DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 12 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1742

Black Bull

Open 2020+

127 Canterbury Road

Foord Pigot's Directory 1840

Folkestone

01303 256903

https://www.hungryhorse.co.uk/pubs/kent/black-bull/

https://whatpub.com/black-bull

Original Black Bull

Above showing the original "Black Bull, circa 1870.

Black Bull 1920s

Above photo, circa 1920s, kindly sent by Paul Taylor.

Black Bull

Above photo, date unknown, kindly sent by Paul Taylor.

Black Bull 1933

Above photo, 1933.

Black Bull 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Black Bull

Picture taken by Jan Pedersen, 12 March 2012.

 

The "Black Bull" was once owned by the Earl of Radnor, and may have been built by him for the benefit of the farm labourers who worked the land on the outskirts of town. The pub was rebuilt in 1880-1, and is still a popular house on the Canterbury Road.

 

I have been informed by Jan Pedersen that the pub looks like it has unfortunately closed as of 9 March 2012.

 

This one seems to have been opened and closed several times during 2012, and I now believe it has closed yet again (February 2013) and local knowledge tells me that it will reopen after being renovated by the "Hungry Horse" food/pub chain. I expect they'll be getting their burgers from Tesco's.

 

Kentish Chronicle 2 March 1810.

Death: On Monday, Feb. 26, at Folkestone, Mrs. Standley, of the Black Bull public house, aged 65 years.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions. May be Stanley.

 

Kentish Gazette 6 March 1810.

Obituary.

Feb. 26, at Folkestone, aged 65, Mrs. Standley, of the Black Bull public house.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions. May be Stanley.

 

Kentish Chronicle 24 April 1812.

Died: April 19th, Mrs. Page, widow, of the "Black Bull," Folkestone, aged 66 years.

Note: Not mentioned in More Bastions.

 

Kentish Gazette 21 April 1812.

Obituary.

Died: April 19th, Mrs. Page, widow, of the Black Bull, Folkestone.

Note: Not mentioned in More Bastions.

 

Kentish Weekly Post or Canterbury Journal 4 April 1823.

DIED.

March 29, at the "Black Bull" public house, Folkestone, Mrs. Ann Birch, aged 43 years, wife of Mr. Richard Birch.

 

Kentish Mercury 26 September 1840.

On Saturday evening last four men, working on the railroad, ill-treated the landlord of the "Black Bull," near this town, and committed an outrage by breaking his furniture, and striking those who were at the house. Two were taken before Wm. Deedes Esq., the County Magistrate, and fined 3 11s., including damages and court fees. The others made their escape.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 October 1855.

Tuesday October 9th :- Present W. Major Esq., G. Kennicott Esq., and J. Kelcey Esq.

The Adjourned General Licencing Meeting was held this day, when the following licence was granted: Thomas Eves, Black Bull.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 December 1857.

Wednesday December 16th:- Before R. W. Boarer esq., and G. Kennicott esq.

Special Sessions for transferring licences.

The licence of the Black Bull was transferred from Charles Daniels to John Harrison.

 

Southeastern Gazette 22 December 1857.

Wednesday: Before R.W. Boarer and G. Kennicott Esqs.

The licence of the Black Bull was transferred from Charles Daniels to John Harrison.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 June 1859.

County Court.

Wednesday June 15th:- Before C. Harwood Esq., County Judge.

Harrison v Baker. – An action to recover 4 15s. 6d. Balance of an account. Mr. John Minter appeared for the plaintiff, who said he was an innkeeper residing at Folkestone. The defendant lived at Hythe. In October, 1857, a Mrs. Baker came to the plaintiff's house, and engaged for board and lodging. She paid the bill at the end of the first week, and then said, that if she went to her uncle (the defendant), at Hythe, he would engage to see him paid for the future. He went, and saw the uncle, who promised to pay a reasonable amount, say about 10s per week. Mrs. Baker remained with plaintiff from 18th October, 1857, to 14th February, 1858; she then left. The bill amounting to 9 15s. 6d. Was sent in, and the defendant paid 5 on account, leaving the balance unpaid.

John Harrison, sworn, said, I keep the Black Bull. In 1857 Mrs. Baker came to me for board and lodging, she paid me the first week and then referred me to her uncle at Hythe. I gave the bill to Mr. Baker (the defendant), at Hythe, who said if I came again in a few weeks he would pay me. On the 31st July, 1858, I received 5 on account from Mr. Baker. It was paid me at my residence, - the bill had been sent in three months before. When Baker paid me the 5 he promised to pay me the remainder in a month or six weeks. I have since applied several times for the balance, sometimes I went to Hythe, and sometimes wrote. The receipt I gave to defendant was not stamped, and he threatened to prosecute me. I consulted an attorney, and by his advice forwarded a stamped receipt.

By his Honour – I did not give the receipt to Mrs. Baker – no other person was present when the agreement was made, - she told me her uncle had money of hers. I went to Hythe to enquire if it was correct, and found it to be so.

Defendant, on being examined, said he might have had 40 in his hands belonging to Mrs. Baker. At the time the 5 was paid, he gave her 12 in all – he had never promised to pay the balance. When she came to him for the money, he told her he would pay the amount to plaintiff in her presence; he had never received a bill from the plaintiff, neither had he threatened to prosecute him for the unstamped receipt; in fact the receipt was not given to him, but to Mrs. Baker, and he had not received a stamped receipt.

The plaintiff was non-suited, but had permission to renew the summons at the Hythe court, and to procure Mrs. Baker as witness.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 19 June 1859. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

COUNTY COURT

Wednesday June 15th:- Before C. Harwood Esq., County Judge.

Harrison v Baker. – An action to recover 4 15s. 6d. Balance of an account. Mr. John Minter appeared for the plaintiff, who said he was an innkeeper residing at Folkestone. The defendant lived at Hythe. In October, 1857, a Mrs. Baker came to the plaintiff's house, and engaged for board and lodging. She paid the bill at the end of the first week, and then said, that if she went to her uncle (the defendant), at Hythe, he would engage to see him paid for the future. He went, and saw the uncle, who promised to pay a reasonable amount, say about 10s per week. Mrs. Baker remained with plaintiff from 18th October, 1857, to 14th February, 1858; she then left. The bill amounting to 9 15s. 6d. Was sent in, and the defendant paid 5 on account, leaving the balance unpaid.

John Harrison, sworn, said, I keep the "Black Bull." In 1857 Mrs. Baker came to me for board and lodging, she paid me the first week and then referred me to her uncle at Hythe. I gave the bill to Mr. Baker (the defendant), at Hythe, who said if I came again in a few weeks he would pay me. On the 31st July, 1858, I received 5 on account from Mr. Baker. It was paid me at my residence, - the bill had been sent in three months before. When Baker paid me the 5 he promised to pay me the remainder in a month or six weeks. I have since applied several times for the balance, sometimes I went to Hythe, and sometimes wrote. The receipt I gave to defendant was not stamped, and he threatened to prosecute me. I consulted an attorney, and by his advice forwarded a stamped receipt.

By his Honour – I did not give the receipt to Mrs. Baker – no other person was present when the agreement was made, - she told me her uncle had money of hers. I went to Hythe to enquire if it was correct, and found it to be so.

Defendant, on being examined, said he might have had 40 in his hands belonging to Mrs. Baker. At the time the 5 was paid, he gave her 12 in all – he had never promised to pay the balance. When she came to him for the money, he told her he would pay the amount to plaintiff in her presence; he had never received a bill from the plaintiff, neither had he threatened to prosecute him for the unstamped receipt; in fact the receipt was not given to him, but to Mrs. Baker, and he had not received a stamped receipt.

The plaintiff was non-suited, but had permission to renew the summons at the Hythe court, and to procure Mrs. Baker as witness.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 July 1861.

Coroner's Inquest.

On Sunday last, an inquest was holden at the Black Bull Inn, before S. Eastes Esq., coroner, on the body of a travelling man, named John Jones, who had destroyed himself that morning at Walton Farm. The jury, having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, which lay in a cart lodge at the above farm. The body was fully dressed and had, loosely tied around the neck, a red handkerchief, with which the shocking deed had been perpetrated.

The first witness examined was Amelia Jones, a young woman with a child in her arms, who deposed she was the wife of the deceased, whose body she identified as that of her husband. He was an umbrella mender, and was about 30 years of age. Witness had been married to him about 7 years, and had three children alive. Her husband had good health generally, until about nine days ago, when he complained of a pain in his head. Deceased was a very sober, steady man. He was obliged to go to the Elham Union, on account of his illness. He went there on Saturday last. Witness heard nothing of him until Friday the 19th, when she went to the union, and he discharged himself, and came part of the way to Folkestone with her. They separated on the road and witness gave him a shilling to pay his railway fare to Dover, as he expressed a wish to go into the union house there. Before they left the union, deceased said he was not happy there, and if he stayed there he should make off with himself. When they parted, witness came to one of Mr. Jeffery's lodges, and when she got there, to her surprise, she found her husband, who, it appeared, had not gone to Dover. He returned witness the shilling, and after a while they lay down together with the children to sleep. Early in the morning a policeman came into the lodge and woke witness, and asked where her husband was. She had not then missed him. She knew of nothing to trouble him, except the illness, and did not know if any of his relatives had ever destroyed themselves.

Richard Sharp, a police constable, deposed to finding the body hanging by the neck to a ladder, that morning about 4 o'clock. The body was quite cold and stiff. Had seen him on the previous night about 10 o'clock, lying in the lodge with his wife and children. On finding the body, witness went and woke the woman in the lodge, and she knew nothing about her husband having left her during the night.

This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner briefly summed up, and the jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that the deceased destroyed himself whilst in a state of temporary insanity.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 July 1865.

Quarter Sessions.

Tuesday July 4th:- Before J.J. Lonsdale.

Elizabeth Field was placed in the dock charged with stealing one silver watch from the person of Edward Chittenden, of Folkestone, on the 30th June last, to which she pleaded Not Guilty.

Edward Chittenden, sworn, deposed that he was a waggoner in the emply of Mr. H. Jeffery, of Coombe. Recollected last Friday night he was at the Black Bull Fair between 10 and 11 o'clock. He missed his watch, and old fashioned double-cased silver one. Had it a few minutes before, as he took it out of his fob to see what time it was, but could not, because it was dark. Would swear he put it back safe in his pocket. He then went into the tap room – was quite sober. Directly he got into the room, prisoner began pulling him about – there were several other persons there. She asked him to pay her. Told her to go away – did not want to do anything with her. Witness then went away to the skittle alley, prisoner following him. Prisoner then ran away, and prisoner, feeling for his watch, found it was gone. Had not seen him since. He then went for a constable, and the going into the tap room again half an hour after, saw prisoner there. Pointed her out to the constable as the woman who had stolen his watch. Prisoner said she had never seen witness before, nor had she got his watch.

P.C. Grove, sworn, said: I recollect last Friday night. Saw prisoner in the tap room of the Black Bull. In consequence of information received from prosecutor I took her into custody and charged her with stealing his watch. She said she had never seen the man or the watch before; she was selling nuts and oranges. On going down Foord Lane with prisoner in custody, when about 60 yards from the house, I was pushed into the hedge by about 7 or 8 roughs and the prisoner was rescued before I could recover myself. Had not observed them following me; it was very dark and rainy. Had not seen prisoner before; saw her again on Saturday evening at the Radnor Inn, and took her in custody to the Station. Had no doubt prisoner was the same woman. I charged her again with stealing the watch, and she made no reply. I was in company with P.C. Grover. Prosecutor was not with us then. Recognised her by her features, and a white jacket she had on. The watch has not since been found.

The jury retired, and in a few minutes returned into court a few minutes later with a verdict of Guilty.

The jury were then re-sword, and the same prisoner was charged with stealing a leather purse containing 1 8s 6d from the person of Thomas Gilbert, on the 30th June last, at Folkestone. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Thomas Gilbert, sworn, said: I am a labourer. Recollect last Friday night – was at the Black Bull Fair. I had a leather purse with about 30s in my left hand trousers pocket. Had it out just before I missed it, to pay for some beer I and a few friends were having. We were outside the house. I was quite sober. Was waiting to get into the house to go to bed – I was lodging there. Prisoner came up and hadled me about. I told her to keep off. I had my hand on my purse then, but missed it directly after she had slipped off. Will swear prisoner is the same woman. I gave information to P.C. Grover. Next saw her in the tap room, but she had thrown off her bonnet and shawl. About ten minutes after she put them on again, and I immediately recognised her. P.C. Grover then took her into custody.

P.C. Grover, sworn, said that: Prosecutor came to me last Friday night about 10.30 and said “I've lost a purse and some money”. He could not tell who had robbed him. I said “Then I can't render you any assistance”. About half an hour after, I heard of the watch robbery, and apprehended prisoner for that. Did not see Gilbert in the tap room then. Saw him outside afterwards. He then said “That is the woman that robbed me”. She had on a white jacket with large sleeves. Saw her bonnet and shawl afterwards at the station house. Did not search her, as we are not allowed to search a female.

The jury returned a verdict of Guilty, and prisoner was sentenced to 6 months lard labour in each case, the second 6 months at the termination of the first.

 

Folkestone Observer 8 July 1865.

Monday July 3rd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., Captain Leith R.V. and J. Tolputt Esq.

Elizabeth Field, a woman scantily clad, was charged with having stolen one silver watch, value 30s., the property of Edward Chittenden, on June 30th.

Edward Chittenden, a waggoner in the employ of Mr. Jeffery, of Coolinge, said on Friday night last he was at Folkestone fair, and was in the Black Bull skittle alley between ten and eleven o'clock. While there the prisoner went to him and began to pull him about, and he told her to go away. She went away, but returned again in less than two minutes and began to pull him about again, and then went away again. Directly she had gone he missed his watch, and went and told police constable Groves about it. They looked for the woman and found her in the tap room of the Black Bull public house. As he was going into the tap room of the public house, just before he went into the skittle alley, he knew that his watch was safe, for he pulled it out of his pocket to see what the time was. It was an old-fashioned silver case watch, and it's value was 30s.

Police constable Groves (7) said he was on duty outside the Black Bull public house about eleven o'clock on Friday night when the prosecutor came to him and said he had been robbed of his watch, and that he could point out the woman who had taken it. He went with prosecutor into the tap room of the Black Bull public house, where prosecutor pointed out the prisoner to him, and he took her into custody. In answer to the charge prisoner said she had neither seen the watch nor the man, but was inside the tap room selling nuts and oranges. Prosecutor said he was sure the prisoner was the woman who robbed him. As he was taking her to the police station, and had proceeded about 30 rods from the Black Bull, six or eight men rushed at him, knocked him into the hedge, and the prisoner escaped. From information received he went to the Radnor Arms about a quarter past six on Saturday evening, found the prisoner there, and took her into custody.

The prisoner was further charged with stealing a purse containing about 30s. from the person of Thomas Gilbert, at the same place, on the same night.

Thomas Gilbert said he lodged at the Black Bull public house and was robbed of about 30s. on Friday night. He saw the prisoner a little before ten o'clock, when she behaved as though she knew him intimately. She put her hand into his pocket, and directly after he missed his money. It was in a purse which contained two half sovereigns, and about 10s. worth of silver. He felt it in his pocket, with his hand on it at the time the prisoner was talking to him. The prisoner ran into the house, and hastily threw off her shawl and bonnet, so that he had some difficulty in recognising her, but he had no doubt she was the same woman. He gave information to the police of his loss.

P.C. Groves said he was on duty about half past ten o'clock on Tuesday night, outside the Black Bull, when the prosecutor came up to him and said he had lost his purse and money. He apprehended the prisoner about 11-30 in the tap room of the Black Bull, and at the station house she was charged with stealing the money, but she made no reply.

Prisoner was committed to take her trial at the Quarter Sessions.

Quarter Sessions.

Tuesday July 4th:- Before J.J. Lonsdale.

Elizabeth Field was indicted for stealing one silver watch from the person of Edward Chittenden at Folkestone fair on Friday 30th ult.

Edward Chittenden, a waggoner in the employ of Mr. Jeffery of Coolinge, gave the same evidence as before the magistrates on Monday. In answer to the Recorder the prosecutor said he was sober when he went into the Black Bull public house. The woman first pulled him about in the tap room and then followed him into the skittle alley and did so again, and afterwards ran away. He then thought about his watch, and on feeling for it, found it was gone. The skittle alley was quite dark, and he went there to look about (laughter), but did not encourage the woman to follow him in. He gave information to police constable Groves immediately after he discovered his loss, and when they found the woman in the tap room, she said she had never seen him before. His watch was fastened round his neck by a guard of string and he believed it had been cut. It had never been dropped off the string.

Police constable Groves (7) repeated the evidence given before the magistrates. With respect to the attack in Foord Lane he said he heard no-one following him after he had taken the prisoner into custody, and did not notice that they were following him. They came from behind him suddenly and pushed him off his legs into the hedge, and before he could recover himself the men and the prisoner had gone away. He was sure the prisoner was the same person. When he took her into custody at the Black Bull tap room there was but one candle burning in the room, and the woman was sitting right away from it. When he found her at the Radnor public house, constable Groves pointed her out, and he also recognised her by her dress and features – principally by the white jacket which she wore. He did not know that the watch had been found.

Prisoner said she was quite innocent of the charge, and that she had had a sprained ankle for two months and could not run. She said she came from Canterbury and had been in Folkestone for nine weeks, during which time she had been for one fortnight in Elham Union with her sprained ankle.

The Recorder summed up and the jury, after retiring for a short time, found the prisoner guilty.

The Recorder reserved the sentence.

Prisoner was the further charged with having stolen from the person of Thomas Gilbert a purse containing 1 8s. 6d. on Friday the 30th ult.

Thomas Gilbert said he was a labourer, and lodged at the Black Bull public house. He recollected Friday night, when he had about 30s. in a purse in his left hand pocket. He pulled out his purse to pay for some beer half an hour before he lost it. At that time he was just outside the door of the Black Bull public house. The prisoner was standing near. He was sober, and had only a share in a pot of beer, and another half pint during the day. After paying for the beer he put his purse back into his pocket. It contained three or four half crowns, a two shilling piece, a shilling, and sixpence. He was waiting to get into the house, in the passage of which was a crowd of people, when a woman came up to him and began to pull him about. He kept his hand on his purse in his pocket for some time, till he supposed he got a little off his guard and took it out. Directly after the woman slipped away and he missed his purse. This was about three rods from the public house and it was rather dark, but he could see the prisoner's features by the lights, and he was sure the prisoner was the same woman. He went and told policeman Groves and they looked for the prisoner. In about ten minutes after they saw her sitting without her bonnet and shawl in the tap room of the Black Bull, and he had some difficulty recognising her as she had taken off her bonnet and shawl, but he was sure it was the same person, for he afterwards saw her with the bonnet and shawl on. The purse and money had not been found since.

Police Constable Groves said he apprehended the prisoner. Before he did so, prosecutor came to him and gave him information that he had lost his purse and about 30s. Asked prisoner whether he knew who took the purse, and prosecutor said he did not. Witness told him he could not render him any assistance. He afterwards apprehended the prisoner in the Black Bull tap room on the previous charge, when the prosecutor recognised her as the woman who had robbed him.

The jury, after consulting for a short time, found the prisoner Guilty.

The Recorder sentenced the prisoner for the first offence to six calendar months, with hard labour, and for the second offence six calendar months imprisonment with hard labour, in Dover gaol, to commence on the expiration of the first.

 

Folkestone Observer 26 August 1865.

It was licensing day on Tuesday, when the magistrates suspended the license for the Black Bull, Canterbury Road, for holding a fair in defiance of the Corporation.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 October 1866.

Coroner's Inquest.

An inquest was held on Thursday afternoon at the Black Bull Inn, before J. Minter Esq., borough coroner, and a respectable jury, on the body of a shoemaker of Rhodes Minnis, named John Hayward, who died on the 23rd instant by injuries received by an accident on the 12th instant. The following evidence was adduced:

James Quested Petts said: I am a builder at Folkestone. I identify the body of deceased as being that of John Hatward, of Rhodes Minnis, shoemaker. On October 12th I was beside the “Old Gun”, Shellons Lane, Folkestone, and saw deceased sitting in a van with another man, whose name I think was Tumber. There was a horse in the van, which was stationary. Deceased was in the act of turning the horse around, and the van was tipped over. The deceased fell between the shaft and the fore wheel, and the fore wheel gathered in and run over him. I caught hold of the wagon and turned it up, and thus prevented the hind wheel going over him. His friends picked him up and took him into the Gun beershop.

Ellen Mannering said: I am the wife of Richard Mannering of Folkestone. On the 12th of October, between 4 and 5 in the afternoon, I was close to the Gun beerhouse in Shellons Lane, Folkestone. I saw deceased on a wagon drawn by one horse. There was another man with him. The deceased was in the act of turning his horse round, when the horse shied and turned short, by which the wagon was turned over and I saw my father fall out. I was so frightened that I did not see the wheel of the wagon go over him. I and others assisted in getting the deceased into the Gun beerhouse.

William Bateman said: I am a surgeon practicing at Folkestone. On the 12th instant, about five o'clock in the evening, I was sent for to the deceased and found him in the Gun beershop. He was lying on the bench in a cold and faint condition, almost in a state of collapse. In examining him I found four ribs broken on the right side, several bruises on the head and body, but no other serious injury. When a little recovered I had him removed in a fly to his daughter's house, where I attended him until his death, which took place on the 23rd instant. The cause of death was congestion of the lungs, the result of the injuries he received.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Observer 27 October 1866.

Coroner's Inquest.

An inquest was held on Thursday at the Black Bull inn, before J. Minter Esq., coroner, on the body of Mr. James Hayward, whose death occurred in the manner detailed in the evidence. Mr. Hales was foreman.

James Quested Petts, builder, identified the body of deceased as being that of John Hayward, Rhodes Minnis, shoemaker. On the 21st October deceased was sitting in his van with another man, whose name he thought was Tumber, opposite the Old Gun, Shellons Lane, Folkestone. A horse was in the van, and the van was stationary. He was in the act of turning his horse around, and the van tipped over. The deceased fell between the shaft and the fore-wheel, and the fore-wheel gathered in and ran over him. Witness got hold of the wagon and threw it up, and thus prevented the hind wheels from going over him. His friends picked him up and took him into the Gun beershop.

Ellen Mannering, wife of Richard Mannering, Folkestone, labourer, and daughter of deceased, was close to the Gun beerhouse, in Shellons Lane, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon on the 21st of October. Saw deceased there in a wagon drawn by one horse. There was another man with him. The deceased was in the act of turning his horse round, when the horse shied and turned short, by which the wagon was turned over and she saw her father fall out, but she was so frightened that she did not see the wheels of the wagon go over him. She and others assisted in getting the deceased into the Gun beerhouse.

William Bateman, surgeon, said: I was sent for to the deceased about five o'clock in the evening of the 21st of October, and found him in the Gun beerhouse, Shellons Lane. He was lying on the bench in a fainting condition, almost in a state of collapse. On examining him I found four ribs broken on the right side. There was a bruising about the head and body but no other serious injury. The same day, when he was a little recovered, I had him removed in a fly to his daughter's house, where I attended him until his death, which took place on Tuesday. Recovering from the first shock, he went on well for three days, and then congestion of the lungs came on, no doubt caused by the injury he had received, and from that he died.

The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 July 1867.

Monday July 1st: Before the Mayor, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

George Yates and John Wilson, travellers, were brought up, charged with stealing a white shirt, a plaid scarf, and a black waistcoat, value 5s., the property of Frederick Squire, a musician, on the 28th.

Prosecutor deposed that he slept at the Black Bull Inn on Friday night, and that on Saturday morning he missed a travelling bag containing three shirts, ten collars, twelve pocket handkerchiefs, six pairs cotton socks, two flannel shirts, a black vest, a plaid scarf, two music scores, hat brush, clothes brush, comb and hard brush, two parts of a cornet, and a piece of music. He went to the Ship Inn, Radnor Street, and found the prisoners there. Accompanied by a man named Burgess he went into a room, and under a bed occupied by the prisoners he found a bundle containing three shirts, a vest, pair of trousers, and two scarves; one shirt, the vest, and one scarf were his property. On charging the prisoners with stealing them, Yates said “It's no use making a bother and charging innocent people about your things. I took 'em. I did not know they were a traveller's, or I would not have done it”. The other prisoner was drunk. He found a policeman and gave them into custody. The value of the articles was 2 10s.

William Borough Darley, salesman for “Cheap Jack”, saw the prisoners and a tall man near the Black Bull on Friday evening. The tall man had a black leather bag and a bundle with him.

Louisa Bates, wife of the landlord of the Ship Inn, said prisoners slept at the house on Friday night. Three persons slept in one bed. There was another in the room, which was also occupied, and three other persons had to pass through the room.

James Penny, exhibitor of Purchase's waxwork, heard prosecutor charge prisoners with the robbery, and heard Yates say “I am the one that nailed them”.

After a brief deliberation Wilson was discharged, and Yates sent to Petworth for six weeks' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Observer 6 July 1867.

Monday, July 1st: Before The Mayor, J. Kelcey, and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

George Yates and John Wilson were charged with felony.

Frederick Squire, musician, said he occupied a bedroom at the Black Bull, and on Friday evening at 6 o'clock his bag was on the drawers in his room. On Saturday morning at 8 o'clock, he missed it from it's place. It contained three new linen shirts, one worn shirt, ten linen collars, twelve white pocket handkerchiefs, six small ones marked with the initial “N”, and six large ones not marked, six pair white cotton socks, two under flannels, one black waistcoat, one plaid winter scarf, two music scores, hat brush, clothes brush, comb and hair brush, two pieces of a cornet, and a pianoforte copy. He immediately went downstairs and made his loss known. Knew prisoners by sight. They were not lodging in the house. Came into the town, and found the prisoners in the Ship Inn, Radnor Street. One was sitting on one sode of the kitchen, and one on the other. Charged them with breaking into his bedroom and stealing the bag. The bedroom door was not locked, but fastened. Both denied it in foul language. Went upstairs with Mr. Purchase, and under the bed that he said they had occupied – between the mattress and the battens – found the bundle of articles produced, containing three shirts (only one of them belonging to witness), a black waistcoat, and a scarf, also belonging to him, and which were in the bag he had missed. Went for a policeman, and took him back with him and gave the prisoners into custody. After charging the prisoners, Yates said “It is of no use you making a bother and charging the whole of us. You have lost your things. They are gone. I took your things. I did not know they were a traveller's, or I would not have taken them”. The other man was drunk.

William Burrough Barber said he was a salesman for Mr. Levi, “Cheap Jack”, and he knew both prisoners by sight. About 8 o'clock on Friday evening, he was in the Black Bull field, about five yards from the inn, and saw prisoners and another man standing near the wagon from which he was selling. The other man, a tall man, had a black bag in his hand. Did not see where they went.

Louisa Bates, wife of George Aquilla Bates, landlord of the Ship Inn, said she knew the prisoners – Yates lodging at her house on Thursday and Friday nights, and Wilson on Friday night. The prisoners and another man occupied one bed together. They were in and out all day. Did not notice either of them bring anything into the house. They went to bed between eleven and twelve. Did not notice whether they took anything upstairs.

Cross-examined: There are two beds in the room, and access is had through that room to another bedroom, in which three persons also slept on Friday night.

James Penny, a traveller, went to the Ship Inn on Saturday morning with prosecutor, and charged prisoners with stealing his bag, with music and different things in it. They said they knew nothing about it. Afterwards, when some of the things were found, Yates said “I am the man that nailed them, and no-one else had anything to do with them”.

P.C. Smith (6) went with P.C. Hills and prosecutor to the Ship on Saturday morning, and prosecutor gave the prisoners into custody on a charge of stealing a bag from his bedroom at the Black Bull. On the way to the station, the prisoner Yates said he thought this job was well done with.

The Bench then discharged Wilson from custody, and he hastily left the court, but Superintendent Martin stepped after him, and gave order for him to be taken below.

Prisoner Yates elected to be tried by magistrates, and pleaded guilty to the things being found in the room in which he slept, but he was not guilty of stealing them. He slept in the house where a great many were stopping. Four slept in the room he slept in, and four in the room to which access was obtained by passing through his room. Prosecutor said that if the things were found nothing would have come of it, and that made him say to the policeman that he thought the case was done with. He did not say that he had nailed the things.

Prosecutor denied having said nothing would be done if the things were found.

The Mayor said “George Yates, the Bench sentence you to six weeks' imprisonment with hard labour”.

Prisoner: My name is Hardman, not Yates.

The Mayor: You gave it wrong. You gave it first as Gates, then as Yates.

John Wilson was again placed in the dock.

James Penny, traveller, lodging at the Bull, said on Friday night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, he missed from his bedroom a bundle, containing a pair of trousers, two shirts, worsted socks, two linen collars, scarf, and pocket handkerchief. The bundle was safe between eight and nine of Friday morning. Told the landlord on Friday night of his loss, and he suggested that some of his companions had been having a lark with them and put them somewhere else. When Mr. Squire came down on Saturday morning and mentioned his loss, then he himself also thought his things had been stolen. Went with quire and Burrough Barber to the Ship Inn, and Barber, sitting down, said “Those persons over there had your things”. He referred to Yates, and the third man not there, who were sitting on one side. The third man got up, and lifting the poker swore he would knock Barber's head off. Wilson was sitting on the other side, very drunk. Squire brought downstairs a bundle in which were some things that had been stolen from him, and the two shirts he had missed. Witness said to those in the room he wanted also his plaid trousers, two collars, and scarf. Yates said to prisoner Wilson “You know you have the trousers in your basket”. Prisoner went to the basket, which was standing on the settle, and said “They are not here now. Somebody has taken them away”. Shortly after that, someone he did not know brought in the things he had asked for, and also Mr. Squire's scarf. That was while witness was in the kitchen, and Squire had gone for a policeman.

This being all the evidence, the prisoner was discharged.

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald. 13 July 1867. Price 1d.

Folkestone.

The Fair held on private grounds near the “Black Bull Inn,” Canterbury Road, which commenced on Friday week, the day of the month on which Folkestone fair began, has been in full swing daring the week, and indeed is considered the annual fair of the place. There were, of coarse, the usual number of stalls, small shows, and not to offend, an exhibition of wax-works, with the indispensable wooden riding school. The place was most patronised in the evening, after the lower classes had finished their day's toil, though it is scarcely necessary to chronicle the indifference of the greater number of the respectable portion of the community, to such a diversion.

 

Folkestone Observer 24 August 1867.

Wednesday, August 21st: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

Licensing Day.

This being the day for granting certificates of publicans for renewal of licenses, or for new licenses, there was a large attendance of the “victualling” craft. In the case of the Black Bull a promise was exacted not to allow the fair to be held in a field behind the house, as in past years, but the promise was refused, and the certificate therefore withheld.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 May 1868.

Tuesday May 26th: Before R.W. Boarer and A.M. Leith Esqs.

John Tutt, a labourer in the employ of Mr. Sladden, contractor, was brought up in custody and charged with stealing a fowl, the property of Edwin Burbidge.

Edwin Burbidge, Bath chairman, residing in Rendezvous Street, said: I have a little bit of garden and shed under the Viaduct, where I keep fowls. I have missed several – one a half-breed Spanish hen – between Good Friday and Easter Monday, which I next saw this morning, about a quarter to five o'clock, at the police station. I can swear to the fowl because there is a hole punched in it's gills and because of it's general appearance. It's value is 2s. 6d.

Cross-examined: I don't allow my fowls to run on other people's ground. I did lose a fowl on the 23rd May (last Saturday), and I asked you if you saw it go through a hole in your stable.

P.C. Charles Smith said, from information received, he went to prisoner's house, No. 13, Darlington, about 4 o'clock this morning and found the fowl produced (which prosecutor identified as his) in prisoner's hen house. There were five others there. I told prisoner it was stolen property and I should take him to the station, and he made no reply.

Cross-examined: You did not attempt to conceal anything.

Prisoner, having been cautioned, elected to be tried by the magistrates, and pleaded not guilty. He said he had four fowls similar to the one produced. He bought them from Robert Fisher at the Black Bull. He had no witness to call: had had no chance of sending for anyone.

Adjourned for an hour to allow prisoner to get any witnesses he pleased.

Robert Fisher attended at the adjournment and deposed to selling prisoner four fowls similar to the one produced, but he could not swear to that fowl.

Committed for one month hard labour.

Mr. Sladden came into court just as the case was closed, and stated that he had every confidence in prisoner's honesty, and offered to pay any fine if the imprisonment could be remitted, but this was out of the power of the bench.

 

Folkestone Observer 30 May 1868.

Tuesday, May 26th: Before Captain Leith and R.W. Boarer Esq.

John Tutt, labourer, was charged with stealing a half bred Spanish fowl, the property of Edwin Burbridge.

Edwin Burbridge deposed that he was the proprietor of several Bath chairs, which he let for hire. He rented a shed under the viaduct, where he kept ducks, fowls, pigs, &c. He also had a piece of garden ground there. He missed a fowl on Easter Sunday. It was a half-bred Spanish hen. He had not seen it from Easter until he saw it at the police station that morning. He had no hesitation in saying that the fowl produced was his property, as it had his private mark on it – a hole through the right gill. The value of the fowl was about 2s. 6d. Anyone passing along the road could have access to his premises under the viaduct.

By the prisoner: Did lose a fowl on the 23rd of May; there was a hole from prosecutor's premises to the stable where the prisoner works. The stable is in the occupation of Mr. Slade.

Police constable C. Smith said from information he received he went to the prisoner's house at No. 13, Darlington. It was 4 o'clock in the morning. Saw the prisoner there and asked him if he had anything in his yard or house that did not belong to him. He said “No”. Witness then searched the premises and found the hen produced in the prisoner's hen house, at the back of his own house. There were five more fowls in the hen house. The fowl produced answered to the description given by the plaintiff. Told the prisoner that the fowl was stolen property, and he must take him into custody. Brought prisoner to the police station and charged him with stealing the fowl. He made no answer. Witness was present when the prosecutor identified the fowl as his own property.

By the prisoner: Did ask him if he had anything that did not belong to him. He did not attempt to conceal anything.

Prisoner said he was not guilty of stealing the fowl. He bought four from Mr. Fisher at the Black Bull about two years ago. Prosecutor had never laid his hand on the bird until that morning. He had no witnesses, but if the case was adjourned he could produce the man he bought the fowls of.

After patiently hearing the case, the magistrates adjourned it for one hour in order to give the prisoner an opportunity to produce a witness in his favour.

At one o'clock the magistrates again assembled, when Mr. G. Fisher was sworn and said that he had sold the prisoner fowls about two years ago, and they were half-bred Spanish, but could not swear the one produced was one of them, as those he sold to the prisoner were only chicks at the time. He sold them for 9d. each. The breed was from a Dorking cock and a black Spanish hen. The fowl produced was like the breed he had, but he would not swear it was the one that the prisoner bought of him 2 years ago.

The Bench said they had the power to send the prisoner for three months imprisonment, but considering that it was the first offence they would sentence him to one month's imprisonment with hard labour to Petworth gaol.

Mr. Slade, the prisoner's employer, here stepped forward and said that a more honest man than the prisoner could not exist. He believed him to be quite innocent of stealing the fowl, and if the Magistrates could take a fine he should be most happy to pay it at any amount.

Captain Leith very kindly explained to Mr. Slade that the Bench had no other alternative with the evidence before them, but to commit the prisoner to gaol. At the same time he was very sorry for his position, and also sorry that a fine could not be taken; the sentence of the Bench had been passed, and it could not be altered.

 

Folkestone Observer 27 June 1868.

Monday, June 22nd: Before R.W. Boarer Esq.

William Baker, labourer, was charged with being drunk and riotous in the Canterbury Road, also with using bad language, on the 21st inst.

Prisoner pleaded guilty, alleging as an excuse that he had been ill-used.

P.C. Hills deposed to finding the prisoner about a quarter before two o'clock on Sunday morning, lying in front of the Black Bull public house. He was very drunk, and made use of the most disgusting language, in consequence of which he took him into custody.

Superintendent Martin, in answer to the magistrate, said prisoner had been there more than once for similar offences.

Mr. Boarer, however, as prisoner appeared to have been knocked about, and in consideration of his having been locked up two nights, gave him one more chance and discharged him.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869.

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Spirit License (Renewal)

Robert Fisher applied for a license for the Black Bull. Mr. Martin said several of the neighbours complained about the applicant holding the fair. He promised it should be done away with last year, yet he persisted in holding it.

The Magistrates said the town had been at considerable expense and trouble in doing away with the fair, and if the Corporation had opposed the license on those grounds they would not have granted it. License granted on promising not to hold the fair again.

 

Folkestone Express 1 July 1871.

Sudden Death.

On Wednesday evening last a man fell down dead at the Black Bull Inn, Canterbury Road. He proved to be a gardener employed at the Pavilion Gardens named Clement Gosby. The deceased, a single man, was only 32 years of age. The cause of death was disease of the heart.

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 July 1871.

Local News.

A man named Clement Gosby died suddenly while drinking at the Black Bull on Wednesday evening. The cause of death was certified by the doctor as disease of the heart.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 October 1872.

Saturday, October 12th: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, and T. Caister Esq.

Mr. Fisher, landlord of the Black Bull, applied for an extension of hours for the following Monday, in consequence of the Michaelmas holiday coming off.

The Superintendent of police said it had been for years the custom of farm labourers to assemble at this house at Michaelmas, and enjoy themselves in dancing and singing. He had no complaint to make against the house, which had always been conducted in an orderly manner.

The Magistrates granted an extension of time until one o'clock on Tuesday morning.

 

Folkestone Express 19 October 1872.

Saturday, October 12th: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny and T. Caister Esq.

An application by Mr. Fisher, Black Bull Inn, Canterbury Road, for an extension of hours on Monday last, on the occasion of the farm servants' Michaelmas holidays was granted, the time of closing being extended to one in the morning. Mr. Martin, Superintendent of Police, gave the house a good character.

 

Folkestone Express 30 March 1878.

Inquest.

A sad occurrence took place at Foord on Saturday night. It appears a man named John Epps, a labourer in the employ of Mr. Wilson, left the Castle Inn, Foord, about eight o'clock in the evening to go to his house in Bridge Street. He was intoxicated at the time. Instead of taking the roadway, which is somewhat further, he attempted to cross some fields and garden ground, through which there is no path, and when about half way came to a pond. The appearance of the vegetation would seem to suggest that he fell or laid down, and on getting up again staggered into the pond. He was not discovered until the next morning (Sunday), when he had been dead several hours. An inquest was held at the Black Bull on Monday afternoon before J. Minter Esq., the borough Coroner, when the following evidence was given:

Francis Perry Mascall, a gardener, living at No. 1, Queen Street, identified the body. He said: On Sunday morning, about nine o'clock, I found the deceased in a pond in my field, which is near here. I was going round the pond and saw something strange. On going closer, I saw it was a body. I called to Mr. Goodchild, and told him there was a man or a woman in the pond. The body was laying on it's side, only one ear and part of a cap being out of the water, which was, I should think, about four feet deep, perhaps hardly so much. A Mr. Page and Mr. Goodchild came and stood by the pond, and I went for a policemen. On Saturday evening I believe I met the deceased about eight o'clock, coming into the garden. He passed me, but was not on my premises altogether, so I said nothing to him. It appeared to me that he was going up towards Mr. Page's gate, but he did not turn in. Near the pond I saw some strange footsteps, and some cabbage plants were broken, as if he had laid down. It seemed to me as if he had been trying to get to the other side of the pond, and that he was making a short cut to his home. He did not appear to me to be sober.

William Page, a bricklayer living at Foord, said: I knew the deceased. On Saturday night at eight o'clock I saw him in at Fields', the Castle Inn. He was sitting there when I went in. He asked me if I had any straw to sell. I said yes, but I could not get it then, as it was too late, but that he could have a bundle in the morning if he wanted it. He said “All right”. He did not appear to be much the worse for drink. I don't think he was sober. He went out, but did not say where he was going. My house adjoins Mascall's garden. I saw the footmarks, and am of the same opinion as Mascall. I had never seen the deceased in my garden before. He was not in the habit of going home that way. There were only the footmarks of one person at the spot, and no appearance of a struggle. There was a place where he had fallen down.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said he was sent for between half past ten and eleven on Sunday morning. He saw the deceased, and on examining him found he had been dead some hours. There were no marks of violence about the body. Death was in his opinion caused by drowning.

P.C. Keeler said he assisted to take the body of deceased out of the water. On searching him he found two pounds in gold, eleven shillings in silver, and a farthing in bronze.

Joseph Coles, a mason living at Foord, said he saw deceased at the Castle Inn about eight o'clock on Saturday evening. Deceased left about eight o'clock. He was drunk when he left.

There was no further evidence to show how deceased came in the pond, and the jury returned a verdict of “Found Drowned”.

The deceased man leaves a widow, but no children.

 

Folkestone Express 1 November 1879.

Saturday, 25th October: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister, Hoad, and Sherwood, Col. De Crespigny, General Cannon, Captain Carter, W.J. Jeffreason, J. Clark, and J. Fitness Esqs.

George Petts was summoned for refusing to quit the Black Bull Inn on the 18th October.

George Finn, the landlord, said defendant went to his house on Saturday the 18th between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. He called for a pot of beer. He was not sober, and insulted everyone who entered the bar. Witness requested him to leave, and defendant pulled off his clothes, and making use of foul language, wanted to fight.

He was fined 5s. and 9s. costs, or seven days.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 May 1881.

Auction Advertisement.

Mr. John Banks is instructed to sell by auction, at the West Cliff Hotel, Folkestone, on Wednesday, May 25th, 1881, at three of the clock in the afternoon, all that unfinished, newly-built leasehold, fully licensed HOTEL, known as the Black Bull, situate and abutting to the Canterbury Road, Folkestone, and covering the large area with the surrounding ground of about 30,000 superficial feet.

Containing in the Basement a Dry Cellar, for the storing and preservation of Stock Ale and Beer, 23 feet square, Wine and Spirit Cellars, 25 ft. by 12 ft. 10 in.

Ground Floor: Public and Private Bars, Bar Parlour, and Taproom, Coffee and Smoking Rooms, Kitchen, Scullery, Larder, Entrance Hall, and W.C.

First Floor: Public Room, 21 feet square, Bagatelle Room, Four large airy Bedrooms, Landing, and W.C.

Second Floor: Eight well-proportioned and airy Bedrooms, Landing, and W.C.

Commanding an uninterrupted view of the hills and valley for about ten miles. Within five minutes' walk of the Junction Station, South Eastern Railway.

A lease will be granted by the Earl of Radnor to the purchaser, for a term of 99 years from the 29th Sept. 1880, at the annual Ground Rent of 30 for the first year, and 60 for the remainder of the term. A draft of the lease and of the plan may be seen at the office of the vendor's solicitor, and will be produced at the time of sale.

The vendor reserves to himself the right at any time before the completion of the sale to take down and remove the present Public House and Buildings and dispose of them.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 May 1881.

On Wednesday afternoon last Mr. John Banks sold by auction at the West Cliff Hotel, the partly finished building adjoining the old established inn, the Black Bull, in Canterbury Road, to supersede which the new house has been built. The Ground Rent for the first year is to be 30, and thereafter 60 per annum. The property was sold for 1,125, and which comprises an area of 30,000 superficial feet.

 

Folkestone Express 28 May 1881.

Local News.

On Wednesday afternoon Mr. John Banks sold by auction, at the West Cliff Hotel, the partly finished building adjoining the old-established inn, the Black Bull, in Canterbury Road, to supersede which the new house has been built. The ground rent for the first year is to be 30, and thereafter 60 per annum. The auctioneer stated that the value of the materials and work in the building was about 1,600. The property, which comprises an area of 30,000 superficial feet, was sold for 1,125.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Day.

The Annual Licensing Day was on Wednesday last, the Magistrates on the Bench being The Mayor, A.M. Watkin, F. Boykett, and J. Clarke Esqs., and Ald. Caister.

On the application of Mr. Minter the license of the Black Bull was transferred to the newly-built premises.

 

Folkestone Express 27 August 1881.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, W. Bateman, A.m. Watkin, J. Boykett and J. Clark Esqs.

Annual Licensing Day.

Mr. Minter applied on behalf of Mr. J.Q. Petts, trustee of Alfred Daniel Keeler, for a transfer of the license of the Black Bull Inn to newly built premises. Granted.

 

Southeastern Gazette 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

On Wednesday the annual licensing meeting for the borough of Folkestone was held at the Town Hall. The Mayor presided, and there were also present: Alderman Caister, Dr. Bateman, and F. Boykett, A. M. Watkin, and J. Clark, Esqs.

James Quested Petts, as trustee, applied for the transfer of the licence of the Black Bull to the new Black Bull in course of erection, and the application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 11 October 1884.

Saturday, October 4th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, General Armstrong, Aldermen Banks and Hoad, and F. Boykett Esq.

Temporary authority was granted to Mrs. Atkins to carry on business at the Black Bull public house.

 

Folkestone News 11 October 1884.

Saturday, October 4th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, Aldermen Hoad and Banks, Captain Crowe, and Mr. F. Boykett.

The Black Bull.

A temporary transfer of the licence of this house was granted to Mr. Atkins.

 

Folkestone Express 1 November 1884.

Wednesday, October 29th: Before Captain Crowe, F. Boykett and A.M. Watkin Esqs.

Transfer Of Licence.

The licence of the Black Bull was transferred to Lucy Atkins.

 

Folkestone News 7 February 1885.

Local News.

The following case was heard before the Borough Bench on Wednesday. John Champion, labourer, was charged with assaulting Charles Austen on the 27th January. Defendant pleaded Guilty and complainant said the assault took place at the Black Bull. A cross-summons charged Austen with assaulting Champion on the same occasion. The complainant said he was in the Black Bull on the 27th, and saw Austen there, who knocked him under the table. He hit Austen and kicked him. He did not know what for. (Laughter) Champion was fined 10s., with 10s. costs, or fourteen days'. Austen's summons was dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 17 July 1886.

Wednesday, July 14th: Before J. Holden and H.W. Poole Esqs.

Joseph Cole, a labourer, was summoned for an assault on a carver and gilder named Thomas Fletcher. Mr. Minter appeared for the defence. It appeared from the evidence, which was rather long, that the complainant and defendant had been drinking together at the Black Bull. They were not drunk, but, according to a witness named Kyrle Gordon, were “in a Saturday night state”. There was some dispute about a dog and a scuffle ensued in the bar, in the course of which the complainant fell over, or was knocked over, a chair, and, as he alleged the defendant struck him several times. Complainant, who was much the smaller man of the two, then challenged the defendant to fight. They went outside and complainant received a good hiding. He was also knocked down and had his arm broken. The defence raised by Mr. Minter was that it was purely a public house row, and if the complainant had not had his arm broken nothing would have been heard of it, but in order to obtain payment of his club money, complainant wanted to make out that he was the victim of defendant's brutality.

The Bench, however, came to the conclusion that a gross assault had been committed, and fined the defendant 1 and 17s. costs, and in default 14 days' hard labour. He was allowed a week to pay.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 January 1895.

Local News.

At the Borough Bench on Saturday the licence of the Black Bull Inn was temporarily transferred to Alfred Pollard, formerly licensee of the Bouverie Hotel.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 January 1895.

Local News.

At the Town Hall on Wednesday, before Messrs. Banks, Gilborne and Wightwick, transfer of licence was granted to the following – A. Pollard to the Black Bull Inn.

 

Folkestone Express 13 November 1897.

Saturday, November 6th: Before The Mayor, J. Hoad, J. Holden, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Pledge Esqs.

Frederick Stephen Allen was summoned for stealing a pair of boots. He did not appear.

Walter Cook, of 1, Park Terrace, a carter in the employ of Alderman Salter, said on Sunday, the 26th September, he left a pair of boots in the stable of the Bouverie Laundry. Next morning he missed them. In consequence of what a man named Taylor told him he went on the 30th October to the Black Bull public house, and there saw a man named McHenry, who showed him a pair of boots, which he identified as his. He valued them at 6s.

John McHenry, a labourer, of 25, Mill Bay, said he was at the Black Bull public house and saw Frederick Stephen Allen there, offering a pair of jackboots for sale for 4s., and afterwards he accepted 3s. from witness for them. He heard no more about the boots until Thursday week. Subsequently he gave the boots up to Cook, who said they were his.

A warrant was ordered to be issued.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 November 1897.

Police Court Record.

On Saturday last – the Mayor (Alderman Banks) presiding – Frederick Stephen Allen was charged with stealing a pair of boots. As he did not appear Supt. Taylor asked for a warrant and called evidence in support of the application.

Walter Cook, of 1, Park Road, deposed that on Sunday, 26th September, at 8 a.m. he left in the stable of 4, Bouverie Laundry a pair of boots, which he missed from there next morning. In consequence of something a man named Taylor told him, he saw a man named Backinery on the 30th October, who showed him the boots (produced) which witness valued at 6s.

A labourer named Backinery deposed that on the evening of the 26th Sept. he saw the defendant in the Black Bull public house, and eventually purchased a pair of boots from him for 3s., Allen saying he had bought them and could not wear them. In consequence of something Taylor said, witness handed over the boots on the previous Saturday.

This concluded the evidence taken in the case, and the Bench ordered a warrant to issue.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 16 February 1898.

Kaleidoscope.

A fire, which, fortunately, was unattended by serious consequences, occurred at the Black Bull Hotel on Thursday evening, when it is supposed that a spark from the fire ignited some linen hanging to air in a bedroom. The damage, thought not great, is covered by insurance in the State Company. A most remarkable incident in connection with the affair is that a child was sleeping at the time of, and during the progress, of the fire, and it was not until two chairs and some linen had been destroyed, practically after the fire burned out, that the conflagration was known to have existed.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Saturday last, George Wanstall was summoned for assault.

Frederick Holland, complainant, deposed that he was a labourer, living at 22, Invicta Road. The alleged assault took place about a quarter to twelve on Saturday night. He was sitting indoors having a bit of supper. Defendant came and knocked at his door. He asked witness who it was interfering with his wife. Witness said “Nobody in here that I know of”. Defendant then asked if there was any woman to fight his wife or any man to tackle him. Witness said “No, nobody wants to”. Defendant then struck him and knocked him down in the doorway. Defendant struck him near his neck with his fist; then he moved away. Witness recovered himself and walked after him. When he got in the road, defendant knocked him down again and got on him, but witness's father pulled him off. Witness followed him to his door and asked why he had hit him. Defendant put his two hands on each side of the doorway and kicked him in the thigh. Witness went away after then. On Saturday night, his wife asked witness to have a drink, and he said he did not want it.

Walter Hills, labourer, 22, Invicta Road, substantially corroborated the assault.

Henry Whittall, of 25, Invicta Road, deposed that he saw Holland on the ground, and the defendant on him; also as to the kick.

Defendant said he went home about twenty past eleven and found his wife sobbing and crying. He was told Frederick Holland and his mother had been beating her somewhat cruelly. He did what he thought was a husband's duty and asked the object. He asked who had done it, and complainant said he did. Complainant knocked him in the passage, and he returned the blow. They got him on the ground. He had to fight or he would have been killed.

Holland was now summoned for assaulting Wanstall.

Mrs. Wanstall deposed that she lived at 15, Invicta Road. She went in the Black Bull on Saturday night at quarter to eleven. She called for what she wanted. She spoke to Mrs. Holland and her husband. Mrs. Holland, the complaiant's mother, struck her. Outside the Bull she knocked her down again. Mrs. Holland and her son both knocked her down. Defendant struck her in the face and knocked her down in Invicta Road. She did not give any provocation.

Mrs. Annie Parsons corroborated that defendant struck Mrs. Wanstall in the face. She was knocked down.

Mary Holland was now summoned for assaulting Esther Wanstall.

Complainant deposed that the defendant struck her three times in the face.

Albert Cheeseman, a milkman, who was called by defendant, deposed that he saw Mrs. Holland push Mrs. Wanstall out of the door, but she attempted to strike Holland.

Another witness deposed that Mrs. Wanstall, calling Holland a foul name, began it. Mrs. Wanstall struck Mrs. Holland on the forehead, and she gave Mrs. Wanstall a push.

The Bench inflicted on George Wanstall a fine of 10s. and 12s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour, and dismissed the other cases.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 24 June 1899.

Saturday, June 17th: Before The Mayor, J. Hoad, J. Pledge, G. Spurgen, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

George Wanstall was summoned for assaulting Frederick Holland.

The complainant said: I am a labourer. The assault took place at a quarter to twelve on Saturday night. The defendant asked me why I had been interfering with his wife. I says “Nobody in here has, as I know of”. He says “Is there any woman in here who can come and frighten him out, or any man that can fight me?” I says “No; nobody wants to”. With that he struck me, and knocked me down on the doorway with his fist, and then he walked away. I recovered myself, and walked after him. When I got in the centre of the road he knocked me down again, and then got on top of me, and my father came and pulled him off. I then followed him to his door, and asked him what he had hit me for. With that he put his hands at each side of the doorway, and tried to kick me in the thigh. I went away after that. I know his wife by sight. I spoke to her one night, when she asked me to have a drink. That was all, sir.

Walter Hill: I am a labourer, living at 22, Invicta Road. I was sitting inside the house, when I heard a knocking, and the defendant came and asked me what man had been knocking his wife about. I said “No-one that I know of”. The complainant was near at the time. The defendant struck the complainant, hit him on the shoulder, knocked him down, and got on the top of him in the middle of the road, and afterwards started beating his wife.

A further witness, living at 25, Invicta Road, said he saw part of the assault on the complainant.

The defendant, in making his statement in Court, accused Frederick Holland with beating and ill-using his wife. He said he went to the complainant to accuse him, and to demand an explanation, and was brutally assaulted in return.

Frederick Holland was then brought up for assaulting Ester Wanstall.

The complainant said: I went to the Black Bull on Saturday night, and just said “Good evening” to young Mr. Holland. No conversation followed, but the defendant became violent and struck me, and knocked me down several times.

Another witness said: I went to the Black Bull on Saturday night with the complainant. She had a little drop, and other things she wanted. Afterwards Mrs. Holland came out of a room and made a strike at Mrs. Wanstall. I could not say exactly what it was about. The defendant struck Mrs. Wanstall on the face with his fist and knocked her down.

Mary Holland was also brought up for assaulting Ester Wanstall on the 10th June.

Evidence similar to that in the last case was given.

The defendant George Wanstall was fined 10s. and 12s. costs, in default 14 days', and the cases against the Hollands were dismissed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 December 1899.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, and Messrs. Wightwick, Herbert, and Pursey.

William George Warner applied for the transfer of the licence of the Black Bull Hotel from Alfred Pollard. Granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 16 December 1899.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before John Banks, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

William George Warn was granted a provisional transfer of licence for the Black Bull Inn.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 December 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday a temporary authority was granted to Mr. William George Warne for the Black Bull Inn from Mr. Albert Pollard.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 January 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday the following transfer was granted: Black Bull Hotel, to Mr. William Geo. Warne from Mr. Alfred Pollard.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 August 1901.

Saturday, July 27th: Before Alderman Banks, Messrs. Herbert, Wightwick, and Pursey, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Mr. Warne, of the Black Bull Hotel was granted an occasional licence to sell at the August Bank Holiday Fete at Moorhall.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 7 March 1903.

Saturday, February 28th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Messrs. G. Peden and J. Stainer.

Arthur Thomas Dorrell, who did not appear, was summoned for being drunk upon licensed premises, and the case was heard in his absence.

P.C. Leonard Johnson having proved service of summons, Sergt. Osborne said at 20 minutes to three in the afternoon of the 20th inst., he saw defendant go into the bar of the Black Bull Hotel. As he was drunk, witness followed him. He heard the barmaid say “I'm not going to serve you; you have had too much, and had better go out”. Defendant said he would not go until he had had “a small lemon”. Witness the requested defendant to leave, and he did so.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 7 March 1903.

Saturday, February 28th: Before Lt. Col. Westropp, E.T. Ward, G. Peden, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Arthur Thomas Dorrell, who did not appear, was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises.

Sergt. Osborne said about 20 minutes to three on Friday afternoon, the 20th inst., he saw defendant go into the Black Bull Hotel. Witness followed and heard the barmaid say “I am not going to serve you – you have had enough to drink. You get out”. Witness had to put defendant out.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs; in default seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1903.

Saturday, February 28th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. J. Stainer, Councillor G. Peden, and Lieutenant Colonel Westropp.

Arthur Thomas Dorrell was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises on the 20th February. Defendant did not appear.

P.S. Osborne stated that at 2.40 p.m. on the 20th February he saw the defendant, who was drunk, go into the bar of the Black Bull Hotel. Witness followed, and heard the barmaid say “I am not going to serve you. You have had quite enough to drink. There's a policeman behind. Go outside”. Defendant replied that he was going to have a “small lemon” before he went out. Witness ordered him out, and he went.

The Bench fined defendant 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs, or 7 days'.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 May 1905.

Monday, May 8th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan and Alderman J. Stainer.

Frank Waller was charged with being drunk whilst in charge of a horse and cart.

P.C. Allen stated that on Saturday evening he was on duty in Canterbury Road, when he noticed a horse and cart standing outside the Black Bull Hotel. Subsequently witness saw the prisoner come out of the public house. Witness noticed that he was drunk. Prisoner tried to get into the cart, but, witness added, he was too drunk to do so. Witness then took Waller into custody, and the man became so violent that it was necessary to put him in an S.E. and C.R. van. When in the van, accused endeavoured to throw the P.C. out, and in the struggle both rolled to the ground. It was only with the assistance of two civilians that prisoner was finally handcuffed, replaced in the cart, and taken to the police station.

The prisoner pleaded Guilty to drunkenness, but denied that he was in charge of a horse and cart; it was another man's.

P.C. Allen said he was quite sure the horse and cart belonged to the accused. There were two carts there at the time.

Mr. Bradley (to accused): You see, you were drunk and took the wrong cart.

Looking at the evidence as to prisoner's great roughness, the fine inflicted by the Bench was a remarkably lenient one, viz., 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 13 May 1905.

Monday, May 8th: Before Aldermen Vaughan and Salter.

Frank Waller was charged with being drunk in charge of a horse and cart on Saturday evening in Canterbury Road.

P.C. Allen said at 7.50 on Saturday evening he was in Canterbury Road, when he saw a pony and cart outside the Black Bull Hotel. Prisoner came out of the hotel and attempted to get into the cart. Witness, noticing he was drunk, took him into custody, and he became so violent that Waller had to be placed in a South Eastern Railway van. When in Sussex Road he tried to throw witness out of the van, but in the struggle they both fell into the road. Witness had then to handcuff him and obtain assistance to hold him in the van. The pony and cart belonged to Waller.

Prisoner said he was drunk, but the pony did not belong to him.

Fined 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Daily News 19 June 1905.

Monday, June 19th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer.

The licence of the Black Bull Hotel was transferred from the present proprietor to Mr. Powell.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 June 1905.

Local News.

On Monday morning the Licensing Justices had before them an application for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Black Bull Hotel, from the present landlord, Mr. Geo. Warne, to Mr. Thos. Edward Powell.

The usual evidence as to the character of the prospective tenant was tendered, and the Chief Constable having no objections to offer, the application was granted.

Mr. Geo. Warne, the outgoing tenant, will be missed by the many sportsmen by whom the Black Bull is frequented. Since he succeeded the late Mr. Pollard, it has been agreed on all hands that the house has been conducted on model principles, and if the new tenant is as fortunate in securing the high opinion held by the public of his predecessor, he should have a long run of successful business and popular favour.

 

Folkestone Express 24 June 1905.

Monday, June 19th: Before The Mayor, W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

An application was made by Thomas Edward Powell for temporary authority to sell at the Black Bull Hotel. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1905.

Monday, June 19th: Before The Mayor, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. G.I. Swoffer and Mr. J. Stainer.

The licence of the Black Bull Hotel was temporarily transferred from Mr. W.G. Warne to Mr. Thomas Henry Carl (sic).

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 July 1905.

Wednesday, July 12th: Before Messrs. Ward, Carpenter, Westropp, Vaughan, and Fynmore.

The transfers of licences of the Black Bull and Globe Hotels from Mr. Hardy and Mr. Warne to new tenants were granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 19 March 1906.

Monday, March 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. T. Ames, and Lieut. Colonel R.J. Fynmore.

Annie Bennett pleaded Guilty to committing wilful damage at the Black Bull Hotel on Saturday.

Mr. Henry William Anderson, manager to the landlord of the Black Bull Hotel, stated that the prisoner came into the house about 6.15 on Saturday, and asked to be served with a glass of beer. He refused to serve her as she had created a disturbance by asking men in the bar to give her a penny to buy a glass of beer. She was requested to leave, and did so. About five minutes later witness heard a crash, and found the plate glass panel of the door was broken. Witness went out and saw the prisoner. She said she had broken the ---- window, and asked him to send for a ---- constable and lock her up. He sent for a constable, and on his arrival gave her into custody. He estimated the damage done at 25s. or 30s.

The prisoner said the witness had served her with a glass of beer. She had some shamrock with her – well, clover – and a man in the bar asked for some. She gave him some of the “green stuff”, and then called for another glass of beer. She was refused, and then was pushed out of the bar, but the witness had not said that he put a man out first. When she got outside she meditated a moment, and then sent a stone through the window. It only made a small hole.

The Chairman asked Mr. Anderson how he arrived at the value of the damage done, as 25s. or 30s. seemed a lot for a panel.

Witness said it was embossed plate glass, and a carpenter had estimated the cost.

The Chairman, addressing the prisoner, said she had deliberately broken the glass, and must pay for it – 25s. She would also be fined 10s., with 4s. 6d. costs, or one month's hard labour.

She was taken to the cells.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 March 1906.

Monday, March 19th: before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lt. Col. Fynmore, and Mr. C. Ames.

Annie Bennett will not forget St. Patrick's Day, 1906, in a hurry. The Emerald Isle's patron saint played many tricks with his admirers on that day, and one fell to the share of the said Annie Bennett, who pleaded Guilty to committing wilful damage at the Black Bull Hotel.

Henry William Anderson, the manager for the landlord of the Black Bull Hotel, briefly told Annie's adventures on Saturday. The lady went to the house at 6.15 on Saturday evening, and asked for a glass of beer. Mr. Anderson refused to serve her, as previously she had asked men in the house to give her a copper, and had created a disturbance. Miss Annie was asked to quit, a proceeding she quietly carried out, but a few minutes later there was a crash, which resulted in the breaking of a plate glass panel in the door. Mr. Anderson went out and saw Annie, who said she “had broken the ---- glass, and wanted a ---- policeman to lock her up”. She was obliged. The damage to the window was put at from 25s. to 30s.

The accused said that Mr. Anderson had served her with a glass of beer. She had some shamrock with her, and a man in the bar asked her for some. She gave him some of the “green stuff” – well, it was clover (laughter), and then called for another glass of beer, which was refused. She went outside, and having thought the matter out, put a stone through the window; it was quite a small hole. Another thing, Mr. Anderson had not told the Bench that he had previously put a man out.

Accused was ordered to pay the damage, 25s., pay a fine of 10s., and 4s. 6d. costs, or go to Canterbury for one month.

Annie accepted the latter alternative.

 

Folkestone Express 24 March 1906.

Monday, March 19th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and T. Ames Esq.

Annie Bennett was charged with committing wilful damage by breaking a plate glass door panel.

Mr. W. Anderson, the landlord of the Black Bull Hotel (sic), said on Saturday evening, at a quarter past six, she came to the bar of the house and wanted witness to serve her with beer. He refused to do so because of the disturbance she created. He asked her to leave and she did so. About five minutes after he heard a crash, and he then saw the glass panel in the swing door of the bar had been broken. He went outside and saw the prisoner, who said she had broken the window, and then he had to send for a constable to lock her up. He did so, and when the constable arrived he gave her into custody. The value of the window was about 30s. He picked up the two stones produced from just outside the door.

Prisoner said the landlord served her with a drink of beer. She had been in the house ten minutes when a man asked her for a bit of clover she was wearing. She said “Certainly, my dear”. When she asked to be served again, the landlord refused to do so and told her to go out. He then pushed a man out of the house and he tried to put her out. When she got outside she meditated a minute, and then picked up a stone which she threw at the window.

The Bench decided to fine her 10s., and ordered her to pay the damage, 25s., and 4s. 6d. costs, and in default of payment she was committed to prison for a month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 March 1906.

Monday, February 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, and Mr. T. Ames.

Annie Bennett was charged with wilfully breaking a plate glass window.

Henry Wm. Anderson, manager at the Black Bull Hotel, said that at about a quarter past six on Saturday defendant came to the bar and asked for some beer. He would not serve her because she was creating a disturbance. He asked her to leave the house and she went out. About five minutes afterwards he heard a crash, and he saw that the glass window in the entrance door was broken. Defendant then admitted to him that she had broken the window. Two large stones (produced) were found outside the door. The damage amounted to about 30s.

Defendant admitted breaking the door “because the prosecutor put her out”. He pushed her. She meditated when she was outside, and then threw the stone.

The Bench ordered defendant to pay 25s. damage, and a fine of 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or undergo one month's imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express 24 November 1906.

Wednesday, November 21st: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and T. Ames Esq.

Thomas E. Powell, landlord of the Black Bull Hotel, was summoned for a breach of the Licensing Act. Mr. De Wet, instructed by the Licensed Victuallers' Association, appeared on behalf of the defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

George Kirby, landlord of the Royal George, was also summoned for being found on licensed premises – the Black Bull Hotel – during prohibited hours.

The Chief Constable said he was willing to take both cases together, but he understood Mr. De Wet objected.

Mr. De Wet objected to the summons, but the Magistrates overruled the objection.

Inspector Swift said about a quarter past eleven on the night of the 12th inst., accompanied by P.C. Cox, he was in Canterbury Road, opposite the Black Bull Hotel. He saw outside the public house a fly, in charge of Mr. Challis. Challis looked towards them, and then went into the porch which leads into the bar. He returned immediately with a man named George Brien, a butcher, of Black Bull Road. A few minutes later, Mr. Kirby, of the Royal George, followed. They stood talking some few seconds. Then Mr. Kirby came to where witness was standing. He reeled round and made some remark about the weather. Witness saw he was drunk. He returned to the house and went in. Witness, accompanied by Cox, went to the house. As they were going Challis entered the porch. He came out immediately. On witness arriving at the door he saw a man named Richard Hart, of Black Bull Road, in the porch. Witness went into the bar, and there saw Mr. Kirby with the barman, who was under the influence of drink. Mr. Kirby was leaning on the counter, drinking from a glass containing ale. Witness said to the barman, William Anderson, “What's the meaning of this?” He replied “I have just come up from the music hall with a friend. You haven't seen any money passed, have you?” On witness turning to the clock in the bar, which was pointing to twenty minutes past eleven, Mr. Kirby said “It is now twenty past eleven”. Anderson said “Yes, twenty past”. Witness asked for the landlord, and Anderson said he was in bed, and witness could not see him that night. Witness said he should make a report against him in respect to that matter, and also against Mr, Kirby. Mr. Kirby said he was a licensed victualler, and knew as much of the law as witness. Witness asked the barman for his name and he said “William Sandy”. Witness had since found it to be Anderson. Witness then left the bar, and Anderson and Kirby followed him out. Kirby said he hoped he was satisfied with his explanation and there would be no report, and pressed him to go and look at the Blue Book. Witness said he should report them. Kirby became abusive and requested witness to take all their names. Kirby subsequently drove away.

Examined by the Chief Constable, witness said he was quite sure about the time. It was between half past eleven and five and twenty minutes to twelve when Kirby drove away.

Cross-examined: He did not see the fly drive up. It was 11.15 approximately. Mr. Kirby did not say he was a guest of the landlord. He did not know “Sandy” was the nickname of Anderson.

P.C. Cox said on the night in question he met Inspector Swift at the bottom of Marshall Street. It was exactly a quarter past eleven. It was about one hundred yards from the Black Bull. The remainedr of the constable's evidence was corroborative of Inspector Swift's evidence.

This concluded the case for the prosecution.

Thomas Edward Powell said he was the licence holder of the Black Bull Hotel. Sometimes he slept at the hotel and sometimes in London. Anderson was witness's son-in-law and manager of the hotel. He knew Mr. Kirby; he was a friend of his.

George Kirby said he was the licence holder of the Royal George. On the 12th November, about eleven o'clock, he was at the Royal George with Mr. Anderson. Anderson asked him to come to the Black Bull to have supper. They called a cab, and were driven up there by Mr. Challis. When they got there the door was shut. They saw Mrs. Anderson, who opened the door, and a barman. Mrs. Anderson asked him to stay to supper. Witness went out to the cabman to tell him to stay a few minutes. He then went over to the policemen to show them who was there. When he went back he did not have any drink. When the Inspector came in he asked the meaning of it and said he should have to report it. He asked witness what he was doing there, and he (witness) said he was the guest of the landlord. Witness went out and asked for the constable's number. The Inspector subsequently gave it to witness. The police then went away. Witness was a friend of Mr. Powell.

Cross-examined: He was perfectly sober. He agreed with the evidence of the police as to going in, and coming out of the house for the constable's number. He did not have a glass of anything while the constables were there. He had a drink when the police were gone. There were some glasses on the counter.

Mark Challis, a fly proprietor, said he drove Mr. Kirby and Mr. Anderson on the 12th November from the Royal George to the Black Bull Hotel. Mr. Kirby was in there about twenty minutes. Witness did not go inside the Black Bull.

Mr. Anderson said he was son-in-law of the Black Bull Hotel and manager of the house. On the night in question, at a few minutes before eleven, he was in the Royal George. He invited Kirby to supper. When they arrived at the Black Bull the door was closed, and they rang the bell. Mrs. Anderson opened the door. When they got inside there was no-one in there except Mrs. Anderson and the barman. He did not see any drink served. He did not see Kirby drink any beer that had been left by anyone else. There was no drink consumed or sold on the premises after eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined: He and Mr. Kirby had been to a licensed victuallers' meeting at Hythe. They drove from Hythe to the Royal George.

Mr. De Wet then addressed the Bench. He said, to convict, the Magistrates must be satisfied that the premises were kept open so that people could get inside for the purpose of obtaining intoxicating liquors.

The Chairman, after a consultation with the other Magistrates, said they fully believed the evidence of the police, but at the same time they were of opinion there was not sufficient evidence to warrant a conviction. Therefore they were bound to give defendant the benefit of the doubt.

The Chief Constable thereupon withdrew the summons against Mr. Kirby.

Mr. De Wet asked that the summons should be dismissed.

The Magistrates said the summons was withdrawn.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 November 1906.

Wednesday, November 21st: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. T. Ames, and Councillor R.J. Fynmore.

Thomas E. Powell, landlord of the Black Bull Hotel, was summoned for keeping his house open during prohibited hours. Mr. De Wet, at the instance of the Licensed Victuallers' Association, represented defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Inspector Swift said that at 11.15 on the 12th inst., accompanied by P.C. Cox, he was in Canterbury Road, opposite the Black Bull. Outside the public house he saw a horse and fly, in the charge of Mr. Challis. Challis looked towards them, and then went into the porch which led into the bar, returning immediately with a man named George Bryan, a butcher, of Black Bull Road. In four or five seconds Mr. Kirby (of the Royal George, Beach Street) came out. The three stood talking together for some seconds, when Kirby came over to where he (witness) was standing, reeled round, and made some remark about the weather. He saw that Kirby was drunk. Kirby returned to the house and re-entered. He accompanied P.C. Cox to the house, and on going towards it Challis entered the porch again and came out immediately. On arriving at the door he (witness) saw a man named Hart step into the porch from the public house door. He (witness) went into the bar, and there saw Mr. Kirby with the barman, who was drunk. Kirby was leaning on the counter drinking from a glass containing ale. He (witness) said to the barman (Mr. Anderson) “What is the meaning of this?” He replied “I have just come up from the Music Hall with a friend. You have not seen any money pass, have you?” On pointing to the clock in the bar, Kirby said “It is now twenty minutes past eleven”. Anderson said “Yes, twenty past”. He (witness) said “Where is the landlord?” Anderson said “He is in bed. You cannot see him tonight”. He (witness) said “I shall lay a report against him in respect to this matter, and also against you, Mr. Kirby”. Kirby said “I am a licensed victualler, and I know as much of the law as you do”. He asked the barman for his correct name, and he said “William Sandy”. He had since ascertained that the name given was a false one, and that the barman's name was Anderson. He (witness) left the bar, and Anderson and Kirby followed him out. Anderson said “I hope you are satisfied with my explanation, and there will be no report”, and pressed him to do back indoors and look at the blue book. He said he should report things as he had found them. Kirby then became abusive, and catching hold of his arm, said “I demand you to come back and take all”. On witness threatening to lock him up, Kirby desisted.

Examined by the Chief Constable, Inspector Swift said it was in the public bar that he saw Kirby. Kirby went away in the fly between half past eleven and twenty five minutes to twelve.

Mr. De Wet: Was it not the private bar where Mr. Kirby was? – No, the public bar. There are no private bars in public houses.

Mr. De Wet: Don't quibble with words, Inspector. Are there not public house doors marked “Private” and “Bottle and Jug Department”? – Yes, that is a notion of the trade.

Mr. De Wet: Was this bar marked “Private”? – No, I think it was marked “Saloon Bar”.

Further cross-examined: Kirby asked the constable for his number. He did not know that Anderson's nickname was Sandy.

P.C. Cox gave corroborative evidence.

Defendant deposed that he was landlord of the Black Bull Hotel. Anderson, his son-in-law, was manager of the hotel, and was in complete control.

Mr. Kirby stated that at 11 o'clock on the night of the 12th November, he drove from the Royal George, Beach street, to the Black Bull, with Mr. Anderson, who had invited him home to supper. They arrived at the Black Bull about 11.10, and Anderson rang the bell. The door was opened by Mrs. Anderson, and inside the hotel he also saw the barman. He went out to tell the cabman to wait a minute, and seeing the policemen on the other side of the road, he went across and made a remark about the weather, thinking they would then see who it was in the hotel. He went inside again, and soon Inspector Swift entered, and said he should report the matter. He had no drink in the house while the Inspector was there.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said he was perfectly sober. He had some drink after the Inspector left the premises. He would solemnly swear that when the Inspector went in he had not a glass of drink in his hand at all.

Mr. Challis deposed to driving Kirby and Anderson to the Black Bull.

Mr. Anderson also gave evidence, repeating the statement as to Kirby having no drink while the Inspector was there.

The Chief Constable: Do you think Inspector Swift and P.C. Cox have gone into the box and sworn what they know to be false? – Yes.

That is your candid opinion? – Yes.

Mr. De Wet contended that no offence had been committed, Mr. Kirby being in the house as the guest of the manager.

The Bench having deliberated for a minute or two, Alderman Herbert said they fully believed the evidence of the police, but they felt that there was not sufficient evidence to secure a conviction. Therefore they would give defendant the benefit of the doubt, and dismiss the case.

A summons had been issued against George Kirby for being found on licensed premises during prohibited hours, but this the Chief Inspector wished to withdraw.

Mr. De Wet asked that the latter summons should also be dismissed, but the Bench refused his application, and allowed the Chief Inspector to withdraw it.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Tuesday, February 5th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Linton, Fynmore, Herbert, Pursey, and Carpenter. Mr. Stainer, Mr. Wells, and Mr. Boyd, the two latter being the new Magistrates, occupied seats on the Bench, but did not adjudicate.

The Chief Constable read his report as to the number of houses and convictions, which showed a decrease last year. He recommended that the Bench should still continue to take advantage of the Act and refer some of the licences to the Compensation Committee at the Canterbury Quarter Sessions. He then went on to say that although he did not oppose the renewal of any licences on the ground of misconduct, there had been five convictions during the last year, and he had had to warn one licence holder against allowing betting and taking in slips. He also wished to caution all licence holders that these practices would not be allowed on any occasion, and after giving this public warning he should take steps to detect and prosecute for any such offences.

The Chairman, before commencing, stated that the Licensing Bench had visited a large number of houses, and they had seen in various places automatic machines, into which people put pennies, and in some instances got their penny back or a cigar, &c. The having of these machines was practically permitting gambling, and it had been decided that they were illegal. Every licence holder must understand that they were to be immediately removed, otherwise they would be prosecuted for having them. As regards the automatic musical boxes, gramophones, &c., if licensed victuallers had them on their premises, they were to be used in such a way as not to be a nuisance to the neighbourhood, and if complaints were made they would have to be removed.

The renewal licences for the Black Bull Hotel, the Railway Inn, the Chequers, Queen's Head, Channel Inn, Alexandra Tavern, Perseverance, and Railway Hotel at Shorncliffe, were adjourned till the 4th March, some on account of convictions, and some for the consideration of closing them under the Licensing Act. The other applications were granted, a full report of which will appear in our next issue.

 

Folkestone Express 9 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, C.J. Pursey and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The Chief Constable read his report as follows:

Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 6th February, 1907.

Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 128 places licensed for the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz.:- Full licences, 80; beer “on”, 9; beer “off”, 6; beer and spirit dealers, 14; grocers, 12; chemists, 4; confectioners, 3; total 128. This gives an average, according to the census of 1901, of one licence to every 239 persons, or one “on” licence to every 344 persons. This is a reduction of 8 licences as compared with the return presented to you last year, as the renewal of 3 “off” licences was not applied for at the last annual licensing meeting, and at the adjourned licensing meeting the renewal of one full licence was refused on the ground that the premises had been ill-conducted, and four other full licences were referred to the Compensation Committee for East Kent on the ground of redundancy. These four licences were subsequently refused by the Compensation Committee, and after payment of compensation, the premises were closed on 31st December last. Since the last annual licensing meeting 22 of the licences have been transferred, viz:- Full licences, 15; beer “on”, 5; off licences, 2; total 22. During the year three occasional licences have been granted by the justices for the sale of intoxicating liquors on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and thirty extensions of the ordinary time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises. During the year ended 31st December last, 131 persons (106 males and 25 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 114 were convicted and 17 discharged. This, it is most satisfactory to find, is a decrease of no less than 52 persons proceeded against as compared with the preceding year, when 164 were convicted and 19 discharged. Six of the licence holders have been proceeded against, and five of them convicted, for the following offences: Selling adulterated whiskey, 1; permitting drunkenness, 1; delivering beer to a child in unsealed vessels, 2; supplying drink to a constable when on duty, 1; total, 5. In the latter case notice of appeal against the conviction has been given by the licensee. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. I offer no objection to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct, the houses generally having been conducted during the past year in a satisfactory manner, but on one occasion one of the licence holders was cautioned (as the evidence was insufficient to justify a prosecution) for receiving slips and money relating to betting, which practice he immediately discontinued, bit I desire to intimate to all the licence holders that if in future any such practice is allowed, or any illegal gaming whatever is permitted on their premises, I shall take such steps as may be necessary to detect and prosecute the offenders. I beg to submit a plan showing the situation of all “on” licensed premises within the congested area, which I have marked on the plan, and would respectfully suggest that the Committee again avail themselves of the powers given by the Licensing Act, 1904, and refer the renewal of some of the licences within this area to the Compensation Committee to deal with under the Act. Within this area there are 920 houses, with a population approximately of 4,600, with 37 “on” licensed houses and 8 other licences, giving a proportion of one licence to every 20 houses or every 102 persons, and one “on” licence to every 24 houses or every 124 persons. This number of licences I consider excessive for the requirements of the neighbourhood. I have received notices from eight persons of their intention to apply at these sessions for the following new licences, viz.,:- Full licence 1; beer off 1; cider and sweets off 1; wine off 3; music, etc., 2; total 8.

I am, Gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve, Chief Constable.

The Chairman said the report seemed to be highly satisfactory. The Magistrates were very pleased to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report he wanted to make a remark upon, and that was the prevalence of gaming in public houses. In several houses the Committee visited they saw automatic machines, in which customers placed pennies and pulled a trigger. Occasionally they got something out for their pennies. That was gaming. It had been decided to be illegal, and they warned all licence holders that they would be watched, and that the machines would not be allowed, and proceedings would be taken against the offending publicans, whose licences would be jeopardised next year. There was one other point of a similar nature with regard to musical instruments, which were reported to be a great nuisance. They warned all licence holders to be careful not to create a nuisance with those pianos and other instruments, which were now very common indeed in public houses.

The following houses were ordered to be opposed as not required: The Channel Inn, High Street; the Queen's Head, Beach Street; the Railway Tavern (sic), Beach Street; the Chequers, Seagate Street; and the Perseverance, Dover Street.

Adjourned: The Black Bull Hotel, the Alexandra Tavern, the Imperial Hotel, Black Bull Road, and the Railway Hotel, Coollinge.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, R.J. Linton, and C.J. Pursey.

The Chief Constable presented his annual report (for details see Folkestone Express report).

The Chairman: The report seems to be very satisfactory, and we are very glad to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report I should like to make a remark upon, and that is about gambling in public houses. In every house we have visited we saw automatic machines in which you put a penny, pulled a trigger, and occasionally you get something out, either your penny back, or a card for a cigar. That is gaming, and it has been decided as illegal, and we warn all licence holders who have these machines that they must be removed or otherwise proceedings will be taken against them for gaming, and their licences may be in jeopardy next year. There is another thing. In the same way, with regard to these musical instruments, which have been reported to the Bench as a great nuisance, we warn all the licence holders to be careful, and not create nuisances with these machines.

The licences of the Channel, High Street, the Queen's Head, Beach Street, the Railway Inn, Beach Street, the Chequers, Seagate Street, and the Perseverance, Dover Street, were not renewed, notice of opposition being given on the ground of redundancy.

The renewals of the licences of the Black Bull Hotel, Alexandra Tavern, Imperial, and Railway Hotel were all adjourned till the adjourned sessions for reasons not given.

The Justices fixed the 4th March as the date of the adjourned licensing meeting.

 

Folkestone Express 9 March 1907.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned licensing sessions were held on Monday at the Police Court, when the principal business to be considered was whether or not the five licences should be referred to the East Kent Licensing Committee for compensation. The Licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., while other justices present were Major Leggett, Mr. G. Boyd, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The Black Bull.

Mr. De Wet applied for the renewal of the licence of the Black Bull.

The Chief Constable said before that licence was granted he had to make an application with regard to the entrance of the house, as at present it was almost impossible to give proper and efficient police supervision to the door of the house. He had to ask the Justices to obtain an undertaking from the owners that they would remove the coloured glass in the south side of the porchway which covered up the main entrance to the house. If they would do that, it would enable them to have better police supervision.

Mr. De Wet said the Chief Constable ought to have asked him to do that before they came there that morning. He submitted that the matter raised by the Chief Constable was somewhat in the nature of an objection, and he ought to have given him notice of it in writing. Strictly speaking, the Justices had no right to take any notice of it. They were always willing to help the police, and he would undertake that the alterations would be done.

The licence was therefore renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 March 1907.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and G. Boyd, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer.

Black Bull Hotel.

The Chief Constable made an application with regard to the Black Bull Hotel. As it was at present, it was almost impossible to give proper police supervision. Therefore he asked for an order or undertaking that the tenant should remove the coloured glass on the south east side of the porch, which covered the main entrance to the house. If they would move the glass it would enable them to have better supervision.

Mr. De Wet thought that the Chief Constable's remarks were in the nature of an objection, and should have been given in writing. However, the brewers were anxious to assist the police, and they would comply with the suggestion.

The licence was granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 26 April 1907.

Thursday, April 25th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Stainer, Leggett, and Herbert.

Thomas Hogben was charged with being drunk and disorderly yesterday afternoon.

P.C. Walters said he was on duty in Canterbury Road, when he saw the defendant ejected from the Black Bull Hotel. He then became very noisy, and used bad language. Witness requested him to go away, but he refused to do so, and was then taken into custody.

Defendant said he had a little business to do at Hythe, and took a little too much to drink. He was very sorry.

Fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 7 days'.

He was allowed a week to pay.

 

Folkestone Express 13 July 1907.

Wednesday, July 10th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames Esqs.

The Magistrates granted the following transfer of licence: The Black Bull Hotel, from Mr. Powell to Mr. Walter Cavey.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 July 1907.

Wednesday, July 10th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Aldermen G. Spurgen and T.J. Vaughan, Messrs. W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames.

The licence of the Black Bull Hotel was transferred from Mr. Powell to Mr. Walter Cavey.

 

Folkestone Daily News 4 April 1908.

Saturday, April 4th: Before Alderman Banks, Messrs. Herbert, Stainer, Swoffer and Leggett.

John Brien was charged with being drunk and assaulting the police yesterday. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. De Wet appeared for defendant.

P.C. Minter said he was on duty in Black Bull Road, when he saw the prisoner stripped, in a fighting attitude, challenging two men who were in the Black Bull Hotel to fight. He was using filthy language, but he refused to desist, and witness actually had to pull him away from the hotel door. Prisoner then went up the road. Witness afterwards came back to the hotel and ejected two men from the house. Prisoner then came back and used filthy language to witness and challenged him to fight. Prisoner then struck witness in the chest, and as a result they closed and fell to the ground together. The accused kicked and bit, and witness received a very nasty blow in the abdomen. Prisoner's wife then came and assisted her husband, and nearly strangled witness. Civilian assistance at length arrived, and the prisoner's boots were taken off. Eventually he was taken to the police station.

The witness underwent a long cross-examination at the hands of Mr. De Wet.

Thomas Tester, of 116, Black Bull Road, said he was in his garden about 7 o'clock, when he heard a noise outside the Black Bull Hotel. He looked out and saw the prisoner. He eventually assisted to bring him to the police station.

George Brian said he saw the prisoner with his coat off, wanting to fight someone. A policeman asked him to go home. Shortly afterwards witness heard a whistle blow, and on going out found the constable and the prisoner on the ground. He assisted to take prisoner's boots off, and also bring him to the station.

Sergeant Osborne corroborated the statement as to prisoner being drunk when brought to the police station.

This was the whole of the evidence for the prosecution.

Prisoner was then sworn, and said when he came back after leaving when the constable told him, P.C. Minter rushed at him, dashed him to the ground, and handcuffed him. Minter then asked someone in the mob to take his shoes off, and accused told him it was not necessary. On the way to the station, Minter nearly broke his wrists, and at the station punched him in the back and also in the eye. The doctor did not say he was drunk.

George Lee said he was with the prisoner yesterday, and a few words arose between some men in the Black Bull Hotel, with the result that accused and another man went out to fight. The constable came up, and at once grasped the accused and threw him on the ground. The prisoner was very excited, but was not drunk.

Mr. De Wet then addressed the Bench on behalf of the prisoner, and submitted that Brien was more excited than drunk. As to the assault, he submitted that there was no evidence to corroborate that of the constable's, and therefore the prisoner was entitled to any doubt in that respect. He asked the Bench to dismiss the charge.

The Bench came to the conclusion that the case had been proved, and there were 17 previous convictions against him, and he would be fined 10s. and 16s. costs for being drunk, and for the assault 20s. and 16s. costs, or one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 11 April 1908.

Saturday, April 4th: Before Alderman Banks, W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs.

John Brien, of Ethelbert Road, was charged with being drunk and disorderly the previous night, and also with assaulting P.C. Minter. He pleaded Not Guilty to both charges. Mr. De Wet appeared for the defendant.

P.C. Minter said shortly before eight o'clock he was in front of the Black Bull Hotel, where he saw the prisoner, stripped, outside the hotel, in a fighting attitude and challenging two men to fight. He used filthy language and witness advised him to go home. He refused to do so, and witness was obliged to pull him away from the hotel door. He again persuaded him to go away, and the defendant put his coat on and went up the road, accompanied by his wife. Brien eventually came back and used filthy and abusive language towards him and challenged him to fight. Witness told him he had no desire to fight him and advised him to go away or he would take him into custody. He said “There is not a man in your force who can do that”, and with that he struck him a blow in the chest and ran backwards, pulling off his coat and putting himself in a fighting attitude. He closed with the prisoner and they fell to the ground together. Brien became very violent and kicked a bit. He kicked witness in the abdomen, which made him feel very sick. Brien's wife and brother then assisted the prisoner and he was struggling with the three on the ground. If it had not been for the kindness of some civilian in pulling the wife off he thought she would have strangled him. He found it was necessary to handcuff the prisoner and then blew his whistle. Assistance was rendered by civilians, who prisoner kicked so severely that they were obliged to take his boots off. Mr. Carden and Mr. Brian, a butcher, assisted in getting him to the police station. On the way there he used filthy language, and also said when he came out he would shoot witness. He only came off the sick list early in the week, and owing to the brutality of the prisoner and his wife he could not sleep during the night.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not lock the prisoner up at first for being drunk, because he always liked to give a man a chance. There had been no ill-feeling between the prisoner and himself for some time. He did not rush at the prisoner, pull him down, and put his knee on his throat. He only used necessary violence. He did not hear cries from the crowd of “You will kill the man”. He could not say who pulled the wife off him. He assisted in taking the handcuffs off the prisoner, but he did not strike him in the eye with them. He walked the man through the street without any boots on. He knew the man asked for a doctor, and one was sent for. He did not know what the doctor's report was. He did not hit the prisoner in the back when he was taking the handcuffs off and say “Take that, you dirty tyke”. At the time he blew the whistle there was a crowd of 200 people there, but they were generally a hostile crowd.

Thomes Tester, an engineer, of 118, Black Bull Road, said he was in the garden when he heard a noise outside the hotel. He went towards the spot when he heard the policeman's whistle. When he first saw the prisoner he had his coat on. When he went up after the whistle was sounded, he saw the prisoner on the ground with the constable on him. He was kicking, shouting and trying to get away. There was a woman at the back of the constable trying to pull him off. He assisted the constable in bringing prisoner to the station. He should say the man was mad with drink. After they got his boots off he was much quieter. He did not think more force was used than was necessary.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not see the prisoner before the handcuffs were on him. He heard the prisoner ask for a cab. When the man was on the ground he had his coat on.

The Chief Constable thanked Tester for the assistance he had rendered to the constable.

George Brian, a butcher, of 94, Black Bull Road, said at about a quarter to eight the prisoner was kicking up a bit of noise near the hotel. He was very excited, with his coat off. The police constable came across the road and asked him to go home. The prisoner went up the road and witness went inside the hotel. Shortly afterwards he heard the whistle blown, and he saw the constable and the prisoner struggling in the road. He assisted the constable. Brien was not as quiet and gentle as a lamb. He considered it was necessary to hold him down, and no more force was used than was necessary. He could not say whether the man was sober or not. He acted like a madman.

P.S. Osborne said when the prisoner was brought into the police station he was mad drunk. He put the man into the cell. At about half past nine the prisoner knocked on the door and persisted in seeing a doctor. At 9.45 Dr. Bateman came and examined him, and was paid his fee out of Brien's money.

Cross-examined, witness said it was an hour and a half afterwards when the doctor saw him. He did not help to take the handcuffs off – Minter did that himself. He did not remember one of the handcuffs striking the prisoner in the eye. Minter might have said to prisoner “You dirty tyke”. When they came in scuffling, witness said to Minter “That is enough, Minter”. No more force was used in the station than was necessary. The man's eye was bleeding a little. The prisoner said at the time he came in that he had somewhere about 80 on him, and in fact 81 was found upon him.

Defendant went into the box. He said there was a little trouble between him and two men. He went away when first advised by Minter, and on returning he stood on the pavement. Minter then came across the road, took hold of him, and pushed him over on the ground. He said “I told you I would get my own back with you”. The constable put his knee on his neck, and, after blowing his whistle, he put the handcuffs on him. Minter then called upon some of the people in the crowd to take his shoes off. He asked for a cab to take him to the police station, but he had to walk there with his boots off. At the police station, when Minter took the handcuffs off him, he punched him on the eye and in the back. The doctor examined him about an hour and a half after he had been in the cell. He denied ever striking P.C. Minter a blow on the chest, or kicking or biting him.

Cross-examined, he said he did not know what the doctor's report was.

George Lee, who said he lived in the Brickyard, Canterbury Road, said the constable walked up to Brien and pulled him. The constable used unnecessary violence to the man. The people cried “Shame” at the way in which the man was treated. The man was not drunk, but was more excited.

Mr. De Wet, in addressing the Magistrates, said that the doctor's certificate stated that the man was suffering from the effects of alcohol.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner was a local man. He had been there on numerous occasions. There were 17 convictions, extending to 1898, against him, and they included an assault on the police.

The Magistrates inflicted a fine of 10s. and 16s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour for being drunk and disorderly, and for the assault he was ordered to pay a fine of 20s. and 16s. costs, or a month's hard labour.

The money was paid.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 April 1908.

Saturday, April 4th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Councillor G. Boyd, Messrs. R.J. Linton, J. Stainer, and W.G. Herbert.

John Brien was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and assaulting the police. Mr. De Wet appeared for the defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Minter said that at 8 o'clock the previous evening he was on duty in the Black Bull Road, near to the Black Bull Hotel, where he saw the prisoner stripped to the waist in a fighting attitude outside the hotel, challenging two men who were inside the hotel to fight. After much persuasion he went up the road accompanied by his wife. Soon after the prisoner came back, and challenged witness to fight. He then struck witness in the chest and ran backwards, at the same time pulling off his coat and preparing to fight. Witness closed with him and they both fell together. Prisoner then began to kick and bite. His wife and brother joined in the struggle. Some civilian pulled the wife off. Witness then found it necessary to handcuff the prisoner, and after he blew his whistle several civilians came to his assistance. Prisoner kicked so violently that they had to take his boots off. With the assistance of some civilians he took the prisoner to the police station. He used obscene language all the way down the road. At the police station witness charged him with being drunk and disorderly in Black Bull Road, and further with assaulting witness in the execution of his duty.

Cross-examined by Mr. De Wet: He did not hit the prisoner on the face with the handcuffs when he was taking the handcuffs off, nor did ne hear Sergeant Osborne say “That is enough, Minter”.

Thomas Tester and George Bryan corroborated.

P.S. Osborne deposed that he was on duty at the police station at about ten minutes past eight on the previous night when the prisoner was brought in by P.C. Minter and several other men. He was mad drunk. At 9.30 he knocked at his cell door and asked to see a doctor. Witness sent for Dr. Bateman, and he examined prisoner, and was paid his fee (10s. 6d.) by prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. De Wet: Witness did not remember P.C. Minter knocking prisoner in the eye with the handcuffs when he was taking them off. Minter did not treat him with more force than the circumstances demanded. Prisoner, when he came in, said he had 80 on him; there was 81 18s. 10d. in his possession.

Prisoner was sworn, and said he was in the Black Bull Hotel on the previous evening. There was a row between witness and two other men. He was going to fight, and P.C. Minter came and sent him away. When he came back he stood outside the hotel and did not speak to anyone. Minter said “I told you I should get my own back”, and rushed at him and put his knee on his throat. He took his handcuffs out of his pocket, and witness put his hands together for him to put them on. When he got to the police station Minter hit him in the eye with the handcuffs as he was taking them off. The sergeant said “Now, that is enough, Minter”. When witness had been in the cell about an hour he asked to see a doctor. The doctor came after some considerable time, and after examining witness, he said “You have been drinking”. Witness said that he had had about four or five glasses. Witness asked if he was drunk, but the doctor did not answer.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said that he did not know what the doctor's report was.

George Lee agreed with all that prisoner had said as to what took place outside the Black Bull Hotel.

Mr. De Wet, addressing the Bench, said that the prisoner could not have been very drunk or he would not have been able to tell how much money he had on him; besides that, when the prisoner asked the doctor whether he was drunk or not, the doctor did not say he was.

The Bench imposed a fine of 10s. and 16s. costs, or 14 days', for being drunk and disorderly, and 20s. and 16s. costs, or on month's hard labour, for assaulting the police.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 October 1916.

Thursday, October 12th: Before Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. J.J. Giles, Mr. H. Kirke, and Alderman A.E. Pepper.

Walter Hogben was summoned for assaulting Thomas Tonbridge, of 4, Ethelbert Road, on October 9th. Mr. H.J. Myers defended.

Complainant said he was having a drink in the bar of the Black Bull Hotel, when defendant came in the house with some friends, and started asking about 2, which he alleged witness owed him. On complainant replying that he did not owe it defendant struck him in the face with his fist. Hogben was ordered outside, and when there took his coat off and caught witness by the throat and struck him several times. His daughter got him away.

Charles Bates, 4, Ethelbert Road, corroborated as to what happened at the Black Bull.

Defendant said he was a fruiterer. Complainant owed him 2, and was always making insinuations about it, asking him “if he thought he'd get it”. As regards the affair in the bar, he thought Tonbridge was going to strike him, and he grasped Tonbridge and asked him to come outside if he wanted to quarrel. He would not swear that he did not strike any blows when the scuffle outside took place.

Thomas James Philpott also gave evidence.

The Chief Constable said defendant was bound over for six months for assault in April last.

A fine of 1 was imposed.

 

Folkestone Express 25 November 1922.

Local News.

The following transfer of licence was granted at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday morning: The Black Bull Hotel, from Mrs. Cavey to Mr Albert Edward Springate, Workington.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 November 1922.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday (Mr. G.I. Swoffer in the chair), the licence of the Black Bull Hotel was transferred from Mrs. Cavey to Mr. Albert Edward Springate.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1924.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday morning, the following transfer of licence was granted: Black Bull Hotel, from Mr. Springate to Mr. William G. Wilson, St. Albans.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 January 1924.

Local News.

On Wednesday the Licensing Justices approved the transfer of the licence of the Black Bull Hotel from Mr. A.E. Springate to Mr. W.G. Wilson.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 April 1924.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Friday the Black Bull Hotel was granted an extension of licence for one hour on Wednesday next on the occasion of a musical evening by the R.A.O.B.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1924.

Friday, August 29th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Frank Waller was summoned for assaulting Mrs. Alice Daisy McElroy, and he pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. H.W. Watts appeared to prosecute.

Mrs. McElroy, 26, Athelstan Road, said that on Saturday last she was outside the Black Bull Hotel at 10.05 with her mother. Defendant was there with another man, and they were using very bad language, and she said “Will you moderate your language?” Waller never said anything, but hit her a violent blow in the mouth with his fist.

Mr. Watts: What kind of a blow was it?

Mrs. McElroy: I cannot tell you. All I know, I got it.

Complainant said four teeth were knocked out by the blow. She was bleeding, and her mouth was still bruised. She fell down. She had her purse in her hand. There was 30s. in the purse, and it was gone when she got up. Someone went to her assistance, and took her to the police station. She was bleeding when she got to the police station.

By the Clerk: She had been in the Black Bull Hotel, but did not see defendant there. She only received one blow, and fell at once. She lost her senses, and had to be assisted to her feet. She had not said anything to Waller before he struck her.

Cross-examined by Waller: She did not go up to him, and she did not scratch his face. She was never near him. She got the blow because he ran at her. She was not the worse for drink, she had only had two. She never said anything about his daughters.

Ernest Crumby, brother-in-law of the complainant, 6, Mead Road, said he was with her on Saturday night outside the Black Bull Hotel, and she was sober. Waller used bad language, and said he was not frightened of the best man who came out of the bar, and would take them across the field and fight them for 5s. or 5. Mrs. McElroy asked Waller to moderate his language, and he ran after her, and knocked her down.

Cross-examined by defendant: He picked defendant up off the ground. He did not go down home with Waller.

By the Clerk: He could not say how Waller got on the ground.

Stephen Taylor, 6, Mead Road, said when he was in his back yard he heard a woman screaming, and on going up the road he saw Mrs. Crumby holding Mrs. McElroy up. He brought Mrs. McElroy to the police station. She was sober.

Cross-examined by defendant: He did not see him at the Black Bull Hotel on Saturday night, because he was not there.

Defendant said he went up to the Black Bull Hotel from the Market, and he had a few goods in his hand that he had not sold. He found he was a little too late, and stood talking to Mr. Scamp, who had gone away hopping. Mr. Scamp said “Frank, I owe you 5s., and I will pay you”. He replied “That is right, I could do with it”. Scamp said he was going away hopping, and they stood talking, and then the woman started swearing, and calling him over, and he had never spoken to her in his life. He heard his three girls' names mentioned, and be told her to be off. She slipped in front of him, and he pushed her, and she spun round and fell. The two brothers and father rolled into him left and right, and hit him on the back of the head with a lump of wood. He got up and “dropped” the younger brother of the two on the ground. He went down home, and left the others up there. He told his girls about it, and two of them went up there, but when they got there there was no-one there. He stood in self-defence, as he was not a man who kicked up a row.

Mrs. McElroy was summoned for assaulting Frank Waller.

Waller gave similar evidence to his statement above, and said she scratched him down the face. The woman was completely drunk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watts: He did not strike Mrs. McElroy. He did not see her face was bruised. Any drunken woman was liable to fall on her face and smash it. He was there when she was lying on the ground.

Mr. Watts: Did she lay down on the ground of her own account?

Waller: No, I pushed her down.

Waller said he could not see any witnesses. They had gone off hopping from what he could see about them. He had wired for them, but they had not turned up.

The Chairman said the case against Mrs. McElroy would be dismissed, and the one against Waller was proved.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said there were thirteen convictions against Waller, including five for assault, the last one being in 1920, when he was fined 1.

The Magistrates having retired, the Chairman said it was a very serious charge, and a very brutal assault, and Waller would go to prison for one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 September 1924.

Friday, August 29th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Frank Waller was summoned for assaulting Mrs. Alice Daisy McElroy.

Mr. H.W. Watts appeared for the complainant, who said that on the previous Saturday at 10.05 p.m. she was outside the Black Bull. Defendant and another man were using violent language, and witness asked them to moderate it. Waller struck her on the mouth, knocking out four teeth and sending her to the ground. Her mouth bled, and it was still bruised. The purse which she had in her hand was lost when she got up.

By defendant: She did not scratch his face. She was not the worse for drink.

Ernest Crumby, of 6, Mead Road, brother-in-law of the last witness, corroborated. Cross-examined by defendant, he said that he picked Waller off the ground when he tripped.

Stephen Taylor, of Mead Road, also gave evidence.

Defendant stated that he went to the Black Bull to sell some goods. He was talking to a Mr. Scamp, when Mrs. McElroy started “calling him over”. She slipped in front of the two of them, and he pushed her away, and down she went. He was hit on the back of the head with a piece of timber.

A cross-summons against Mrs. McElroy for assaulting Waller was then heard.

Waller repeated his previous statement and said that Mrs. McElroy told him that she “would give him something”. She “tore him down the face” and he pushed her away. She was completely drunk, and she slipped to the ground.

By Mr. Watts: He pushed her down.

The Bench dismissed the case against Mrs. McElroy, but held that the summons against Waller was proved.

The Chief Constable stated that there were thirteen previous convictions against defendant, five of which were for assault. They were minor offences.

The Magistrates considered the assault a very brutal one, and sentenced Waller to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 21 February 1925.

Local News.

The following extension of licence was granted by the Magistrates at the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday:—Black Bull Hotel, one hour, on the occasion of the Sick and Dividend Society’s annual dinner on the 25th.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1925.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday (before Colonel G.P. Owen, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. J.H. Blamey, and Miss A.M. Hunt) various licensing matters were dealt with.

The licence of the Black Bull Hotel, Canterbury Road, was transferred from Mr. William George Wilson to Mr. William John Bennett. After the Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) had read various testimonials regarding the suitability of Mr. Bennett to be a licensed victualler, the Chairman said that they were glad to hear he was so highly spoken of, and they hoped he would be successful.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 April 1926.

Felix.

By the courtesy of Mr. J. Bennett, the proprietor of the Black Bull Hotel, I was able a few days ago to glance at a large oil painting, the work of an artist of many years ago, on which the old hostelry on the present site is depicted. There the old building - a tumbledown looking old building – is depicted. All around there are nothing but bare fields. Outside the building is an ancient tree, whilst a strangely clad milkmaid stands at the gate. Here indeed is a reminder of the onward march of Folkestone. When Messrs. Nalder and Collyer erected the present hotel the ancients and non-progressives shook their heads. But the enterprise of the firm has been justified. A town has grown up around the hostelry, and it will grow, especially if Hill Road is fully developed. The present proprietor of the Black Bull Hotel is one of those who believe that catering for the needs of the holiday public in the matter of food is one of the needs of the age, and he is hoping to use his establishment in this direction at no distant date, more especially as there is considerable space and well-kept gardens that adjoin it. I have noticed several wayside hotels which, although they have the chance, do not develop on these lines. The other day I heard of a motoring party travelling about the country. They called at a somewhat pretentious kind of hotel and asked for a cup of tea (it was in the afternoon). “Sorry”, said the proprietor, “the kettle don't boil, and the Missus is out”. It is hoped that Mr. Bennett's hope of developing the catering side of his establishment will be rewarded.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 March 1928.

Felix.

I wish someone would relieve me of writing this paragraph, for the simple reason that I cannot find words in the English vocabulary to express myself in a suitable manner. Have any of my readers ever seen a dog or cat suffer and die from the effects of poison? I have. There is no need to labour the point. It is pitiable in the extreme. Why am I mentioning the matter at all? Well, here is the reason. Councillor John Bennett, the newly-elect of the North Ward, and proprietor of the Black Bull Hotel, up to a couple of weeks ago owned a fine Airedale dog. This member of the canine species had a fine pedigree. He was one of the most intelligent dogs I has seen for many a day. Its owner, his wife, and youngsters were all fond of him. Never was there a better four-footed guardian of any premises. Someone, however, probably under the cover of darkness, spread poison in the dog's path. In spite of all efforts on the part of its owner the faithful friend died. Councillor Bennett offered 5 reward for the discovery of the poisoner, and has increased this sum to 10. In the same neighbourhood two other canines have been similarly poisoned. The owners are Mrs. Hazell, West View, Canterbury Road, and Mr. G. Parks, Albion Stores, Albion Road. In these three families there is grief because of the loss of their pets. The poisoner is the most despicable being in the world, and is difficult to detect. He goes out under the cover of darkness and drops death around. He squares his conscience by remarking to himself “I shall never be found out”.

But sure as the sun will rise on the morrow retribution will overtake him. He may escape human justice, but the Creator of all things will in the end exact vengeance. Before leaving this subject I may also mention that twenty or thirty cats have suffered the same end. Why torture these animals with poison? If they need riddance, why not the lethal chamber? That 10 of Councillor Bennett's is waiting for anyone who will give information of the dog poisoner who appears to haunt the Canterbury Road district.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 September 1928.

Friday, August 31st: Before Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Mr. W. Griffin, Miss A.M. Hunt, Alderman W.H. Moncrieff, Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, and Dr. Wolverton.

Robert Todd was summoned for being disorderly and refusing to quit licensed premises. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Mrs. Edith Bennett, wife of Mr. John Bennett, licensee of the Black Bull Hotel, said that at 9.30 p.m. on August 27th she was in charge of the public bar. There was a good number of people there. She noticed Todd standing near the door with a pint glass of beer in his hand. Some months ago he was refused admittance to the house, and had not been in since. Witness told him to get outside as he knew very well she would not serve him. He replied that he wouldn't go until half past ten. She asked him again to go out, and he called her “bad names”. She said she would fetch her husband, and he said “Fetch your old man”.

At the Magistrates' Clerk's request Mrs. Bennett wrote on a piece of paper the names which she alleged defendant called her.

Shown the names, defendant said in decided tones “No, sir”.

Continuing, witness said that eventually her husband came, but defendant still refused to go, and taking off his coat showed fight. Her husband got hold of his arm to eject him and eventually, with the help of his friends, Todd was ejected.

Replying to defendant, witness denied that her husband hit defendant with a glass.

Why did you refuse me admittance? – Because I lent you 5s. when you were hard up and you have not been man enough to come into the house or pay up.

Replying further to the Clerk, witness said defendant was always disorderly when in the house.

Harry Croucher, a barman employed at the Black Bull Hotel, said he saw defendant standing just inside the door of the public bar. Mrs. Bennett said “You had better go out, Todd; you know I don't serve you”. Defendant replied that he would go out until 10.30. He threatened Mrs. Bennett, saying “I'll mix you up amongst these glasses” and “Fetch your ---- old man”. When Bennett came in Todd said “Ah, here he is; I'll show you what I'll do with him”. He pulled his coat open and adopted a fighting attitude. Bennett got hold of defendant and eventually he was ejected. Defendant used both obscene and abusive language.

Todd: Did you see Bennett try to hit me in the face with a pint glass of beer? – No.

Mr. John Bennett, licensee of the Black Bull Hotel, said he was called into the public bar, and there found a man rather under the influence of drink – the defendant – using very obscene language. Witness went up to him and told him he must go, as he was barred the house. He said he would not go until 10.30 and after using a most awful expression took off his coat and attempted to fight. He butted witness with his head.

Inspector Pittock, Folkestone Borough Police Force, said he saw defendant being pulled out of the public bar by his hands. When told he would be reported for refusing to quit licensed premises he said “He can get on with it”. When witness read over the summons to defendant he said “I can't do with it”.

Defendant told the Bench that he said he would leave the Black Bull when he had finished his glass of beer.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said there were no previous convictions against defendant. Mr. Bennett was trying to keep his house clean and defendant had caused a lot of trouble.

Defendant was fined 1 or in default 14 days'. He was given a week in which to pay.

 

Folkestone Express 8 September 1928.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Friday, Robert Todd was summoned for refusing to quit the licensed premises, the when Black Bull Hotel, when he was disorderly, on the 27th August. Defendant pleaded not guilty. Defendant asked for all witnesses to be sent out of the Court.

Mrs. E. Bennett, wife of John Bennett, said she was in charge of the bar at 9.30 p.m. on the 27th August and she saw Todd standing just inside the door. He had a pint glass of beer in his hand. Some months ago she refused him admission to her house, and he had not been in since so far as she knew. She told him to get outside, as he knew she had refused to serve him. She told him to get outside, and he said he was not going until 10.30. She asked him two or three more times to go, and thinking he would go in time she left him alone, but in later she had to fetch her husband, and defendant said “Fetch your old man, and I will show you what I will do with him”. Obscene language continued for some time.

Defendant denied he used bad language.

Mrs. Bennett said her husband came round from the street, and asked him twice to go, and he took his coat off, and showed fight. He got hold of his arm, and tried to eject him, and with the help of Todd’s friends he was finally got outside.

Cross-examined by defendant: Defendant went in, and she did not see him go in. She put his fourpence on the counter, and he refused to pick it up. She did not tell him she would bash his head in. She certainly would have struck him with the funnel if he (defendant) had struck her husband. She would not go round to the defendant because he said he was going to make a mess of her. Some months ago she refused to serve him because he borrowed 5s., and had not repaid it or been in the house. If he was playing push-penny he would use bad language.

Harry Shorter Croucher, barman at the Black Bull Hotel, said he heard Mrs. Bennett say “You know l do not serve you, Todd, you bad better go”. Defendant said he would not go, and then he said he would not go until 10.30. Defendant told Mrs. Bennett “I will mix you up amongst those glasses, ' When Mr. Bennett arrived defendant said “Now I will show you what I will do with it". He thought defendant had had as much drink as he could do with.

John Bennett, licensee of the Bull Hotel, said when he was called to the bar he saw defendant there, who was rather under the influence of drink. Defendant used obscene language. Defendant made five or six attempts to butt him with his head. Defendant was got out of the bar by his friends before the police arrived.

Cross-examined by defendant: He did not throw the beer in his face.

Inspector Pittock said that 10.15 p.m. on the 27th he received a telephone message, and in consequence he went to the Black Bull Hotel, arriving at 10.25. He saw the defendant being pulled out of the premises by four of his friends, and he told him to get away home. He told defendant he would be reported for refusing to quit licensed premises, and he said “Let him get on with it”. He served the summons on Thursday night, and defendant said “I can do with it”.

Defendant said he came out of the Black Bull and walked straight along. Inspector Pittock and two constables met him at the bottom of Sidney Street, and said “Now get home”, and he replied “l am going home, sir”. Mrs. Bennett told him he had to got out, and he said ho would go when he had drank his beer. Mrs. Bennett said she would smash his face with the funnel. She stopped him outside and asked him for some money, and he told her the street was not the right place to ask him for money, and he would not pay it. Mrs. Bennett said “It isn't that, it is your regular custom and your money”, and he replied “You have lost both”.

Defendant was fined 1, or in default fourteen days' imprisonment.

Defendant was allowed one week in which to pay.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 May 1931.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a protection order to Mr. Eric E. Anderson in respect of the Black Bull Hotel.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1932.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, The Mayor, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Alderman T.S. Franks, Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, Mr. F. Seager, Mr. W. Griffin, Dr. W. Nuttall, Miss A.M. Hunt, Councillor Mrs. E. Gore, Mr. S.B. Corser, and Councillor the Hon. Mrs. N.E. Howard.

The Bench granted music licences for the use of wireless concerts at the Ship Hotel and the Black Bull.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1932.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Magistrates were: Alderman R.G. Wood, The Mayor, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Mr. W. Griffin, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Miss A.M. Hunt, Mrs. E. Gore, Alderman T.S. Franks, Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, the Hon. Mrs. N. Howard, Mr. F. Seager and Mr. S.B. Corser.

Music licences were granted to the Ship Hotel and the Black Bull Hotel so that wireless concerts might be given on the licensed premises.

 

Folkestone Express 7 May 1932.

Saturday, April 30th: Before The Mayor, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Alderman T.S. Franks, Councillor W. Hollands, and Mr. W. Smith.

John Scott, a Folkestone business man, residing at Maidstone, was charged with stealing two bronze figures, together of the value of 17, the property of Mr. Eric Edwin Anderson, on April 20th. Prisoner was also charged with stealing two brass vases on April 26th, the articles again being the property of Mr. E.E. Anderson. Mr. B.H. Bonniface appeared for the defence.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said he proposed to take the evidence of arrest only and would then ask for a remand until next Friday.

P.C. Simpson said at 9 p.m. on the previous evening he took up observation on the interior of the lounge at the Black Bull Hotel. There were several people in the lounge, including the prisoner, who was sitting at the side. At 9.25 prisoner changed his position and went over to the fireplace, placing his drink on the mantelpiece above. On the mantelpiece was a brass-figured ashtray, and the prisoner placed his drink next to it. He remained in that position until 10 p.m., when time was called. He then turned round to the mantelpiece, took hold of his drink with his right hand, and took hold of the ashtray with his left, and placed it in the left pocket of his overcoat. He then walked towards the front door. Witness immediately ran round to the front entrance of the lounge and stopped the prisoner as he was leaving. He told him he was a polie officer and that he had seen him take the ornament from the mantelpiece and place it in his pocket. He cautioned prisoner, who replied “Yes, here it is; I admit taking it”. Prisoner handed him the article. He brought prisoner to the station to be detained for enquiries. At the station prisoner asked if he could speak to him. He told him he could, and cautioned him. He then said “I wish to tell you that about a week ago I took two bronze figures from the same place, and a few days afterwards two brass ornaments (produced) also from the same place. The bronze figures are at my house at Oak Leigh, East Sutton, Maidstone, and the two brass ornaments are in my bedroom in Folkestone, where I am lodging”. Witness then proceeded to the prisoner's lodgings, and in the bottom drawer of the chest in the bedroom he recovered the two brass ornaments. He then returned to the station, where he formerly charged and cautioned the prisoner. He replied “I have got nothing to say”.

By Mr. Bonniface, witness said the prisoner was in business in the town.

The Chief Constable then asked for the remand.

Mr. Bonniface asked for a remand on bail. The man was in substantial business in the town. The man had held an excellent character, and he did not think the police would object to bail.

The Chief Constable said he did not object to bail.

The Magistrates granted bail, the prisoner in 25 and one surety of 25, and remanded the case until Friday next.

 

Folkestone Express 14 May 1932.

Friday, May 6thth: Before The Mayor, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Alderman T.S. Franks, Mr. F. Seager, and Mr. W. Smith.

John Scott, a Folkestone business man, residing at Maidstone, was charged on remand with stealing two bronze figures, together of the value of 17, the property of Mr. Eric Edwin Anderson, the licensee of the Black Bull Hotel. Prisoner was further charged with stealing two brass vases on April 26th, also the property of Mr. Anderson. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty, and was defended by Mr. G.W. Haines.

Eric Edwin Anderson, licensee of the Black Bull Hotel, said there were a number of metal ornaments. He recognised the bronze ornaments (produced) as belonging to him. They were kept on the mantelpiece in the lounge. On Saturday, April 23rd, he missed two bronze ornaments, the value of which was between 7 and 10 each. Brass ornaments produced also belonged to him, and they were kept in an alcove near the fireplace. They were missing on April 26th. On April 29th he put a brass ashtray on the mantelpiece to take the place of the bronzes that were missing. On the following Friday that was also missed. He had known defendant about three weeks. He had been in the lounge nearly every night.

Mr. G.W. Haines said the defendant pleaded Not Guilty. He had borne a splendid character, and he was a businessman in Folkestone. The wonder was why he took the articles. There was no reason why he should have done such a thing.

Chief Inspector Pittock said that there was nothing against prisoner, but the police had recovered the bronzes from the defendant's home.

The Mayor said that the Bench, in order that medical evidence could be called with regard to the defendant's state of health, would adjourn the case until Tuesday.

At the Police Court on Tuesday, defendant was again brought before the Magistrates.

Mr. G.W. Haines said that defendant had been examined by Dr. C. Barratt on Saturday, and presented his report to the Bench. He asked that it should not be read in Court.

Chief Inspector Pittock said that defendant bore an unblemished character, and had worked for one firm for 25 years. The police had nothing whatever against him.

After retiring, the Mayor said that the Bench had given careful consideration to the doctor's statement, and they had decided, in the circumstances, to dismiss the case.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 May 1932.

Local News.

When John Scott, a middle aged man, appeared at Folkestone Police Court, three charges of theft were preferred against him. He was charged with having, on April 20th, stolen two bronze figures together of the value of 17; with having, on April 26th, stolen two brass ornaments, value 8s.; and with having, on April 29th, stolen a brass ashtray, value 5s., all the property of Mr. Eric Anderson. Mr. H.B. Bonniface appeared for Scott.

P.C. Simpson said he took up observation in the lounge at the Black Bull Hotel. There were several people in the lounge, including Scott, who was sitting at the side. At 9.25 p.m. Scott changed his position and went over to the fireplace, placing his glass on the mantelpiece above it. On the mantelpiece there was a brass figure ashtray (produced), and Scott placed his glass next to this ornament. Scott remained in that position until 10 p.m., when “Time” was called. He then turned round to the mantelpiece, took hold of his glass containing liquor with his right hand, and with his left took hold of the ornament, placed it in the left hand pocket of his overcoat, and walked towards the front door. Witness immediately ran round to the front entrance of the lounge and stopped Scott as he was leaving. Witness told him he was a police officer, and that he had seen him take the ornament from the mantelpiece and place it in his overcoat pocket. He cautioned Scott, who replied “Yes, here it is”, and handed it to witness. “I admit taking it” he added. Witness took Scott to the police station to be detained for enquiries. At the police station Scott said “I wish to tell you that about a week ago I took two bronze figures from the same place, and a few days afterwards two brass ornaments (produced), also from the same place. The bronze figures are at my house at Oak Leigh, East Sutton, near Maidstone, and the brass ornaments are in my bedroom where I am lodging”. Later witness proceeded to the house where defendant was lodging and in the bottom drawer of the dressing chest in the back bedroom he discovered the two brass ornaments.

Following two adjournments of the case, Scott appeared before the Folkestone Magistrates, on remand, on Tuesday last week, when a medical report as to his condition having been considered, the case was dismissed.

Dr. C. Barrett gave evidence of having examined defendant, the result being the report produced.

Chief Inspector Pittock said there was no record of anything against defendant. He bore an unblemished character. He had worked for one firm for 25 years.

The Magistrates retired, and upon return the Chairman said they had discussed in private the circumstances of the offence, and had decided under the circumstances to dismiss the case.

 

Folkestone Express 7 January 1933.

Wednesday, January 4th: Before Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Mr. W. Smith.

An application for the transfer of the licence of the Black Bull Hotel from Mr. E. Anderson to Mr. R.A. Barber was granted. Mr. Barber has previously held licences in London and Weybridge.

 

Folkestone Express 17 June 1933.

Friday, June 9th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Miss A.M. Hunt, Mr. L.G.A. Collins, and Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens.

Reginald Barber, of the Black Bull Hotel, was summoned that on the 29th May, being the holder of a justices' licence, he sold a bottle of beer to one George Baker, under the age of 14, for consumption off the premises, it not being in a corked or sealed vessel. Defendant pleaded Guilty.

A police constable gave evidence that at about 9.10 p.m. on the 29th of last month he was standing at the corner of Invicta Road, when he saw a small boy going into the side door of the Black Bull Hotel carrying a bottle. When witness got to the hotel the boy came out carrying the bottle full of beer. He asked the boy what he had got there, and he said “A pint and a half of beer for my father”. There was a cork in the bottle, but it was not sealed. He spoke to the barman about it, and he said “No, we have run out of labels. It was served by the landlord himself”. Defendant came through, and he (witness) pointed to the bottle. Defendant said “Yes. I ran out of labels. They have been ordered for three weeks. I sold it myself”. The boy in question was ten years old.

Defendant said he wished to apologise for that offence. Unfortunately his labels had run out. They were served by the brewery and had been on order for three weeks. They did not arrive, and he thought he had been run out for about a day. He did not get a lot of call for bottles. It was mostly sold in bottles already sealed and corked.

The Chairman: If an adult comes, you do not have to seal it, only in the case of children under fourteen?

Defendant: Yes, sir.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes): Of course, this is looked on as being rather important.

The Chairman: It is rather unfortunate that the constable came along at that time.

Defendant: It is, very unfortunate.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said he did suggest that a penalty should be imposed in that case, in order to show the other licensees that the licensing authority did look upon that offence with some seriousness.

The Chairman said that was a child of very tender age in that case, and the Bench thought perhaps defendant should have made a note of that. He would be fined 10s.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 June 1933.

Local News.

A licensee's omission to seal a bottle of beer he sold to a person under 14 led to his appearance at the Folkestone Police Court on Friday last week to answer a summons for a breach of the Licensing Laws.

The defendant was Reginald Barber, the licensee of the Black Bull Hotel, and he was summoned for selling a bottle of beer which was not labelled, to a person under 14, for consumption off the premises.

P.C. Alexander said at 9.10 p.m. on May 29th he was standing at the corner of Invicta Road, when he saw a small boy going into the Black Bull Hotel carrying a bottle. Soon after the boy came out carrying the bottle. He asked the boy what he had got in it, and he replied “A pint and a half of beer for my father”. The bottle was not sealed, and when he went into the bar the barman said “We have run out of labels”, but added that the bottle had been wrapped up. He next saw the licensee, who said “We have run out of labels; they have been on order three weeks”. The boy was aged 10.

Defendant said he wished to apologise. Unfortunately he had run out of labels on this occasion, although they had been on order three weeks. He stated it was not often he sold beer like this.

The Chairman (Alderman R.G. Wood): You don't have to seal it in the case of adults? – No.

The Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) said this was regarded as a rather important matter by the authorities.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) suggested that some penalty should be imposed, so that when these matters were brought before the Magistrates the licensees would realise that they treated them with a certain amount of seriousness.

The Chairman said it was rather an important matter, and defendant would be fined 10s.

 

Folkestone Express 10 March 1934.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Tuesday, March 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Alderman T.S. Franks, Councillor Mrs. E. Gore, Mr. W. Smith, Judge H. Terrell, and Councillor W. Hollands.

An application was received for the transfer of the licence of the Black Bull Hotel from the present holder, Mr. Barber, to Mr. W.H.C. Jackson, of St. John's Wood.

The Chairman asked if it was not a fact that there had been several changes at that house recently.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley): Changes have been far too frequent.

The Chairman said the last one seemed to be about twelve months ago.

The Chief Constable: It was not much over twelve months.

Mr. Barber said he had been there fourteen months.

The Chairman said it was not for them to offer a reason, unless it was on the grounds of redundancy. There was a reason, no doubt, for those very frequent changes.

The Chief Constable: I think it is very obvious.

The Bench agreed to the granting of the transfer.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1934.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

At the adjourned annual licensing sessions, held at the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday, Alderman R.G. Wood presiding, the licence of the Black Bull Hotel was transferred from Mr. R.A. Barber to Mr. W.H.J. Jackson, of St. John's Wood.

The Chairman remarked on the rather frequent changes of licence in connection with this hotel, and the Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said the changes were more frequent than he would wish.

The Chairman said he believed it was about 12 months ago when the licence was last transferred.

Mr. Barber said it was 14 months ago.

The Chairman said it was not the Magistrates' business, unless it was on the grounds of redundancy, but there must be a reason for these changes.

The Chief Constable said he thought the reason was pretty obvious.

The Magistrates agreed to the transfer.

 

Folkestone Express 28 March 1936.

Local News.

Damage, which was estimated at 100, was caused by a fire at the Black Bull Hotel, Black Bull Road, Folkestone. The fire broke out in the public bar close to the fireplace early on Monday morning.

The existence of the fire was first discovered by Miss Hilda Richards, a maid at the hotel. She was in bed when she was awakened by smoke coming out of the fire-place in the room. She quickly went down to Mr. Jackson, the licensee, who inspected the bars. He opened the door leading to the public bar but was met by clouds of smoke and the heat was so intense that he was forced to shut it again. Mrs. Jackson phoned for the Fire Brigade, who turned out very smartly.

Chief Officer Woods and six men came with the Thornycroft tender at about 3.20 a.m. They had to cut their way through the outside door, which opens into the bar from the street, owing to the intense heat at the other entrance. After about two hours’ work they succeeded in extinguishing the blaze with water from the hydrant and by cutting away burning wood.

The fire was caused through a wooden joist, which had been smouldering for some little time, bursting into flame.

 

Folkestone Express 27 April 1940.

Lighting Order.

Folkestone Justices - Dr. F. Wolverson and Mrs. A. M. Saunders - made light work of a heavy list of “black-out” cases at the Borough Police Court on Friday.

As one official (whose name we will not reveal) said, the whole atmosphere was so genial, it was a pleasure to pay five bob, or even ten shillings.

Arthur E. Lacey, Black Bull Hotel, Canterbury Road, elicited the fact that no ray of light could be seen from his room; just a reflection from a ceiling, and the case was dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 18 May 1940.

Lighting Order.

On Tuesday at the Folkestone Police Court, when there was a number of summonses for lighting offences in the black-out, the Mayor (Alderman G.A. Gurr), who presided on the Bench, gave another warning with regard lo lights showing during the black-out. Alderman Gurr said “In view of the altered circumstances regarding the war, greater stringency will have to be observed with regard to the lighting. The public must understand that the regulations will be strictly enforced”.

The Clerk (Mr. C Rootes): And penalties will be heavier.

Arthur Lacey, Black Bull Hotel admitted that a bonfire was burning in his gardens after the black-out time.

P.C. Atkins said on May 1st at 11.55 p.m. he saw a heap of garden refuse on fire in the garden of the hotel and it was lighting up the surrounding area. He went to the hotel and the fire was extinguished by buckets of water.

P.C. Binding said he saw the defendant on the following morning and he told him that he would accept the responsibility for the fire being seen. He informed him that the fire had been lighted two days previously and that it had rained incessantly therefore he did not expect it was burning.

Defendant said the heap was not more than two or three feet high. It was not conceivable that the fire should be alight 36 hours after it was first lighted and before there was a very heavy thunderstorm with a downpour of rain, after which it appeared to have died out. He would see that such a thing did not occur again.

The Bench ordered the defendant to pay a fine of 5/-.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 May 1940.

Local News.

When Arthur E. Lacey, of the Black Bull Hotel, Folkestone, was summoned for a breach of the black-out restrictions on Tuesday, the light which showed during the night was stated to come from a bonfire.

P.C. Atkins said at 11.55-p.m. on May 1st he saw a fairly large bonfire in the garden of defendant’s hotel. He called at the hotel and the fire was extinguished with buckets of water.

P.C. Binding said when he saw defendant the next day he said: “I will accept responsibility for the fire”. Defendant informed him that the bonfire had been lit two days earlier and it had rained incessantly on the day the fire was lighted. He did not think it would have burned up again.

Defendant told the Magistrates that the bonfire was lit 36 hours before. That it should have blazed UD again seemed more like an act of God than negligence on his part because in the meantime there had been a terrific downpour of rain.

The Magistrates fined defendant 5s.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 October 1942.

Local News.

The licence of the Black Bull Hotel, Folkestone, was transferred by the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday from Mr. Lacey to Mr. Christopher Charles Bew of Wickhambreaux.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 November 1945.

Local News.

A young man who damaged an automatic machine in a public house was fined 10/- for wilful damage by Folkestone Magistrates last Friday.

Defendant was Timothy Falvey, who pleaded Not Guilty.

Albert J. Keen, manager of the Black Bull Hotel. Canterbury Road, said on November 9th just before 10 o’clock when he called “Time” Falvey was playing on an automatic machine and he shouted out that a ball had jammed. He told Falvey it was too late as it was closing time. Defendant then turned round and smashed the glass of the machine.

P.C. Duke said he saw Falvey, who stated that he asked the landlord to fix the machine as a ball had jammed. As he refused to do so he (defendant) smashed the glass. Falvey added “I admit I did it; he should have fixed it, then I would not have done it”.

Falvey told the court that he did not deliberately smash the glass. He was tapping the machine and trying to bring the ball into play when the glass broke.

The Magistrates fined Falvey 10/- with 2/6 costs to pay for the damage.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 November 1948.

Local News.

A very enjoyable evening was spent at the Black Bull Hotel on Thursday last week when the saloon bar played the Black Bull darts team. Despite reinforcements by Tommy Fox and some of his friends, the saloon bar lost 8-3. Fox gave a brilliant display during the evening. He hit the lighted end of a cigarette held in a colleague’s mouth, scored nominated doubles with a paper held over the dart board, knocked coins off fingers, palms and glasses held by onlookers, and played darts with four-inch nails.

The licensee of the Black Bull, Commander C.N. Jones, has arranged for Fox and his colleagues of a miners’ team from Aylesham, to play a very strong side next Friday evening. Fox will give an exhibition at the end of this game. The newly furnished lounge will be used for the occasion. All darts players will be welcome.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 September 1951.

Local News.

Walter Henry Todd, 32, of no fixed abode, pleaded Guilty at Folkestone on Tuesday to breaking into the Black Bull Hotel oon August 1st and stealing 50 belonging to the licensee, Mr. Cyril Nicholas Jones. Accused also pleaded guilty to stealing 54 10/- from Mr. James Alfred Thompson, of 73, Joyes Road, Folkestone, on Saturday. He was committed for trial at West Kent Quarter Sessions.

D.C. Payne said at 5.25 p.m. on Saturday he saw Todd in Dover Road. He took him to the police station where, in different pockets, 50 was found in accused’s possession. Todd then made a statement in which he was alleged to have said that some time after 3 p.m. that day he visited 8, Downs Read in order to get a suit. While he was in the fitting room he saw a jacket. He felt in the pockets and found some money. He took some and left some; he did no know how much he took. Referring to the Black Bull Hotel, Todd said at the beginning of August he went to the hotel and opened a door at the back. He went inside and took some money from a handbag and a desk.

Cyril Nicholas Jones, licensee of the Black Bull Hotel, said at 3 p.m. on August 1st there was 50 in the dining room. At the time the doors of the hotel were all locked except the main entrance door. At about 5.20 p.m. he went to his desk and the money was missing.

James Alfred Thompson, 73, Joves Road, Folkestone, an outfitter, carrying on business at 8, Downs Road, said on the Saturday afternoon accused called at his place of business. He gave his name as Todd and an address in Invicta Road. He asked terms for the supply of a ready-made suit. He tried on two suits and one was satisfactory. Todd paid 2 deposit and left about 4 p.m. After Todd had gone witness went to his jacket on a rail in the fitting room and felt for his wallet which should have contained 62 10/-. There was only 8 in it.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 September 1951.

Local News.

After serving two years in prison for housebreaking Walter Henry Todd, 32-year-old plasterer, of Folkestone, was released on July 14th. A fortnight later he stole 50 from a Folkestone public house. On Wednesday, at the West Kent Quarter Sessions at Maidstone, Todd returned to prison to serve a sentence of three years’ corrective training. He pleaded guilty to breaking into the Black Bull Hotel, Canterbury Road, Folkestone, and stealing 50 belonging to Cyril Nicholas Jones and on August 25th to stealing 54 10/-, the property of James Arthur Thompson.

Mr. A.L. Stevens, prosecuting, stated that when the public house closed during the afternoon of August 1st Mr. Jones, the licensee, placed 50 in a desk. About two hours later he discovered that the money had been stolen. On August 25th, continued Mr. Stevenson, Todd went to a house in Downs Road, Folkestone, where Mr. Thompson carried on a business as a tailor. Todd said he wanted a ready-made suit and after trying one or two suits he paid a deposit of 2 on one of them and left the house. While Todd was trying on the suits Mr. Thompson was twice out of the room, leaving behind his jacket which contained 62 10/-. After Todd had left, Mr. Thompson discovered that there was only 8 left in his jacket. A couple of hours later Todd was arrested in Dover Road, Folkestone and although he at first denied the theft, when he was searched he had 50 on him. He then admitted stealing the money and made a statement in which he also admitted stealing 50 from the hotel.

Det. Const. William Payne stated that Todd had eight previous convictions; he asked for two other offences to be considered.

Sir Frederick Gentle, K.C., deputy chairman, told Todd he was reaching the time of life when he was liable to be sentenced to a long term of preventive detention, up to 14 years, if he did not alter his ways.

Todd was ordered to return the 50 found on him to Mr. Thompson.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 April 1952.

Local News.

Approval of plans for alterations to the servery at the Black Bull Hotel was given by Folkestone Licensing Justices on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 November 1952.

Local News.

Folkestone Magistrates on Wednesday approved plans of proposed alterations to the Black Bull Hotel, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1955.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Plans for the provision of a store at the Black Bull Hotel were approved.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 February 1956.

Local News.

A 59 year old credit outfitter, who was said to have told a police officer that he would be 90 next month, was fined 25 and costs at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court, on Tuesday, after pleading not guilty to attempting to drive a motor car whilst under the influence of drink or drugs, on February 7th. Defendant, who was not represented, was Robin George Thomson, of 8, Downs Road, Folkestone.

Mr. R.P. Tunstall, prosecuting, said it was a case in which, because of defendant's state, had he been successful in driving away he would have been a menace on the road. The fact that he could not drive the car was not due to anything wrong with the car, but to something being wrong with defendant.

Dr. E.S. Pearlman said he examined defendant at Folkestone police station at 1.37 p.m. on February 7th, and came to the conclusion that he was under the influence of drink or drugs, so as to be incapable of being in control of a car.

P.C. Atkins stated that he was in Dolphins Road in plain clothes at 12.40 p,m, on February 7th, when he heard the sound of a car being given full acceleration from the direction of the Black Bull Hotel, and he saw Thompson seated in a car in the front drive of the hotel. The sar was stationary, he said. Thompson appeared to be endeavouring to engage the gears, but did not appear to be using the engine at all. Witness came to the conclusion that defendant was under the influence of drink or drugs, and phoned the police station.

P.C. Warner said he arrived at the scene at 12.55 p.m. and saw Thompson in the driving seat of a car. The engine was running and Thompson was trying to engage the gear without success. Witness stated that he asked Thompson “Can I help you? Is there anything I can do?” to which Thompson mumbled a reply which was incoherent. He (witness) switched off the engine, and Thompson got out, but could only stand by supporting himself against the side of the car. Thompson then got back into the car. Witness arrested him, locked the car, and took the ignition key. Thompson said “I am 90 next month”. When charged at the police station Thompson replied “I did pass all the doctor's tests, or did I?”

P.C. Martin said he saw Thompson in the driving seat of his car at 1 p.m. on February 7th; he was smoking a cigarette, and his eyes were glazed and staring. Thompson had to be assisted into the police car, and he refused to stoop to pick up a sixpence which had fallen on the ground. At the police station Thompson was very unsteady on his feet and collided with a wall.

P. Sgt. Barnes said he saw Thompson at the police station at 1.30 p.m. on February 7th, and he asked him if he knew why he was there, but he received only a mumbled reply. Witness told him he would be examined by a doctor, and asked if he had any objection. Thompson replied “Right, but what about my dinner?” Witness stated that he asked Thompson three times if he wanted a doctor or any relative called, on his behalf, but he made no reply. When witness asked him to stand up he made one unsuccessful attempt, and the second time he had to hold the table before he could do so. Thompson was continually smoking cigarettes and was wearing woollen gloves. He burnt holes in the left glove. On his way to the detention room Thompson twice collided with a wall in a short passage.

Giving evidence, defendant said on the day of the alleged offence he drove from Cheriton, and on the Black Bull hill he found the clutch of his car was beginning to fade out, so he pulled off the highway into the forecourt of the Black Bull Hotel. He tried the engine; it was a very cold day, and he thought it was wise to keep the engine warm. After a while he thought he would go home for lunch. He went into the Black Bull for a drink, and came back to the car to warm the engine up again. He revved it and a police officer came up, took his key away, and arrested him. As to driving the car, or attempting to drive it, it was quite out of the question, Thompson added. Had the clutch been in order he would have gone straight home to lunch.

Cross-examined by Mr. Tunstall, Thompson said he made no attempt to drive the car. He did not consider he was under the influence of drink; all he had had was a shandy and a gin. He told the police officer he would be 90 next month “for a bit of fun”.

Thompson produced a pair of what appeared to be fur-backed gauntlet gloves, which he said he was wearing on February 7th, and pointed out that there were no holes in them.

Mr. Tunstall: The officer said you were wearing woollen gloves.

Thompson, who had seven convictions for minor motoring offences, was fined 25, with 4 17/- doctor’s fees, and 2 2/- advocate’s fee. He was disqualified from driving for a year and his licence was endorsed.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1966.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The number of cases of drivers unfit to drive through drink trebled last year, it was reported at the annual licensing meeting at Folkestone on Wednesday.

At the meeting the following licence was transferred: The Black Bull Hotel, Canterbury Road, from Mr. E.E.G. Mansell to Mr. W. R. Scarbrow.

 

South Kent Gazette 22 November 1978.

Local News.

Empty tankards brought few cheers at four Folkestone pubs when beer kegs and bottles ran dry. Regulars had to make do with fruit juice and spirits as a result of a brewery workers' strike at Ind Coope. The brewery supplies local pubs including the Black Bull, Nailbox, Morehall and Railway Bell from its Aylesham depot. After missing three deliveries, pub supplies dwindled last week to nothing.

One landlord said his trade had been cut by 50 per cent, and another claimed his darts league and pool players had turned to lemonade and Coke.

Now customers will be finding what their right arms are for again. The 14 workers at Aylesham agreed to return to work yesterday. A spokesman for the brewery said the strike by a total of 1,750 production and distribution employees was over a pay claim. Most of the other workers agreed to return to work on Monday.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 November 1979.

Local News.

A window was smashed when the Black Bull public house in Black Bull Road, Folkestone, was broken into on Tuesday night. The float of about 30 was stolen from the bar till.

 

South Kent Gazette 17 February 1982.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Publicans' applications for transfer agreed by the Bench include: The Black Bull, Folkestone (music and dancing); Bouverie Arms, Folkestone; Honest Lawyer, Folkestone; Old Harbour Crab and Oyster House (extension to cover restaurant area); Royal George, Folkestone. Approval of plans to alter Folkestone's Pullman Wine Bar was given.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 March 1982.

Local News.

Regulars at Folkestone’s Black Bull pub are on cue to break the world non-stop pool playing record in a bid to raise cash for kidney victim Lee Prothero. Yesterday morning John Winyard and Jack Cathrew chalked their cues and got down to the business of raking in the cash for the 5,000 appeal. Plucky schoolboy Lee, 13, was on hand to see the two men break off in an aim to beat 207 hours and earn a spot in the Guinness Book of Records. The pair are allowed a five-minute break each hour and if all goes well will be breaking open the champagne sometime next Saturday.

According to landlady Mrs Christine McAllister, both men are feeling pretty confident. “If they carry on the way they have been I’m sure they’ll make it”, she said. One of the drawbacks each man faces is a ban on alcohol during the record attempt because, says Christine, it’s likely to send them to sleep and destroy their chances. “I’m expecting our takings to go down”, she quipped. Folkestone Lions, too, have joined the appeal with a 250 cheque delivered to the home of appeal organiser Mrs. Gloria Stone, in Downs Road, Folkestone.

 

South Kent Gazette 9 March 1983.

Local News.

Clerical assistant Gillian Godden had a nasty experience tucking into a jar of seafood. Floating among the cockles in her night-time snack was a cigarette butt. Mrs. Godden, of Thanet Gardens, Folkestone, had difficulty opening the jar, which she bought at the lounge bar of the Black Bull Hotel, Folkestone, on November 4. After eating a couple of cockles she noticed they had a strange taste. Making a closer examination of the jar she found the filter tip end of a cigarette.

And on Thursday Folkestone Magistrates found the firm which sells the jars Guilty of selling sub-standard food.

Bottling firm Leslie A. Parsons and Sons, of Burry Port, Dyfed, Wales, was fined 50 and ordered to pay 25 costs. Managing director Mr.
Leslie Parsons wrote a letter to the court, pleading Guilty to the offence. He asked for the case to go ahead without him appearing because of the distance from Wales to Folkestone.

Mr Michael O’Flaherty, prosecuting for Kent County Council, was taken to Folkestone's Trading Standards offices and sent for analysis. This showed that the cigarette had been smoked, he added.

Giving evidence, Mr. James Bell, a trading standards officer in Folkestone, said he telephoned the firm's managing director, who accepted the analyst's report.

In his letter Mr. Parsons said his company had been going since the 1940s and sells about three million jars a year. Out of more than 90 million jars sold it has only been prosecuted once before, he said. When cockles are collected from the sea bed there is a lot of “bric-a-brac” among them. The factory has a rigorous sorting method and the cockles are inspected before being sterilised and bottled, he added.

Mr. O'Flaherty said he had no information of any previous convictions and as far as he knows the company has an “unblemished record”.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 April 1984.

Local News.

A Cockney night with a Pearly King and Queen is being held to raise money for charity. As part of a nationwide campaign Folkestone's Black Bull pub will be aiming to raise cash for Muscular Dystrophy. On May 12 landlord Pat Gill hopes to hold competitions to encourage customers to dress up in Cockney style.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 August 1984.

Local News.

A pub has been honoured by the Muscular Dystrophy Group of Great Britain for its fundraising work for the charity. Local Chairman David Miller presented the Black Bull in Canterbury Road, Folkestone, with an engraved tankard and certificate signed by Sir Richard Attenborough on Friday. Landlord Pat Gill has raised 464 for research into the muscle-wasting disease in the past three months.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1987.

Local News.

Beer drinkers in Folkestone have passed a bitter milestone in pint prices. This week the Good Pub Guide book was frothed up over Kent regulars digging deeper into their pockets than most of Britain's pub-goers. The guide criticises a one third increase in Surrey, Sussex and Kent during the year “pressing towards the 1-a-pint barrier which London has passed”. But some pubs in Folkestone broke the barrier up to two years ago and finding a brew in the area for less is a problem.

Folkestone landlords this week criticised the guide for being out of touch and blamed high rates plus brewery increases for the pricey cost of their pints.

Geoff Gosford, landlord of the Lifeboat in The Durlocks, said “Prices are quite high, but so are the overheads. Folkestone rates are the same as some London boroughs. Our beers can be expensive, but it is all real ale. We recently had the legendary Conqueror here as a guest ale. It was 1.28 a pint but three pints of that beer was worth nine of any other. I haven't had one complaint about my prices”.

Eileen Lewis, landlady of the Guildhall on The Bayle (1 a pint) said “Some pubs may take advantage and raise prices higher. But the majority are very conscious of the cost of beer to their customers. It is not publicans clamouring for expensive beer, it is breweries”.

Ken Holletts, landlord of the British Lion (1 a pint) said “I have not raised the price of beer since becoming the landlord. All increases have been imposed by the brewery. Our prices are reasonable, and as cheap as you'll find in the town centre”.

Black Bull landlady Maureen Coles in Canterbury Road (prices again in the 1 range) said “Rates and electricity and so on are all expensive and brewery increases take their toll”.

A spokesman for Whitbread, a major brewery supplying Folkestone, said “Beer prices are cheaper in other parts of the country, but Folkestone is no different, really, to most other parts of the South East”.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 May 1990.

Local News.

A fun charity evening at the Black Bull pub raised 573 for muscular dystrophy victim Tony Mathews. The money will go towards the maintenance of Tony's wheelchair and a holiday in Disneyland. Money was also raised for Muscular Dystrophy. Special guests included Tony's mother Helen Mathews, London marathon runner Ian Moore, and Cheriton shopkeeper John Tapping, who is buying Tony's wheelchair. Tony will be getting his chair on Monday, and family and friends are now trying to raise enough money to send the 10-year-old to Disneyland. Anyone wishing to help can make donations to the Tony Mathews Appeal at the National Westminster Bank, Europa House, Sandgate Road.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 January 1991.

Local News.

Pub regulars are laying claim to strips of wallpaper as mementoes of their soon-to-close local. Drinkers at the Black Bull pub will be bidding for the decor in an auction tomorrow from 8.30 p.m. The next week builders will move in and start transforming the pub into a steak house and bar. Money raised from the auction will go to the William Harvey Scanner Appeal.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 January 1991.

Local News.

Crowds filled the Black Bull for a last big knees-up before it is turned into a restaurant. And the regulars at the Canterbury Road, Folkestone, boozer bought up all their favourite parts of the pub and managed to raise 622 for charity. Everything was auctioned off including the carpet and even the wallpaper.

Landlady Maureen Coles said “One piece of the carpet is on its way to Australia. One of our regulars bought it, and he's going these, so if he gets homesick he can look at it and remember his local pub. It was great that the Black Bull's last night was such a success”.

The money raised will go to the William Harvey Scanner Appeal and Barnardo's.

The pub is being turned into an upmarket pub and restaurant.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 July 1998.

Advertising Feature.

Maureen Coles returned as manager to the Black Bull, in Canterbury Road, Folkestone, in October, 1997. She had worked at the pub previously, and having spotted its potential set her heart on running it. Maureen said “The Black Bull is a lovely pub. When I worked here before I knew that I could really make a go of it. It is a friendly, lively place where families can enjoy a few drinks and our superb food – at reasonable prices. Although it is large, the bar area has a very comfortable, relaxing atmosphere, making it feel very cosy”.

The pub boasts a separate dining area, ideal for large parties and families with small children. On the menu is a wide range of dishes. The famous 32oz. steak is very popular, as are the dishes available on the specials board, which changes often.

Maureen continued “We have found our “all for one” menu has been extremely successful because you can have a 3 course meal for just 9. You get a choice on every course, and all starters are 2, main courses are 5 and all desserts cost 2. Our two course Sunday lunch is also very reasonable. Our roast is all home cooked, we use fresh vegetables and cook our potatoes in the traditional way. You can then follow that with the sweet of your choice. It's delicious and costs just 5. Children's meals start from just 1.45. I have the support of extremely good staff, who are friendly and professional. I have worked hard to make the pub a success, and I am very pleased the pub has been highly recommended by the Kent Tourist Board”.

In the main bar area there are pool tables and a big screen showing all the major sporting events. The Black Bull also has a very large garden and barbecue area – an ideal place to enjoy a drink with friends and family on a sunny day.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 November 1998.

Local News.

Television smash Changing Rooms has got a lot to learn from the bar staff at Folkestone's Black Bull pub. For the pint-pulling pair were more than happy to pool their tips money to give the pub's restaurant a facelift while their landlady boss was on holiday.

Wendy Reeves and Liz Stanley, who work at the pub on Canterbury Road, decided it was time the eating area was revamped. And so, with the help of other staff and customers, they worked hard to finish redecorating before Maureen Coles returned from a two week holiday in sunny Spain. Liz said “The dining room area really needed brightening up and we thought it would be a nice surprise for Maureen”. Wendy added “Before we started it was grubby and tatty as it hasn't been redecorated for years. The wallpaper was brown and we repainted it a light blue colour, with a butterfly frieze all around the edge. The night before we were expecting Maureen we stayed up until 4 a.m. finishing the painting and laying the tables in the dining room”.

Customer Duncan McLennan said “We are like a big family, so I was happy to help. I came in here one day for a pint and someone put a paintbrush in my hand – it was a case of all hands to the pumps!”

Maureen was astounded and when she saw what had been done she said “I was completely overwhelmed and couldn't believe what they had done for me”.

 

From the East Kent Mercury, 3 May 2007.

Country's media descends on the "Black Bull" pub.

Brendon Whelan

FOR the landlord of the "Black Bull" pub the hastily improvised hub for journalists covering the earthquake story - it was more than business as usual, the pub was extremely busy.

Brendan Whelan said: "We had lots of camera crews here, all the major TV stations and, of course, the emergency services, who we fed and served drinks.

"We had a band playing that night as part of a birthday party"

Mr Whelan had to check his premises in "Black Bull" Road before opening. He said: "I was coming down the stairs when there was a massive bang and a tremble. I thought it was a bomb.

“I had a good look and we have lots of cracks, but not a lot otherwise.

 

From the Folkestone Herald, 5 September, 2013

BLACK BULL UNVEILED AS A HUNGRY HORSE PUB

Black Bull unveiling 2013

PUB OPEN: Managers Carrie and Chris Richards, Mayor and Mayoress councillors Roger and Pat West cut the ribbon with the help of a mascot.

 

THE "Black Bull" in Canterbury Road has reopened as a Hungry Horse.

More than 40 jobs have been created by the venture, for which the building has been refurbished over the past two months.

The ribbon was cut by Folkestone mayor Roger West on Monday, alongside general managers Carrie and Chris Richards.

A Hungry Horse spokesman said: “The pub has been completely transformed into a modern, family-friendly pub and restaurant. We hope people in Folkestone will be proud and pleased with their new pub and the team look forward to welcoming in customers.”

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

STANLEY John 1782+ Bastions

STANLEY Mrs 1810+

PAGE Mrs 1812+

BIRCH 1823

WYATT John 1832-39+ BastionsPigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1839

HARRISON William 1837-40+ Next pub licensee had BastionsPigot's Directory 1840

SPICER Thomas 1842-50 Next pub licensee had (age 60 in 1851Census) Bagshaw's Directory 1847Bastions

EVES Thomas 1850-55 (age 40 in 1851Census) Post Office Directory 1855BastionsFolkestone Chronicle

DANIELS Charles 1855-Dec/57 BastionsFolkestone Chronicle

Last pub licensee had HARRISON John Dec/1857-64 (age 36 in 1861Census) Folkestone ChroniclePost Office Directory 1862Bastions

FISHER Robert 1864-79 (age 46 in 1871Census) Post Office Directory 1874Bastions (Also of "Eagle Tavern")

FINN George 1879-80 Bastions

KEELER Alfred 1880-81 Bastions

DRAY William 1881 (only listed as baker age 63Census)

POTTS James Quested 1881-82 Bastions

NALDEN & COLLYER 1882 Post Office Directory 1882

HAND Ernesto 1882-84 Bastions

AITKEN Lucy 1884-85 Next pub licensee had Bastions

ERRINGTON John 1885-87 Bastions

SADLER George 1887-95 Post Office Directory 1891Bastions

Last pub licensee had POLLARD Albert 1895-1900+ Next pub licensee had Kelly's 1899Bastions

WARNE William George 1900-05+ Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903Bastions

POWELL Thomas 1907 Bastions

CAVEY Walter 1907-13 Post Office Directory 1913Bastions

CAVEY Mrs Amelia 1913-22 Post Office Directory 1922Bastions

SPRINGATE Capt. Albert 1922-24 Bastions

WILSON William 1924-Mar/25 Bastions

BENNETT William "Jack" Mar/1925-29 Bastions

BRAY Frederick 1929-31 Bastions

ANDERSON Eric 1931-33 Next pub licensee had Bastions

BARBER Reginald 1933-34 Bastions

JACKSON William Henry 1934-37 Kelly's 1934Bastions

LACEY Arthur E 1937-42 Post Office Directory 1938Bastions

BEW Christopher 1942-47 Bastions

JONES Cyril 1947-51 Bastions

BUNDY Albert 1951-58 Next pub licensee had Bastions

CASH Peter 1958 Bastions

WILSON Thomas 1958-59 Bastions

PETTIT Nelson 1959-61 Bastions

MANSELL Ernest 1961-66 Bastions

SCARBROW William 1966 Bastions

ELLIS Alan 1966-68 Bastions

JARVIS George 1968-76 Bastions

LAKER Brian 1976-79 Bastions

HOPPER Harry 1979-81 Bastions

McALLISTER David & GRIFFITHS David 1981-83 Bastions

GILL Patrick & GRIFFITHS David 1983-85 Bastions

MUNN David & BEEDON Arthur 1985-86 Bastions

BEEDON Arthur 1986-87 Bastions

COLES Maureen & CLARK Edward 1987-90+ Bastions

COLES Maureen & BLYTH Simon 1991-92 Bastions

GARTSHORE George & BLYTH Simon 1992-94 Bastions

GARTSHORE George & GRIFFITHS Geoffrey 1994-95 Bastions

GRIFFITHS Geoffrey & RIDLER Jamie & STUBBERFIELD Alison 1995-96 Bastions

GRIFFITHS Geoffrey & MUSEYIN Memish & SNELLING Rebecca 1996-97 Bastions

COLES Maureen 1997-2000 Next pub licensee had Bastions

STANLEY Elizabeth 2000 Bastions

ARTHURS Terence 2000 Bastions

WHELAN Brendan 2001-07+ Bastions

 

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Post Office Directory 1855From the Post Office Directory 1855

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

 

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