John Bryant was charged with being drunk in charge of a horse and cart in Dover Road on April 22nd.

P.C. Burniston said he ejected the prisoner from the Swan Inn. He got up into a cart and drove off, but stopped at the New Inn. Prisoner was further charged with refusing to quit the Swan Inn.

Mr. Brett, manager, said the prisoner was drunk in his house and refused to leave. He did not get drunk in his house.

P.C. Burniston said he ejected the prisoner as he refused to leave. He used very bad language. He had seen him previously at the Red Cow, when he was sober.

He was fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs for the first offence, and the second charge was dismissed, the Bench believing he got drunk in the house.

Folkestone Herald 30 April 1898

Police Court Report

On Saturday last – Alderman Pledge presiding – John Bryan pleaded Guilty to being drunk in charge of a horse and cart.

P.C. Burneston deposed that on the previous night he ejected the defendant from the Swan public house. He drove twice on to the pavement. He was drunk, and unfit to be in charge of a horse and cart.

There was another charge against defendant of refusing to quit licensed premises. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Brett, manager of the Swan Inn, deposed that defendant came into the Swan. Witness saw him about 4 o`clock. He refused to leave. The constable put him out. Defendant was in a drunken state.

Defendant said he only went in there.

P.C. Burneston deposed that he was called at ten past six to eject prisoner.

Defendant said he had several twos of whisky.

The Bench fined him 5s., 4s. 6d. costs, or 7 days` hard labour. They dismissed the second charge of refusing to quit, it being the firm impression of the Chairman that defendant got drunk at this house.

Folkestone Up To Date 30 April 1898

Saturday, April 23rd: Before Ald. Pledge, T.S. Spurgeon, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

John Brien, horse dealer, Folkestone, was charged with having been drunk on licensed premises, and refusing to quit, and also in being unfit to take charge of his horse and cart on the 22nd inst.

P.C. Burniston said that about 6.10 on the previous evening he was called into the Swan to eject the prisoner and another man. The prisoner had a horse and cart standing outside, and drove several times on the pavement while proceeding to the New Inn, where he was taken into custody by Burniston.

Mr. Brett, of the Swan, said: The prisoner and his friend came into the Swan Inn last evening, and called for drink. I was not in at the time. I asked the prisoner to leave the house, but he would not do so.

For the first offence the prisoner was fined 5s., and 4s. 6d. costs, and for the second dismissed.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had dealt so lightly with the second offence because they believed that the prisoner got the principal part of his drink at the Swan.

Folkestone Herald 21 May 1898

Police Court

On Saturday – the Mayor (Colonel Penfold) presiding – Mrs. Eliza Holloway was summoned for assaulting Mrs. Harriett Wall on the 9th inst.

Complainant deposed that she was a married woman, living at 68, Black Bull Road. On the previous Monday evening she went into the Red Cow for the key of the house. She had to wait a little while, and had a “small lemon”. Her husband gave her the key, and went out. She followed. Whilst he was talking to Mrs. Holloway`s son, witness went up and asked him something. Witness`s husband and defendant`s son had a scuffle, and defendant tore a bag out of her hand.

Defendant then gave her version of the affair.

The Bench dismissed the case. Complainant to pay 2s. costs.

Folkestone Up To Date 25 June 1898

Saturday, June 18th: Before J. Hoad Esq., and Justices Pledge, Vaughan, and Holden.

Samuel Baker was summoned for using obscene language on the Foord Road, on June 10th.

P.C. Varrier said: About 5.10 in the afternoon I was on duty on the Foord Road when I saw a pony and trap unattended opposite the Red Cow. I went into the public house and cautioned a man I saw there. Baker then followed me into the street, and began using disgusting language, telling me that I had ---- well exceeded my duty.

The defendant told the Magistrates that he was very much excited because he could not get possession of a horse he had paid for.

He was fined 5s. and 9s. costs.

Folkestone Chronicle 3 May 1902

Monday, April 28th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, G. Swoffer, and C.J. Pursey.

Thomas De Boar, a respectable-looking mechanic, describing himself as a painter, was charged with stealing a pair of steps from the outside of a shop in Foord Road between the hours of nine and ten on Sunday evening.

Mr. Edwards, tobacconist, etc., Foord Road, said that on Sunday night he placed the steps outside the shop. He left the shop front for a few moments, and when he returned they were missing.

P.C. Chaney said that he found the prisoner at the Red Cow public house with the steps. Witness asked him where he got them from, and received the reply that they were obtained from another man. Prisoner was taken to the station and charged. He had been drinking.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty, and made a pathetic appeal to the Bench. He said he had a wife, mother, and four children dependent upon him. He had come down to Folkestone to do some work, and he could not think what had possessed him to take the steps. He had been a teetotaller for two years.

The Chairman, having advised the accused as to his future conduct, fined him 10s., or seven days`.

Accused: Thank you, sir; I am very thankful.

The fine was paid.

Folkestone Chronicle 22 August 1903

Thursday, August 20th: Before Aldermen Banks and Salter, Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Arthur Jones and James Allen were charged with being concerned in uttering a gilded sixpence, representing it to be a half sovereign.

Mary Fisher, a barmaid at the Harbour Inn, said: I recognise Jones, who came to the bar about 8.30 p.m. yesterday, and asked for a mild and bitter. I served him, and he offered me a sovereign in payment. I went to the place where the money is kept and took half a sovereign and 10s. worth of silver. I then, from the till, changed 1s. for a mild and bitter, and, having taken 1½d., I placed the 19s. 10½d. before Jones upon the counter. He picked up the silver, put his hand over the half sovereign, as if to pick it up, then drew his hand back, and suddenly put it out again, asking me to give him the half sovereign in silver. I took a coin up, thinking I had the same half sovereign I had put down, and went to the cupboard and changed it. After the prisoner had gone, Mr. Hall spoke to me, and then went to the cupboard and brought to me the coin for which I had given Jones 10s. in exchange.

Thomas Hall, landlord of the Harbour Inn, proved watching the transaction just spoken to, and said that as Jones left the house he (witness) went to the cupboard and found a genuine half sovereign he had put there earlier, and also the coin produced (a gilded sixpence). He went in search of prisoner, and found him with another man at the bottom of High Street, counting money. Witness said to Jones “I want you. You have been passing bad coin with my barmaid”. Jones replied “Where do you mean? What house do you mean?” Witness said “You know whose house it is; you have just left it”. I told a cabman who stood by to call a policeman, when Jones said “Don`t call a policeman”, and the other prisoner said “How much do you want?” Just then a policeman came up and witness gave prisoner in charge. The other man was brought to the house later on, and witness identified him as the one who was with Jones.

James Butland, a cab driver, deposed to seeing the prisoners acting suspiciously, and then walk away from the Harbour Inn in company, going down South Street. Following them, witness, at the bottom of High Street, saw them stop and share out some money. Jones handed it to the other man. Mr. Hall came along, and witness gave him information.

The Chief Constable asked for a remand, as there would be one additional case to prefer next week.

Jones, who had previously said that he took the half sovereign at the Folkestone Racecourse, now said that he was Guilty, and that he had had some drink when he passed the coin. He would like the Magistrates to deal with the case at once.

The Chief Constable: No doubt he has very good reasons for that wish.

The Chairman said the prisoners would be remanded for seven days.

Folkestone Express 22 August 1903

Thursday, August 20th: Before Aldermen Banks and Salter, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, W. Wightwick, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Arthur Jones and James Allen were charged with being concerned together in uttering a gilded sixpence for half a sovereign.

Mary Fisher, barmaid at the Harbour Inn, identified the prisoner Jones as a person who came to the bar about 8.30 p.m. the previous evening and asked for a mild and bitter. Witness served him and prisoner offered a sovereign in payment. She then went to a cupboard for change and placed 19s. 10½d. on the counter. Prisoner placed his hand over the half sovereign as though he intended to pick it up, but drew it back, and then put it suddenly forward, at the same time asking witness to give him the half sovereign in silver. Witness took it up, thinking it was the same half sovereign that she had put down. She took 10s. worth of silver and placed what was supposed to be a half sovereign in the cupboard. Prisoner finished his glass and then went out. In consequence of something said by the landlord witness went to the cupboard, and then discovered that the supposed half sovereign was a counterfeit.

Thomas Hall, landlord of the Harbour Inn, said that about 8 o`clock the previous morning he placed two half sovereigns and 10s. worth of silver in a cupboard. At 8.30 he was in the saloon bar when the prisoner Jones came in, and he saw the barmaid go to the cupboard for change and afterwards hand it over the counter; she then went back and took further change from the cupboard. Prisoner then left the house. In consequence of something said by the barmaid witness went to the cupboard and there found one of the coins which he had placed there in the morning, but discovered that the other was not a half sovereign. On going outside witness met a cabman, and in consequence of his statement proceeded along South Street and found the two prisoners at the bottom of High Street counting money. Witness caught hold of Jones and said “I want you for passing a bad coin to my barmaid”. He replied “What house do you mean?” Witness said “You know which house it is; you have just left it”. Allen said “Don`t call a policeman. How much do you want?” Just then a policeman came up. Witness informed prisoner that he required nothing. He then gave Jones into custody. Allen was brought to the bar later on and witness identified him as the person he had seen with Jones.

John Butland, a cabman, said that he was on the stand close to the Harbour the previous evening when he saw prisoners at the corner of Barton`s Wall. They walked across the road and had a conversation, at the same time watching the Harbour Hotel. Jones looked through the window, spoke to Allen and then went into the bar and called for a drink. The other prisoner then went in the bar and they both came out together. Witness followed them. When outside Maestrani`s shop in South Street they shared some money. Mr. Hall then came up and witness went for a policeman who took Jones into custody.

The Superintendent applied for a remand in order that further enquiries might be made.

Mr. Bradley advised the prisoners not to make any statement, but the prisoner Jones said that he had the half sovereign passed on to him at the Folkestone Races. Allen said the coin was not a counterfeit.

Prisoners asked to have the case settled at once, but the Magistrates decided to remand them for a week.

Folkestone Herald 22 August 1903

Thursday, August 20th: Before Aldermen Banks and Salter, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Messrs. W. Wightwick, and G.I. Swoffer.

Arthur Jones and James Allen were charged with being concerned together in uttering a gilded sixpence for a half sovereign.

Mary Fisher, a barmaid at the Harbour Inn, recognised Jones as the man who, about half past eight the previous day, came into the bar and asked for a “mild and bitter”. Prisoner offered a sovereign in payment, and witness gave him the change, 19s. 10½d., a half sovereign and the rest in silver. She saw prisoner put his hand over the piece of gold as if to pick it up, but drew it back and then put it suddenly forward, at the same time asking her to give him the half sovereign in silver. Witness thought it was the same half sovereign she had put down, and complied with his request. Prisoner then left.

Thomas Hall, landlord of the Harbour Hotel, said that he saw the two prisoners at the bottom of High Street counting some money between them. He caught hold of Jones and said “You have been passing a bad coin through my barmaid”. Prisoner said “What house do you mean?” A policeman coming up at the time, he gave prisoners in charge.

John Butland, a cabman, stated that he was on the stand near the harbour about eight o`clock the previous evening, when he saw the two prisoners standing near the wall. They afterwards went across the road. He saw Jones go into the Harbour Hotel, followed shortly afterwards by Allen. He saw them come out, and go together to South Street, and also saw them sharing the money. He went for the police.

Prisoners, who pleaded Guilty, were remanded for a week.

Folkestone Chronicle 29 August 1903

Thursday, August 27th: Before Aldermen Banks and Salter, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Arthur Jones and James Allen were charged on remand with passing a Jubilee gilded sixpence as a half sovereign. Additional evidence was called, and a second charge was gone into. In this case, as in the first, it was alleged that the accused “rang the changes” with a gilded sixpence upon Thomas Philip Jordan at the Red Cow public house.

On the application of Chief Constable Reeve, both prisoners were committed to take their trial at the next Quarter Sessions of the Borough, bail being offered in prisoners` own sureties of £100 and two sureties of £50 in each case.

Folkestone Express 29 August 1903

Local News

At the Folkestone Borough Police Court on Thursday, Arthur Jones and James Allen were brought up on remand charged with being concerned together in uttering gilded sixpences as half sovereigns, and further evidence having been given, the prisoners were committed for trial.

Folkestone Herald 29 August 1903

Thursday, August 27th: Before Aldermen Banks and Salter, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Arthur Jones and James Allen were charged, on remand, with uttering a counterfeit coin, viz., a gilded sixpence.

The evidence given at the previous hearing was repeated.

Both prisoners were committed to take their trial at the next Quarter Sessions for the borough, bail being fixed at £50 each.

Folkestone Chronicle 17 October 1903

Quarter Sessions

Monday, October 12th: Before John Charles Lewis Coward.

Arthur Jones, 29, labourer, and James Allen, 49, hawker, both described as of imperfect education., were charged with unlawfully and knowingly uttering one piece of false and counterfeit coin at Folkestone, on the 19th of August, 1903. Both prisoners pleaded Guilty.

The indictment, as well as that referring to the Harbour Inn, or “Mary Fisher” charge, included that of Thomas Philips Jordan, of the Red Cow, upon whom the same false pretence was practiced.

Counsel for the Crown, Mr. T. Matthew, in opening, repeated the facts as detailed in our issue of October 5th, and mentioned that the prisoners, London men, came down to the Folkestone Racecourse on the 19th of August, and then into the town, where, according to the evidence, they had been “ringing the changes”.

The Recorder: Wait a minute. I think “ringing the changes” is another thing.

Concluding the outline of the offence, Counsel said he would like to draw the learned Recorder`s attention to the provisions under 34 – 35, Victoria, Chap 112, Sec. 8 (Prevention of Crimes Act), which gave the judge power to add to his sentence a term of police supervision, the maximum term being seven years.

Detective Sergeant Samuel Lee, of the H Division, Metropolitan Police, then proceeded to give an account of the prisoners` criminal career, which showed four convictions within the last four years. Allen`s course of crime was then established by the witness and Chief Constable Reeve. A written statement was then handed in by the prisoner Jones, who attributed his fall to the influence of bad company and to his giving way to drink. He promised to leave the country as soon as he had served his sentence.

Allen created a smile on the Bench when he said that this was his first visit to Folkestone, and he hoped it would be his last.

The Recorder then passed sentence. He said: You two men have the worst records I have had before me during the period I have sat at this Court. You do not seem to have many friends among the police, and there is no doubt from the evidence that you are the worst scum of the racecourse. I must pass a sentence that will keep both of you from visiting this borough for some time to come, and I feel it my duty to accede to the request of Counsel for the Crown that you should be placed under police supervision. If Jones is making a true statement about going to America that will not affect him. You will both be sentenced to 12 months` hard labour, to be followed by three years` police supervision.

Both prisoners (who seemed much relieved): Thank you, my Lord.

Folkestone Express 17 October 1903

Quarter Sessions

Monday, October 12th: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

Arthur Jones (29), described as a labourer, and James Allen (49), a hawker, were indicted for unlawfully and knowingly uttering counterfeit coin on the 10th August at Folkestone. Prisoners pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Matthews, who prosecuted, said the prisoners were carrying out a trick called “ringing the changes”.

The Recorder: I don`t think it is a trick. They uttered counterfeit coins.

Mr. Matthews: Then I am misinformed.

Counsel then intimated that he was desired to call attention to the provisions of the 34th and 35th Vict., chapter 112, which enabled the Recorder to say that there should be a period of police supervision in addition to any sentence passed. If there was an order that there should be a supervision for a certain period, the police would be able to keep an eye upon such men as prisoners, and prevent anything occurring again.

Detective Sergt. Lee, H Division (Metropolitan Police) proved that on Dec. 16th, 1901, at the Central Criminal Court, Jones, in the name of Edward Connell, was sentenced to twenty months hard labour for stealing £3 13s. 6d. from a till.

The Recorder: A rather stiff sentence, was it not?

Sergt. Lee: Hardly, after his “previouses”.

The Recorder: Oh, I see!

Continuing, Sergt. Lee said that Jones`s criminal career commenced on the 18th of Oct., 1899, at the Southwark Police Court, where he was fined 40s. or one month`s hard labour for stealing money from a public house. On the 23rd March, 1900, he was charged at the Guildhall Police Court with “ringing the changes”, and on that occasion, because his previous convictions were not proved, he was bound over. At the time he was in company with two old convicts. At Epsom Petty Sessions, on April 26th, 1900, he was charged with stealing a pair of opera glasses off the racecourse, and received five weeks` hard labour, while on July 11th, 1900, at the South London sessions, he was sentenced to 15 months` hard labour for attempted larceny. On this occasion prisoner was working in concert with others, using a sticky substance at the end of a stick and pocketing money from shelves in public houses.

P.C. Gosling, 632Y (Metropolitan), stated that on the 6th Feb., 1901, he was present at the North London Sessions when the prisoner Allen was convicted, in the name of James Slade, for attempted larceny and “ringing the changes”. He received 12 months` hard labour. There were other convictions against Allen, but witness was not in a position to state thm.

Supt. Reeve produced a further list against Allen. It was as follows:- April 22nd, 1896, three weeks` hard labour at Epsom for stealing an overcoat; April 19th, 1898, at the North London Sessions, six months` hard labour for stealing a purse and money.

In a written statement to the Recorder, Jones said he was 33 years of age, and up to four years ago he always held a good character. Unfortunately he fell in with bad company and gave way to drink. Since his last discharge he had been leading an honest life, and worked for a Mr. Southwood until the day when the Folkestone Races came off. He begged the Recorder to give his defence consideration and to deal with him mercifully, as, with God`s help, he should promise not to touch drink again. Since he had been in Canterbury Gaol awaiting his trial, his brother had written offering to pay his fare to America in order to get him away from bad company.

Prisoners were sentenced to twelve months` hard labour, and three years` police supervision.

Jones: Thank you, my Lord.

Folkestone Herald 17 October 1903

Quarter Sessions

Monday, October 12th: Before J.C.L. Coward Esq.

Arthur Jones (29), labourer, and James Allen (49), hawker, pleaded Guilty to “unlawfully and knowingly uttering one piece of false and counterfeit coin, apparently intended to pass for certain of the King`s current gold coin, called a half sovereign, on the 19th August, 1903, at Folkestone”.

Counsel for the Crown, Mt. T. Matthews, said he was instructed that prisoners were both London criminals who had come down to Folkestone for the race meeting at Westenhanger in August last. By a trick known as “ringing the changes”....

Here the Recorder interposed with the remark that “ringing the changes” had nothing whatever to do with uttering counterfeit coins. It was an entirely different trick.

Continuing, Counsel pointed out that, whatever the process, the prisoner Jones went into the public house, called for a drink, handed a sovereign in payment, and received in the change half a sovereign, and the rest in silver and bronze. Having got a good half sovereign, prisoner substituted for it a gilded sixpence, and then asked for the whole of the change to be given him in silver, thus receiving 10s. for the counterfeit coin. This was done twice, though in both cases ultimately unsuccessful. In the first case it was seen to be a bad coin and the men were pursued. Jones denied having given the gilded sixpence, but he handed back the money he had received for it. Then they went to the Harbour Inn, where the same process was repeated. The landlord again had suspicions, and declined to accept any explanation, giving the man Jones in charge. Allen was subsequently arrested, and when searched another gilded sixpence was found upon him, which no doubt he intended to pass off in the same manner. In addition to the sentence of imprisonment, Mr. Matthews asked the Recorder, under powers which he was enabled to exercise, to say that there should be a period of police supervision, as it would then enable the police to keep their eye upon the men, so as to prevent them doing anything further of the sort, at any rate in the direction of making counterfeit coins.

With regard to the first case, the publican victimised, as stated in our report of the Police Court proceedings, was the landlord of the Red Cow, Foord.

Particulars concerning previous convictions against the two men were then given. Detective Sergeant Lee, of the London Force stated that on the 16th December, 1901, he was present at the Central Criminal Court when the prisoner Jones, in the name of Edward Connell, was sentenced to twenty months` hard labour for stealing £3 13s. 6d. from a till.

The Recorder: A stiff sentence for that.

The Detective: Hardly, after his “previouses”.

Proceeding, he said that Jones`s criminal career commenced on the 18th of October, 1899, when, at the Southwark Police Court, he was fined 40s. or one month`s hard labour for stealing money from a public house; on the 23rd of March, 1900, he was charged at the Guildhall Police Court for “ringing the changes”. On that occasion his previous convictions were not proved against him, and he was bound over.

The Recorder: “Ringing the changes” is one thing, and counterfeit coin another.

Witness: That is so.

Continuing, the detective said that prisoner Jones was at the time in company with two old convicts. At Epsom Petty Sessions, on the 26th of April, 1900, he was charged with stealing a pair of opera glasses from the racecourse, and was sentenced to 5 weeks` imprisonment with hard labour. Charged with attempted larceny at the South London Sessions on the 11th of July, 1902, he received fifteen months` hard labour. On that occasion he was working in concert with others, and was using a stick with some sticky substance at the end. Whilst his companion attracted the attention of the person in charge of the bar, the man with the stick picked up the gold.

With regard to Allen, Police Constable Gosling, of the Metropolitan Police stated that on the 6th of February, 1901, he was present at the North London Sessions when the prisoner Allen, in the name of James Slade, was convicted of attempted larceny and “ringing the changes”, receiving twelve months hard labour. There were other convictions recorded against him which he was not in a position to prove.

Chief Constable Reeve informed the Recorder that Allen`s proper name was James Slade. On the 22nd of April, 1896, at Epsom, he was sentenced to three weeks` hard labour for the theft of an overcoat, whilst at the North London Sessions on the 19th April, 1898, he was given six months` hard labour for stealing a purse and money. One summary conviction, for unlawful possession, was recorded against him, as well as the conviction spoken to by the last witness.

In a written statement which he handed to the Recorder, Jones said he was 33 years of age, and up to four years ago he held a good character. Unfortunately at that time he fell into bad company and gave way to drink. Since then he had served three terms of imprisonment. Since his last discharge from prison he had led an honest life until he went to the races at Folkestone. He had been drinking heavily, and in the evening uttered the gilded sixpence. He begged for another chance, promising never to touch drink again. His wife`s brother had promised to pay his fare to America, and he asked the Recorder not to let his past character weigh heavily against him. His correct name was Edward Connell, but being in drink he gave the name of Jones. He promised to leave the country at the expiration of the sentence passed upon him, and also to lead a sober and industrious life in the future. Under those circumstanced he begged the Recorder to grant him mercy.

Allen`s defence was that this was the first time he had ever been in Folkestone, and he hoped it would be his last. He was fifty years of age, and had four children to support. Taking into consideration the time he had been waiting for his trial, having expressed his guilt in the first “onset”, he pleaded for the Recorder`s mercy.

The Recorder, addressing the prisoners, said they had the worst record he had ever had before him since he had sat in that Court. They were the scum of the racecourse. He must pass a sentence upon them to keep them away from this sort of thing for some time to come, and he felt it his duty to accede to the request of Counsel for the Crown that they should be placed under police supervision. If Jones was allowe to go away the punishment would not act harshly upon him, and the sentence he passed upon each of them was imprisonment for twelve calendar months, with hard labour, with police supervision for three years.

Jones: Thank you.

They were then removed below.

Folkestone Chronicle 21 October 1905

Notice

Mary Ann Jordan Deceased

All persons having any claims or demands against the estate of Mary Ann Jordan, late of the Red Cow Inn, Folkestone, Kent, who died on the 17th day of October, 1905, are requested to send particulars thereof to me, the undersigned, forthwith.

Dated this 19th day of October, 1905,

Frederick Hall,
Solicitor for the executors,
Bank Chambers,
Folkestone.

Folkestone Chronicle 9 December 1905

Wednesday, December 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Maj. Leggatt, and Mr. Linton.

Mr. Douglas De Wet applied, on behalf of the executors of the late Mrs. Jordan, for the transfer of the licence of the Red Cow, Foord, to Mr. Savage.

Formal evidence as to the notices etc., was tendered, and the application granted.

Folkestone Express 9 December 1905

Wednesday, December 9th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggatt, W.G. Herbert and J. Linton Esqs.

At the special sessions for the transfer of ale-house licences the following transfer was made: The Red Cow Inn, from the executors of the late Mrs. Jordan, to Mr. Savage.

Folkestone Herald 9 December 1905

Wednesday, December 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggatt, and Mr. T. Ames.

The licence of the Red Cow, Folkestone, was transferred to Mr. Savage.

Folkestone Express 14 July 1906

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Vaughan, and R.J. Linton Esq.

Plans for an alteration in the Red Cow Inn, Foord, were approved of.

Folkestone Herald 14 July 1906

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. Linton.

Permission was granted to the proprietor of the Red Cow for some proposed alterations to the building.

Folkestone Daily News 6 March 1908

Friday, March 6th: Before Alderman Banks, Messrs. Herbert, Linton, Leggett, and Boyd.

Edward Flisher was charged with stealing four bottles of ale.

Frederick Wickenden deposed: I am a labourer, living at 8, Garden Road. I am in the employ of Mr. Savage, of the Red Cow Inn. At 5.10 yesterday afternoon I was in the public bar. A man named Nickolls was also in the bar at the same time. While there I saw an arm go over the counter. The two bars are divided by a glass screen. I saw four bottles in the hand. The bottles were taken from a shelf under the counter. At the time the beer was taken there was no-one at the back of the counter. I went to the back and reported it, and received instructions to go into the private bar, where I found the prisoner. No-one else was there. He had a bag, which Mr. Savage asked me to hand to him. We then found four bottles of ale in the bag.

The Prisoner: Did you say you saw me take four bottles?

Witness: Yes.

Albert Edward Nickolls deposed: I am a fitter, living at 8, Albert Road. At 5.10 yesterday afternoon I was in the Red Cow Inn. The last witness was also there, and put his finger up to me as if he did not wish me to speak, at the same time pointing to the private bar. No-one was at the back of the counter at the time. The two counters are divided by a screen, and there is an opening for passing things to and fro. When Wickenden pointed at the private bar I looked in that direction, and saw a hand passed through s screen and take a bottle of ale from under the counter. I did not see Wickenden take the bag from the prisoner.

Albert Edward Savage, landlord of the Red Cow Inn, deposed: At ten minutes past five yesterday afternoon I went into the private room at the back of the bar. Wickenden came to me and my wife and made a statement. I saw the prisoner in the private bar, and told Wickenden to go and fetch the bag with the four bottles of ale from that bar, which he did. I then looked under the counter and found four bottles of ale were missing. I said to the prisoner “You have stolen these four bottles of ale”, and he replied “I got them from elsewhere”. I requested him to leave the house, and he did so, but returned later on, when I gave him into custody and charged him.

Prisoner (to witness): Do you know the number of bottles under the counter? – Yes; there were two dozen.

When did you count them last? – When I put them there, but four were afterwards missing.

Do you know a woman came in and had two bottles? – No.

You say that I told you I got the bottles elsewhere? – Yes.

I did not. I brought in two bottles to change for stout.

Dora Woodward, barmaid at the Red Cow, said: The prisoner came into the private bar at 4.30 yesterday afternoon, and asked for a pint of porter. I served him, and he remained there just after five o`clock, when I went off duty, and was in the private bar all the time. There were two dozen bottles of beer under the counter at the time. The prisoner is a customer at the house. No-one else came in while the prisoner was there. Wickenden came in and made a statement to Mr. Savage about ten minutes past five. The prisoner had not purchased any bottled ale. I saw the bag and bottles taken from him. When he came in at 4.30 he had his bag rolled up under his arm.

Prisoner: Was there another barmaid come in when you left? – Yes.

You say you saw the bag taken from me? – Yes.

No, you didn`t. You saw the bag taken from the floor.

P.C. Lemar said: At 6.35 yesterday I was called to the private bar of the Red Cow by the landlord, Mr. Savage. I there saw the prisoner. Mr. Savage said “I wish to give this man into custody for stealing four bottles of ale from a shelf under the counter in the private bar. I have two other witnesses who saw him take it, and also the four bottles of ale that he took in a carpet bag that belongs to Flisher”. Flisher then replied “Don`t be hard on me. I only took two; the other two I bought and paid for”. I then brought him to the police station and charged him with stealing the four bottles of ale, value 1s. 6d., and he replied “I only stole two; the other two I paid for”.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty to stealing two bottles only, and handed in a statement that he hoped the Bench would deal leniently with him. It was his first offence, and he had never had a stain on his character.

He was sentenced to 14 days` hard labour.

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1908

Friday, March 6th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Councillor G. Boyd, Major Leggett, Messrs. W.G. Herbert, and R.J. Linton.

Edward Flisher was charged with stealing four bottles of ale.

Frederick Wickenden, in the employ of Mr. Savage, landlord of the Red Cow, said at about ten minutes past five on Thursday he was in the public bar. He saw an arm reach over the counter of the private bar. The two bars were divided by a glass screen. He saw the hand take four bottles of ale. He went into the private bar, and there found the prisoner, who had a bag with him. He asked prisoner to hand over the bag, which contained four bottles of ale.

Albert Edward Nichols also gave evidence.

Albert Edward Savage, the landlord, deposed that he said to the prisoner “You stole these bottles of ale”. Accused replied “I got them from elsewhere”. He left the house when witness requested him, but returned later. Witness gave him into custody.

Nora Woodward, barmaid, having been called, P.C. Lemar deposed that, when given into custody, prisoner said “Don`t be hard on me. I only stole two; the other two I bought and paid for them”.

Prisoner put in a written statement, in which he said that he had never had a stain on his character. He hoped they would deal leniently with him, and would not send him to prison. He would take good care that it would not happen again. It was only a sudden temptation that made him commit the offence.

Prisoner was sentenced to 14 days` hard labour.

Folkestone Express 14 March 1908

Friday, March 6th: Before Alderman Banks, Major Leggett, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs.

Edward Flisher was charged with stealing four bottles of ale from the Red Cow Inn the previous afternoon.

Frederick Wickenden, a labourer, of 8, Garden Road, said he was in the employ of Mr. Savage, the landlord of the Red Cow Inn. About ten minutes past five the previous afternoon he was in the public bar with a man named Nichols. During the time he was in the bar he noticed an arm reach over the counter from the private bar, and four bottles of ale were taken from a shelf under the counter. There was no-one at the back of the counter at the time. He therefore told Mr. Savage what he had seen, and, acting on instructions, he went into the private bar, where he saw the prisoner, who was alone. He was carrying a bag, which he (witness) took and handed to Mr. Svavge, who found the four bottles of ale in it.

Albert Edward Nichols, a fitter, of 8, Albert Road, said he was in the public bar, when the last witness motioned to him to look in the direction of the private bar, which was divided from the public bar by a screen. Witness looked, and saw a hand and arm come over the counter and take a bottle of ale from beneath the counter. Wickenden left the public bar, and later he saw him go into the private bar.

Henry Edward Savage, the landlord of the Red Cow Inn, said at ten minutes past five the previous evening, from what he was told by Wickenden, he went and saw the prisoner in the private bar. Witness told Wickenden to go and fetch the bag the prisoner was carrying, and when he (witness) opened it he found the four bottles of ale produced. Witness, on looking on the shelf beneath the counter, missed the four bottles of ale. He then said to the prisoner “You have stolen these bottles of ale”, and he replied “I got them from elsewhere”. At witness`s request Flisher left the house, but returned later, when he (witness) gave him into custody. The selling price of the ale was 10d., and there was also 8d. for the bottles.

Cross-examined, witness said he knew how many bottles were placed on the shelf.

Miss Woodward, the barmaid at the Red Cow, said she was in the bar at half past four the previous afternoon, when prisoner came into the bar. He asked for a pint of porter and she served him. Flisher was there when she went off duty, after five o`clock. At that time there were about two dozen bottles under the counter. From the time prisoner came into the bar to the time she left, no-one else came into the bar. About ten minutes after she left the bar, Wickenden came and made a statement to Mr. Savage. Prisoner had not purchased any bottled ale. She saw the bag and bottles taken from the prisoner. When he entered the bar he had the bag rolled up under his arm.

P.C. Lemar said at 6.35 p.m. he was called to the private bar of the house by the landlord, and he there saw Flisher, whom the landlord said he wished to give into custody for stealing four bottles of ale. Flisher said “Don`t be hard on me. I only stole two, and the other two I bought and paid for”. At the police station, on being charged, he repeated his previous statement.

Prisoner agreed to the case being dealt with by the Magistrates, and he pleaded Guilty to stealing two bottles of ale. He said he had purchased the other two. A statement, written by the prisoner, was read to the Magistrates. In it Flisher said he was truly sorry for what had occurred. He had never been in such a position before. He had lived in Folkestone eleven years, and the rest of his life he had spent at Sandgate. He had never had a stain on his character, and he hoped and trusted they would deal with him as leniently as they could. He appealed to them not to send him to prison, as he did not wish to lose his character. He was sure Mr. Savage did not press the charge against him. It was sheer temptation that caused him to take the bottles.

Sent to prison for 14 days` hard labour.

Folkestone Daily News 8 July 1910

Friday, July 8th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Jenner, and Fynmore.

Albert Carter was charged with being drunk and incapable yesterday.

Sergt. Sales deposed that he saw defendant at 2.30 in the afternoon in Foord Road near the Public Baths. He was very drunk, and went into the Imperial Hotel, but the landlord refused to serve him. Defendant then went into the Red Cow public house and was again refused, and went in the direction of the Viaduct and up Derby Steps, where he had to hold on to the railings to keep himself from falling. Witness, with the assistance of P.C. Allen, took him into custody.

P.C. Allen and Sergt. Simpson corroborated.

Defendant said he was not drunk. He had been ill for five years, and a very little drink overcame him.

A fine of 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs, or 7 days` was imposed.

Folkestone Herald 9 July 1910

Friday, July 8th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Alderman C. Jenner.

Albert Carter, on bail, was charged with being drunk and incapable. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

P.S. Sales deposed that at about 2.30 the previous afternoon he was in Foord Road, near the Public Baths, when he saw the defendant very drunk. Defendant went away in the direction of Black Bull Road. Witness followed him, in company with P.C. Allen, and saw him go into the Imperial public house, where he was turned out by the landlord without being served. About a quarter of an hour later he went into the Red Cow, and was turned out of there also. He then went away in the direction of the Viaduct, and went up the steps leading into Derby Place, and had the greatest difficulty in getting up. Seeing that he was incapable of taking care of himself, witness took him into custody, with the assistance of P.C. Allen.

P.C. Allen and Sergt. Simpson corroborated as to the defendant`s drunken condition.

Defendant said he had been laid up with consumption for five years. He had a glass or two to drink, and it overcame him. He had not worked for nine months. He had a job to walk about. He had been a ratepayer for 34 years, and that was the first offence he had had brought against him.

The Chairman stated that the Bench felt very sorry that prisoner was in that position. They had a duty to perform to the public, however, and he thought that the police were to be commended on their conduct, and the publicans, for not serving him in the condition he was in. A fine of 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs, or 7 days` imprisonment, was imposed, seven days being allowed in which to pay.

Folkestone Express 16 July 1910

Friday, July 8th: Before Aldermen Vaughan and Jenner, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Albert Carter was charged with being drunk and incapable the previous afternoon. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.S. Sales said at about 2.30 the previous afternoon he was in Foord Road, near the public baths, when he saw the defendant, who was very drunk. He went away in the direction of Black Bull Road, and he (witness), in company with P.C. Allen, followed him. He saw him go into the Imperial public house, so they followed him in, and the defendant was turned out by the landlord without being served. About a quarter of an hour later he saw the defendant in the Red Cow, from which he was ejected. Carter then went away in the direction of the Viaduct, and he went up Derby Place steps. He had the greatest difficulty in mounting the steps, and when about halfway up he stopped and held on the fence for support. Seeing that he was incapable of taking care of himself, witness, with the assistance of P.C. Allen, brought him to the police station.

P.C. Allen said at about 2.15 p.m. he saw the prisoner being ejected from the Castle public house. He advised him to go home. P.S. Sales then came up. Witness then corroborated the sergeant`s statement.

P.S. Simpson said at three o`clock, when the prisoner was brought in, he was drunk.

Carter said he had been laid up with consumption for five years. He had a glass or two of liquor the previous day, and no doubt that overcame him. He had not worked for about nine months. His illness, however, made him stagger, and he had a job to walk about at times. Therefore the officer might have thought he was drunk.

Alderman Vaughan said the Magistrates thought the officers and the publicans were to be commended for the action they took. The Bench had a duty to perform, and they had decided to fine the defendant 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs.

Folkestone Daily News 20 July 1910

Wednesday, July 20th: Before Messrs. Herbert and Stainer.

Herbert Edward Savage (sic), landlord of the Red Cow inn, was summoned for selling intoxicating liquor to a drunken person on the 7th July. Mr. Haines appeared for defendant and pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Mowll, of Dover, represented Leney and Co.

Sergt. Sales deposed: About 2.30 on the 7th inst. I was in Foord Road, near the Public Baths, when I saw a man named Carter, who was drunk. Shortly afterwards I saw Carter go into the Imperial public house. I went into the Imperial, and the landlord turned Carter out. About 15 minutes later, from something I was told, in company with P.C. Allen, I visited the Red Cow inn. In a bar I saw Carter seated near the counter. He had a glass containing rum on the counter. The barman was behind the bar, and I asked him to call the landlord, Mr. Savage, who came in. I said to him “You see this man`s condition, landlord. He is drunk. He has been served with liquor”. Mr. Savage replied “I am very sorry. I did not know he was in the house”. The barman said “I served him”. The landlord then took the rum away, and advised Carter to leave the house. After Carter got up, I said to the landlord “You see he is drunk”, and he replied “I am very sorry, Sergeant”. Carter left, and shortly afterwards was locked up for being drunk and incapable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: Was Carter discharged when summoned?

Witness: No. He was fined.

What made you think Carter was drunk? – By his manner and walk.

Could the landlord see he was drunk? – Not unless he saw him come in, as Carter went in and sat down.

Did you ask him to stand up? – Both the landlord and I did.

And Carter walked from the Red Cow to the Derby Steps without assistance? – Yes.

And went up the steps without assistance? – Yes, about half way up, and then held on to the rails.

Had the glass of rum been touched? – Well, it wasn`t full.

P.C. Allen said he was in company with Sergt. Sales on the 7th July, and corroborated all the previous witness had said.

Sergt. Simpson said Carter was drunk when brought to the police station.

Percy William Attwood, landlord of the Castle Inn, said he ejected Carter because he was inclined to be troublesome when he had had a glass or two. Witness did not think Carter was drunk, although he had been drinking.

Defendant went into the witness box and said he had been manager of the Red Cow 11 years, and landlord five years. He did not see Carter come into the bar on the 7th July, and did not know he was there until Sergt. Sales spoke to him about it. He admitted that he did not contradict the Sergeant when told about Carter`s condition.

George Barringer, barman at the Red Cow, said he served Carter with twopennyworth of rum, and he seemed alright. After being served, Carter sat down.

The Chief Constable: You were there when Sales came in? – Yes.

And you heard him call attention to Carter`s condition? – Yes.

And you didn`t say Carter was not drunk? – No.

Did he stagger when he stood up? - No, he stood up alright.

Alfred William Chambers, harness maker, Foord Road, said he saw Carter after he left the Red Cow, and he seemed to witness to be more ill than drunk.

The Chief Constable: Do you know Carter?

Witness: No.

Ever seen him before? – No.

Then the man you saw might not have been Carter at all? – Certainly.

Then what induced you to come here and give evidence? – Well, I was asked to come here and say what I saw.

Mr. Haines briefly addressed the Bench, pointing out that there was nothing to indicate that Carter was drunk when he was served by the barman. Every precaution was taken to guard against serving persons who were intoxicated, and this fact was borne out when he stated that no charge had been brought against this house during the last 16 years. He pointed out that it would be a serious matter for his client if he was convicted, and asked the Bench to take into consideration the good conduct of the house and dismiss the case.

The Bench retired for a few minutes, and on returning the Chairman said they had taken into consideration what Mr. Haines had said, and the case would be dismissed, but warned defendant to be careful in future.

Folkestone Express 23 July 1910

Wednesday, July 20th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

Herbert Edward Savage, the licensee of the Red Cow Inn, was summoned for selling intoxicating liquors to a drunken person, on July 7th. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defendant, who pleaded Not Guilty, and Mr. R. Mowll, of Messrs. Mowll and Mowll, of Dover, watched the case on behalf of Messrs. Leney and Co., the owners of the house.

P.S. Sales said at about 2.30 the afternoon of July 7th he was in Foord Road, near the public baths, when he saw a man named Albert Carter, who was drunk. Shortly afterwards he saw Carter go into the Imperial public house, Black Bull Road. In company with P.C. Allen, he went into the Imperial and called the landlord`s attention to Carter`s condition. Carter was turned out without being served. A quarter of an hour later, from something he was told, in company with P.C. Allen, he visited the Red Cow. In a bar, known as the bottle and jug department, he saw Carter sitting near the counter. A glass containing liquor was standing on the counter in front of him. He afterwards found the liquor was rum. The barman was behind the bar, and he asked him to call the landlord. Mr. Savage then came into the bar, and he said to him “You see this man`s condition, landlord? He is drunk. He has been served with liquor”. Mr. Savage replied “I am very sorry. I did not know he was in the house”. The barman said “I served him”. The landlord then took away the glass containing the liquor, and advised Carter to leave the house. Shortly afterwards Carter was locked up for drunkenness on the Derby Place steps by P.C. Allen and himself. There was no-one else in the bar at the time. He told the landlord after Carter left that he should report him for a summons for supplying drink to a drunken person. Defendant replied that he was sorry. He did not say that Carter was not drunk.

Cross-examined, witness said Carter was not discharged by the Magistrates, but was fined. He was charged with being drunk and incapable, but was not charged with being drunk on licensed premises. In the first instance he was informed that Carter was drunk, and he also saw for himself when he came out of the public lavatory opposite the baths that he was drunk. He was led to think that the man was drunk by his general appearance and that he could not walk straight. He believed Carter was consumptive. Carter was able to walk to the Imperial without any assistance. He warned the landlord of that house because Carter was drunk. He was afraid the landlord would not have seen that Carter was drunk because he went in and sat down. It was their instructions to warn a publican when a drunken man went in the house. When carter got out of the house he advised him to go away, and Allen and himself (witness) went up the Black Bull Road. When he pointed it out to the landlord that Carter was drunk, they both of them asked him to stand up. Carter did stand up and did not fall over, although he had the usual difficulty of a drunken man in getting up. He got up from his seat without assistance. When they arrested Carter he was hanging on with one hand to the fence by the side of the Derby Place steps. He had no doubt about the man being drunk, while at the same time he might have been ill. He should think about a third of the contents of the glass in front of Carter had been drank. The man`s symptoms were such that it must have been palpable to anyone that he was drunk. It could be easily detected that he was drunk by his gait.

Re-examined by the Chief Constable, Sales said if he had seen Carter enter the Red Cow he would have warned the landlord.

P.C. Allen said at a quarter past two on July 7th he was in Foord Road, near the Public Baths, when he saw Carter leave the Red Cow public bar, drunk. He saw him go across the road and enter the Castle Inn public house. He went to that house, and on pushing the door open he saw Carter go away, and he went down into the public convenience. P.S. Sales came up at about half past two, and Carter once again appeared and went into the Imperial. Witness then corroborated the previous witness`s story of what afterwards occurred. He had no doubt that the man was drunk.

In reply to the Clerk, P.C. Allen said when Carter got up from his seat in the Red Cow he reeled a little.

Cross-examined, witness said that from 2.15 to a quarter to three Carter got gradually worse. The reason they left the man after he came out of the Imperial was because he had to work his beat, but before doing so they advised him to go away. They hoped that he would go home.

Percy Attwood, the landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord, said that he had known Carter for some time. On July 7th, at 2.15 in the afternoon, he was on the flat top of the front portion of his premises when his attention was called by a plumber to Carter coming from the direction of the Red Cow. The man went up to some dustmen and began kicking about a heap of dirt which they had just swept up. Noting his actions, he (witness) went down into the bar, thinking that he might come into the house. Carter came in immediately after. He ordered him to leave before he asked for any drink, and ultimately he had to eject him. He looked out of the window afterwards and saw Carter go towards Black Bull Road. He man walked all right. The man`s actions in the road, and as his previous experience of the man led him to think that he would become a nuisance, were the reasons why he ejected him.

The Chief Constable: You say that and no other reason caused you to refuse to serve him?

Witness: He was a trifle thick in his speech.

Cross-examined, Mr. Attwood said when he was on the top of the front portion of his house he saw Carter was in some way under the observation of the police. He refused to serve him in order to avoid any trouble in his house. His wife, who was serving in the bar, would not have served Carter, who had not been served by her for two years. Witness, however, had served him once or twice during the last month or so.

The Clerk: The Bench would like to know if you would have served Carter yourself if you had not seen what you had outside? – No, sir.

Why not? – Because he was a man, when he had had a drink or two, would behave in a hostile manner and challenge anyone. I thought he was likely to get up to his horse-play.

Answering further questions, witness said he was of opinion that Carter had had a glass or two of beer, and was in a condition likely to cause trouble. In his opinion the man was not drunk. When P.S. Sales came to see him about four or five days after, he told him what he told the Magistrates about the man`s condition.

P.S. Simpson gave evidence that when Carter was brought in at 3 p.m. on the 7th he was drunk.

Defendant went into the witness box and gave evidence on his own behalf. He said he had been the tenant of the Red Cow for five years, and for the previous eleven years he had acted as manager for his sister. During that time there had been nothing against the house. He had always given his barmen instructions not to serve anyone in any way intoxicated. Until he was called into the bar, when P.S. Sales and P.C. Allen were present, he had not seen Carter before that day. He asked Carter to stand up and he did so. He also saw him walk from his premises to the Viaduct. There was nothing about his appearance or gait to lead him to think he was drunk.

The Chairman: When the police called your attention to the man`s condition, did you deny that he was drunk? – No.

The hief Constable: The sergeant told you when you got out of the bar that he should report you. Did you deny that Carter was drunk? – No.

Did you say “I am sorry”? – I did.

George Barringer, a barman in the defendant`s employ, said he was in the bar when Carter came in and called for two pennyworth of rum. Carter stood when asking for the liquor, but sat down when he was served. He had no conversation with the man, whom he thought was quite sober. He certainly did not appear to be drunk.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said that neither the landlord nor himself denied that the man was drunk. Carter had previously been in the house, and he was served on that occasion with two pennyworth of rum. When the man was told to stand up, he stood up, although he was not erect.

Alfred William Chambers, harness maker, of 122, Foord Road, said about 2.30 on the afternoon of the 7th his attention was attracted to a man outside the Red Cow. He saw him walk in the direction of the Viaduct, followed by the police officers. He certainly did not think the man was drunk; he looked more ill than drunk.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not know the man Carter, and he could not say that the man referred to was Carter.

Mr. Haines then briefly addressed the Bench.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return into court, the Chairman said the Bench had very carefully considered all the evidence, and taking into consideration the character Savage had borne, the character the house had always borne, and all the circumstances, they were inclined to deal very mercifully with him. Technically, they could have brought him in Guilty, but taking everything into consideration, they would dismiss the charge. He hoped it would be a warning to him, and to all publicans and barmen, to look very carefully before serving anyone.

Folkestone Herald 23 July 1910

Wednesday, July 19th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

Herbert Edward Savage was summoned for selling intoxicating liquor to a drunken person. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defendant, and Mr. Mowll, of Dover, represented Messrs. Leney and Co.

P.C. Sales said that about 2.30 p.m. on the 7th inst. he saw a man named Carter, who was drunk, in Foord Road, near the Public Baths. Shortly afterwards this man went into the Imperial public house. In company with P.C. Allen, witness then went into the Imperial, and called the landlord`s attention to Carter`s condition. The landlord sent Carter out without serving him. About half an hour later, from something he was told, witness, still in the company of P.C. Allen, went to the Red Cow Inn (kept by the defendant). There, in the bar known as the bottle and jug department, they saw Carter, who was sitting near the counter. Near him was a glass containing a quantity of drink. Witness did not know at the time what it was, but afterwards found out that it was rum. The barman was behind the counter, and witness asked him to fetch the landlord. The barman did so. Witness called the landlord`s attention to Carter`s condition, saying that he was drunk, and that he had been served. Defendant replied that he was very sorry, and that he did not know that Carter was in the house. The barman stated that he had served Carter. The landlord took the glass away. Carter was advised to leave the house, which he did. When he went out witness said to defendant “You see the man is drunk, don`t you?” He replied “I am very sorry, sergeant”. Shortly afterwards Carter was locked up for drunkenness. He was near the Derby Place steps when witness and P.C. Allen arrested him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines, witness said that when he was in the Red Cow he did ask Carter to stand up. He got up without falling over, and without assistance. He walked down the road without assistance. Carter got part of the way up Derby Place steps, and then stopped. It was witness`s opinion that he could not go any further. Carter might have been ill, but in witness`s opinion he was undoubtedly drunk. There was a handrail part of the way up the steps.

P.C. Allen corroborated.

Cross-examined, witness stated that Carter was drunk when he first saw him, but got worse. There was no doubt he was drunk, as he reeled when he walked. When he stood up in the Red Cow he reeled, although he stood up without assistance. He walked down the road after he had left the Red Cow without assistance.

Percy William Attwood, the landlord of the Castle, said that he was on the flat roof of his premises at about 2.15 p.m. on the day in question, talking to a plumber who was doing some repairs. From what the plumber said he looked over into the road, and there saw Carter. Two policemen were watching him. Witness could not form any idea as to how he was walking as he came from the direction of the Red Cow, and witness could only see him side face. Carter came across the road, and started to kick up some dust that the roadmen had swept up. Witness then went downstairs into the bar, as he thought perhaps Carter might come into his house. Carter did come into the house, but witness told him that he would not be served.

P.S. Simpson said that he was on duty at the police office when Carter was brought in. There was no doubt that he was drunk.

Defendant, in the witness box, stated that he had been the landlord of the Red Cow for 5 years, and had been manager there for his sister for 11 years. During that time there had been nothing against the house. There were four bars in the house. He kept a barman, and always gave him instructions never to serve an intoxicated person. He knew Carter, but until he had been called into the bar by the policemen he had not seen him that day. Defendant told Carter to stand up, and also saw him walk out of the house. He stood up without assistance, and walked away all right. He had said he was sorry because he was sorry to see the man in that state.

George Barringer, the barman at the Red Cow, said that he had been in the house over four years. He was in the bar when Carter came in. He walked in all right, and asked for twopennyworth of rum. He sat down in the bar when he had been served. There was nothing in his appearance to suggest that he was drunk. Witness would not have served him had he been drunk.

Questioned by the Chief Constable, witness said Carter was only in the bar about four or five minutes on the outside on this occasion. He had been in the bar before that morning, and had had a similar drink.

William Chambers, a harness maker, residing at 123, Foord Road, stated that he was going out for a drive at about 2.30 p.m. on the day in question. His attention was drawn to Carter by the fact that the two policemen were following him. He did not know Carter at all, and was therefore not sure that he was the man that the police were following. The man that they had under observation was certainly not drunk. Witness added that he was not absolutely positive that the man he saw was the man in question.

The Bench, after a short deliberation in private, returned, and the Chairman said the case should be a warning to publicans and barmen in the future to look very carefully at their customers. It was all very well for them to say that they did not know that the man was drunk, but unfortunately the Act did not allow this as any defence. However, in view of the previous good character of the house, the Bench thought they might dismiss the case against Mr. Savage.

Folkestone Express 21 October 1911

Local News

We regret to record the death of Mr. H.E. Savage, the landlord of the Red Cow Inn, Foord. Although Mr. Savage had been rather unwell on and off for some time, his death was rather sudden, the seizure from which he died early in Monday morning being only of two days` duration. Mr. Savage, who was 39 years of age, had been the licensee of the Red Cow for about five years, and was a genial landlord. He was highly respected by a large circle of friends, and the greatest sympathy will be felt with the widow and family in the loss which they have sustained.

Folkestone Herald 21 October 1911

Obituary

We regret to record the death of Mr. Herbert Edward Savage, which sad event occurred on Monday. Mr. Savage had for several years been the proprietor of the Red Cow Inn, Foord Road, and was very popular among a large circle of friends. He had been ill for some time, but his death came rather unexpectedly. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon.

Folkestone Daily News 30 November 1911

Wednesday, November 29th: Before Messrs. Stainer, Linton and Leggett.

The licence of the Red Cow was transferred from the late Mr. Savage to Mrs. Savage, his widow.

Folkestone Express 2 December 1911

Wednesday, November 29th: Before J. Stainer and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Major Leggett.

Mr. De Wet, solicitor, said he was instructed to apply for the transfer of the licence of the Red Cow Inn, Foord, from the executors of the late Mr. Herbert Edward Savage, who was the licence holder. Under the Act, it was provided that the executors should have power to carry on the business until the next transfer day. Mrs. Savage (widow) would be assisted by her elder brother, who would act as manager.

Mr. Linton asked whether it was to be a permanent transfer.

Mr. De Wet said Mrs. Savage hoped to retain it as long as the Bench and the brewers would allow her.

The application was granted.

Folkestone Herald 2 December 1911

Wednesday, November 29th: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Major Leggett, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

Mr. De Wet applied on behalf of Mrs. Savage for the transfer of the licence of the Red Cow to her. The licence had been held by the applicant`s husband, who had recently died. Mr. De Wet explained that the business had been carried on by the executors of the will, but the licence must be transferred at the first licensing sessions. He explained that the applicant`s elder brother was going to help her with the business, and was to live constantly on the premises.

The application was granted.

Folkestone Daily News 12 November 1912

Tuesday, November 12th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Herbert, Boyd, Vaughan, Harrison, Stace, Linton, Ward, Stainer, Fynmore, Giles, Morrison and Wood.

A temporary transfer of the Red Cow was granted to Mr. George Summerfield from Mrs. Savage, it being understood that Mr. Summerfield`s son was about to take over the licence of the Royal Standard.

Folkestone Express 16 November 1912

Local News

The licence of the Red Cow Inn, Foord Road, was temporarily transferred on Tuesday by the borough Magistrates from Mrs. Savage to Mr. G. Smallfield (sic) of the Royal Standard, who, however, had to make arrangements for his son to manage the house until the licence he then held could be transferred to his son.

Folkestone Herald 16 November 1912

Tuesday, November 12th: Before The Mayor, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, Major G.E. Leggett, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Councillor A. Stace.

Application was made for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Red Cow Inn from Mrs. Savage to Mr. George Summerfield, at present the landlord of the Royal Standard, Canterbury Road. It was explained that arrangements were being made for Mr. Summerfield`s son to take over the licence of the Royal Standard.

The application was granted on the understanding that Mr. Summerfield Jun. went into the Red Cow for the time being until his father could take over the business.

Folkestone Daily News 29 November 1912

Wednesday, November 27th: Before Messrs. Ward, Herbert, Stainer, Leggett, Stace, Swoffer, Linton, and Boyd.

The licence of the Red Cow, Foord, was transferred from Mrs. Savage to Mr. G. Summerfield, and the latter gentleman`s licence, the Royal Standard, was transferred to his son, John William Summerfield.

Folkestone Herald 30 November 1912

Wednesday, November 27th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Major G.E. Leggett, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, and Councillor A. Stace.

The licence of the Red Cow, Foord Road, was temporarily transferred from Mrs. Savage to Mr. George Summerfield, and that of the Royal Standard was transferred from Mr. G. Summerfield to his son, Mr. John William Summerfield.

Folkestone Express 15 March 1913

Monday, March 10th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Aldermen Vaughan and Jenner, Captain Chamier, and J.J. Giles Esq.

Leonard Eaton Brown, a lance corporal in the Lancashire Fusileers, was charged with being drunk and disorderly.

Detective Johnson said about twenty minutes past seven the prisoner came to the police station, and said he wished to report the landlord of the Red Cow for refusing to serve him. P.S. Sales took his complaint, and advised him to come in the morning as he was the worse for drink. Prisoner became very abusive and refused, so they ejected him. When he got outside, Brown began to bang on the door, so they took him into custody.

Prisoner had nothing to say.

An officer from the regiment said the prisoner was addicted to drink, and had been three times punished in the service, the last time being a year ago.

The Chairman, in fining Brown 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, said they did not have a soldier before them very often, and they hoped they would not see one there for a long time to come.

Folkestone Express 24 February 1917

Local News

The licence of the Red Cow Inn, Foord, was on Tuesday temporarily transferred at the Police Court from Mr. G. Summerfield, who is in a bad state of health, to Mr. W.H. Collar, who formerly kept the Royal Oak.

Folkestone Herald 24 February 1917

Local News

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Mr. W.H. Collard, late landlord of the Royal Oak, North Street, applied for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Red Cow, Foord, from Mr. G. Summerfield, who is relinquishing the business due to serious illness. The request was granted.

Folkestone Express 3 March 1917

Local News

On Wednesday the Red Cow was transferred from Mr. G. Summerfield to Mr. W.H. Collar.

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1917

Obituary

Many will learn with regret that Mr. George Summerfield, of Canterbury Road, passed away on Sunday after a somewhat prolonged illness. Deceased was well-known as a licensed victualler. He aws for many years landlord of the Royal Standard, Canterbury Road, and latterly had carried on business at the Red Cow Inn, Foord Road. To meet his wish, his family had him removed to his old house (his son being licensee there now), where he died. The late Mr. Summerfield enjoyed the sincere esteem of a large circle. There was no keener supporter of football in Folkestone and he was an active member of the Radnor Park Bowls Club. In truth can it be said of him, whether in pastimes or other dealings with his fellows, he played a straight game. The Standard Sick and Dividend Club was his special pride, and his care for the Royal Victoria Hospital was well manifested in the many handsome collections which have been credited to the Royal Standard from time to time. To his widow and family there goes out a genuine sympathy. The funeral took place from the Royal Standard on Thursday.

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1917

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, March 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. H. Kirke.

The licences of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, the Red Cow, Foord, and Royal Oak, North Street, were respectively transferred Mr. Bert Nash, Mr. W. Collard, and Mr. H.W. Baldock.

The Chairman, addressing the licensees, impressed upon them the great necessity of taking the greatest care in the conduct of their businesses, whilst at the same time acknowledging their difficulties.

Folkestone Express 5 May 1917
Notice

Re. George Summerfield, deceased

All persons having claims against the estate of George Summerfield, late of the Red Cow Inn, Foord Road, Folkestone, Kent, licensed victualler, deceased, who died on the 3rd March, 1917, are required to send particulars thereof to me, the undersigned Solicitor for the Executors, before the 11th June next, after which date the Executors will distribute the assets having regard only to claims then notified.

Dated 3rd May, 1917, Geo. W. Haines, 18 and 20, Church Street, Folkestone, Solicitor for the Executors.

Folkestone Express 6 December 1924

Local News

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday, William Henry Collar was summoned for having on the 22nd November, did by his servant, deliver four quarts of ale from a crate, and did not make an entry of the fact in the day book kept by him on the premises. Frederick Wickenden was summoned for being the person delivering the ale without having with him an invoice.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said this case was the first of the kind they had had in the borough for a long time. It was for delivering liquor without having a delivery note or invoice. The regulation was perfectly clear, and as a matter of fact defendant could have been summoned for three offences. Wickenden was seen delivering four bottles in a crate, and he was asked for his delivery note, and he said “What, for this?” He then said “I had it, but I expect I have lost it”. He did not produce it. Inquiry was made of Collar, who was landlord of the Red Cow public house, and the day book was examined, but not before there had been some little difficulty. The officer in charge had to wait while defendant went into another room, and he was so long that the police officer followed, and saw certain entries being made in the day book, and demanded the book, and he found entries apparently recently made, but the alleged notice was not complete, and that was the most serious feature of the case.

Mr. R. Mowll appeared for both defendants, and pleaded Guilty.

Inspector Pittock said that about 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, the 22nd November, he saw Wickenden leave the Red Cow public house, Foord Road, carrying a crate containing four quart bottles of ale. He followed him to No. 2, Pavilion Road, and went up to him on the doorstep and said to him “Show me your delivery note for this sale”. Wickenden said “For this?” Witness said “Yes”. Wickenden said “Well, I had it, but I suppose I have lost it”. The beer was delivered. Witness went back to the Red Cow and asked to see the day book Collar went to another room, and as there appeared to be some unnecessary delay, he (witness) walked up into the adjoining bar, and saw the barman writing in the day book, with Collar bending over his shoulder. He told him not to make any entry, but to give the book to him. He found the last invoice was dated the 19th November, and an invoice was being made out for Mrs. Spicer, dated the 22nd November, and Mrs. Spicer`s name was on it. He said to Collar “What do you mean by this?” Collar replied “To tell you the truth, I have not troubled much about it”. He told defendant he would report him for a summons, and he replied “It is a standing order”. The barman said “I gave him the delivery note”. Wickenden said “I lost it”.

By the Chief Constable: He noticed a number of counterfoils had been removed from the book previous to the 19th November. Defendant said “I don`t trouble to keep the counterfoils”.

P.C. Lawrence corroborated.

Mr. Mowll said there was no defence to the case. He pleaded Guilty. The licensee had held a licence for 24 years without any sort of question, and he had been seven years in this house, and this was just because it was one of those moments in a man`s life when his good character should stand in very good stead for him. He was not justifying what happened. There was a laxity about the compliance with this quite modern rule under the Act of 1921, which now required that a licensee who was sending out anything like a crate required the licensee to enter the transaction in a day book, which he kept at his place, and an invoice which was delivered to the customer, and that was the proper thing to do, and what he ought to have done. He did not do it. It was the first case of its kind that had been brought before the Magistrates, and his submission was that although it was absolutely the duty of licensed victuallers to comply with the law, he was asking the Magistrates to take into consideration defendant`s long good character. There were many ways in which a licensed victualler was liable to lend himself open to a prosecution. He understood defendant had not been previously summoned on any account for a quarter of a century. That was a very fine record. Supposing he had carried on some criminal offence. Could there be any doubt a most merciful view would have been taken of his conduct, having regard to his good character? A case like this did a lot of good. It brought to the notice of every licensed victualler there was this section they had to comply with. He suggested to the Magistrates that the man`s previous record and good character justified them in taking this course – that while he had committed an offence they did not consider they were obliged to tarnish his reputation by recording a conviction against him, but to exercise their right of dismissing the case on the payment of costs. It would be a warning to others, and to defendant, that this sort of thing must not happen again. With regard to Wickenden, he could only say that the responsibility of this case was entirely upon the licensed victualler. They had this customer, and it was a standing order they should deliver to her house a crate of ale once a week, and they were complying with it. It ought to have been recorded, but it was not, and therefore an offence had been committed.

The Clerk asked what was the object of Section 7 of the Licensing Act – was it directed against hawking?

Mr. Mowll said he thought that was the main object, and that the legislature in introducing this as a post-war measure with a view to meeting what had been done before the war, by persons selling beer away from their premises. It applied to every licensed victualler, but he doubted whether it was the licensed victualler himself that it was primarily aimed at. He thought the idea was to prevent hawking.

The Chief Constable said that with all due regard to Mr. Mowll, he did not see what he could say was in the eyes of the legislature when they made the regulation.

Mr. Mowll said it was the duty of a lawyer to try and interpret what it meant.

After the Magistrates had retired, the Chairman said the Magistrates had decided to dismiss the cases on the payment of costs, but at the same time they wished to point out to defendant, and to all publicans in the town, that these regulations must be complied with, and all persons who sold liquor for consumption off the premises must comply with the law, and they considered that defendant, with his great experience, should have been the last to fall.

Folkestone Herald 6 December 1924

Tuesday, December 2nd: Before Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. G. Boyd, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Colonel P. Broome-Giles, and Miss. A.M. Hunt.

William Henry Collar, the licensee of the Red Cow Inn, Foord Road, was summoned for delivering four quarts of ale on November 22nd without making an entry of the fact in his day book. Frederick Wickenden was summoned for delivering the ale without an invoice. Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the defence.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said before any evidence was called that this was the first case they had had in the borough. The regulations were perfectly clear on the point, and there were really three offences, but they were only proceeding on one. Wickenden was employed by Collar. Defendants both pleaded Guilty.

Inspector Pittock said that about 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, November 22nd, he saw defendant Wickenden with a crate of beer leave the Red Cow Inn and go to 2, Pavilion Road. Witness asked defendant for his delivery note. Wickenden replied “What, for this?” Defendant said “I had it, but I expect I have lost it”. He saw Collar, told him he had just stopped Wickenden for not having a delivery note, and he asked him (Collar) for the day book. He replied “All right” and went to a bar. Defendant was away some time, and witness`s suspicions were aroused. He went to the bar and saw the barman writing in a book, Collar looking over his shoulder. He asked defendant for the book and he found that the last invoice was dated 19th November. An attempt had been made to make out an invoice for Spicer, of Pavilion Road. He said to Collar “What is meant by this?”, and Collar replied “To tell the truth, I did not trouble much about it”. He told defendant he would report him, and he replied “It is a standing order”. The barman said “I gave him (Wickenden) a delivery note”. Wickenden said “I lost it”.

In reply to the Chief Constable, witness said when he examined the day book he found only one used invoice. Collar said he did not trouble to keep the counterfoils.

P.C. Lawrence also gave evidence.

Mr. Mowll said Collar had been a licensee for 24 years, and had been seven years licensee of the Red Cow Inn. It was just because it was one of the moments in a man`s life when his good character stood in good stead. There was a laxity in the compliance with a quite modern rule, which required every licensee, in delivering anything like a crate of ale, to enter up the transaction in the day book, and have an invoice to deliver to the customer. Defendant ought to have done that, but he did not. They heard it was the first case brought before that Bench, and, although it was the duty of all licensed victuallers to keep the law, he did ask them to take into consideration defendant`s good character, and the fact that he had never been summoned before. A case like that did a lot of good, for it brought things to the notice of other victuallers. Mr. Mowll suggested that the defendant`s previous good character and record would justify the Bench in taking a certain course, viz., not to record a conviction against defendants, but to dismiss the case on payment of costs. He suggested it would be a warning, not only to his client, but others, that that sort of thing must not happen again. As regards Wickenden, he thought the responsibility was on the licensed victualler. The order for Spicer was a standing one, and there was an order for the delivery of a crate of ale once a week.

The Magistrates having retired, on their return the Chairman said that they had decided to dismiss the case on payment of costs. He wished to point out, however, that the regulations must be complied with. People who sold liquor should obey the law, and defendant, with his great experience, should have known.

Folkestone Express 20 December 1924

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Mr. G. Boyd and other Magistrates.

Ernest Alfred Clarke, Folkestone, was charged with being the trustee of a sum of 9s., and fraudulently converting it to his own use.

Sergt. Styles said that at 4.50 on Tuesday afternoon he was in the Police Office when the prisoner went in, and said “I wish to give myself up for embezzling funds belonging to the Red Cow public house share-out club, of which I have been acting as Secretary”. He said to him “Are you serious?”, and he replied “Yes”. He had no further conversation with him. Prisoner remained in the office for a time, until the arrival of Det. Insp. Johnson.

William Henry Collar, licensee of the Red Cow Inn, Foord Road, said he had a thrift club at his house, called “The Red Cow Share-Out Club”. The Secretary was the prisoner, and he (Mr. Collar) was Treasurer. The members attended at his house between the hours of 7 and 8.30 every Tuesday evening for the purpose of paying in their contributions, which ranged from threepence upwards. Each member had a membership card. The contributions were paid direct to the Secretary, and it was his duty to enter the amount paid on the member`s card and return it to the paying member. Defendant also kept the Secretary`s account book, and it was his duty to enter at the time of receipt all sums received by him. On the 15th April last he paid defendant 10s., and he entered the receipt on his card. In the Secretary`s book only 1s. was entered. At the close of the weekly meetings it was defendant`s duty to pay over to him, as Treasurer, all the monies received by him from the members, for which he gave him a receipt, taken from a counterfoil book. He received from defendant at the close of the meeting on the 15th April £5 2s. He gave defendant the receipt produced, entering the amount received on the counterfoil. When he received the amounts he did not check them with the amount shown in the Secretary`s book. On Tuesday afternoon defendant attended at his house by appointment, for the purpose of getting the money ready for distribution to the members at the annual share-out of the members. Defendant took with him the Secretary`s book, the receipts produced for the year`s payments to him (witness), and the box containing numbered envelopes, bearing the name of each member of the Thrift Club, most of the members` cards, some of which had not been taken in, and the amount paid in by each member in the prisoner`s handwriting. The cash received weekly from defendant was paid by him into a deposit account with Messrs. Leney and Co., his brewers, who allowed 5 percent interest. He had received from Messrs. Leney a cheque for £291 2s. 3d., representing the year`s payments with interest, and he had in hand a sum of £27 13s. 4d., representing the last two or three weeks` contributions from the members, which he had not deposited with the brewers. He cashed the cheque ready for the share-out on Tuesday evening, and the defendant counted the cash to see that it was correct. He found it was correct, and defendant then turned round to him and said “I shall have to ask you to assist me”. He said “What for? Are you behind in your accounts?” Defendant said “Yes”. He said to defendant “How much are you behind?”, and he replied “£88”. Witness said “Well, you will get no £88 out of me. The best thing you can do is go to the police station and give yourself up”. Defendant said “That is what I will do”. Defendant then left the house.

Inspector Bourne said that was as far as he could take the case that morning, and in the absence of the Chief Constable he asked for a remand in custody until Tuesday next.

Mr. Boyd asked Mr. Collar if he ever saw the Secretary`s book.

Mr. Collar said he did not. It was no business of his.

Mr. Boyd: Don`t these men pay the money in because you are the landlord of the house, and they think the brewers are behind you?

Mr. Collar: No, they simply join the club.

Mr. Boyd: they join the club, and bring something to the house, and have their drink in the house.

Mr. Collar: Some.

Mr. Boyd: Do you mean to say some come and don`t?

Mr. Collar: Yes, plenty.

Mr. Boyd: I should have thought you would have looked through the Secretary`s book.

Mr. Collar: I sign here for the amount received.

Mr. Boyd: you have other officials here?

Mr. Collar: Yes, the Committee.

Mr. Boyd: Does the Committee ever attend?

Mr. Collar: It is very seldom we have a Committee meeting.

Mr. Boyd: All the more reason you should examine it, and see it.

By the Clerk: There was no check on defendant`s accounts until he attended for the annual share-out.

The Clerk asked defendant if he applied for bail.

Defendant said he had not got any money. He would like to apply for bail.

Inspector Bourne said he was instructed by the Chief Constable to oppose bail.

The Chairman said bail would be granted in two sureties of £25 each, or one in £50, and defendant in £25.

The case was adjourned until Monday.

Folkestone Herald 20 December 1924

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman W. Dunk, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, and Col. P. Broome-Giles.

Ernest Alfred Clarke, Folkestone, was charged with fraudulently converting to his own use the sum of 9s., of which he was the trustee.

Police Sergeant Styles said that at 4.50 on the previous afternoon he was in the Police Office when the prisoner came and said that he wished to give himself up for embezzling funds belonging to the Red Cow public house share-out club, of which he had been acting as Secretary. Witness asked prisoner if he were serious, and he replied “Yes”. They had further conversation. Witness remained in the office until the arrival of Inspector Johnson.

Mr. William Henry Collar, the licensee of the Red Cow Inn, said that they had a thrift club at his house, which was called “The Red Cow Share-Out Club”. The Secretary of the club was prisoner, and he (witness) was Treasurer. The members attended at his house between the hours of 7 and 8.30 every Tuesday evening for the purpose of paying in their contributions, which ranged from threepence upwards. Each member had a card. The contributions were paid direct to prisoner, whose duty it was to enter the amount received on the card and return the card to the paying member. Defendant also kept the Secretary`s account book (produced), and it was his duty to enter into that, at the time of receipt, all sums received. On the 15th April last witness paid prisoner 10s., and he entered the receipt on his card. He referred to the Secretary`s account and found that the amount entered there was 1s. only. At the close of the weekly meetings it was prisoner`s duty to pay over to him, as Treasurer, the money received by him from the members, for which he gave him a receipt from the counterfoil receipt book (produced). He referred to the receipt book, and on reference to receipt and counterfoil No. 15 found that he received from defendant at the close of the meeting on the 15th of April £5 2s., for which he gave him the receipt produced, entering the amount received on the counterfoil. When he received those amounts he did not check the amount he received with the amount appearing in the Secretary`s book. On the previous afternoon defendant attended at his house by appointment, for the purpose of getting the money ready for distribution to the members at the annual share-out. Prisoner brought with him the Secretary`s book, the receipts (produced) for the year`s payments to witness, and a box containing some numbered envelopes, bearing the names of the members of the club, most of the members` cards, some of which had not been brought in, and the amount paid in by each member in prisoner`s handwriting. The money that he (witness) received from defendant was paid by him into a deposit account with Messrs. Leney and Company, his brewers, who allowed him five percent interest. He had received from Messrs. Leney a cheque for £291 2s. 3d., representing the year`s payments. He had in hand the sum of £27 13s. 4d., representing the last two or three weeks` contributions from the members, which was not deposited with the brewers. He (witness) cashed the cheque ready for the share-out, and the prisoner counted the money to see that it was correct. Accused then turned round and said “I shall have to ask you to assist me”. He said “What for? Are you behind in your accounts?” Prisoner said “Yes”. He asked prisoner “How much are you behind?”, and he said “£88”. Witness replied “You will get no £88 out of me. The best thing you can do is go to the police station and give yourself up”. Prisoner said that was what he would do, and then defendant left the house.

Inspector R. Bourne said that in the absence of the Chief Constable he asked for a remand in custody until Tuesday.

Mr. Boyd asked if Mr. Collar ever saw the prisoner`s book.

Witness: It is no business of mine.

Mr. Boyd remarked that he would have thought witness would have looked through the book, and then asked if the Club`s Committee ever attended.

Mr. Collar replied that it was very seldom that they had a Committee meeting.

Mr. Boyd: All the more reason why you as Treasurer should attend and see to it.

The Magistrates` Clerk (to prisoner): Do you apply for bail?

Defendant said that he had no money, but would like to apply for bail.

Inspector Bourne stated that he was instructed to oppose bail.

The Chairman said that the Bench had decided to allow prisoner bail, himself in £25, and two sureties of £25 each, or one in £50, subject to the approval of the police.

Prisoner would be remanded until Monday.

Folkestone Express 27 December 1924

Monday, December 22nd: Before Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman Dunk, and Dr. W.W. Nuttall.

Ernest Alfred Clarke, Folkestone, and Secretary of the Red Cow Inn share-out club, was charged on remand with fraudulently converting to his own use monies received by him on behalf of the share-out club.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said that since the last hearing the Chief Constable and himself had had the opportunity of going into the case, and the prisoner was now charged with receiving on the 15th April, and on two subsequent days the amounts of £7 3s. on the first, £8 4s. 9d. on the second, and £6 18s. on the third, and he was charged with converting to his own use parts of these amounts, on the first £2 1s., on the second £2 16s. 9d., and on the third £1 12s.

After the evidence of Mr. W.H. Collar, the licensee of the Red Cow Inn, had been read over, he stated he had, since the last hearing, examined the Secretary`s book, containing entries in the prisoner`s handwriting of the sums he admitted receiving from the members of the club on the members` weekly nights. He referred to the book containing the amounts for the 15th April, the date on which he personally paid the prisoner 10s., his own contribution. On that date he received £5 2s. from the prisoner at the close of the meeting, for which he gave him the receipt produced, taken from the cash receipt book. The prisoner signed the corresponding counterfoil. He had checked the amounts appearing in the Secretary`s book on that date, as contributions received by prisoner from the members, amounting to £7 3s. He had never received from prisoner the deficiency of £2 1s. On the 24th June he received £5 8s. from Clarke, for which he gave a receipt, prisoner signing the counterfoil. He had checked the amount received in the Secretary`s book, which was £8 4s. 9d., and he had not received from Clarke the deficiency of £2 16s. 9d. On the 25th November he received from Clarke £5 6s., for which he gave a receipt, prisoner signing the counterfoil. The Secretary`s book showed that prisoner received £6 18s., and he had not received from Clarke the deficiency of £1 12s. He had checked prisoner`s account book of contributions received by him from the 1st January to the 9th December, and the total amount prisoner received was £396 4s. 3d. In the same period he received from Clarke £315 13s. 9d., showing a deficiency of £80 10s. 6d. There were 190 members of the club. Since the last hearing he had examined the whole of the members` cards, and prepared a statement, showing the entries in Clarke`s handwriting, and it showed a receipt by the prisoner of £406 1s. from the 1st January to the 9th December. He (Mr. Collar) had recompensed the members for their loss. Prisoner had been Secretary of the club for over seven years.

Det. Insp. Johnson said he received the prisoner in custody on the evening of the 16th inst., and told him he would be charged with stealing, on the 15th April, 1924, the sum of 9s., the property of William Henry Collar. He cautioned him, and he made no reply. That morning he formally charged him with fraudulently converting to his own use three sums of £2 1s., £2 16s. 9d., and £1 12s., part of larger sums received by him for the use of the members of the Red Cow Share-Out Club, on the 15th April and two subsequent dates. He cautioned him, and he replied “All right”.

Prisoner said he did not wish to say anything.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had no alternative but to commit prisoner for trial at the Assizes. It was not a case they could deal with, or the Recorder could deal with. Bail would be granted in one surety of £25 and prisoner in £25.

The Assizes will probably be held in February.

Folkestone Herald 27 December 1924

Monday, December 22nd: Before Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman Dunk, and Dr. W.W. Nuttall.

Ernest Alfred Clarke was charged on remand with fraudulently converting to his own use money belonging to the Red Cow share-out club.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) stated that the charge against prisoner was now that he received on April 15th, and on two dates subsequently £7 3s., £8 4s. 9d., and £6 18s., and he was charged with fraudulently converting to his own use part of these amounts, on the first date £2 1s., on the second £2 16s. 9d., and on the third £1 12s.

The evidence given at the last hearing having been read over, Mr. W.H. Collar, said he had examined the Secretary`s book, containing entries in the prisoner`s handwriting of the sums he admitted to have received from the members of the share-out club on the members` weekly nights. He referred to the book containing the amounts for the 15th of April, the date on which he personally paid the prisoner 10s.as his own contribution. On that occasion he received from prisoner £5 2s., for which he gave him the receipt (produced), taken from the cash receipt book. Prisoner signed the corresponding counterfoil. Witness had checked the amount appearing in the Secretary`s book from the members amounting to £7 3s. He never received from prisoner the deficiency of £2 1s. Witness next referred to the account of June 24th, when he received £5 8s. at the close of the meeting from prisoner. He gave prisoner a receipt for that, taken from the counterfoil receipt book. The prisoner signed the corresponding counterfoil. He had checked the amount appearing in the Secretary`s book on that date as contributions received by him from the members, amounting to £8 4s. 9d. Witness had never received from prisoner the deficiency of £2 16s. 9d. Mr. Collar also referred to the account for the 25th of November, on which date he received from defendant the sum of £5 6s., for which he gave him a receipt (produced), taken from the counterfoil receipt book. Prisoner signed the corresponding counterfoil. He had checked the amounts appearing in the Secretary`s account book on that date as contributions received by him from members, amounting to £6 18s. Witness had never received from him the deficiency of £1 12s. He had checked prisoner`s account book of contributions received by him from the 1st of January last to December 9th. The total amount received by prisoner was £396 4s. 3d. In the same period witness received from prisoner £315 13s. 9d., which showed a deficiency of £80 10s. 6d. There were 119 members of the share-out club. He had since the last hearing examined the whole of the members` cards, and prepared a statement (produced), showing the entries in Clarke`s handwriting. The statement showed a receipt by the prisoner of £406 1s. in the period stated. He had recompensed the members for their loss. Prisoner had been Secretary of the club for over seven years.

Prisoner said he did not wish to ask the witness any questions.

Detective Inspector Johnson stated that he received prisoner into custody on the 16th of December, and told him he would be charged with stealing, on April 15th, 1924, the sum of 9s., the property of William Henry Collar. He cautioned prisoner, who made no reply. That morning he formally charged prisoner with fraudulently converting to his own use three sums of £2 1s., £2 16s. 9d., and £1 12s., part of larger sums received by him for the use of the members of the Red Cow Share-Out Club, on the 15th April and two subsequent dates. He cautioned accused, who replied “All right”.

Defendant said that he did not wish to say anything.

The Chairman said that they had no alternative but to commit prisoner for trial at the Kent Assizes. It was not a case they could deal with, and it could not be dealt with by the Recorder. Bail would be allowed in one surety of £25 and himself in £25, with twenty four hours` notice to the police.

Folkestone Express 28 February 1925

Local News

At the Kent Assizes at Maidstone on Saturday, before Mr. Justice Finlay, Ernest Alfred Clarke, 51, chauffeur, was indicted for fraudulently converting to his own use and benefit various sums of money entrusted to him by members of the Red Cow Share-Out Club, at Folkestone.

Mr. Wardley (instructed by Mr. A.F. Kidson) prosecuted, and briefly outlined the facts, and said that the sum concerned was about £28. When share out time came, the prisoner found that he was short, and gave himself up to the police.

Mr. Waddy, in mitigation, said that the prisoner had a perfectly good character up to the time of this offence. He had been the Secretary of the club for seven years. At the time of the offence he was employed by a doctor as chauffeur, and had been for a period of fourteen years, and part of his punishment was that he had lost that employment. The explanation he gave why he committed the offence was that his wages were 35s. a week, and while he had no complaint about his wages he had a wife and eight children to keep, and his rent was 10s. a week, and so it was very easy for the man to be financially embarrassed, and to get into difficulties. Five of the children were at school. He was tempted, and he took the money. He had been in prison for nine weeks, and he asked that His Lordship might make that the most substantial part of his punishment.

His Lordship said that the prisoner was in a position of trust, and it was most unhappy that he had proved himself unworthy of that trust. He had attended carefully to what his counsel had said, and he could see real circumstances of mitigation in this case. It was a most deplorable thing that he had lost his good character, and also that the temptation was real and strong. He felt the punishment, which he was bound to inflict, was but part of what he would have to bear. Taking all the circumstances into account, and that he had been in prison for some time, he would only send him to prison for a short time – two months in the second division.

Folkestone Herald 28 February 1925

Local News

At the Kent Winter Assizes at Maidstone, before Mr. Justice Finlay, on Wednesday afternoon, Ernest Alfred Clarke, aged 51, described as a chauffeur, pleaded Guilty to an indictment against him that he, having been entrusted by the members of the Red Cow Share-Out Club with three several sums of £7 13/-, £8 4/9, and £6 18/- for a certain purpose, and having received the same for and on behalf of the members, fraudulently converted three sums of £2 1/-, £2 16/9, and £1 12/-, part thereof, to his own use and benefit, at Folkestone, on April 15th, 1924.

Mr. W.A. Wardley prosecuted, and Mr. Waddy appeared for the accused.

The prisoner was given a good character. It was said that he was well known in Folkestone, that he had been employed as a coachman, and more recently as a chauffeur. When the share out time came he admitted that he was short, and went and gave himself up to the police.

Mr. Waddy saiud Clarke had been Secretary of the Red Cow Club for seven years. At the time of the offence he was employed as a chauffeur to a local doctor, and had been so employed for fourteen years. Part of his punishment was losing that employment. His wages were 35/- a week, and he had a wife and eight children to keep. The man paid 10/- a week rent, so it was very easy for him to be financially embarrassed, and be in difficulties. He was tempted and took the money. He had been in prison nine weeks, and Counsel asked His Lordship to make that the more substantial part of his sentence.

Mr. Justice Finlay said he could see there were real circumstances of mitigation, and also that the temptation was real and strong. Taking all the circumstances of the case into consideration, although bound to send Clarke to prison, it would only be for a short time. His Lordship passed sentence of two months imprisonment in the second division.

Folkestone Express 12 October 1929

Local News

A special transfer sessions was held at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, when transfers in connection with several well-known licensed houses were made.

Protection order was granted as follows: The Red Cow Inn, Foord Road, to Mr. McIlveen from the late Mr. W.H. Collar.

Note: No record of McIlveen in More Bastions. Date is at variance with More Bastions.

Obituary

The death occurred with painful suddenness on Tuesday of Mr. William Henry Collar, the well-known licensee of the Red Cow, Foord Road, Folkestone. He got up as usual in the morning and was just going to partake of his breakfast when he had a heart attack and died within an hour.

The deceased, who was 61 years of age, was a native of Whitstable, and came to live at Folkestone when he was a boy. He had been a licensed victualler for 30 years, but before entering the licensed trade he was employed by the Folkestone Corporation and was also a member of the Fire Brigade.

His first licensed house was the Royal Oak, North Street, which he occupied for 18 years. In 1916 he took over the licence of the Red Cow, which he held up to the time of his death. During the time he was a licensed victualler he made numerous friends and was associated with several public bodies. He was formerly a member of the committee of the Folkestone Licensed Victuallers` Association, and he held a similar office in connection with the North and East Ward Conservative Association. Though he did not hold any office, he was still a member of those organisations up to his death.

Mr. Collar, it will be recalled, was injured in the big air raid on May 25th, 1917, on Folkestone. He was standing at the entrance to the Red Cow when a bomb exploded in a nearby coal yard. A piece of the missile hit Mr. Collar on the leg, and he was laid up for some time afterwards.

His wife died nine years ago. He leaves a son, Mr. W.H. Collar, and a daughter, Mrs. McIlveen, to whom the greatest sympathy has been extended.

The funeral takes place this (Friday) afternoon at the Folkestone Cemetery.

Folkestone Herald 12 October 1929

Local News

The transfer of several licences was approved by the Folkestone Magistrates at the Folkestone transfer sessions on Wednesday. Mr. Arthur Macilbean was granted a protection order in respect of the licence of the Red Cow, formerly held by the late Mr. Harry William Collar.

Notes: No record of Macilbean in More Bastions. Date is also at variance with More Bastions.

Obituary

We regret to announce the death, on Tuesday, of Mr. William Henry Collar, licensee of the Red Cow Inn, Black Bull Road.

Deceased, who was in his 62nd year, had been landlord of the Red Cow for 13 years. He had previously held the licence of the Royal Oak, North Street, for a considerable period.

The late Mr. Collar, who was a native of Whitstable, was at one time in the employ of the Folkestone Corporation.

Much sympathy will be felt for his son and daughter.

Folkestone Express 19 October 1929

Local News

The funeral took place in Folkestone Cemetery on Friday afternoon of Mr. William Henry Collar, the well-known licensee of the Red Cow, Foord Road, Folkestone, whose death the previous Tuesday was reported in our last issue.

Folkestone Express 11 January 1930

Local News

The Magistrates granted protection orders to Mr. William Henry Albert Best, of Canterbury, who was taking over the George the Third, in Great Fenchurch Street, and to Mr. Henry William Cork, who leaves the latter house to go to the Red Cow, Foord Road.

Folkestone Herald 21 June 1930

Felix

This is a thoroughly up-to-date age, and nearly everything tends to prove it. At Foord (once the village of Ford, owing to the vicinity of an open stream) there stands one of Folkestone`s oldest – if not the oldest – hostelries. The interior of the building with its heavy oak beams, its winding narrow passages and wooden corkscrew staircase proclaim this fact. The old inn has been painted up and presents quite a smart appearance. Over the front of the entrance hangs a nicely painted signboard. In large lettering there appear these words; “The Red Cow”, whilst directly underneath is a pictorial representation of an elephant – tusks, trunk and all. Below this is the one word, Fremlin. “That is the strangest cow I have ever seen” remarked an excursionist when viewing the pictorial representation on Saturday. This is taking a long glance. At a closer inspection one can read “Fremlin`s ales and stout are the best”. The elephant is the trademark of the firm. But taking a rapid and distant glance one cannot fail to indulge in a smile at the large words “Red Cow” with a big tusker underneath. Mr. H. Cork owns the “Cow” (not the elephant), and it may be this is the particular milker of which the poet sings so touchingly:- “If I had a cow that gave such milk, I`d clothe her in the finest silk, Feed her on the finest hay, And milk her forty times a day”.

Folkestone Express 24 March 1934

Local News

Four silver cups, awarded by the United Friendly Societies (Folkestone) Royal Victoria Hospital Saturday and Sunday Fund to the licensed houses collecting the highest amount of money in the town during the year, were presented on Monday evening.

The principal award went to Mr. T.I. Jordan, of the Richmond Tavern, who collected £16 15s. towards the fund. The second prize was gained by Mrs. E.A. Summerfield, of the Royal Standard, collecting £8 6s. 8d; third place by Mr. S. Herbert, of the Swan, with £4 7s. 6d.; and finally Mr. H.W. Cork, of the Red Cow, who collected £3 12s. 8d. Messrs. B. Todd, S. Burvill, G. Spicer, and Mr. G. Dunkling, who superintended the collecting at the respective houses, were the recipients of presents of cigarettes.

Folkestone Express 25 November 1939

Local News

The Folkestone licensing transfer sessions were held at the Police Court on Wednesday. The Mayor (Alderman G.A. Gurr) was in the chair and also sitting were Councillor R.G. Wood, Dr. F. Wolverson and Alderman Mrs. E. Gore.

Henry Cork, licensee of the Red Cow, Foord Road, made application for a licence for music by wireless installation.

The Magistrates’ Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) said a number of licence holders had music licences which were restricted to wireless.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said there was no objection.

The Chairman: I expect you find it in demand for the news.

Mr. Cork: Chiefly for the news at one and nine.

The application was granted.

Folkestone Herald 31 May 1941

Local News

An 18 years’ old member of the Home Guard was fatally wounded as the result of a street incident on Friday night last week. The tragedy occurred in Pavilion Road shortly before 11 p.m. Archibald Frank Voller, manager of his father’s newsagent’s shop in that road, had been in conversation with another man when he collapsed from a bayonet wound.

Voller, who had been on Home Guard duty and was in uniform, had just before withdrawn his bayonet from its scabbard. He was removed to the Royal Victoria Hospital, where he died shortly after admission

Christopher George Watson, a 41 years' old unemployed cycle engineer, living next door to Voiler, appeared before the local Magistrates on Monday on a charge of manslaughter. He was acquitted.

At the inquest on Wednesday, a jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

Police Court Proceedings

A charge of manslaughter in connection with Voller`s death was preferred against Christopher George Watson, (41), of Pavilion Road, Folkestone, and he appeared before the Folkestone Magistrates on Monday.

The Mayor presided, with Alderman R.G. Wood and Mr. Percy Fuller.

Watson was charged that on May 23rd at Folkestone he unlawfully stabbed Voller, through which injuries he died on May 24th, and it was alleged he thereby killed him.

To Watson the Magistrates` Clerk said “You are not represented anybody?” to which defendant said that that was so but he might be at a further hearing.

Det. Sergt. Bates said at 2 a.m. on Saturday, May 24th, he went to 56, Pavilion Road. He knocked at the door and it was answered by Watson.
He told Watson that he was a police officer and informed him that Archibald Frank Voller, who had been injured as the result of a bayonet wound late the previous evening, had died. As a result he (Watson) would be taken into custody. After being cautioned Watson replied “Oh, no, no, but I think it was his own fault”. He brought defendant to the police station and on arrival he said “We had a scuffle, he drew his bayonet at me and I went for him and grabbed him by the wrist and took it away. He must have fallen on it”. Watson then pointed to his own jacket, which was torn right side, and said "'This was done in the scuffle". Defendant’s breath smelt of port wine, but he was not drunk. At 7 p.m. on Saturday he charged Watson with the offence. He was again cautioned and he replied “Well, I say I never stabbed him; it was done in a scuffle”. After bringing Watson to the police station witness went to accused's house. Outside, on the pavement, and in the front porch of the house he saw a number of spots of blood. In the back room, in the kitchen occupied by the defendant, he found several pieces of cotton wool saturated with blood; also a bloodstained face flannel which was on the table in the kitchen. In the bedroom, in the front of the house, on the dressing table, he saw a number of bottles. There was a full pint bottle of Cockspur white wine and a pint bottle of Mercury white wine half full: one quart and four pint bottles which had contained wine were empty. Witness later went to the Royal Victoria Hospital and took possession of deceased’s clothing, consisting of a battle dress jacket and trousers, two woollen pullovers and a shirt. On examining them he found a tear in each garment on the right side, above the waist line. He took possession of the rifle and bayonet produced. Three inches above the point of the bayonet were bloodstains.

At this stage the hearing was adjourned until the following day.

After hearing further evidence on Tuesday, the Magistrates discharged Watson on a charge of manslaughter, it being stated that the evidence of what happened during the scuffle was not sufficient to justify defendant's committal for trial.

Ronald H. Fisher, of 67, Guildhall Street, a milk roundsman and a member of the Home Guard, said he knew Voller, also a member of the Home Guard, having been friendly with him for about 11 months. He attended a parade with him at 8 p.m. on Friday last. They paraded in uniform with rifle, bayonet and ammunition. They came away from the parade at 9.30 p.m. and went to Red Cow public house, Foord Road. They remained there until 10.30. During that time Voller had two pints of ale and beer mixed. On leaving Voller went in the direction of Black Bull Road and witness went up Ship Street.

The Clerk: When Voller went away and left you was he in ordinary condition?

Witness: Yes, perfect.

Perfectly sober? - Yes.

Defendant: When you came into the shop just before tea-time that evening there was a young lady in the shop, wasn’t there?

Witness: Yes.

Answering further questions, witness said there appeared to be no sign of jealousy on the part of Voller while he was in the shop. He (Fisher) agreed that he said he was in a hurry and flourished his bayonet in the shop.

Dennis Harold Boss, 25, Pavilion Road, a baker's assistant, said on Friday night about 10.40 he was going along Pavilion Road. He knew Voller and saw him outside his house. He was dressed in Home Guard uniform and he was talking to Watson. At the time witness was on the other side and before he crossed the road Voller said “Halt, who goes there?” the challenge being addressed to witness, who then crossed the road.
Voller had a rifle slung över his right shoulder, and on his left hand side he was carrying a bayonet in a sheath. Deceased left Watson, and witness and Voller walked about halfway to witness’s house. Voller then said “Cheerio”, turned and went back. It was rather dark at the time, but he could see across the road; not well enough, however, to recognise a person on the other side.

Frederick Charles Curtis, 110. Foord Road, a builder s labourer, said on Friday night he went to defendant’s home at 9 p.m. They talked about 20 minutes and he then left the house to get Watson a bottle of Cockspur wine. Witness returned to defendant's house about 10.20. After having a glass of wine with Watson he left again. After leaving the house they stood outside talking on the pavement. As they were talking a young man in uniform (Voller) came along. He stopped in front of defendant and they were speaking a lot, but witness did not take any notice of what they were saying. He did hear Watson say “Your papers have come”. He also heard defendant say “I could hit you like this (making a sweep with his arm) and knock you to Ashford’’, adding “Of course I am only talking silly”. Witness took this for a joke. He thought by the way Voller spoke he had had a drink or two. Voller came back after accompanying the previous witness (Boss) along the road some distance. Watson said something about it being a nice rifle Voller had. There was some talk about papers and Watson gave deceased money for papers. A little later Voller put one foot on the pavement and drew his bayonet. Voller then tried to pierce Watson with the bayonet several times, saying “This has a nice sharp point”, or something like that. Voller appeared to be serious. Watson dodged back and said “You better put that away, it`s very dangerous". There was a sort of scuffle, Watson closing to take the bayonet away. He thought he did take it away. Witness was about 6ft. away and he could not see him take it. Voller fell to the ground as though wounded. Witness said to defendant “Surely you haven’t done anything to him'’, and Watson said “Surely, no”. Watson beckoned to him to help. Defendant undid Voller’s tunic and he saw Watson put the bayonet back into its sheath. That was the first time he knew defendant had the bayonet. They took Voller in defendant's house. Inside the house Watson got some wadding and placed it on the wound. Defendant also told him to get a doctor or an ambulance. Witness went to the A.R.P. depot outside the hospital, saw Mr. Nash there, and returned with him to the house.

The Clerk: How did the scuffle begin?

Witness: Voller was challenging defendant with the bayonet. Watson dodged out of the way.

Answering further questions, witness said defendant was trying to take the bayonet away. Up to then he thought Voller was only playing about. Watson went to him to try to take the bayonet away. Later he saw the bayonet lying on the pavement. There were two distinct scuffles.

The Mayor: What was your condition? You don't seem to have had a very clear idea of what happened. What was the argument just before this happened – the argument which caused this man to draw his bayonet?

Witness: I don`t know.

The Mayor: People don`t draw bayonets for nothing.

The Clerk (to Curtis): You don't give one the impression that you are trying to tell the Magistrates all that happened. That is all they want to know. Where was the rifle after deceased had fallen?

Curtis: I believe it dropped off his shoulder. I am not sure.

The Clerk (to Curtis): I have been bound to press you a little about this because it does not sound as though you are trying to help the Magistrates as to what happened.

The Magistrates retired at this point and on their return the Clerk said this was the only evidence that could be given as to what happened. That being so the Magistrates were not satisfied that they could commit defendant for trial on the evidence. The defendant would therefore be discharged.

Inquest

The Folkestone Coroner (Mr. B.H. Bonniface) opened an inquest on Voller at the Town Hall 6n Monday afternoon. Mr. Bonniface, who sat with a jury, said he had been informed that a man had been charged with manslaughter. That being so it was only necessary for them that day to hear evidence of identification and as to the cause of death. Then he proposed with their approval to adjourn the inquest until Wednesday by which time he understood the Magistrates would have investigated the charge of manslaughter and would have taken some course or another. It might be that when the enquiry was resumed they would only be kept a few moments and after that they might not be called again.

Mr. G. P. Medlicott watched the proceedings on behalf of deceased's father, who was the first witness.

Frank William Voller, of Sea-light, Lydd-on-Sea, a newsagent, father of the deceased, gave evidence of identification. He added that his son managed his newsagents' business at 58, Pavilion Road, and was a member of the Home Guard.

Mr. Raymond A. Hill, house surgeon at the Royal .Victoria Hospital, said Voller was brought to the hospital at 11.20 p.m. on Friday. At the time he was collapsed and semi-conscious. On first examination deceased appeared to be moribund from haemorrhage resulting from a stabbed wound of the abdomen. He was placed in an electrically healed bed and a blood transfusion was given. He made no recovery and died at 12.30 a.m. on Saturday. The cause of death was haemorrhage due to a perforating wound of the liver.

The Coroner: Had deceased-been attending the hospital at all?

Witness: I had seen him on two occasions, on May 16th and. May 23rd as an out patient. He had a strain of his right knee.

The Coroner: In any sort of struggle might that knee have affected him?

Witness: I don't think so; he had practically recovered from it.

The inquest was at this stage adjourned until Wednesday.

A verdict of accidental death was returned by the jury at the adjourned inquest on Wednesday afternoon at the Town Hall.

New evidence, including a statement Watson had made to a police officer, was given during the proceedings, at the beginning of which the Coroner informed the Jury that a man (Watson), charged with the manslaughter of Voller, had been discharged by the Magistrates. That being so, he added, he proposed to continue the inquest and call all the witnesses before them.

Dennis H. Boss, who gave evidence at the police court, said he saw Watson and Voller talking together in a friendly way in Pavilion Road about 10.40 on Friday night. Voller's breath smelt of alcohol but he was sober.

Frederick Charles Curtis, the next witness, described, as he had at the police court, what he saw. “After pulling out his bayonet”, witness said, Voller said “There’s a nice point” and added “I will put this through you”. He then made several lunges at Watson with the bayonet. Watson jumped out of the way and said "Put that thing away, it’s a very dangerous thing to have’’. Then there was a scuffle and he saw Voller fall.

The Coroner: Did you see the bayonet when deceased fell? - No.

Witness said to Watson "Surely you haven’t done anything to the chap” and Watson spoke to deceased but witness could not say what he said. At no time did he see Watson with the bayonet in his hand.

After they had carried the man into the house Voller said “Have I been pricked?” or something like that. Deceased never accused Watson of stabbing him with the bayonet. Watson sent witness for a doctor and ambulance. When he saw Voller draw the bayonet it appeared to him that deceased was serious.

Albert Ernest Nash, 34, Bolton Road, Deputy Commandant A.R.P. Mobile Unit adjoining the hospital, said Curtis came to them about 11 p.m. and stated that a soldier had been stabbed in Pavilion Road.
Witness went to 56, Pavilion Road and saw deceased lying on the floor of a room. He was conveyed to the hospital.

Inspector C. Haestie said he went to Watson's house about 11.50 p.m. On seeing witness Watson said “I thought someone would be along”. Witness said “Do you know anything of a man being stabbed near here this evening?" Watson replied “Yes I will tell you what happened”.He cautioned Watson, who then said that at about 10.45 p.m. he was standing outside his house talking to Curtis. The statement went on: “I saw Archie Voller, who lives next door at No. 58, coming along Pavilion Road from the direction of Black Bull Road. He was dressed in Home Guard uniform and had a rifle slung over his shoulder. As he came by us we entered into conversation. I noticed he had been drinking; he was unsteady on his feet and was excited. As we were talking a youth went by who I believe is named Boss, who lives nearby. Voller went over and spoke to him for a couple of minutes and then returned to us. When he came back he drew his bayonet from the scabbard on his belt and said “See this. I’ll stick it through you”. He then lunged at me with the bayonet and tore my jacket about one and a half inches. I told him I would take it from him and closed with him and took the bayonet from him. Before he lunged at me he said he had five rounds in his rifle. As soon as I had taken the bayonet from him he fell towards me. I had the bayonet in my left hand which was pulled back. The bayonet pierced him in the stomach and he collapsed. I then realised he had fallen on the bayonet. He said “It`s my fault for sparring about”. I sent Curtis to get assistance. At the time this occurred it was getting dusk. There was no quarrel between Voller and me. It was an accident and entirely his own fault”.

The Coroner: Was Watson perfectly sober?

Witness: Yes.

Did you see a rifle and bayonet there? – Yes, on the floor in the room.

Witness said he examined the bayonet and about three inches from the point he found traces of blood.

Miss Beatrice M. Adams, a nurse at the Royal Victoria Hospital, said she was on duty when deceased was admitted at 11.20 p.m. While deceased was in the out-patients` department she asked him how it happened. His condition was very, very poor, but he replied “We were playing about”. Just before midnight a police officer visited him in the ward and asked Voller if it was an accident and he replied “Yes, I think so”. The constable then asked him who did it and he replied “Watson”.

The Coroner then called Watson, who reminded him of the statement he had made to Inspector Haestie.

Watson was then sworn. He stated he was a cycle engineer at present unemployed. There was nothing he wished to add to the statement he made to Inspector Haestie.

“Would you like to tell me whether you had a quarrel that night?”, said the Coroner.

“There was no quarrel. Mr. Voller was getting high pitched”, replied Watson. "There were just a few words in regard to papers. I told him his papers had come and he said “Never mind about them”.

The Coroner: You had no intent ion of hurting him in any way? - No. sir.

The Coroner: Is it correct what has been said to all intents and purposes that it was an entire accident?

Watson: Yes, a completé accident.

The Coroner, addressing the jury, said as he had told them Watson appeared before the Magistrates and the charge of manslaughter was dismissed. It was therefore not for them to consider the question of manslaughter any further, the man having been acquitted.

Without retiring, the jury, after a brief deliberation, found that deceased met his death accidentally.

Mr. Voller was born at Willesborough, near Ashford, and was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Voller, of Lydd-on-Sea. Educated at Willesborough Schools he was captain of the soccer side and afterwards played for Willesborough Old Boys. He came to Folkestone about two years ago to manage his father’s newsagent’s business. He joined the Home Guard when it was formed last year and had been a most enthusiastic and keen member. A member of St. John’s Church, he was on the committee of the tennis club associated with the Church.

Folkestone Herald 11 April 1942

Local News

Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a protection order to Mr. John A. Miles, of Dover, who is taking over from Mr. Henry Cork the licence of the Red Cow Inn. Mr. Miles, it was stated, had been for a number of years the licensee of a house which was blitzed last autumn.

Folkestone Herald 25 April 1942

Local News

At a Transfer Sessions, held at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, several licences were dealt with.

Alderman R.G. Wood presided with Alderman J.W. Stainer.

Folkestone Herald 21 November 1942

Local News

The funeral of Mr. J.A. Miles, of the Red Cow inn, Foord Road, Folkestone, took place at Hawkinge on Tuesday. The Rev. A.L. Lawler, Priest-in-charge of St. Johns, officiated at a service at St. John's church previous to the interment.

Folkestone Herald 9 January 1943

Local News

At a licensing transfer sessions at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Wednesday, the licence of the Red Cow, Foord Road, was transferred from the late Mr. John Arthur Miles to his widow.

Folkestone Gazette 22 November 1961
Local News

Further help for the British Empire Cancer Campaign has come from two Folkestone public houses during the past week. Piles of pennies were toppled over at The Red Cow and The Lifeboat, North Street. Total for the Red Cow was £10 14/11 and for the Lifeboat £22 4/1. The local committee of the British Empire Cancer Campaign thank all who contributed to such excellent results.

Folkestone Herald 12 May 1979

Local News

Children at Parkfield Special School, Folkestone, have been presented with a stereo cassette and a record player by a local pub. Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Biggs, landlord and landlady of the Red Cow, Foord Road, Folkestone, and their customers, raised nearly £150 through various events in the past year. The cassette and record player were presented to the school by the pub’s darts team at the East Cliff Pavilion, Folkestone. The children use the equipment every morning during play sessions and at other times during the day.

“The record players we have had before have been big and bulky”, teacher Mrs. Jean Vincent said. “This one is compact and easy to carry about. It also has a tape recorder for cassettes which we did not have before. I am teaching one of the boys to use the tape himself to record his stories”.

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1982

Local News

Burglars broke in through the front door of the Red Cow pub in Foord Road, Folkestone, last Monday night, and stole a video recorder, 12 video cassettes and £400.

South Kent Gazette 15 June 1983

Local News

The Red Cow pub in Folkestone has a plush new image. A renovation campaign costing several thousand pounds and lasting six months has transformed the hostelry.

Landlady Mrs. Joan Biggs told the Gazette “It was just an old spit and sawdust pub until after Christmas. We are delighted with it”. She and husband Geoffrey took over the pub 13 years ago and have been pressing the brewery for renovations for nearly as long. The work has included knocking the two bars into one and complete re-decoration.

An informal reopening ceremony was performed on Thursday by owner of Lingfleld Racecourse Mr. Ron Muddle and his wife Joan. Mr. Muddle who is a former chairman of Folkestone Football Club said he has used the pub for many years. “The transformation work is terrific and I hope Joan and Geoff do very well from it”, he said.

Oldest customer Mr. Bill Davies was the first to pull a pint in the refurbished pub. Mr. Davies, 83, has been a regular in the Red Cow since he moved to Folkestone in 1928.

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1983

Advertising Feature

Anyone walking into the Red Cow pub in Foord Road after a few months` absence could be forgiven for wondering if they were in the right place For what before Christmas was a basic spit `n` sawdust local has been transformed into an attractive and elegant hostelry set to compete with some of the smartest places in town. The original public and saloon bars have been knocked into one and a special eating area has been set aside. In fact the whole pub has been modernised and improved, but with the installation of false beams and the carefully selected decor, the atmosphere is very much one of bygone days.

Landlord and landlady Geoff and Joan Biggs are delighted as are their regulars and an ever increasing number of new customers. But for them the virtual overnight transformation of the Red Cow marks the end of a long, long wait. Fourteen years ago the couple, who have been in the licensed trade since 1938, ran the old Foresters Arms in Shellons Street, Folkestone. It was a thriving business, regularly packed and serving umpteen lunches every day. But their success was short-lived. A compulsory purchase order forced them to move and they took over the Red Cow with high hopes of improving it. They made repeated requests to the brewery but it was 13 years before they got the go-ahead for their new-look pub. “People have to pay a lot of money for drinks these days. It is only right that they get something a little bit special in return”, says Geoff.

Folkestone Herald 9 September 1983

Local News

A pub landlord has died after a lifetime in the licensed trade. Mr. Geoffrey Biggs, landlord at the Red Cow in Folkestone`s Foord Road, died in the early hours of last Thursday, apparently from a heart attack. His death at the age of 63 came as a shock to his wife Joan, son Stephen, daughter Vicky and many friends. He had been a publican in the town for nearly 20 years. Mr. Biggs had been landlord at the Red Cow for 15 years. Before taking over he was at the Foresters Arms in Shellons Street, Folkestone. He and his wife have wanted to improve the Red Cow since they first moved there and in June their dreams came true when modernisation work was completed. Well-known in the town, Mr. Biggs was heavily involved in the darts leagues. A funeral service takes place today at Hawkinge.

Folkestone Herald 24 January 1992

Local News

Publicans are prepared to lose their jobs and homes rather than sign new leases they say could double their rents. Half the publicans in Fover being offered these contracts and two thirds in Shepway are rebelling, say the local branches of the Licensed Victuallers` Association.

“It`s like signing a suicide pact, and I won`t do it”, says Rick Abbott, who runs the Cricketers in River. He added “I have a wife and three children and we would lose our home, but we would be ruined if I signed”.

Big breweries, with more than 2,000 pubs in the country, are selling pubs or offering 20-year leases because the Monopolies and Mergers Commission is restricting how many they can have.

Alf Bentley, landlord of the Red Lion in Charlton Green, Dover, said “This is as ill-conceived as the poll tax. What use is a 20-year lease to me when I am 60? The breweries are also driving out experienced landlords and replacing them with people who were probably bakers before”.

Leslie Carpenter, of Carpenter`s in The Stade, Folkestone, said “My own rent will only go up by a third, but I couldn`t even manage that. I am prepared tolose my job rather than accept. It`s hard enough to survive with the recession. We`ve just lost more customers through the Sealink redundancies”.

The L.V.A. says the increases would further damage pubs because landlords would have to put up their prices to try to survive. They say the cost of a pint is now pushing £2.

Only last week Barry Musk walked out of the pub where he had been a tenant for four years, the Red Cow, in Foord Road, Folkestone. He now manages a free house, the Imperial, in Black Bull Road. He said “Signing would have meant my rent going up from £12,000 a year to £20,000, which would have ruined me. I was lucky because I found another pub without that kind of expense”.

All four pubs are owned by Whitbread. A spokesman said the company was willing to negotiate with landlords if they could not afford new rents. “The LVA claims that rents will double, but I dispute that. Our own survey shows that overall rents have increased by just 45 percent”, he added. Whitbread says Government legislation has been put it and other brewers in a dilemma. The new Landlord and Tenant Act gives publicans security of tenure, yet the Monopolies Commission says brewers must get rid of pubs.

Folkestone Herald 1 May 1992

Local News

A bankruptcy order has been made against Barry and Victoria Musk, of Alder Road, Folkestone. The couple used to run and live at the Red Cow Inn, Foord Road, Folkestone. The petition was filed at Canterbury Crown Court by the Musks, and the Official Receiver has been appointed to safeguard their assets.

Folkestone Herald 22 May 1992

Local News

We would like to point out that despite a bankruptcy order being made against Barry and Victoria Musk, who used to run the Red Cow Inn, the pub itself has not closed. The inn, which is in Foord Road, Folkestone, has been taken over by Jim and Madeleine Tansey. We would like to apologise for any misunderstanding our story about the Red Cow in our May 1 edition may have caused.

Folkestone Herald 5 August 1993

Local News

A man who conned a salesman out of a £90 car, attempted to break into a pub, and then burgled a house in Folkestone has been jailed for 18 months.

Canterbury Crown Court heard that at the time of the burglary Sxcott Doherty was wanted on warrant for failing to appear before local Magistrates. Doherty, 25, from Glasgow, admitted obtaining the Vauxhall from Peter Kent by deception in March, 1991, attempted burglary at the Red Cow three months later and burglary at Jointon Road a year later.

Julian Woodbridge, prosecuting, said Doherty used the name Tagford when he obtained the car for £90 from Mr. Kent at Kent Car Breakers in Dover. He signed a cheque in the name of Tagford, the cheque having come from a cheque book stolen in an earlier burglary in Folkestone. In June Doherty was caught by an off-duty policeman, who spotted Doherty and another man by the Red Cow at Foord Road early in the morning. Doherty was then bailed to appear at Folkestone Magistrates` but failed to turn up. In August, 1992, he broke into a house in Jointon Road and stole property worth £1,185. He was traced because of his fingerprints, but was not arrested until January this year.

Cairns Nelson, defending, said his crimes stemmed from heroin addiction, but since serving a three month sentence in Scotland he had been drug free.

Folkestone Herald 14 September 1995

Local News

Liverpool soccer fan Steve Gill had a hair-raising ordeal after his side were beaten by Wimbledon. His head was shaved in front of a cheering crowd packing the Red Cow pub in Foord Road, Folkestone, on Saturday night.

Liverpudlian Steve, of Marshall Street, Folkestone, runs the Kent Reds Liverpool Travel Supporters Club. He was joined by three mates for the shaves. The brave four had a sponsored “grade one”, leaving a little on top, to raise hundreds of pounds for Parkfield Special School in Folkestone and the William Harvey Hospital Cancer Day Care Centre.

Steve, married with two children, was joined by Phil Walker, Shane England, and Tony Bennett, 23-year-old son of Red Cow landlord, Liverpudlian Louis Bennett. Hairdresser les Neill did the cuts before having his own hair cut close. And soo other Red Cow customers were getting theirs done while a bucket was sent round the pub for more money.

Steve said afterwards “I`ll be wearing a wig for a time!” Raffle prizes included a football signed by the Liverpool team.

Folkestone Herald 12 March 1998

Local News

Regulars at a Folkestone pub have raised enough money to buy seven vital communication devices for children with special needs. Customers and staff at the Red Cow in Foord Road, Folkestone, filled a collection bottle with £290, and the figure was matched by local firm Breda Transport. The cash will be used to buy a number of “BIGMacks” for pupils at the Foxwood School in Seabrook Road. BIGMacks are saucer-shaped devices which record messages and aid communication. Red Cow landlord, Louis Bennett, said “We try to do quite a bit for charity and we like to raise money for local causes. We are only too happy to help and I am really grateful to all our customers”.

Foxwood head-teacher Chris Soulby said “I can`t thank the people at the Red Cow enough. The children at the school will benefit greatly from this money, and they, too, will be very grateful”.

Folkestone Herald 12 August 1999

Local News

Veterans of the great Folkestone floods have had their annual celebration scuppered by licensing laws. Plans to hold the party in the garden of the Red Cow, Foord Road, were ruined after the pub was told it could not hold live music outdoors. Organisers refused to hold the bash indoors because it meant children who suffered through the floods three years ago would not be allowed in.

Now Louis Bennett, landlord of the pub for three years, said it would be business as usual on Sunday. He said “We feel this is very petty of the Council. We can`t afford a live music licence because we cannot pay £600 for just one day. This was popular with all the family. Now there will be no celebration. We cannot hold the event in the pub because we want children to be able to join in. We were told we would be allowed to hold a private party, but then people will not be able to come and go as they please”. The party was to include music and drinks for the adults who braved the floods, which devastated Foord Road in 1996. For the children there would have been face-painting and food and drinks in the garden.

In 1996 floods submerged ground floors, cars and roads in central Folkestone and the harbour after torrential rain.

Council Licensing Officer, John McEwan, said the pub could have up to two musicians in the pub to celebrate. Or they could hold a private party. The pub would have had to have applied for an outdoor public entertainments licence 28 days before the event. He added “I had a conversation with someone at the pub and explained the options open to them if they still wanted to hold the event. We have to operate within the rules”.

 

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