DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, June, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 30 June, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1838

Castle Inn

July 2012

77 Forde Road

Folkestone

Castle 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Casstle Inn 1983

Above photo taken and sent by Chris Excell, 9 January 1983.

Castle

Above photo taken just after the cladding had been put onto the walls, circa 1984. Kindly sent by Chris Excell.

Castle Inn

Above photo, date unknown, by Steve Schmid.

Castle Inn, Folkestone

Pictures above and below taken by Paul Skelton, 5 July 2009.

Castle Inn sie view
Former Castle Inn 2012

Above photo kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

 

Their last night is 1 July 2012 and I am informed that this is yet another pub that is going to be turned into a residential home.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1864.

Wednesday 24th August:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, and A.M. Leith Esqs.

General Annual Licencing Meeting – Special Sessions.

Applications for new licence was made by Mr. Minter, and granted, for the following person; Thomas Field, Castle, Foord.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 19 November, 1864.

POSSESSING A LURCHER

Tuesday November 15th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and W. Bateman, James Tolputt and A.M. Leith, Esqs.

Richard Baker appeared on summons, charged with having in his possession a lurcher dog, property of John Richardson.

John Richardson, licensed victualler and general dealer, living at Hythe, said he bought the dog about three months ago. He was standing at his door one morning when Mr. Allen, who served meat at the camp for Mr. Major, passed the door, having a man with him, and dog. He asked 5s. for the dog, but witness ultimately bought it for 4s. and a pot of beer. It was a middle sized lurcher dog, answering to the name of Ben. The man he bought it of seemed to be a looker, and he said he bought it to look after sheep, but it was too fast for sheep. Witness had the dog about two months, and one day, going to Broad Street with the dog, a man claimed the dog. Witness brought the dog with him to Folkestone, and left it unfastened under the manger with his horse in the "Rose" stables. Had not seen the dog till that morning, but had advertised it in the Folkestone Observer. Last Sunday his son saw the dog with defendant.

William Ellen, butcher, confirmed prosecutor's statement as to the purchase of the dog. Did not know the man the dog was bought of, as he had merely given him a ride in his cart on the road. He seemed to be a drover.

Defendant said the dog was his. He bought the dog of his nephew in Foord, giving a donkey for it and a sovereign. He got drunk at Romney Fair and got locked up, and thus lost his dog.

Thomas Fields, landlord of the "Castle Inn," said the purchase as described by defendant took place in his presence, in his house, four or five months ago.

Aaron Baker had brought the dog from Netley Forest, a pup, and sold it as described to defendant.

The bench dismissed the charge, not undertaking to say in whom the right of property in the dog was vested.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 June 1871.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Thomas Field, landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord, was summoned at the instance of Supt. Martin, charged with keeping an open house during prohibited hours on Sunday, the 28th inst. Defendant pleaded Guilty to the offence, and the Bench fined him 20s. and 9s. costs.

The offender was cautioned as to how he conducts his houses in the future, and promised not to offend against the law again.

 

Folkestone Express 3 June 1871.

Wednesday, May 31st: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Thomas Field, proprietor of the Castle Inn, appeared in answer to a summons charging him with having his house open for the sale of drink on the morning of Sunday, the 20th inst. He pleaded Guilty.

Superintendent Martin said he visited the defendant's house at five minutes past eleven o'clock on Sunday morning last. He met two women coming out; one man was in the skittle alley, and four women in the wash house. It was the first complaint he had against the defendant.

Defendant, when called on to answer the charge, said the evidence of Mr. Martin was perfectly correct; he did not dispute it.

The Bench said as this was the first offence, they should fine him 1 and 9s. costs.

 

Southeastern Gazette 3 June 1871.

Local News.

At the Police Court, on Wednesday, T. Field, of the Castle Inn, Foord, and Mr. Phillips, of the Prince of Wales beer-house, were charged with having their houses open for the sale of intoxicating beverages on Sunday morning last. As it was the first offence in both cases, they were each fined 1 and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 30 March 1878.

Inquest.

A sad occurrence took place at Foord on Saturday night. It appears a man named John Epps, a labourer in the employ of Mr. Wilson, left the Castle Inn, Foord, about eight o'clock in the evening to go to his house in Bridge Street. He was intoxicated at the time. Instead of taking the roadway, which is somewhat further, he attempted to cross some fields and garden ground, through which there is no path, and when about half way came to a pond. The appearance of the vegetation would seem to suggest that he fell or laid down, and on getting up again staggered into the pond. He was not discovered until the next morning (Sunday), when he had been dead several hours. An inquest was held at the Black Bull on Monday afternoon before J. Minter Esq., the borough Coroner, when the following evidence was given:

Francis Perry Mascall, a gardener, living at No. 1, Queen Street, identified the body. He said: On Sunday morning, about nine o'clock, I found the deceased in a pond in my field, which is near here. I was going round the pond and saw something strange. On going closer, I saw it was a body. I called to Mr. Goodchild, and told him there was a man or a woman in the pond. The body was laying on it's side, only one ear and part of a cap being out of the water, which was, I should think, about four feet deep, perhaps hardly so much. A Mr. Page and Mr. Goodchild came and stood by the pond, and I went for a policemen. On Saturday evening I believe I met the deceased about eight o'clock, coming into the garden. He passed me, but was not on my premises altogether, so I said nothing to him. It appeared to me that he was going up towards Mr. Page's gate, but he did not turn in. Near the pond I saw some strange footsteps, and some cabbage plants were broken, as if he had laid down. It seemed to me as if he had been trying to get to the other side of the pond, and that he was making a short cut to his home. He did not appear to me to be sober.

William Page, a bricklayer living at Foord, said: I knew the deceased. On Saturday night at eight o'clock I saw him in at Fields', the Castle Inn. He was sitting there when I went in. He asked me if I had any straw to sell. I said yes, but I could not get it then, as it was too late, but that he could have a bundle in the morning if he wanted it. He said “All right”. He did not appear to be much the worse for drink. I don't think he was sober. He went out, but did not say where he was going. My house adjoins Mascall's garden. I saw the footmarks, and am of the same opinion as Mascall. I had never seen the deceased in my garden before. He was not in the habit of going home that way. There were only the footmarks of one person at the spot, and no appearance of a struggle. There was a place where he had fallen down.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said he was sent for between half past ten and eleven on Sunday morning. He saw the deceased, and on examining him found he had been dead some hours. There were no marks of violence about the body. Death was in his opinion caused by drowning.

P.C. Keeler said he assisted to take the body of deceased out of the water. On searching him he found two pounds in gold, eleven shillings in silver, and a farthing in bronze.

Joseph Coles, a mason living at Foord, said he saw deceased at the Castle Inn about eight o'clock on Saturday evening. Deceased left about eight o'clock. He was drunk when he left.

There was no further evidence to show how deceased came in the pond, and the jury returned a verdict of “Found Drowned”.

The deceased man leaves a widow, but no children.

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 April 1878.

Inquest.

A sad occurrence took place at Foord on Saturday night. A man named John Epps, a labourer, in the employ of Mr. Wilson, left the Castle Inn, Foord, about eight o’clock in the evening to go to his house in Bridge Street, and it is said he was intoxicated at the time. Instead of taking the roadway, which is somewhat farther, he attempted to cross some fields and garden ground, through which there is no path, and when about half way came to a pond. He would seem either to have fallen or to have laid down, and on getting up again staggered into the pond. He was not discovered until the next morning (Sunday), when he had been dead several hours. An inquest was held at the Black Bull, on Monday afternoon, before J. Minter, Esq., the borough coroner, when, after hearing the evidence of several persons, the jury returned an open verdict. The deceased leaves a widow but no children.

 

Folkestone Express 13 July 1878.

Thursday, July 11th: Before Colonel De Crespigny and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Henry Cooper was brought up on remand, charged with a violent assault upon James Burvill on the 3rd inst., at Foord.

James Burvill said he was a labourer, living at No. 12, St. John's Street. On Wednesday, July 3rd he went to No. 8, Rose Cottages between six and seven o'clock. Mrs. Shrubsole, his sister, lived there, and the prisoner lodged there. He went to the house for some property that belonged to him. He asked his sister if she would put the things in a basket for him. She said “No”, and he went and got the basket himself. He asked if he should put the things in it, and she said “No”. Prisoner was sitting at the table in the front room. His sister said to him “If he offers to take the things, assist me in putting him out”. Prisoner did not like to interfere until he was persuaded by Mrs. Shrubsole. Prisoner did get up and they had a bit of a scuffle, and witness went out. They handled one another roughly. He went back again, and as soon as he got to the front door he received a blow in the face from the prisoner, who had something in his hand. The blow knocked him down in the passage. Mrs. Shrubsole said “Give it to the ----, he's been asking for it”. He then received another heavy blow on the right cheek whilst he was on the floor. He believed it was a kick. He was almost certain, because he got hold of prisoner's shoe to prevent him kicking again. He was stunned, and recollected nothing after until the doctor was with him. He was then at his own home, and in bed. His face was very much cut, and he could not see for two or three days. His nose was injured, and was still sore. He was confined to bed for five days, and was yet unable to work. When he went to the house the second time he did not see the prisoner before he struck him.

In reply to the Magistrates' Clerk, witness said he did not strike his sister at all. Prisoner did not come into another room and say “Don't strike her again, Jim, but come and take the things when you are sober”. She said he should not have the things at all. Never asked the prisoner to fight, but told him he would not be put out by a man like him; he would sooner walk out. Did not hear prisoner tell his sister to go for a policeman.

In reply to prisoner he said he did not strike his sister four times.

William Fagg, of 73, Peter Street, a labourer, said he was at the Castle Inn with the prisoner and complainant. They had two or three pots of beer, and stayed there about an hour. Prisoner then said he should go and get his tea, and Burvill went out a few minutes after, saying he was going to get some cookeryware. Witness stayed there about ten minutes, and was told by the landlord there was a row. When he got up to the house he saw Burvill on his hands and knees trying to get up, and the prisoner was kicking him. He said to prisoner “Hello, what are you doing with him?” He replied “Look how he has served me”. Prisoner had a little scratch on the nose at the time. He said “You must be a coward to serve a man like that”, and he went to take hold of him, but he ran away, and he had not seen him since until he saw him in the dock. Mrs. Shrubsole said to him “You ----, what do you want in my house?” He told her he had come to protect Burvill. She told him that what he had got served him ---- well right. As he turned to leave the house she kicked him. He stayed outside the door until a policeman came, and then went in. Burvill was leaning against the wall in the passage. He led the complainant home.

In reply to the prisoner, witness said he did not see him bleed much.

Mr. William Bateman, surgeon, said the complainant's eyes were swollen and injured, he had a cut on the left cheek below they eye, and a deep cut running in to the angle of the eye. The cartilage of the nose was broken. At the time he thought he was in considerable danger, but he now appeared to be out of danger. He believed the wounds were caused by blows from a blunt instrument – probably by the toes of the prisoner's boots. They were very unlikely blows to be caused by a fist. The most serious wound was quite in the angle of the eye.

Prisoner had nothing to say for himself, but called Sarah Shrubsole, a widow, living at 3, Rose Cottages, Foord, who said Burvill was her brother and prisoner lodged with her. On the day in question her brother came to her house. He used bad language, and struck her twice on the face with a basket and once with his fist. Her lodger came in from the back room and she asked him to defend her. Cooper told him not to strike her again, and complainant struck him twice. She left the house to fetch a policeman, and when she went by the house Burvill was trying to make Cooper come out to fight. She admitted raising her foot when she put Fagg out, but denied calling after her brother and using bad language.

Mrs. Annie Lepper said she saw Burvill take off his coat and waistcoat in the garden and ask Cooper to go out and fight. She did not hear Cooper's answer. Burvill said “Come out and fight like a man. If you don't, I'll come in and make you fight”, and he then rushed into the house. She heard a scuffle, and Mrs. Shrubsole's children ran screaming, and got over the wall into her garden. Cooper also got over the wall, and she gave him some water to wash his face.

Other witnesses were called for the defence, and at the conclusion of the case the Court was cleared for the Bench to consider the evidence. When the Court was reopened Mr. Boarer stated that the punishment they had decided to inflict was one month's hard labour, and they cautioned the prisoner as to his conduct in future.

 

Folkestone Express 30 October 1880.

Local News.

On Monday evening a rumour prevailed in the town that Mr. Thomas Field, the landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord, had been accidentally killed by falling out of a cart. On investigating the facts it was ascertained that for some time the deceased had been suffering from heart disease, and had been attended by Dr. Mercer. On Monday he had occasion to visit Canterbury, and drove to Dover, journeying from thence by the London And Chatham Railway to Canterbury and back. He left Dover in the evening to return to Folkestone, being accompanied in the cart by a young man, a relative, who was driving. When near the Royal Oak Inn, he suddenly fell from the cart, his companion not having previously noticed anything was wrong with him. Medical assistance was summoned as quickly as possible from Dover, Dr. Long attending the deceased, but he had been dead some time – in fact there is no doubt he died in the cart before he fell. On Tuesday an inquest was held on the body of the deceased, and a verdict of death from natural causes was returned.

 

Folkestone Express 7 April 1883.

Saturday, March 31st: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong C.B., Captain Crowe, and F. Boykett Esq.

John Champion was charged with refusing to quit licensed premises.

The landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord, said the defendant went to the house drunk and called for a pint of beer. He declined to serve him, and the defendant then threatened to “hammer him”, and offered to fight anyone in the bar. He stayed in the house about 15 minutes. He requested him to leave twice, and as he refused to go, he sent for a constable.

Jeremiah Richards corroborated, and said he went for a policeman at the landlord's request.

Defendant was fined 5s. and 16s. costs, or 14 days' in default.

 

Folkestone Express 14 April 1883.

Wednesday, April 11th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Holden Esqs.

Thomas Compton was summoned for refusing to quit the Castle Inn, Foord. The evidence showed that the defendant had been drinking for a long time in the house, and in dismissing the summons, the Bench intimated that proceedings would be directed to be taken against Delo, the landlord of the house.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 April 1883.

Wednesday, April 18th: Before Capt. Crowe, R.W. Boarer, M.J. Bell, and E. Oykett Esqs.

Charles Delo, landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord, was summoned for allowing drunkenness in his house on the 10th April.

The charge was proved and prisoner was fined 2 and 16s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 21 April 1883.

Wednesday, April 18th: Before R.W. Boarer, M.J. Bell and F. Boykett Esqs., and Captain Crowe.

Charles Delo, landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord, was summoned for permitting drunkenness in his house on the 10th April.

 

Mr. T. Young, of Croydon, appeared for the defendant.

Thomas Compton, a labourer, living at Foord, said on Thursday last he went to the Castle Inn, about a quarter to eight in the morning. He remained until half past nine. He had four pints of beer. He returned to the house about a quarter to two, and remained about four hours. He was sober when he went to the house the second time. He bought three pints of beer from Mr. Delo, and besides that he drank with others. At the end of the four hours he was drunk, and could hardly stand. He left about nine to take a pail home. Then he went back. Mr. Delo refused to serve him with any more beer because he was drunk. The landlady told him to leave, but he refused to go.

In reply to Mr. Young, the witness said the beer he drunk was not a large quantity of beer for a whitewasher to “put away”. He was the landlady's brother. He did not drink four pints of beer every morning. He could drink more. He did not leave the premises from two o'clock until nine. Mr. Delo served him with all the beer except one glass. He remembered shoving the landlord, but could not say what time it was. That was because he would not serve him. Did not know that he broke a window in trying to get at the landlord.

P.C. Kennett said he was called to the Castle Inn at a quarter to eleven by Mrs. Delo, the landlady. He found Compton drunk in the taproom, lying on the table. He took Compton into custody for being drunk and disorderly. He understood Sergeant Butcher had been called to eject Compton. He had to get assistance to hold him up. Mrs. Delo said he had been very riotous and breaking glass.

Mrs. Delo had been subpoenaed, but a medical certificate signed by Dr. Eastes was put in that she was not well enough to attent.

Sergeant Butcher, who was called for the defence, said he was sent for to the Castle Inn about half past six. He was asked if he would assist in expelling Compton. They went into the taproom and found Compton asleep, and he therefore said “Let him sleep”. There had been several complaints about the way in which the house had been conducted, but there had been no charge against the landlord.

James Richards, who was in the Castle when Compton went in, said he heard Delo refuse to serve him. He thereupon assaulted Delo.

Richard Chidwick gave similar evidence.

Mr. Young urged that there was not a title of foundation for the charge, and that his client had done everything he possibly could to conduct his house in a proper manner.

The Bench, however, considered the case proved, and fined the defendant 2 and 16s. 6d. costs, or one month's imprisonment, but did not endorse the license.

 

Folkestone Express 29 September 1883.

Wednesday, September 26th: Before W. Bateman, R.W. Boarer, J. Clark and J. Holden Esqs., Colonel De Crespigny, and Alderman Caister.

This was the adjourned licensing day.

Charles Delo applied for a renewal of the license to the Castle Inn. Mr. Martin Mowll appeared on behalf of the applicant.

Superintendent Taylor opposed on the ground that the applicant had been convicted on the 18th April for allowing drunkenness, and since that time the house had been conducted in such a manner as to cause annoyance to the people who attended St. John's Church. He stated in evidence that he had had complaints from the Rev. Mr. Russell and Colonel De Crespigny. He also said that Delo was a man of very dissipated habits. He had not been convicted of drunkenness, but was seldom sober. His wife appeared to be a very respectable woman, and did all she could to have the house managed in a better manner.

In reply to Mr. Mowll, Superintendent Taylor said the reason he had not given notice to oppose the license at the general annual licensing day was that he did not consider there was sufficient ground until he received an intimation from the Bench.

The Bench granted the license, but advised the applicant to let the house, because, in the event of any other complaint being made against it the license would be forfeited.

 

Folkestone Express 5 April 1884.

Auction Advertisement.

Folkestone.

Notice of Auction Sale of Valuable Freehold Public House.

T.J. Harrison has been favoured with instructions to sell by Auction, in the month of April next, the

CASTLE INN, FOORD, FOLKESTONE.

Doing a good business.

Further particulars of the Auctioneer, 17, Guildhall Street, Folkestone, and the Vendor's Solicitor, W.G.S. Harrison, 4, Cheriton Place, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 19 April 1884.

Auction Advertisement.

FOORD, FOLKESTONE.

Notice of Auction Sale of a Valuable Freehold, Fully Licensed, Public House.

Mr. T.J. Harrison has been favoured with instructions to sell by Auction, at the West Cliff Hotel, Folkestone, on Tuesday, the 6th of May, 1884, at Three o'clock in the afternoon, all that valuable Corner, Freehold, Fully Licensed Public House.

Known as the Castle Inn, situate in Foord, Folkestone.

Comprising on the Ground Floor – Double Bar, Parlour, Sitting Room, Large Club Room. First Floor – Three Bedrooms, W.C., and Large Attic, together with Kitchen, Yard and Outhouses in Rear, and Commodious Cellarage in Basement.

In the occupation of the Owner, the Castle Inn is a well-known old established business, and has been in the occupation of the same family for the last 22 years, and in distance less than half a mile from the Town Hall, Folkestone. The district is a populous and increasing one, and the house contains every means for carrying on a large and productive trade. The present sale affords an excellent opportunity either for a man of business, or for investment, and for an increasing trade.

The bar fixtures and fittings, and all the furniture and effects, utensils of trade, and the licenses (an inventory of which will be produced at the time of sale) will have to be taken by the purchaser at a valuation in the usual way. The Stock-In-Trade is also to be taken at the like valuation.

Particulars and Conditions of Sale may be had at the offices of the Auctioneer, 17, Guildhall Street, Folkestone, and of W.G.S. Harrison, Vendor's Solicitor, 4, Cheriton Place, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 3 May 1884.

Advertisement.

The Castle Inn, Foord.

The Sale of this Property, advertised to take place at the West Cliff Hotel, on Wednesday next, May 6th, is WITHDRAWN FROM PUBLIC AUCTION, and will be let on Lease. For further particulars, apply at my Offices, 17, Guildhall Street, Folkestone.

T.J. Harrison,

Auctioneer and Valuer.

 

Folkestone Express 12 July 1884.

Saturday, July 5th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs.

The license of the Castle Inn, Foord was transferred to Mr. Tunbridge.

 

Folkestone Express 10 November 1888.

Wednesday, November 7th: Before H.W. Poole Esq., and Alderman Banks.

Mr. Hills applied for a transfer of the Castle Inn, Foord.

 

Folkestone Express 15 December 1888.

Wednesday, December 12th: Before H.W. Poole and W. Wightwick Esqs.

Transfer of License.

The licence of the Castle, Foord, was transferred to Alfred Hills.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 December 1894.

Local News.

Last Saturday at the Borough Police Court, before Messrs. Banks, Herbert and Pledge, the licence of the Castle Inn, Foord Road was temporarily transferred to Edward Judd, late commercial traveller, applicant stating that he was a bona fide tenant. Messrs. Nalder and Collyer's agent and traveller were present, and produced written testimonials as to applicant's character.

Note: Date is at variance with information in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 22 December 1894.

Saturday, December 14th: Before Aldermen Banks and Sherwood, and W.G. Herbert Esq.

Transfer of Licence.

Edward John Judd applied for temporary authority to sell at the Castle Inn, Foord. Granted.

Note: This transfer is at variance with dates in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 January 1895.

Local News.

At the Town Hall on Wednesday, before Messrs. Banks, Gilborne and Wightwick, transfer of licence was granted to the following – C.J. Judd to the Castle Inn, Foord Road.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 March 1897.

Wednesday, March 10th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, and J. Pledge.

Mr. Halke (sic) was granted the transfer of the licence of the Castle Inn, Foord.

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 19 May, 1900. Price 1d.

THURSDAY

Before Dr. W. H. Nethererclift (in the chair), and Mr. T. Wacher.

THE CHARGES AGAINST AN INSURANCE MANAGER

Thomas William fellows, lately residing in the Borough, Canterbury, was charged on remand with falsifying the accounts of the East Kent branch of the Pioneer Life Assurance Company, of which be had been tee district manager.

Mr H. Broughton again appeared for the prosecution.

Frank Scotland of the accounting department of the Pioneer Company, produced five documents given him by the head office which were originally sent in by prisoner when acting as an agent at Ashford. Witness remitted him 4s. 10d. (for which he gave the receipt produced.

Mr. Broughton said that something over 7 was found on prisoner when he was arrested, 7 of which he had borrowed from a lady in Court, who had made arrangements to go to America with him. She drew the money out of the Post Office Savings Bank and handed it to prisoner. He (Mr. Broughton) had spoken to prisoner about it, and he had expressed a wish that the lady (Miss Hubbard) should have the money back. He (Mr. Broughton) asked the Bench to make an order that the money should be handed over to her by the police. - The Bench complied.

A second charge against prisoner of embezzling 6 7s. 8d. which he had received as premium for the renewal of a life assurance policy on the 24th April, was then gone into.

John William Morton, of 16, Orange Street. Canterbury, travelling inspector to the company, having repeated his evidence as to prisoner's duties, Essu Balke, landlord of the “Castle Inn,” Folkestone, deposed that on the 24th April last, he paid prisoner 6 7s. 8d. as a renewal premium on the life on his son. He paid him in cash and received the receipt produced.

By prisoner:- Witness understood that he (prisoner) was collecting the money for an agent named Armstrong, and that he would get his commission just the same. Prisoner gave witness back 5s. which Armstrong owed him.

Frank Scotland deposed that any payment received by a district manager on the 24th should have been remitted so as to reach witness on the 28th. He had not received from prisoner any accounts or remittances since April 24th.

By prisoner:- No accounts had been received from any agent in prisoner's district for the week commencing 24th April.

Mr. Morton (recalled) produced a letter which he received from prisoner on the 28th April.

Mr. Broughton re-read the letter, which was to the effect that prisoner gave up all connections with the company, and sent back stationary, etc.

Prisoner, who reserved his defence, was committed for trial at the Assizes.

On bail being applied for Mr. Broughton strongly objected. He said that prisoner was a married man, but at the time of his arrest he was preparing to sail to America with another lady. He had, in fact, paid 2 deposit on his passage money.

The Bench declined the bail.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 October 1900.

Saturday, October 20th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, and Messrs. J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert, J. Pledge, and W. Wightwick.

The transfer of the licence of the Castle Inn to Albert Pollard was agreed to.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 December 1901.

Monday, December 16th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Messrs. W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey, and G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

George Edward White was charged with having been drunk and disorderly in Foord Road about 9.10 p.m. on Sunday night.

P.C. Taylor said prisoner was drunk and fighting with another man outside the Castle Inn.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. Bradley): Where is the other man?

Witness: He ran away.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve): He had more sense than this man.

Prisoner said he was very sorry it had occurred. He had never been there before.

He was fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1903.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held in the Town hall on Wednesday. In view of the opposition by the police to a number of the existing licences extraordinary interest was evinced in the meeting, and when the proceedings commenced at eleven o'clock in the morning there was a very large attendance, the “trade” being numerously represented. Representatives of the Folkestone Temperance Council and religious bodies in the town were also present, prominent amongst them being Mr. J. Lynn, Mrs. Stuart, and the Rev. J.C. Carlile. Prior to the commencement of business the Licensing Justices held a private meeting amongst themselves. When the doors were thrown open to the public there was a tremendous rush for seats. The Justices present were the following:- Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Mr. J. Pledge, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

Before proceeding with the business, the Chairman announced that at the Annual Licensing Meeting the Justices adjourned the renewal of 23 full licences and five on beer licences, and directed the Chief Constable to give notice of objection to the owners of the licences of the following nine houses:- Providence (Arthur F. East); Marquis Of Lorne (William R. Heritage); Granville (Charles Partridge); Victoria (Alfred Skinner); Tramway (Frederick Skinner); Hope (Stephen J. Smith); Star (Ernest Tearall); Bricklayers Arms (Joseph A. Whiting); and Blue Anchor (Walter Whiting). Since the former sessions the Justices had inspected all the houses objected to, and considered the course which they ought to pursue with respect to the same, with the result that they had directed the Chief Constable to withdraw the notices of objection served by him with respect of the Victoria, Hope, and Blue Anchor, and to persist in the opposition to the following:- Providence, Marquis Of Lorne, Granville, Tramway, Star, and Bricklayers Arms. As regarded the remaining 15 full licences and five beer licences they would renew the same this year, and deal with them next year according to the circumstances.

With respect to the Packet Boat, the Brewery Tap, and the Castle they ordered the back entrances of the licensed premises to be closed within 14 days from this date.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. T.J. Vaughan, and Mr. J. Stainer.

Following, in most cases, orders for temporary authority, full transfers of licences in relation to the following houses were granted: The Castle Inn, Foord Road, held by the late Mr. Pollard was, as a temporary measure, transferred to the widow.

 

Folkestone Express 11 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and J. Stainer Esqs., and Alderman Vaughan.

A temporary authority was granted to Mrs. Pollard, widow of the late Albert Pollard, for the Castle Inn.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The following licence was transferred: Castle Inn, Foord Road, to Mrs. Pollard, wife of the late landlord.

 

Folkestone Express 5 September 1903.

Wednesday, September 2nd: Before W. Wightwick, E.T. Ward, and J. Stainer Esqs.

The licence of the Castle Inn was transferred to Mrs. Pollard, widow of the late Alfred Pollard.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 September 1903.

Wednesday, September 2nd: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, E.T. Ward, and J. Stainer.

Licence was transferred as follows: Castle Inn, Foord, from Albert Pollard, deceased, to his wife, Mary Pollard.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 February 1904.

Monday, February 15th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, Lieut. Cols. Westropp and Fynmore, Mr. W.C. Carpenter, and Mr. G. Stainer.

George Henry Higgins was charged with the theft of a clock, valued at 30s., in April, 1902.

Mr. Sidney Harris, a watchmaker, living at 14, South Street, said that he had employed the prisoner between March and April, 1902. The prisoner had then started business for himself at 1, Boscombe Road, and about April 20th witness had given him a clock to repair. This had not been returned, and in June witness found that he had left the shop and disappeared, together with the clock. Witness had then informed the police, and a warrant for the arrest of the prisoner was issued. The clock produced was that which had been stolen.

Ellen Lucy Edith Pollard said that she was landlady of the Castle public house, Foord Road. About June 1st, 1902, a man named Burrell had sold the clock, which she recognised, to her husband for 30s.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said that he took over the charge of the prisoner at Cavendish Road police station, London. On the journey to Folkestone prisoner had said that he had given the clock to James Burrell to sell for him. When formally charged he confessed that he had stolen the clock in order to obtain food for his children.

The prisoner denied the evidence of Detective Sergeant Burniston with regard to his words in the train.

A sentence of one month's hard labour was imposed.

 

Folkestone Express 20 February 1904.

Monday, February 15th: Before E.T. Ward, W.C. Carpenter and J. Stainer Esqs., Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, and Lieut. Cols. Westropp and Fynmore.

George Henry Higgins was charged with stealing a clock in April, 1902.

Sidney Harris, a watchmaker, of 14, South Street, said in March, 1902, prisoner went to his shop and asked for work. He employed him for a time. In April of the same year he accompanied witness to No. 1, Boscombe Road, where h hired a part of the shop to do business on his own account. About the 20th of April witness handed to prisoner a clock to repair. He called about a week after and asked to be allowed to keep it a few days longer, and witness assented. In June he ascertained that prisoner had left the shop and taken the clock with him, and in consequence witness gave information to the police and applied for a warrant. He identified the clock produced as his property, and valued it at 30s.

In answer to prisoner, witness denied that he had the clock for sale on commission.

Ellen Lucy Edith Pollard, landlady of the Castle public house, Foord Road, said about the 1st of June, 1902, a man went to the inn and offered her husband a clock for sale. It was not the prisoner. Her husband bought the clock for 30s. The man of whom he bought it was named Burrow or Burrell, and he lived in Ship Street.

Prisoner said the man only gave him 8s. for the clock.

Det. Sergt. Burniston said on Saturday he received the prisoner at Cavendish Road Police Station, Balham, London, and arrested him on a warrant. Prisoner said he would tell him all about it at Folkestone. On his way down he said “I gave it to James Burrell to sell for me, and he told me he sold it for 30s. to the landlord of the Castle public house”. When formally charged at Folkestone, prisoner said “I shall plead Guilty. I took the clock because I had no money. My wife was in hospital, and I wanted to buy some food for my children”. He received the clock from Mrs. Pollard.

Prisoner denied telling Burniston the story he had related, and said he did not know where the clock had gone to, or what amount it was sold for.

The Bench sentenced the prisoner to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 20 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 20th: Before Messrs. G. Spurgen and W.G. Herbert.

The temporary transfer of the Castle Inn, Foord, was applied for by Mr. Attwood, who for 20 years has been park keeper at Radnor Park, Mrs. Pollard being the outgoing tenant.

The application was granted, but Mr. Herbert expressed the opinion that Mr. Attwood was not acting very wisely in giving up his appointment to become a licensed victualler.

The applicant and the officials were kept waiting a long time before two licensing justices could be found. After some time Mr. Herbert arrived, and the services of Alderman Spurgen were procured from the adjacent committee room, where he was attending to the town's business.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 23 December 1905.

Local News.

On Wednesday morning at the police court, Mr. Attwood, late Radnor Park keeper, applied for the transfer of the licence of the Castle Inn, Foord, from Mrs. Pollard. Mr. Herbert and Alderman Spurgen were on the Bench, and the former said the licence would be granted, but they both thought Mr. Attwood was very stupid.

Mr. Attwood: I hope not.

Mr. Herbert: We hope it will turn out all right for your sake.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 20th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert and Alderman G. Spurgen.

An application for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, from Mrs. Pollard to Mr. Attwood was granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Daily News 24 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. E.T. Ward, R.J. Linton, T.J. Vaughan, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, and Major Leggett.

Mr. W. Attwood's application for the transfer of the licence of the Castle Inn, Foord, was acceded to.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor Carpenter, Aldermen T.J. Vaughan and W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggatt and Mr. Linton.

The following licensed premises were transferred:- The Castle, to Mr. W. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Express 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, E.T. Ward, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

The following licence was transferred by the Magistrates: The Castle Inn, from Mrs. Pollard to Mr. E. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Major Leggett, Mr. E.T. Ward, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Castle Inn was transferred from Ellen Lucy Pollard to Wm. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Daily News 24 May 1907.

Friday, May 24th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Swoffer, Vaughan, Ames, Stainer, Boyd, and Hamilton.

John Minter pleaded Not Guilty to damaging a glass panel.

P.C. Bourne said at 10.50 last night he was in Foord Road opposite the Baths. He observed the prisoner near the Castle Inn, where he saw him throwing something at the public house, and heard a crash of glass. Witness went over, and found the glass panel of the door broken. He went after the prisoner and told him he should charge him with breaking the glass panel of the door. Prisoner replied “Yes, I meant to do it. The landlord wouldn't let me have any more beer, and chucked me out. I don't care if I get three months for it”. Witness brought him to the police station, and charged him with breaking the panel, value 45s.

William Attwood, landlord of the Castle Inn, said about 10.50 his son called his attention to a crash of glass, and on going into the bar he found a large stone lying on the floor. The prisoner came into the house about 9 o'clock, and left about a quarter to ten. Witness had to put him out of the bar because he used very indecent language and refused to leave. He heard prisoner say something about smashing a glass. He valued the damage at 45s.

The prisoner said he threw the stone at a dog, and the stone bounced through the window.

He was sentenced to two months' hard labour.

Prisoner: Thank you.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 May 1907.

Friday, May 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J. Stainer, and Major Leggett.

John Wm. Minter was charged with wilfully breaking the glass panel of a doorway of the Castle Inn.

P.C. Bourne said at 10.50 p.m. he saw the prisoner throw something towards the house, and heard the smashing of glass. The glass panel of the door to the public bar was broken. Prisoner walked away, but witness stopped him, and told him that he would be charged with the offence. Prisoner said “Yes, I meant to do it; that old landlord would not let me have some more beer, and threatened to chuck me out. I don't care whether I get six months for it”. Prisoner had been drinking, but appeared to know what he was doing.

William Attwood, landlord at the Castle Inn, estimated the damage at about 45s. Witness had seen defendant at about 7 p.m. in the public bar. Prisoner left three quarters of an hour after. Witness had to put him out of the bar because he would not cease using obscene language. As he refused to leave when requested to do so, witness picked him up and put him out. Accused said something about smashing the glass.

Prisoner said he had no intention of smashing the window. He threw at a dog – a kind of collie dog – that was passing by.

It was stated that prisoner had been convicted eight times for drunkenness.

The Mayor said prisoner was a disgrace to civilisation. The sooner he was out of the town the better. The Bench sentenced him to two months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 1 June 1907.

Friday, May 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggatt, and J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and G. Boyd Esqs.

John William Minter was charged with wilfully breaking a pane of glass at the Castle Inn, Foord, the property of William Attwood.

P.C. Bourne said at 10.50 on Thursday evening he saw prisoner standing in front of the Castle Inn, and also saw him throw something in the direction of the public house and heard a smash of glass. He went up to the door and saw a glass panel was smashed. He followed prisoner, overtook him, and charged him with wilfully breaking the glass panel of the door. He replied “Yes. I meant to do it. That old landlord would not let me have any more beer just now, and chucked me out. I don't care if I get three months for it”. The value of the glass, he understood, was 45s. Prisoner had been drinking, but appeared to know quite well what he was doing.

In reply to prisoner, witness said he saw no dog.

William Attwood said his son called his attention to the smash of glass. He went to the bar and picked up the stone produced. There was a large hole in the glass panel. The damage was 45s. Prisoner was in the bar about nine o'clock, and left at a quarter to ten. He then put him out of the bar because he was disorderly, and using filthy language. He only had half a pint of beer during the whole time he was there. He heard prisoner say something about smashing the glass.

Prisoner said it was an accident. He had no intention of breaking the window. He “fired” at a dog, and the stone bounced off.

The Chief Constable said the mean had been eight times before the Bench, chiefly for drunkenness.

The Bench sentenced the prisoner to two months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 27 November 1907.

Wednesday, November 27th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. Vaughan and Fynmore.

An application was made by Mr. Attwood jun. for the temporary transfer of the Castle Inn from Mr. Attwood sen. to himself. Granted.

 

Folkestone Express 30 November 1907.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday, before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore, the licence of the Bouverie Arms was temporarily transferred from Mr. S. Lester to Mr. Attwood, and the Castle Inn, Foord, was also temporarily transferred from the latter to his son, Mr. P.A. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 November 1907.

Wednesday, November 27th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore.

Applications for the transfer of the Bouverie Arms from Mr. Lester to Mr. W. Attwood, sen., and that of the Castle Arms (sic) from Mr. Attwood, sen., to Mr. Attwood, jun., were granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 4 December 1907.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. Herbert, Fynmore, Boyd, Carpenter, and Leggett.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms was transferred from Frederick Lester to William Attwood, and the licence of the Castle Inn from William Attwood sen. to Percy William Attwood jun.

 

Folkestone Express 7 December 1907.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs.

The following transfer of alehouse licence, for which temporary authority had been granted, was confirmed: Castle Inn, from Mr. W. Attwood to Mr. P.W. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 December 1907.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and G. Boyd, Messrs. W.G. Herbert and R.J. Linton.

It was a special session for the transfer of licences. That of the Castle Inn was transferred from Mr. W. Attwood, senior, to Mr. P.W. Attwood, junior.

 

Folkestone Daily News 6 July 1908.

Monday, July 6th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Wood, Fynmore, and Jenner.

Frederick Loach was charged with wilfully breaking a plate glass window at the Castle Inn, Foord, on Saturday.

Frederick Percy Attwood said he was the landlord of the Castle Inn. On Saturday night the prisoner came in and asked for something to drink, but as he was drunk witness refused to serve him. Witness asked him to leave, but as he declined to do so he put him out. Witness immediately heard a crash, and saw prisoner's fist through the window. On going out, prisoner said “Now you can have me locked up”. Witness gave him into custody.

Prisoner said he put his hand up to save the door being slammed in his face, and his hand went through the glass panel.

The Chief Constable said prisoner was one of his regular customers, and there were several charges against him.

He was sentenced to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 11 July 1908.

Monday, July 6th: Before Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Alderman Vaughan, and Messrs. C. Jenner and R.G. Wood.

Frederick Loach, whose right wrist was bandaged, was charged with wilfully and maliciously breaking a plate glass panel at the Castle public house, Foord, on Saturday night. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Percy William Attwood, landlord of the Castle Inn, said he was in the bar on Saturday night, when prisoner came in. He had had enough to drink, and witness refused to serve him with more. He asked prisoner several times to leave, and eventually he had to put him out into the street. Directly witness shut the door, he heard a crash and saw an arm come through the glass panel. He went outside and prisoner said “There you are; now you can have me locked up”. Blood was running from prisoner's hand. He gave information to the police, and prisoner was taken to the police station. The cost of replacing the panel was 2 5s.

Prisoner endeavoured to prove that the panel was broken by an accident.

The Chief Constable said Loach was one of their regular customers. He had been there six times for various offences. When he got a little money he spent it on drink.

Loach was sent to prison for one month with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 October 1908.

Saturday, October 3rd: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, and Councillor C. Jenner.

Ellen Hall was charged with being drunk and disorderly in St. John's Church Road on Friday. She pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Watson deposed that at 11 o'clock the previous night he was on duty in St. John's Church Road, where he saw the prisoner, very drunk. She was swearing about a man called Nash, and also used bad language to witness. He requested her to go home, but she refused. Witness then took her into custody, and brought her to the police station, and charged her with being drunk and disorderly. That was a usual occurrence almost every night with prisoner, and there were a great many complaints against her.

P.S. Lawrence deposed that at ten minutes past eleven the previous night he was on duty at the police station, when the prisoner was brought in by the last witness. She was very drunk and abusive.

Susan Button said that her sister (the accused) went out the previous night at about nine o'clock to get a bottle of stout from the Castle Inn. She came back, and then went out again at about ten o'clock. She was not intoxicated then. Witness went out and saw a lot of people in the street with a policeman. Her sister was there. Witness brought her in and would not let her go out again. Witness locked the door and kept the key, but her sister was determined to go out, so she gave way. She did not hear of her any more until she was told that she had been taken to the police station. Witness did not hear any noise.

Prisoner corroborated the evidence of her sister, and denied using bad language.

A fine of 10s. was imposed for being drunk, 10s. for being disorderly, and 6s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 10 April 1909.

Monday, April 5th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Frederick George Fennell, a man with a wooden leg, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Foord Road. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Waters said at 11.20 on Saturday night he saw the prisoner outside the Castle Inn, Foord Road. He was drunk, shouting and swearing. When requested to go away, he refused to do so. As he had previously spoken to him at about half past ten, he took him into custody, when he became very violent. With the assistance of P.C. Ashby, he (witness) got him to the ground and handcuffed him. They also had to tie his legs together and put him on a motor coach to get him to the police station.

Prisoner said he was not drunk. Ashby came behind him and threw him to the ground. He had not had a drop of drink. The Magistrates could see where the police knocked him about. He had his eye blacked and his head cut.

P.S. Osborne said when the prisoner was brought to the station he was very drunk and making use of filthy language.

Prisoner made allegations against the police that they punched him four or five times in the mouth when he was lying on the ground handcuffed. They also kicked him. He had never, he said, had policemen knock him about in that town, and he had never knocked anyone about.

The Chief Constable said there were ten previous convictions against Fennell, eight for being drunk and disorderly, one for assaulting the police, and one for stealing, the last being 2 years ago.

Fined 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs, but in default he went to prison for seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 8 July 1910.

Friday, July 8th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Jenner, and Fynmore.

Albert Carter was charged with being drunk and incapable yesterday.

Sergt. Sales deposed that he saw defendant at 2.30 in the afternoon in Foord Road near the Public Baths. He was very drunk, and went into the Imperial Hotel, but the landlord refused to serve him. Defendant then went into the Red Cow public house and was again refused, and went in the direction of the Viaduct and up Derby Steps, where he had to hold on to the railings to keep himself from falling. Witness, with the assistance of P.C. Allen, took him into custody.

P.C. Allen and Sergt. Simpson corroborated.

Defendant said he was not drunk. He had been ill for five years, and a very little drink overcame him.

A fine of 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs, or 7 days' was imposed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 July 1910.

Friday, July 8th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Alderman C. Jenner.

Albert Carter, on bail, was charged with being drunk and incapable. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

P.S. Sales deposed that at about 2.30 the previous afternoon he was in Foord Road, near the Public Baths, when he saw the defendant very drunk. Defendant went away in the direction of Black Bull Road. Witness followed him, in company with P.C. Allen, and saw him go into the Imperial public house, where he was turned out by the landlord without being served. About a quarter of an hour later he went into the Red Cow, and was turned out of there also. He then went away in the direction of the Viaduct, and went up the steps leading into Derby Place, and had the greatest difficulty in getting up. Seeing that he was incapable of taking care of himself, witness took him into custody, with the assistance of P.C. Allen.

P.C. Allen and Sergt. Simpson corroborated as to the defendant's drunken condition.

Defendant said he had been laid up with consumption for five years. He had a glass or two to drink, and it overcame him. He had not worked for nine months. He had a job to walk about. He had been a ratepayer for 34 years, and that was the first offence he had had brought against him.

The Chairman stated that the Bench felt very sorry that prisoner was in that position. They had a duty to perform to the public, however, and he thought that the police were to be commended on their conduct, and the publicans, for not serving him in the condition he was in. A fine of 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs, or 7 days' imprisonment, was imposed, seven days being allowed in which to pay.

 

Folkestone Express 16 July 1910.

Friday, July 8th: Before Aldermen Vaughan and Jenner, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Albert Carter was charged with being drunk and incapable the previous afternoon. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.S. Sales said at about 2.30 the previous afternoon he was in Foord Road, near the public baths, when he saw the defendant, who was very drunk. He went away in the direction of Black Bull Road, and he (witness), in company with P.C. Allen, followed him. He saw him go into the Imperial public house, so they followed him in, and the defendant was turned out by the landlord without being served. About a quarter of an hour later he saw the defendant in the Red Cow, from which he was ejected. Carter then went away in the direction of the Viaduct, and he went up Derby Place steps. He had the greatest difficulty in mounting the steps, and when about halfway up he stopped and held on the fence for support. Seeing that he was incapable of taking care of himself, witness, with the assistance of P.C. Allen, brought him to the police station.

P.C. Allen said at about 2.15 p.m. he saw the prisoner being ejected from the Castle public house. He advised him to go home. P.S. Sales then came up. Witness then corroborated the sergeant's statement.

P.S. Simpson said at three o'clock, when the prisoner was brought in, he was drunk.

Carter said he had been laid up with consumption for five years. He had a glass or two of liquor the previous day, and no doubt that overcame him. He had not worked for about nine months. His illness, however, made him stagger, and he had a job to walk about at times. Therefore the officer might have thought he was drunk.

Alderman Vaughan said the Magistrates thought the officers and the publicans were to be commended for the action they took. The Bench had a duty to perform, and they had decided to fine the defendant 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Daily News 20 July 1910.

Wednesday, July 20th: Before Messrs. Herbert and Stainer.

Herbert Edward Savage (sic), landlord of the Red Cow inn, was summoned for selling intoxicating liquor to a drunken person on the 7th July. Mr. Haines appeared for defendant and pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Mowll, of Dover, represented Leney and Co.

Sergt. Sales deposed: About 2.30 on the 7th inst. I was in Foord Road, near the Public Baths, when I saw a man named Carter, who was drunk. Shortly afterwards I saw Carter go into the Imperial public house. I went into the Imperial, and the landlord turned Carter out. About 15 minutes later, from something I was told, in company with P.C. Allen, I visited the Red Cow inn. In a bar I saw Carter seated near the counter. He had a glass containing rum on the counter. The barman was behind the bar, and I asked him to call the landlord, Mr. Savage, who came in. I said to him “You see this man's condition, landlord. He is drunk. He has been served with liquor”. Mr. Savage replied “I am very sorry. I did not know he was in the house”. The barman said “I served him”. The landlord then took the rum away, and advised Carter to leave the house. After Carter got up, I said to the landlord “You see he is drunk”, and he replied “I am very sorry, Sergeant”. Carter left, and shortly afterwards was locked up for being drunk and incapable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: Was Carter discharged when summoned?

Witness: No. He was fined.

What made you think Carter was drunk? – By his manner and walk.

Could the landlord see he was drunk? – Not unless he saw him come in, as Carter went in and sat down.

Did you ask him to stand up? – Both the landlord and I did.

And Carter walked from the Red Cow to the Derby Steps without assistance? – Yes.

And went up the steps without assistance? – Yes, about half way up, and then held on to the rails.

Had the glass of rum been touched? – Well, it wasn't full.

P.C. Allen said he was in company with Sergt. Sales on the 7th July, and corroborated all the previous witness had said.

Sergt. Simpson said Carter was drunk when brought to the police station.

Percy William Attwood, landlord of the Castle Inn, said he ejected Carter because he was inclined to be troublesome when he had had a glass or two. Witness did not think Carter was drunk, although he had been drinking.

Defendant went into the witness box and said he had been manager of the Red Cow 11 years, and landlord five years. He did not see Carter come into the bar on the 7th July, and did not know he was there until Sergt. Sales spoke to him about it. He admitted that he did not contradict the Sergeant when told about Carter's condition.

George Barringer, barman at the Red Cow, said he served Carter with twopennyworth of rum, and he seemed alright. After being served, Carter sat down.

The Chief Constable: You were there when Sales came in? – Yes.

And you heard him call attention to Carter's condition? – Yes.

And you didn't say Carter was not drunk? – No.

Did he stagger when he stood up? - No, he stood up alright.

Alfred William Chambers, harness maker, Foord Road, said he saw Carter after he left the Red Cow, and he seemed to witness to be more ill than drunk.

The Chief Constable: Do you know Carter?

Witness: No.

Ever seen him before? – No.

Then the man you saw might not have been Carter at all? – Certainly.

Then what induced you to come here and give evidence? – Well, I was asked to come here and say what I saw.

Mr. Haines briefly addressed the Bench, pointing out that there was nothing to indicate that Carter was drunk when he was served by the barman. Every precaution was taken to guard against serving persons who were intoxicated, and this fact was borne out when he stated that no charge had been brought against this house during the last 16 years. He pointed out that it would be a serious matter for his client if he was convicted, and asked the Bench to take into consideration the good conduct of the house and dismiss the case.

The Bench retired for a few minutes, and on returning the Chairman said they had taken into consideration what Mr. Haines had said, and the case would be dismissed, but warned defendant to be careful in future.

 

Folkestone Express 23 July 1910.

Wednesday, July 20th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

Herbert Edward Savage, the licensee of the Red Cow Inn, was summoned for selling intoxicating liquors to a drunken person, on July 7th. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defendant, who pleaded Not Guilty, and Mr. R. Mowll, of Messrs. Mowll and Mowll, of Dover, watched the case on behalf of Messrs. Leney and Co., the owners of the house.

P.S. Sales said at about 2.30 the afternoon of July 7th he was in Foord Road, near the public baths, when he saw a man named Albert Carter, who was drunk. Shortly afterwards he saw Carter go into the Imperial public house, Black Bull Road. In company with P.C. Allen, he went into the Imperial and called the landlord's attention to Carter's condition. Carter was turned out without being served. A quarter of an hour later, from something he was told, in company with P.C. Allen, he visited the Red Cow. In a bar, known as the bottle and jug department, he saw Carter sitting near the counter. A glass containing liquor was standing on the counter in front of him. He afterwards found the liquor was rum. The barman was behind the bar, and he asked him to call the landlord. Mr. Savage then came into the bar, and he said to him “You see this man's condition, landlord? He is drunk. He has been served with liquor”. Mr. Savage replied “I am very sorry. I did not know he was in the house”. The barman said “I served him”. The landlord then took away the glass containing the liquor, and advised Carter to leave the house. Shortly afterwards Carter was locked up for drunkenness on the Derby Place steps by P.C. Allen and himself. There was no-one else in the bar at the time. He told the landlord after Carter left that he should report him for a summons for supplying drink to a drunken person. Defendant replied that he was sorry. He did not say that Carter was not drunk.

Cross-examined, witness said Carter was not discharged by the Magistrates, but was fined. He was charged with being drunk and incapable, but was not charged with being drunk on licensed premises. In the first instance he was informed that Carter was drunk, and he also saw for himself when he came out of the public lavatory opposite the baths that he was drunk. He was led to think that the man was drunk by his general appearance and that he could not walk straight. He believed Carter was consumptive. Carter was able to walk to the Imperial without any assistance. He warned the landlord of that house because Carter was drunk. He was afraid the landlord would not have seen that Carter was drunk because he went in and sat down. It was their instructions to warn a publican when a drunken man went in the house. When carter got out of the house he advised him to go away, and Allen and himself (witness) went up the Black Bull Road. When he pointed it out to the landlord that Carter was drunk, they both of them asked him to stand up. Carter did stand up and did not fall over, although he had the usual difficulty of a drunken man in getting up. He got up from his seat without assistance. When they arrested Carter he was hanging on with one hand to the fence by the side of the Derby Place steps. He had no doubt about the man being drunk, while at the same time he might have been ill. He should think about a third of the contents of the glass in front of Carter had been drank. The man's symptoms were such that it must have been palpable to anyone that he was drunk. It could be easily detected that he was drunk by his gait.

Re-examined by the Chief Constable, Sales said if he had seen Carter enter the Red Cow he would have warned the landlord.

P.C. Allen said at a quarter past two on July 7th he was in Foord Road, near the Public Baths, when he saw Carter leave the Red Cow public bar, drunk. He saw him go across the road and enter the Castle Inn public house. He went to that house, and on pushing the door open he saw Carter go away, and he went down into the public convenience. P.S. Sales came up at about half past two, and Carter once again appeared and went into the Imperial. Witness then corroborated the previous witness's story of what afterwards occurred. He had no doubt that the man was drunk.

In reply to the Clerk, P.C. Allen said when Carter got up from his seat in the Red Cow he reeled a little.

Cross-examined, witness said that from 2.15 to a quarter to three Carter got gradually worse. The reason they left the man after he came out of the Imperial was because he had to work his beat, but before doing so they advised him to go away. They hoped that he would go home.

Percy Attwood, the landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord, said that he had known Carter for some time. On July 7th, at 2.15 in the afternoon, he was on the flat top of the front portion of his premises when his attention was called by a plumber to Carter coming from the direction of the Red Cow. The man went up to some dustmen and began kicking about a heap of dirt which they had just swept up. Noting his actions, he (witness) went down into the bar, thinking that he might come into the house. Carter came in immediately after. He ordered him to leave before he asked for any drink, and ultimately he had to eject him. He looked out of the window afterwards and saw Carter go towards Black Bull Road. He man walked all right. The man's actions in the road, and as his previous experience of the man led him to think that he would become a nuisance, were the reasons why he ejected him.

The Chief Constable: You say that and no other reason caused you to refuse to serve him?

Witness: He was a trifle thick in his speech.

Cross-examined, Mr. Attwood said when he was on the top of the front portion of his house he saw Carter was in some way under the observation of the police. He refused to serve him in order to avoid any trouble in his house. His wife, who was serving in the bar, would not have served Carter, who had not been served by her for two years. Witness, however, had served him once or twice during the last month or so.

The Clerk: The Bench would like to know if you would have served Carter yourself if you had not seen what you had outside? – No, sir.

Why not? – Because he was a man, when he had had a drink or two, would behave in a hostile manner and challenge anyone. I thought he was likely to get up to his horse-play.

Answering further questions, witness said he was of opinion that Carter had had a glass or two of beer, and was in a condition likely to cause trouble. In his opinion the man was not drunk. When P.S. Sales came to see him about four or five days after, he told him what he told the Magistrates about the man's condition.

P.S. Simpson gave evidence that when Carter was brought in at 3 p.m. on the 7th he was drunk.

Defendant went into the witness box and gave evidence on his own behalf. He said he had been the tenant of the Red Cow for five years, and for the previous eleven years he had acted as manager for his sister. During that time there had been nothing against the house. He had always given his barmen instructions not to serve anyone in any way intoxicated. Until he was called into the bar, when P.S. Sales and P.C. Allen were present, he had not seen Carter before that day. He asked Carter to stand up and he did so. He also saw him walk from his premises to the Viaduct. There was nothing about his appearance or gait to lead him to think he was drunk.

The Chairman: When the police called your attention to the man's condition, did you deny that he was drunk? – No.

The hief Constable: The sergeant told you when you got out of the bar that he should report you. Did you deny that Carter was drunk? – No.

Did you say “I am sorry”? – I did.

George Barringer, a barman in the defendant's employ, said he was in the bar when Carter came in and called for two pennyworth of rum. Carter stood when asking for the liquor, but sat down when he was served. He had no conversation with the man, whom he thought was quite sober. He certainly did not appear to be drunk.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said that neither the landlord nor himself denied that the man was drunk. Carter had previously been in the house, and he was served on that occasion with two pennyworth of rum. When the man was told to stand up, he stood up, although he was not erect.

Alfred William Chambers, harness maker, of 122, Foord Road, said about 2.30 on the afternoon of the 7th his attention was attracted to a man outside the Red Cow. He saw him walk in the direction of the Viaduct, followed by the police officers. He certainly did not think the man was drunk; he looked more ill than drunk.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not know the man Carter, and he could not say that the man referred to was Carter.

Mr. Haines then briefly addressed the Bench.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return into court, the Chairman said the Bench had very carefully considered all the evidence, and taking into consideration the character Savage had borne, the character the house had always borne, and all the circumstances, they were inclined to deal very mercifully with him. Technically, they could have brought him in Guilty, but taking everything into consideration, they would dismiss the charge. He hoped it would be a warning to him, and to all publicans and barmen, to look very carefully before serving anyone.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 July 1910.

Wednesday, July 19th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

Herbert Edward Savage was summoned for selling intoxicating liquor to a drunken person. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defendant, and Mr. Mowll, of Dover, represented Messrs. Leney and Co.

P.C. Sales said that about 2.30 p.m. on the 7th inst. he saw a man named Carter, who was drunk, in Foord Road, near the Public Baths. Shortly afterwards this man went into the Imperial public house. In company with P.C. Allen, witness then went into the Imperial, and called the landlord's attention to Carter's condition. The landlord sent Carter out without serving him. About half an hour later, from something he was told, witness, still in the company of P.C. Allen, went to the Red Cow Inn (kept by the defendant). There, in the bar known as the bottle and jug department, they saw Carter, who was sitting near the counter. Near him was a glass containing a quantity of drink. Witness did not know at the time what it was, but afterwards found out that it was rum. The barman was behind the counter, and witness asked him to fetch the landlord. The barman did so. Witness called the landlord's attention to Carter's condition, saying that he was drunk, and that he had been served. Defendant replied that he was very sorry, and that he did not know that Carter was in the house. The barman stated that he had served Carter. The landlord took the glass away. Carter was advised to leave the house, which he did. When he went out witness said to defendant “You see the man is drunk, don't you?” He replied “I am very sorry, sergeant”. Shortly afterwards Carter was locked up for drunkenness. He was near the Derby Place steps when witness and P.C. Allen arrested him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines, witness said that when he was in the Red Cow he did ask Carter to stand up. He got up without falling over, and without assistance. He walked down the road without assistance. Carter got part of the way up Derby Place steps, and then stopped. It was witness's opinion that he could not go any further. Carter might have been ill, but in witness's opinion he was undoubtedly drunk. There was a handrail part of the way up the steps.

P.C. Allen corroborated.

Cross-examined, witness stated that Carter was drunk when he first saw him, but got worse. There was no doubt he was drunk, as he reeled when he walked. When he stood up in the Red Cow he reeled, although he stood up without assistance. He walked down the road after he had left the Red Cow without assistance.

Percy William Attwood, the landlord of the Castle, said that he was on the flat roof of his premises at about 2.15 p.m. on the day in question, talking to a plumber who was doing some repairs. From what the plumber said he looked over into the road, and there saw Carter. Two policemen were watching him. Witness could not form any idea as to how he was walking as he came from the direction of the Red Cow, and witness could only see him side face. Carter came across the road, and started to kick up some dust that the roadmen had swept up. Witness then went downstairs into the bar, as he thought perhaps Carter might come into his house. Carter did come into the house, but witness told him that he would not be served.

P.S. Simpson said that he was on duty at the police office when Carter was brought in. There was no doubt that he was drunk.

Defendant, in the witness box, stated that he had been the landlord of the Red Cow for 5 years, and had been manager there for his sister for 11 years. During that time there had been nothing against the house. There were four bars in the house. He kept a barman, and always gave him instructions never to serve an intoxicated person. He knew Carter, but until he had been called into the bar by the policemen he had not seen him that day. Defendant told Carter to stand up, and also saw him walk out of the house. He stood up without assistance, and walked away all right. He had said he was sorry because he was sorry to see the man in that state.

George Barringer, the barman at the Red Cow, said that he had been in the house over four years. He was in the bar when Carter came in. He walked in all right, and asked for twopennyworth of rum. He sat down in the bar when he had been served. There was nothing in his appearance to suggest that he was drunk. Witness would not have served him had he been drunk.

Questioned by the Chief Constable, witness said Carter was only in the bar about four or five minutes on the outside on this occasion. He had been in the bar before that morning, and had had a similar drink.

William Chambers, a harness maker, residing at 123, Foord Road, stated that he was going out for a drive at about 2.30 p.m. on the day in question. His attention was drawn to Carter by the fact that the two policemen were following him. He did not know Carter at all, and was therefore not sure that he was the man that the police were following. The man that they had under observation was certainly not drunk. Witness added that he was not absolutely positive that the man he saw was the man in question.

The Bench, after a short deliberation in private, returned, and the Chairman said the case should be a warning to publicans and barmen in the future to look very carefully at their customers. It was all very well for them to say that they did not know that the man was drunk, but unfortunately the Act did not allow this as any defence. However, in view of the previous good character of the house, the Bench thought they might dismiss the case against Mr. Savage.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 May 1916.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court yesterday, the licence of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, held by Mr. J. Attwood, was transferred to his wife. It was stated that Mr. Attwood was joining H.M. Forces.

 

Folkestone Express 3 June 1916.

Friday, May 26th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Colonel Fynmore, Alderman Pepper, Councillor R.G. Wood, and H. Kirke Esq.

The licences of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, and the Princes Royal, South Street, were temporarily transferred from the landlords to their wives, the husbands having been called up for military service. It was elicited that the wives had assisted in the management of the houses, and that there would be a competent man left on each of the premises.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 July 1916.

Local News.

At a transfer Sessions at the Police Court on Wednesday, Mr. Percy Wm. Attwood, of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, applied for the transfer of the licence to his wife. He had a man of over military age to assist his wife. He himself was going into the Navy. The transfer was allowed.

 

Folkestone Express 1 March 1919.

Local News.

The following licence was transferred at the Police Court on Wednesday: The Castle, Foord, to Mr. P.H. Attwood from his wife.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 March 1919.

Local News.

On Wednesday the Magistrates consented to the transfer of licence as follows: The Castle, Foord Road, from Mrs. Attwood to Mr. P.H. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 June 1919.

Local News.

On Monday an empty red car was being driven up the incline leading from Foord into St. John's Church Road when, owing to the steering gear becoming jammed, the vehicle, which had considerable “way” upon it, mounted the kerbstone, ran across the pavement, and dashed against the Castle Inn. That the impact must have been terrific is evident by the fact that the porch leading into the saloon bar was entirely demolished, whilst the surrounding brickwork was shifted or started in several places. A door, too, was moved out of position. It is expected that the whole side of the premises will have to be pulled down and rebuilt.

Mr. and Mrs. Pat Attwood were in one of the bars at the time, and were naturally rather startled, as were several customers. On the following morning Mr. Attwood got into conversation with the brewers (Messrs. Nalder and Collyer), and within a short time the firm's surveyor was on the spot for the purpose of making a report. A well-known local builder estimates the damage at 200. The damaged saloon bar porch is temporarily strutted up, and business is carried on as usual.

 

Folkestone Express 2 August 1924.

Friday, July 25th: Before Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman C.E. Mumford, Messrs. W.R. Boughton and W. Hollands, and Dr. Nuttall.

Mr. P. Attwood was granted a licence to sell intoxicants in a marquee for the Cheerful Sparrows' Fete on August 6th and 7th, from 2.30 to 10 p.m., the Clerk stating that the Magistrates had no power to grant the licence later than 10 p.m., as it would be against the law to do so.

 

Folkestone Express 13 March 1926.

Obituary.

We regret to have to announce the death of Mr. James Tunbridge, of Laudec Villa, 74, Radnor Park Road, and which took place in the Royal Victoria Hospital on Monday morning. He was 76 years of age, and had enjoyed good health until about a month ago. The deepest sympathy, we are sure, will be extended to the members of the family, who are left to mourn a very great loss. He leaves a widow, three sons and a. daughter, nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Ever a fine personality, the late Mr. Tunbridge was characterised by his extreme geniality and goodwill. He was a typical old English gentleman, who had won the highest esteem of those whom he came in contact. He was ever ready to help those in distress, and some of his staunch advice proved invaluable. His kindly nature had won the admiration of his fellow men. He celebrated his golden wedding on Christmas Day, 1921, the marriage taking place at the Holy Trinity Church, Dover, on Christmas morning, 1871. He was born at Alkham, the village midwav between Folkestone and Dover, and was a son of the late Mr. Thomas Tunbridge. He was a brother of the late Mr. Tilden Tunbridge. He was a carpenter, and was employed on the South Eastern Railway for twelve years. He was one of the first to commence the work on the projected Channel Tunnel. He assisted in the building of Shorncliffe Station and was foreman-in-charge of Cheriton Arch Station, which, at the present time is known as the Central Station. He became the proprietor of the Castle Inn, Foord, and subsequently resided at the Guildhall Vaults, the Railway Bell, and the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. He retired from business in 1917. He was the chairman of the Licensed Victuallers Society on three occasions, and was the chairman of the Licensed Victuallers’ Mineral Water Co. for six years. He was exceedingly fond of bowls, and was a member of the Hythe Bowling Club. He was quite content and happy when “trundling the woods’.” He was, in his time, an excellent shot, and was probably one of the best shots in the neighbourhood. He was greatly devoted to shooting, and with! his canine friend and a gun and cartridges, would make his way to the woods, where he spent many happy hours. He loved a game of billiards, and was known to be a very good welder of the cue, and was a rather formidable exponent of the game. He came to Folkestone 47 years ago. He was a member of the Brotherhood of the Cheerful Sparrows, and also of the Folkestone Club.

The funeral took place yesterday (Thursday), at the Folkestone Cemetery, when the Vicar of St. John’s Church (the Rev. J. B. Cowell) officiated at the Church and at the graveside in the Folkestone Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1926.

Obituary.

We regret to announce the death on Sunday of Mr. James Tunbridge, of 74, Radnor Park Road. The deceased, who was seventy four years of age was widely known in the town and district.

In his early days he followed the occupation of a carpenter and was employed on the South Eastern Railway for twelve years. He was one of the first to start on the work of the Channel tunnel, the site of which was afterwards utilised for a coal boring. He helped to build Shorncliffe Station, and was foreman-in-charge of the erection of Cheriton Arch Station, subsequently known as Radnor Park and now as the Central Station. As a licensed victualler he was in turn licensee of the Castle Inn, Foord, Guildhall Vaults, Railway Bell, and the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. In his particular calling deceased was regarded as a model, inasmuch as he always acted strictly in accordance with the licensing laws. He was for some time Chairman of the local Licensed Victuallers' Association, and also acted in a similar capacity for the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Mineral Water and General Supply Coy., Ltd. In both these positions he enjoyed the full confidence of the members. He retired from business about nine years ago.

Decease was a great devotee of the outdoor life. He loved a game of bowls, and nothing gave him greater pleasure than to handle the “woods” on the greens of the Hythe Bowling Club, of which he was a member up to the time of his death. He found great pleasure, too, with his gun and dog amid the “wheaten stubble” on autumn and winter days. He was widely regarded as a “dead shot”. A respected member of the Folkestone Club, he also enjoyed a game of billiards, and could give a good account of himself with the cue and ivories.

The late Mr. Tunbridge was born at Alkham, but had resided in Folkestone practically all his life. He celebrated his Golden Wedding on Christmas Day, 1921, and on that occasion, with his devoted partner, was the recipient of presents from many friends. Deceased was a typical Englishman. He was outspoken to a degree, “straight as a die”, and a real manly man. As such he was regarded by all who had the privilege of his acquaintance. He was a friend to many, and did a lot of good by stealth.

To his widow and surviving family (three sons and one daughter) much sympathy is extended.

The funeral took place at the Cemetery on Thursday afternoon.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 July 1927.

Local News.

Mr. P.W. Attwood, of the Castle Inn, was granted an occasional licence to sell intoxicating liquors on the Leas Sports Ground on August 3rd, 4th, and 5th, on the occasion of the Cheerful Sparrows fete, at the Folkestone Petty Sessions yesterday (Friday).

 

Folkestone Express 12 October 1929.

Local News.

A special transfer sessions was held at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, when transfers in connection with several well-known licensed houses were made.

The following full licence was transferred: The Castle Inn, Foord, from Mr. Pat Attwood to Mr. H. Surtees.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 October 1929.

Local News.

The transfer of several licences was approved by the Folkestone Magistrates at the Folkestone transfer sessions on Wednesday. The licence of the Castle Inn was transferred from Mr. Percy Attwood to Mr. Henry Surtees, of Tonbridge.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 April 1930.

Local News.

When Gladstone Martin, the licensee of the True Briton public house, and W. Surtees, the licensee of the Castle Inn, made applications at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday for music licences to enable them to give wireless entertainments in their houses, the Chief Constable (Mr. A. S. Beesley) said there were now 16 of these particular licences in the borough in respect of public houses.

The Magistrates granted the application, the hours being from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on weekdays, and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Sundays.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1934.

Obituary.

We regret to announce the death recently, at New Malden, Surrey, of Mrs. Harriett S. Tunbridge, the widow of the late Mr. James Tunbridge, who was in turn licensee of the Railway Bell Hotel, Guildhall Hotel, Fountain Hotel (Seabrook), and the Castle Inn, Foord. Mrs. Tunbridge was respected by all who knew her. The funeral took place on Wednesday at Folkestone cemetery.

 

Folkestone Express 3 September 1938.

Obituary.

Many Folkestone people will regret to hear of the death of Mr. William Attwood, one of Folkestone’s best-known figures, after an illness of about a week's duration at the residence of Mrs. A.E. Godden, his daughter, Enbrook Manor House, Cheriton.

The late Mr. Attwood played a big part in making Radnor Park the very delightful and attractive open space it is in the centre of the town, for he was for a number of years the Park-keeper in the employ of the Corporation. He was 78 years of age, and up to his last illness he was remarkably vigorous, and certainly appeared to be considerably younger than he was. A native of Rhodes Minnis, he came to Folkestone when quite a young man in order to work at the Manor Office under the late Mr. W.B. Radford, Lord Radnor’s agent. He subsequently entered the employ of the Corporation, and was Park-keeper for 20 years. Then be became the licence holder of the Castle Inn at Foord, and later took over the Bouverie Arms Hotel. He retired from that house previous to the war. On one occasion he sought election for the Town Council, but was not successful. He, however, always took a great interest in the town’s affairs. He was a well-known local sportsman, and was for many years a member of the Folkestone Club. He was one of the promoters of the Central Picture Theatre, and had quite a large financial interest in it until the local company sold it His wife predeceased him many years ago.

He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Godden, and one son, Mr. Pat Attwood, of the Shakespeare Hotel. One of his grandsons is the captain of the Folkestone Cricket Club.

The funeral will take place tomorrow (Saturday) at the Folkestone Cemetery, Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 September 1938.

Obituary.

Folkestone residents will learn with regret of the passing of one of the town’s most familiar figures for many years, Mr. William Attwood, who died at his daughter's residence, Enbrook House, Cheriton, on Thursday.

Mr. Attwood, who was 78, played a large part in the development of Radnor Park, and was for several years a park-keeper employed by the Folkestone Corporation. Despite his age he was exceedingly vigorous, and maintained to the last his keen interest in the affairs of the town.

Born at Rhodes Minnis, he came to Folkestone as a young man to work at the Manor Office under the late Mr. W B. Radford. After serving 20 years with the Corporation he took over the Castle Inn at Foord, later becoming licensee of the Bouverie Arms Hotel. He retired just before the Great War. Mr. Attwood always took a great interest in local affairs, and once stood unsuccessfully for the Town Council. He was a keen sportsman, and was for many years a member of the Folkestone Club.

Mr. Attwood leaves one daughter, Mrs. A.E. Godden, and a son, Mr Pat Attwood, of the Shakespeare Hotel. The Captain of the Folkestone Cricket Club, Mr. L.W. Godden, is his grandson.

The funeral will take place today at the Folkestone Cemetery, Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 October 1948.

Obituary.

The death occurred at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Folkestone, on Monday, of Mr. Harry Surtees, licensee of the Castle Inn, St. John’s Church Road, Folkestone. Aged 66, Mr. Surtees had been ill for only a short time.

He was born in Newcastle and came to Folkestone 20 years ago after holding a licence in Tonbridge for several years. For some time he has been a director of the Silver Spring Mineral Water Company and a member of Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers’ Association. During the first world war Mr. Surtees served as an Engineer Lieut. in the Royal Navy and for a period was in command of H.M.S. St Vincent.

He leaves a widow and two daughters, the younger of whom is in Malaya where her husband is manager of a rubber plantation. The other daughter is married to Mr. B.J.W. Hosking, headmaster of Christ Church C. of E. School.

The funeral will take place today at 11 a.m. at Holy Trinity Church, followed by the interment at Hawkinge.

 

Folkestone Gazette 22 October 1952.

Local News.

Licensee in Folkestone for nearly 50 years and a well-known sporting personality, Mr. P.W. (Pat) Attwood, of the London and Paris Hotel, is retiring shortly.

It was in 1904 that Mr. Attwood entered the licensed trade, helping his father in the management of the Castle Inn, Foord Road. Two years later he became mine host there and remained for 22 years. He left there to take over the licence of the Shakespeare Hotel in Guildhall Street.

“In January, 1939, I decided to retire and was looking forward to a restful time”, Mr. Attwood told the Gazette, “but the war upset my plans”.

But it was not back to the licensed trade that Mr. Attwood went. Instead, he joined the Auxiliary Fire Service, completing about a year’s service, when he was invited to accept the licence of the London and Paris.

They were grim days in Folkestone then, and grimmer ones were to follow, for within a short time of taking over the “L and P” the premises were not only damaged by air raid action but they came under repeated shellfire from the Nazis’ big guns on the other side of the Channel.

The tall building stood out very conspicuously in the vulnerable Harbour area and the military authorities had it camouflaged; possibly the only pub in the country to be dealt with in that way. The London and Paris remained open throughout the war except for one fortnight in March, 1943, when it was considerably damaged by a cross-Channel shell which fell just behind the premises. “It happened one evening about nine o'clock when there were about a dozen in the bars”, said Mr. Attwood. “No-one was hurt although we were pretty well shaken. We had to close for a time to get things straight again. Altogether the place was damaged 22 times as the result of enemy action”.

A Folkestonian - his father was one-time park keeper at Radnor Park - Mr. Attwood has also been closely associated with sport in the town.

In his younger days he was a very good oarsman; he won the Championship of Folkestone one year and the Championship of Folkestone and Dover combined on another occasion. About that time there were only four towns with rowing clubs - Folkestone, Dover, Herne Bay and Hastings. He was also a cricketer and footballer, playing for the old Wingate club on Park Farm. Mr. Attwood was one of the first members of the Folkestone Park Bowls Club. In his possession he has a group of bowlers who went to Chelsea to play a match. Mr. Attwood is the only one still living. His interest in Folkestone football clubs has extended over many years. He was a shareholder of the old Folkestone Football Club in the days when the club played on the Canterbury Road ground. He was a member of the committee, as he was of the Folkestone Football Club formed after World War 1. During the last war Mr. Attwood was also associated with Folkestone Wartime Football Club.

Mr. Attwood, who is 71, is still a very active man. Not infrequently he can be seen on his bicycle and although he says he is retiring, well, who knows what he will turn his hand to next?

He was a foreman plumber before he went into the licensed trade, and altogether had 10 years' experience in the building trade.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 October 1952.

Local News.

Mr. P.W. (Pat) Attwood, 71, of the London and Paris Hotel, one of the best known personalities of the licensed trade in Folkestone, will retire shortly. He has held the licences of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, and the Shakespeare, Guildhall Street. He has been in the trade for over 48 years.

During the war the London and Paris was damaged in air raids and by shellfire. It remained open throughout the war except for a fortnight in March, 1943, when it was considerably damaged by a cross-Channel shell which fell just behind the premises. “Altogether the place was damaged 22 times as the result of enemy action”, Mr. Attwood told the Herald.

A Folkestonian - his father was one-time park keeper at Radnor Park - Mr. Attwood has long been closely associated with sport in the town. In his younger days he was a very good oarsman; he won the Championship of Folkestone one year and the Championship of Folkestone and Dover combined on another occasion. He was also a cricketer and footballer, playing for the old Wingate club on Park Farm. Later he became one of the first members of the Folkestone Park Bowls Club. His interest in Folkestone football clubs has extended over many years.

 

Folkestone Gazette 29 June 1960.

Obituary.

Well-known licensee and sportsman, Mr. Percy (Pat) Attwood, 44, Earls Avenue, Folkestone, died at his home on Monday after four weeks’ illness. He was 79.

Mr. Attwood was born in a cottage, now demolished, on the old Manor Farm. His father was park-keeper at Radnor Park. An old boy of North Council School in Black Bull Road, Mr. Attwood started in the plumbing business, and soon became a master plumber. On the death of his father, who had become the proprietor of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, Mr. Attwood, or Pat as he was affectionately known by his many friends in the district, commenced in 1904 his long association with the licensing business. He took over the Castle Inn, and remained for some 20 years, a popular and much respected licensed victualler. Later he took over the licence of the Shakespeare, at the corner of Guildhall Street and Bouverie Road East, and in 1942, under shell-fire, moved to the well-known harbour hostelry, The London and Paris. At this time Folkestone harbour was badly shelled and the hotel itself was damaged, but Mr. Attwood kept the business going. A great personality, Mr. Attwood had a large clientele and many famous people, especially actors and boxers, visited him to make The London and Paris their first port of call from the harbour. About eight years ago Mr. Attwood relinquished the hotel, and took a half interest in the Bristol Hotel, on The Leas. He retired about five years ago.

An enthusiastic sportsman, Mr. Attwood was an expert oarsman in his younger days and won many trophies while a member of Folkestone Rowing Club. He was Chairman of the Club for a number of years. He was also very interested in boxing, cricket and football, which he helped to promote in Folkestone during the last war, being a founder member of the Folkestone Wartime Football Club. He was a member of Folkestone and Hythe Licensed Victuallers’ Association for many years, and he was a prominent Freemason.

The funeral service will be held at Hawkinge on Thursday, followed by cremation.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 July 1960.

Local News.

The funeral service of a well-known local Freemason, Mr. Percy (Pat) Attwood, of 44, Earls Avenue, Folkestone, who died on Monday, took place at Hawkinge on Thursday, followed by cremation. Mr. Attwood, who was 79, had been ill for the past four weeks.

Born in a cottage, now nonexistent, at the old Manor Farm, the son of a park-keeper at Radnor Park, Mr. Attwood was educated at the North Council School in Black Bull He started work as a plumber, and soon became a master man, but in 1904 succeeded his father, who had become the proprietor of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, and took over the premises to start his long association with the licensing trade. Mr. Attwood, or “Pat”, as he was affectionately known to his many friends in the district, remained at the Castle for about 20 years. He then moved to the Shakespeare at the corner of Guildhall Street and Bouverie Road East, and then in 1942 took the licence of the London and Paris under shell-fire. This well-known harbour hostelry was among the many buildings damaged in the area during the war period, but Mr. Attwood kept the business going. Many famous people, including actors and boxers, used to make the inn their first port of call when arriving at the harbour. About eight years ago he left the London and Paris and took a half interest in the Bristol Hotel, on The Leas, finally retiring about five years ago.

A keen sportsman, Mr. Attwood was an expert oarsman in his younger days. He won many trophies, and was club champion of Folkestone Rowing Club, of which he later became chairman for a number of years. He was closely interested in football and before the last war was a director of Folkestone Town. He was a founder member when Folkestone Wartime F.C. was formed in 1942, and continued to support the club.

As a young man he played cricket for Swingate C.C. and also supported the Folkestone team for many years. He was interested in boxing.

During World War I, Mr. Attwood served with the Royal East Kent Regiment (“The Buffs”). When he was stationed at Chatham at the beginning of the war the barrack room he was billeted in was hit by a shell, and some 30 soldiers were killed. At the outset of World War II he was a member of the National Fire Service for a time.

Always a very active man, Mr. Attwood could often be seen at the London and Paris golf course, where he played until 10 years ago. He rode a bicycle until four years ago, but his main hobby in recent years was gardening. Mr. Attwood was greatly interested in the Turf, and on the Saturday before he died he had a winner at Newbury.

Mr. Attwood’s wife died in March, 1950. He is survived by a daughter.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 February 1964.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Transfer of licence was granted for the following application: Castle Inn, from Mrs. Alice V.V. Surtees to Mr. Frederick A. Nicholson.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 August 1965.

Local News.

A man who climbed through a skylight into a Folkestone public house was cornered by the landlord's dog until the police arrived.

Inspector Michael Foley told Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday that Robert James Smillie broke a glass skylight and climbed down into the bar on a piece of rope. But the rope broke and he was cornered by the landlord's dog at the Castle Inn, Foord Road, on Monday evening. Smillie was found hiding under a settee in the public bar.

Smillie, who has no fixed address, was remanded in custody for a week.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 October 1969.

Local News.

Mr. Tony Jessup, 46-year-old landlord of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, Folkestone, has been elected chairman of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers Association. Mr. Jessup has been in the licensed trade for seven years. He moved to Folkestone two years ago from Whitstable, where he kept his first public house - the Nelson. Mitcham-born Mr. Jessup, who was a joiner before entering the licensed trade with his wife, Violet, has four children. He has a brother who is also a licensee at Oare near Faversham - by coincidence at an inn also named the Castle. “I was very surprised when I was nominated as chairman”, said Mr. Jessup, who was a member of the association’s committee. “Normally the vice-chairman is elected, but he could not make it just yet”. The vice-chairman is Mr. Alan White of the Prince Albert, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 December 1972.

Local News.

The children of Parkfield special school, Folkestone, are very near to the hearts of the members of the darts club at Castle Inn, Foord Road.

The club raises money to buy presents for the children who are mentally or physically handicapped. It has been doing so for two or three years and so far it has collected about 100. Members have distributed Christmas presents, fruit and Easter eggs among the 200 children. And it spent 50 on fireworks for the children’s Guy Fawkes’ celebrations. The money is raised by donations, competitions and friendly dart matches.

The idea to give presents to the children came from Mrs. Vi Jessop, wife of Mr. Tony Jessop, the landlord. A main-spring of the darts club is Mr. Andy Hall, chairman and secretary. Three members who also take a major part in bringing the children pleasure are Mr. Ray Waddell, Mr. Colin Drake and Mr. William “Cokie” Fullinton.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 January 1978.

Stroller.

Cheers to the new pint-pullers at the Castle Inn, at the corner of St. John’s Church Road and Foord Road, Folkestone. The new hosts, who moved in this week, are Arthur and Founzou Barrington. Arthur comes from London, where he ran a bar before moving to the coast. His wife comes from Hythe, and her brother runs the Phoenix restaurant in Folkestone’s Old High Street. “We were looking for a pub in the area - we like it here”, said Arthur, as he prepared to pull his first pint. “We think we will be very happy at the Castle”.

 

South Kent Gazette 25 June 1980.

Local News.

Bill Glass and Jim Middleton aim to spend ten days in a pub without touching a drop of alcohol. On Saturday the two men set out to pocket a world record at The Castle in Folkestone. They hope to beat the non-stop pool playing record – which stands at 201 hours – to claim a place in the Guinness Book of Records. Their efforts are being sponsored by firms, clubs, pubs and individuals in the area to raise money for Eversley House, the home for mentally handicapped children, in Horn Street, Seabrook.

Bill, aged 34, and Jim, 19, hope to get 5,000 towards the cost of building a therapeutic pool at the home. On Saturday two of the youngsters were at the pub with their parents for the start of the marathon. Mrs. Beryl Harrison, chairman of the home's parents and friends' association, took a cue to play the first shot at 9.30 a.m. If all goes well the two players will finish playing at 9.30 a.m. on July 1.

Pub landlord, Mr. John Barrington, and his wife, Fonzu, who live above the bar, will be with them all the way. Bill and Jim will be eating normal meals and have stocks of sweets to nibble at. They plan to save up a five minute break, allowed every hour, to take a 3 hour sleep at intervals, and still welcome sponsors.

The idea to raise money for Eversley House came from Folkestone Lions Club, which has already taken on the therapeutic pool project. Ten members will take it turns to adjudicate the marathon and keep score. A pool of this sort is desperately needed at the home, Mrs. Harrison told the Herald and Gazette.

There are 25 children at Eversley, all handicapped. Ages range from three to 15 years, but none of the children can feed themselves and most need support to be able to sit up. Care and attention is given to physical exercise and massage by the nursing staff, but the best form of exercise for them is hydro-therapy, Mrs. Harrison said. Some of the children are now in the care of Kent County Council. “The children are lying so still their joints become stiff and set”, she said. At present the home has more than 5,000 of the 12,000 it needs for the pool. On Saturday, July 12, it will be holding an open day and fete to raise a further 1,500; comedian Jim Davidson will open the fete. With 5,000 from the marathon pool the project can get off the ground.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 June 1980.

Local News.

A bid to break the world non-stop pool playing record ended in drama and disappointment early on Wednesday. After completing a gruelling 95 hours at the table in the public bar of The Castle, in Foord Road, Folkestone, 19-year-old Jim Middleton collapsed. The heart-breaking end to the attempt came about an hour after Jim and his partner, Bill Glass, 34, had snatched two hours' sleep they had collected by giving up their five minutes' rest each hour. By attempting to break the record they had hoped to raise 5,000 towards building a therapeutic pool for Seabrook's Eversley House, a home for handicapped children.

Linos' Club member, David Pritchard, who was invigilating at the time, said “He looked very tired and I thought once he'd had a couple of hours' sleep he would be better. There was no way he could have continued – he was just beaten by lack of sleep”. And, speaking of the emotional moment of Jim's collapse, he added “He just went like that. He couldn't get up and practically cried in the chair”.

The pair of pool players had hoped to complete 240 hours and smash the world record, which stands at 201 hours.

Despite coaxing by the organisers, Jim, a welder, was beaten and had to be taken home. At midday, a fresh-looking Bill Glass stood at the bar drinking brandy and talking of his ordeal. “I'm not tired, but I feel as if there is something I have to get out of my system because I'm sure I could have done it”, he said. “I feel sick I can't continue, but it's out of my hands. I do not blame the lad – he couldn't keep his eyes open. But he did his best and shouldn't feel at all guilty because he put on a good show of 95 hours”.

John Barrington, landlord of the Castle, had stayed up all night following the men's progress. “The bottom fell out of pur world when he had to give up.. I feel sick for his mum and dad and for everyone else who backed him up”, he said.

But in spite of the setback, Bill, a transport and warehouse manager, says he will make a bid for the 208 hour one-man marathon next year.

The pair's remarkable stamina in completing a total of 771 games will not go unrewarded. If all their sponsors pay up they stand to claim about 2,000.

Fully recovered on Thursday, Jim told the Herald and Gazette of the frightening side-effects of the marathon game. On two occasions he went into a trance and felt he was playing in his sleep. His mind began to play tricks and he started hallucinating. “The balls didn't look round any more and once it seemed as if they were linked together. I felt as if I picked one up they would all follow; also the cues looked banana-shaped. After having early nights the week before the attempt, he said he made the silly mistake of having a night out before the challenge. This meant he only had about four hours' sleep. He also thought he would have been better having “cat-naps” because he couldn't wake up after the longer rest periods. To add to his troubles an old eye wound opened up. His mother, Margaret, brought her exhausted son home and watched anxiously as he fell into a deep sleep for 13 hours.

 

South Kent Gazette 10 September 1980.

Local News.

Tempers frayed at a meeting of pub landlords. Two members stormed out at the end of the Licensed Victuallers- Association meeting at the Swan Inn, Sellindge, on Wednesday afternoon amid scenes described as “chaotic” and “farcical”.

Host Mr. Bill Corne, landlord of the Swan, told the Herald and Gazette “I had to shout at one member to shut him up. He was drunk when he arrived at the meeting. I threatened to cancel the meeting and sling them all out”.

And Mr. Chas Croft, landlord of the Gate Inn, Hythe, said “As the most junior person present, I was rather embarrassed to see my elders and betters behave in the way they did”. He said the two men wanted the L.V.A. to do things which are impossibilities. “They were unfortunately very inebriated and shouting at the same time. The members didn’t discuss anything relevant and made a load of fools of themselves. It was a typical farce”.

After the meeting Mr Brian Adams, landlord of the White Lion in Cheriton, resigned from the L.V.A. committee for what he later described as “purely personal reasons which I don’t really want to discuss”.

However, L.V.A. chairman Mr John Mees, of Botolph’s Bridge, Hythe, denied there had been a row.

Several other landlords declined to comment and Mr John Barrington, landlord of the Castle Inn, Folkestone, who also is believed to have resigned from the L.V.A. after the meeting, was unavailable for comment.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 September 1980.

Local News.

An angry landlord hit out this week at people who complained about trouble in the streets near his pub after a charity evening.

Mr. John Barrington, landlord of The Castle Inn, in Foord Road, Folkestone, said that the police were called following the incidents at the weekend. Complaints were made after a special concert at his pub to raise money for Eversley House, the Folkestone home for handicapped children. He said that the police had been called by a group of anonymous people living nearby. It was claimed that late-night customers had been slamming car doors and one man had urinated against a wall and used abusive language in the street. But on Tuesday Mr. Barrington said that he and his wife, Founzou, felt the complainants were being “bloody-minded”. Efforts were being made, he said, to raise 1,000 for Eversley House by Christmas. The pub has already made over 800 this year by staging special events, and, until now, no complaints had been made about the behaviour of customers. He pointed out that the police officer who visited the Castle had no complaints about the way the pub was run, and added that there were other pubs and clubs in the area besides his. The specific incidents complained about happened outside the pub after the customers had left and were not something of which he had control or was aware. “What am I supposed to do? Walk everyone home?” he asked.

Late a police spokesman said they had been called to disturbances outside the pub on previous occasions. But he said “Really there was nothing to it. If we receive a call about people making a row in a residential area we are bound to act on it. We just go and make sure that things are O.K. or have a word with people. If we find people committing an offence then they are reported”.

 

South Kent Gazette 31 December 1980.

Local News.

Regulars at a Folkestone pub have handed over 1,000 they raised for handicapped children. With sponsored pool matches, barbeques and jumble sales, customers and staff at the Castle, in Foord Road, collected the money for children at Eversley House in Horn Street. The hospital for handicapped children in Seabrook will use the money to pay for a 30,000 hydro-therapeutic pool. It should be finished by 1982. The charity started with a world record pool playing attempt at the pub in April. Since then the pub has virtually adopted the house as its charity and plans to continue until it has collected 5,000. Mr. Bill Glass, who played in the record attempt, said “We are not going to stop until we have built them that pool”.

They are already on their way to collecting another 1,000 and plan another record attempt at the same time next year. So far, 13,000 has been collected for the swimming pool, which will also help children from outside the hospital, and this is the largest single donation. Chairman of the hospital's parents and friends association, Mr. Steve Atmore, accepted the money from the pub's landlord, Mr. John Barrington, and thanked all those who helped raise it.

 

South Kent Gazette 9 February 1983.

Local News.

Landlord John Barrington has reported the theft of ten tins of food from the kitchen of his pub, the Castle in Foord Road, Folkestone, on Tuesday night. Police are investigating.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 June 1983.

Advertising Feature.

Len Fairclough can usually be found propping up the bar of the Rovers Return in Coronation Street. But on Saturday Len, alias actor Peter Adamson, will be well away from his home ground. In fact he will be visiting the revamped Castle Inn in Foord Road, Folkestone, to mark the official opening of the Dungeon Bar. The new-look pub has, as regulars will tell you, changed drastically over the past few months. The exterior has been completely altered with special stone cladding to give it an authentic castle-like look and the interior has been expanded to provide extra space and a unique style of decor.

The Dungeon Bar in fact is decked out in the style of exactly that – a medieval jail. Only there are one or two subtle differences. Firstly, it is considerably more comfortable, and there can't have been many prison cells among the castles of the Middle Ages to feature two pool tables. The walls of the bar are designed to continue the theme of the outside of the building. And amid the wooden beams and stone effect walls there are one or two nice touches. A mural by artist and customer Judith Avril gives the customer an idea of what a view from a window from the same spot would have been like in the early 19th century. Copied from an 1833 print, it shows what is now Foord Road as a tranquil country area, with rolling hills and a windmill. Another slightly gruesome touch is a caricature model head of landlord John Barrington incarcerated behind bars.

In fact 37-year-old John and his wife Founzou have been largely responsible for the pub's recent transformation. They took over the Castle as tenants some four-and-a-half years ago. At that time it was Londoner John's first taste of life in the licensed trade. A former electrical contractor, he says “It was something I always wanted to do. I spent most of my time in a pub anyway but on the other side of the bar as a customer. It was a logical step to take and just a matter of selling the idea to my wife. The Barringtons soon found that running a pub was no holiday. “I honestly didn't appreciate just how much hard work went into it”, said John. But he soon became determined to capitalise on his efforts and last year he bought The Castle from the brewers, Ind Coope, and set his transformation plans into action. He knocked the old public bar through into the house next door to create the new expanded Dungeon Bar and set the work in progress. Customers, he says, have been delighted with the results. And he is convinced that once word gets around even more people are going to want to visit the pub, which is now a free house selling beers that include Scottish and Newcastle. Charrington's and Ind Coope.

 

South Kent Gazette 15 June 1983.

Local News.

Coronation Street star Peter Adamson swapped his bar stool at the Rovers Return for one at the Castle Inn, Folkestone, on Saturday morning. Peter, who plays Len Fairclough in the long-running soap opera, spent half an hour signing autographs for fans. His visit to the Castle coincides with a promotion campaign by Reface Ltd., the company responsible for re-cladding the outside of the pub.

Owners Mr. John Barrington and his wife Founzou have spent nearly 25,000 renovating the hostelry since they bought it from the brewery in August. As well as the stone cladding they have converted the public bar into a dungeon bar incorporating a mural Hilda Ogden would be proud of.

Although Len Fairclough is frequently seen with a pint in his hand on the Coronation Street set, Peter Adamson has actually been teetotal for 14 years.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 July 1984.

Advertising Feature.

The times they are a-changing at the Castle pub in Folkestone’s Foord Road. Genial host John Barrington and his wife Fonz have turned the clock back several hundred years to recreate the age of Elizabeth I, Walter Raleigh and Francis Drake in their new look Tudor Bar. Wooden beams now dominate the bar in Tudor style and the couple plan a host of other touches to make it a relaxing place to drink with a distinctly historic feel.

The couple have been in the licensed trade for seven years at the Castle. It was run by Ind Coope but two years ago John and Fonz took the plunge and joined the growing number of publicans who prefer not to be tied to any one brewer. During that time they have spent thousands of pounds transforming their pub. They started at the bottom, with the now hugely popular cellar bar, and have moved up to the top bar, with its new Tudor style. Outside the couple added stone cladding to give the pub a homely look.

Former Coronation Street star Peter Adamson, who played Len Fairclough in the long-running series, swopped his bar stool in the Rovers Return for a seat in the Castle to celebrate one major phase of the pub’s expansion.

There’s further good news for drinkers at the pub with the couple now offering two real ales as well as a selection of keg bitters. Draught Bass and IPA, two beers with distinctive flavours, are available on handpump. For lager drinkers there is the strong Swiss lager Hurlimann and that pride of Scotland, Tennents. In hot weather there's nothing like a drop of either to quench the most powerful thirsts.

Don’t think the couple are going to stop there for they have ambitious plans to add further facilities to the pub, hopefully in the autumn. Next time you’re in Foord Road pop into the Castle - the drawbridge is always down and there’s no danger of being locked in the dungeons!

 

Folkestone Herald 16 November 1984.

Local News.

Plans to change a house into a pub with bed and breakfast facilities were turned down by planning councillors last Wednesday. Members of Shepway’s Plans Sub-committee refused a scheme to extend the Castle pub in Foord Road, Folkestone. The plan included extending the bar into the house next door and using three of the rooms on the first floor of 73, Foord Road for bed and breakfast. The end result would have been two bars, a kitchen, dining room, two offices, two bathrooms and seven bedrooms. Councillors felt the development would worsen current traffic and parking problems.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 December 1984.

Advertising Feature.

It's not often you find a pub that caters for all tastes and transfers you 400 years through time. But at the Castle Inn in Folkestone’s Foord Road you can sup a pint of English ale in the Elizabethan style Tudor Bar or enjoy music and the bright lights of the video games downstairs in the Dungeon Bar - complete with fruit machine and pool tables. Landlords John and Fonz Barrington can even offer you a candlelight dinner in the pub’s new dining room. Six tables in elegant Tudor surrounds, silver service waiters and an a la carte menu would impress even Good Queen Bess.

The Castle is a free house which means it selects the best beers from the entire range offered by the breweries. Bass and I.P.A. are on hand for real ale fans and for the lager drinker there’s the strong Swiss Hurlimann. Whether you decide to travel back to the past or stay firmly in the present the Barringtons can assure you of good beer, good food and good cheer. And as an added boost landlord John has had his picture painted by artist Ivor Jones. It shows John in a cavalier’s outfit and hangs, appropriately enough, in the Tudor Bar.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 January 1985.

Local News.

Wily rag trade boss Mike Baldwin from television’s Coronation Street has a hard nose for business. He may moan about the cost of living but he drives a flash car and never seems short of a bob or two. Now a Folkestone pub has invited him to pay them a visit in the hope that a little of his Midas touch will rub off on them. Not one to refuse the chance of a free drink - despite what Vera Duckworth and her mates might get up to in his absence – Mike, in the form of actor Johnny Briggs, will be arriving at the Castle Inn in Foord Road on Wednesday, February 6. It’s a long way from the Rovers Return and he won’t find Bet Lynch behind the bar but landlord John Barrington and his staff will be on hand to give him a warm welcome. And the likelihood is that a large number of devoted “Street” fans will turn up for the occasion too. Mr. Barrington is hoping that Johnny's visit will help to publicise their Tudor Dining Room, which opened at The Castle early in December. Despite offering a full A La Carte menu as well as businessmen's lunches and Sunday lunches business has been poor. Staff are convinced that the lack of interest is due to the pub's rather unfashionable location. Johnny Briggs' visit will also help maintain a connection with Coronation Street that was originally fostered by the pub a couple of years ago. On that occasion actor Peter Adamson, who played the long-running character of Len Fairclough, was their guest and opened their successful Dungeon Bar.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 February 1985.

Local News.

Coronation Street’s Mike Baldwin sauntered casually up to the bar, smiling that winning, slightly lop-sided grin. Everyone in the pub was waiting for that almost immortal line “I’ve had a hard day” and the sight of the Street’s factory boss knocking back a large scotch. Suddenly the script had been changed and Mike Baldwin, alias Johnny Briggs, ordered draught Guinness! However, visitors at Folkestone’s Castle Inn were not too surprised, for on Wednesday, Johnny was making an appearance as himself (well, almost) to promote the Foord Road pub’s restaurant. Landlord John Barrington was thrilled with the results of Johnny’s visit and the actor has promised to return - to the Rovers and the Castle Inn!

 

Folkestone Herald 13 January 1994.

Local News.

Drug abuse lay behind a string of burglaries committed by a young Folkestone man, a court heard. But despite a plea on his behalf that he was determined to rid himself of the habit, Judge David Croft told Jamie Farmer the desire was not strong enough to persuade him to find an alternative to prison. Farmer, 22, of Trinity Crescent, Folkestone, was jailed for a total of 30 months for burglary and other offences.

Mr. Richard Travers, prosecuting at Maidstone Crown Court, said one burglary was committed by Farmer in a flat above the Castle Inn, Folkestone, after he had been drinking in the pub. A second burglary took place on October 6 at the home of Mrs. Mary Ronco in Sandgate Road, Folkestone, while she was out walking her dog. An Empress Josephine clock worth 800 was stolen.

The sentence included concurrent terms of 18 months and two years for the burglaries at The Castle and Sandgate Road, and a consecutive term totalling six months to replace a probation order that was imposed for earlier offences dealt with at another court.

 

From an email sent 4 October 2009

Regarding the previous information I supplied regarding the "Valliant Sailor," if you have any knowledge or information on the Castle Inn, Folkestone, I should appreciate hearing as the evening before his death Charles VIDLER visited that pub ordered a beer but left before either paying for or drinking it, according to a witness at the inquest into his death.

Also he had previously complained of having banged his head somehow and feeling 'queer', so he could well have been suffering from undiagnosed concussion, which may have caused him to blackout and fall into the sea. Just a theory.

As you will see, Charles VIDLER was born at Brenzett, and I have been continuing my family history research in respect of my VIDLER ancestors, to include, Brookland, Fairfield, Ivychurch and St Marys in the Marsh, New Romney etc, so any info anyone can provide me with I should be delighted to hear from them.

Many thanks again.

 

Best wishes Ian Nicoll.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

FIELD Thomas Aug/1864-80 (age 62 in 1871Census) Post Office Directory 1874BastionsFolkestone Chronicle

PELO/DELO Charles 1880-84 Post Office Directory 1882Bastions

PRESSLAND Daniel 1884 Next pub licensee hadBastions

TUNBRIDGE James 1884-88 Next pub licensee had Bastions

Last pub licensee had HILLS Alfred 1888-94 (age 50 in 1891Census) Post Office Directory 1891Bastions

HILLS Charlotte 1894-95 Bastions

JUDD Edward 1895-97 Bastions

BAULK Esau 1897-1900 Kelly's 1899Bastions

Last pub licensee had POLLARD Albert 1900-03 (age 40 in 1901Census) BastionsPost Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

POLLARD Ellen 1903-05 Bastions

ATTWOOD William 1905-07 Next pub licensee had Bastions

ATTWOOD Percy William 1907-16 (age 29 in 1911Census) Post Office Directory 1913Post Office Directory 1922Bastions

ATTWOOD Marie Kate 1916-19 (age 27 in 1911Census) Bastions

ATTWOOD Percy 1919-29 Next pub licensee had  Bastions

SURTEES Henry 1929-48 Kelly's 1934Post Office Directory 1938Bastions

SURTEES Alice 1948-64 Bastions

NICHOLSON Frederick 1964 Bastions

FIRRELL William 1964-66 Bastions

POWELL Reginald 1966-67 Bastions

JESSUP Anthony 1967-75 Bastions

SLADE Leslie 1975-78 Bastions

BARRINGTON Arthur 1978-84 Bastions

BARRINGTON Arthur & Founzou 1984-89 Bastions

BARRINGTON Arthur & Founzou & HALL William 1989-92 Bastions

HALL Harry & RICHARDSON Lisa Next pub licensee had 1992-95 Bastions (Also "Imperial")

HALL Harry and William & RICHARDSON Lisa 1995-98 Bastions

HALL Harry and Lillian and William 1998-2001 Bastions

HALL Harry & William 2001 Bastions

HALL Harry and William and Tracy and Sarah & RICHARDSON 2001-04 Bastions

HALL Harry and William and Lisa and Sarah & RICHARDSON Lisa & DAY Warren 2004+ Bastions

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/castle.html

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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