DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 11 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1855

Bouverie Arms

Latest July 1997

33 Cheriton Road

Folkestone

Bouverie Arms 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Former Bouverie Arms, Folkestone Former Bouverie Arms, Folkestone Bouverie Arms, Folkestone. Sign today

Above photos by Paul Skelton, 27 June 2009.

Former Bouverie Arms

Above photo kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

Bouverie Arms card

Above aluminium card issued June 1951. Sign series 3 number 4.

 

Albert Hart and wife

Above photo showing Albert Hart and his wife, licensee 1891-1903 and 1910-1915. Kindly sent by Iain Crump, great grandchild. He says he still has the teapot they were given on their retirement from the pub. Below is another photo of him, date unknown.

Albert Hart

Iain has recently sent me the following two photographs of the tea-pot celebrating their silver wedding.

Silver teapot Silver teapot

Iain goes on to say the following:- It has seen better days but it has done well, having survived a parachute mine in Morehall Avenue in WW2 which fell on my Great Aunt Daisy and put an end to her, the entire house and also to the Mayor of Brighton and his wife and a couple called Sinstadt. The latter lived next door to and were friends of my grandparents, and were the parents of Gerald Sinstadt the sports commentator. My father and my grandparents were in Crowborough when the parachute mine landed – for I must give thanks!

Iain Crump.

 

Further reading from http://evenmoretales.blogspot.co.uk

 

From the Folkestone Observer 27 April, 1861

BEER AND SPIRIT LICENSE

Friday April 26th:- Before the Mayor and R.W. Boarer, Esq.

Mr. Hudson applied for a temporary authority to Mr. Thomas Baker, to sell beer and spirits at the "Bouverie Arms," Cheriton Place, until the special sessions for transfer of licences on the 5th of June next. The request was acceded to.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 July 1861.

Notice.

Whereas a petition of James Kirby, formerly of Tovil, near Maidstone, in the County of Kent, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then of the Bouverie Arms, in the town of Folkestone, in the County of Kent, Beershop Keeper, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then of the same place Licensed Victualler, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then in lodgings in the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, in the County of Kent, out of business or employment, then living in furnished lodgings at Cheriton Street aforesaid, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then and now of Cheriton Street in Cheriton aforesaid, Journeyman Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, an Insolvent Debtor, having been filed in the County Court of Kent, holden at Folkestone, in the said County, and an Interim Order for Protection from Process having been given to the said James Kirby, under the provisions of the Statutes in that case made and provided, the said James Kirby is hereby required to appear in the said Court, to be holden at Folkestone aforesaid, before the Judge of the said Court, on the twenty fourth day of July, 1861, at ten o'clock in the forenoon precisely, for his First Examination touching his debts, estate, and effects, and to be further dealt with according to the provisions of the said Statutes: And Notice is hereby given that the choice of Assignees is to take place at the time so appointed.

All persons indebted to the said James Kirby, or who have any of his effects, are not to pay or deliver the same but to Ralph Thomas Brockman, the Registrar of the said Court, at his Office at Folkestone, the official Assignee of the Estate and Effects of the said Insolvent.

William Venables, High Bailiff,

Messenger of the said Court.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 July 1861.

County Court.

Wednesday, July 24th: Before C. Harwood Esq.

James Kirby appeared to petition the Court under the Insolvent Debtors' Act; he passed his first examination, and received protection till next Court day.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 24 August, 1861.

ANNUAL LICENSING DAY

A new licence was also granted to Thomas Baker, late of Canterbury, for the "Bouverie Arms," Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 August 1861.

Annual Licencing Day & Petty Sessions.

Wednesday August 21st:- Before the Mayor, James Tolputt, W.F. Browell, W. Major, W. Bateman, and A.M. Leith esqs.

New Licence

A new licence was also granted to Thomas Baker, late of Canterbury, for the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 March 1865.

Death.

Died on the 21st instant, at Cheriton Road, Mr. John Hobden, landlord of the Bouverie Arms, aged 35 years.

Note: This is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Observer 1 July 1865.

Wednesday June 28th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., Captain Leith R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

Ellen Ovenden was charged with being drunk and using obscene language in the Cheriton Road, and the 27th instant.

Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Police constable Ovenden (2) said that yesterday afternoon about three o'clock he received information that a policeman was wanted at the Bouverie Arms. He went there and saw the prisoner in the tap room, and the landlady wished to have her removed from the house. The prisoner was drunk and using very abusive language. He removed her from the house, when she began to swear and use obscene language, and refused to go away when ordered, and he took her into custody.

Mrs. Hobden, landlady of the Bouverie Arms, said that the prisoner came to her house between 12 and one o'clock and had some ale, and made use of bad language and disturbed the neighbourhood. She went away and came back again and repeated the bad language, when she sent for a police constable and had her removed. The prisoner was drunk.

Prisoner in defence said that her husband was in the house at the time, and that made her abuse the landlady. Mrs. Hobden denied this, and said that she did not know the woman's husband.Mr. Tolputt told Mrs. Hobden that there had been many complaints about the house by the neighbours, and that if she did not mind she would lose her license.

The magistrates fined prisoner 5s. and costs for being drunk, and 1s. and costs for using obscene language, amounting to 15s.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 February 1873.

Wednesday, January 29th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

A special session was held for the transferring of Alehouse licenses.

George Hogben applied for a transfer of the license of the Bouverie Arms, granted to Sarah Tidmarsh at the last General Annual Licensing meeting.

Application granted.

 

Folkestone Express 1 February 1873.

Wednesday, January 29th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

The license of the Bouverie Arms was transferred from Sarah Tidmarsh to Richard Hogben.

Note: More Bastions lists him as George Hogben.

 

Folkestone Express 31 January 1874.

Wednesday, January 28th: Before Col. De Crespigny, J. Tolputt and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Transfer:

The following transfer of public house was granted:

Bouverie Arms – to Thomas Simmonds.

 

Folkestone Express 17 October 1874.

Thursday, October 15th: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt, J. Hoad, and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Thomas Simmons, the landlord of the Bouverie Arms, applied for permission to open his house at five o'clock every morning because it “paid him to do so”.

The Mayor said the Bench felt they could not grant the application as other publicans would ask for the same privilege. Applicant must show that it was for the public convenience.

The Clerk said it appeared to be a question of putting a few extra shillings into applicant's pocket.

 

Folkestone Express 4 May 1878.

Tuesday, April 30th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Henry Care, of Folkestone, was charged with being a deserter from the East Kent Militia. P.C. Knowles apprehended the prisoner at the Bouverie Arms on Sunday night.

The Bench ordered the prisoner to be sent to the headquarters of the regiment at Dover, to be dealt with by the authorities there.

 

Southeastern Gazette 6 January 1879.

Local News.

Richard Charles Austen was summoned for refusing to leave licensed premises when requested to do so. He pleaded not guilty, but the Bench, after hearing the evidence of the landlord of the Bouverie Arms, convicted the defendant and fined him 1s., costs 9s., or 7 days’.

 

Folkestone Express 11 January 1879.

Saturday, January 4th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, General Armstrong, R.W. Boarer and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

Charles Austen, a painter, was charged with refusing to quit the Bouverie Arms on the 26th December.

Thomas Simmons, the landlord, said the defendant went to his house. He was the worse for drink, and was refused any more. He declined to go when requested, and witness sent for the police and he was ejected.

He was fined 1s. and 9s. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 April 1881.

Monday, April 4th: before The Mayor, Gen. Cannon, W.J. Jeffreason, W. Bateman and J. Holden Esqs, and Alds. Caister and Sherwood.

George Hawkins, labourer, of 5, Saffron's Row, Dover Street, was charged with maliciously wounding James Laws, bricklayer, on April 2nd.

Prosecutor, sworn, said that on Saturday April 2nd he was in the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon. The prisoner was also there, and they were engaged in raffling and playing cards until five o'clock in the afternoon. He then went to sit in front of the fire, when an altercation took place between him and the prisoner, the latter wanting to fight. Prosecutor left the taproom, and outside they had a scuffle and a fall, prisoner whilst he was down biting him twice on the thigh. When they got up they went back into the public house together, prisoner still wanting to fight. Prosecutor struck him two or three times on the head, and prisoner then ran out of the house. About seven o'clock he returned, prosecutor then standing in front of the bar. They had a scuffle and fell. A man looking on cried out “Look out, Jim, he's got a knife”. He felt a prick in his right side. Prisoner said he had not got a knife. Finding he had been stabbed, he went to Dr. Bateman.

George Austin, carman, deposed to being present when the offence was committed. They had a word or two, and he saw that prisoner had something in his hand, which he believed to be a knife. He called out “Look out, Jim, he's got a knife in his hand”. Witness saw the knife picked up by someone present, but could not tell by whom. Neither appeared to be drunk.

By the Bench: When the knife was found, prisoner said it was his.

Thomas Simmons, landlord of the Bouverie Arms stated that prisoner was at his house on the afternoon in question. About half past four o'clock he left the bar to lie down, and came down at a quarter to seven. Witness described an altercation which took place between prisoner and prosecutor, who had taken off his coat and was in a threatening attitude. Witness said “My friend, put your coat on again. That won't do here, and if you don't leave my house I shall fetch a policeman to eject you”.

Prisoner: Why don't you use the words you used then?

Witness proceeded to corroborate the evidence of preceding witness, and in reference to the stabbing said that on hearing a disturbance in the bar he went there. Laws told him he was stabbed. Both men were on the floor, and he told those in the bar to hold prisoner down. Prisoner said “I have not got a knife”. At the same time Alfred Goodchild picked up a knife from off the floor, the same as the one produced. Both men were sober.

Being cross-examined by prisoner, witness said: You did not ask me for the dice. There was none in the bar. I never handed you the dice. I did not know you had the cards in the room.

Mr. Bradley reminded prisoner that that had nothing to do with the case. If he desired to get witness convicted for allowing gambling in his house, he must proceed in a proper manner.

Re-examined: I have no animosity against you.

P.C. Reads deposed to going to the house and hearing the accusation of assault.

Mr. W. Bateman, M.R.C.S., said that prosecutor came to him on Saturday evening and said he had been stabbed. Before he took off his clothes, witness observed a hole in his waistcoat, and immediately under it a hole in the shirt and flannel. On the right side of the chest, at the juncture of the ribs with the lower part of the sternum there was a small incised wound, about an eight of an inch in depth, and about the size the point of the knife produced would make. There had been a small flow of blood from the wound, but not much, as it was only through the skin into the fatty matter below. The wound was just over the bone, but the bone was not laid bare. It was not a dangerous wound, but in a dangerous place, if it had been deeper.

Prisoner: If the blow had been struck intentionally, would not a knife like that have gone in much deeper?

Dr. Bateman: It happened to be a place where it would not go through very easily.

Prisoner: Wasn't it such a wound as might have been done in a scuffle?

Witness: It seems it was done in a scuffle. I can't say how it was done.

Supt. Rutter said that on Saturday evening he sent for prisoner and asked him if he knew the serious nature of the charge. He had the knife alleged to be used in his hand. Prisoner said “I'll swear that is not my knife. I had it in my hand at the time, but I have no recollection of having used it. If they say so, I suppose I'll have to put up with the consequences”. The prisoner was the worse for drink.

Prisoner: Did not I say that I'll swear that I did not use it?

Supt. Rutter: No.

Prisoner, being asked whether he wished to say anything, stated that it was a public house quarrel from beginning to end. Prosecutor and two others sat down to play cards. They had words, and one word brought up another. Prosecutor knocked him down. He ran out of the house. Outside he met his wife, who enquired of him where he had been and what he had been doing. They went back to get a bag and bottle left in the public house. As soon as he went in prosecutor said “I'll give it to you, you ----, if you want anything”. He then knocked him down, and got his head between prosecutor's legs. After a time prosecutor let him get up. A man standing at the door said “Here's a knife”. He said “That's my knife”, and he could not account for it, or how it came out of his pocket, and prosecutor said he had been stabbed, and he (prisoner) replied “I have not stabbed you”. If there was anything wrong in the matter, he was sorry for it, and apologised. Had it not been for Simmons, the matter would have been made up.

Prisoner was then formally committed to the Quarter Sessions for trial.

 

Folkestone Express 9 April 1881.

Monday, April 4th: Before The Mayor, General Cannon, W.J. Jeffreason, W. Bateman and J. Holden Esqs, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood.

George Hawkins, a labourer, of 3, Saffron's Row, Dover Street, was charged with maliciously wounding James Laws, a bricklayer, on Saturday evening, April 2nd.

Prosecutor said he was a bricklayer, residing at 21, Darlington Street. On Saturday the 2nd of April he was in the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, about two o'clock. The prisoner was also there and they remained playing cards and raffling until about five o'clock. Witness then went to sit down in front of the fire. Prisoner asked whose legs he was sitting on. Prosecutor replied “Not yours”. Prisoner got up and wanted to fight, but prosecutor said he did not want to have anything to do with a row. Prisoner kept shaking his fists in prosecutor's face whilst they remained in the taproom. Prosecutor got up and went out, and prisoner followed. They had a scuffle and fell, and while they were down prisoner bit him twice on the thigh. When they got up, prosecutor went into the Bouverie Arms again, and prisoner still wanted to fight. Prosecutor then got up and hit him two or three times on the head, and he then ran out of the house. About seven o'clock he returned. Prosecutor was then standing in the bar. Prisoner looked at him, and then they both rushed at one another. They had a scuffle and both fell. A man standing there called out “Look out, Jim, he's got a knife”. Whilst they were on the ground he felt a prick in his right side. Prisoner held up his hands and said he had not got a knife. Prosecutor, finding he was stabbed, went to Dr. Bateman. He was bleeding. The clothes produced, with the flannel stained with blood, he was wearing at the time. Prisoner seemed alright when he returned about seven o'clock.

In cross-examination by prisoner, prosecutor said they had three raffles and played cards, but they did not quarrel about the cards.

George Austin, a carman, residing at 2, Coolinge Cottages, said he was at the Bouverie Arms on Saturday between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. Prisoner and prosecutor were there. They had a word or two, but witness could not tell what was said. They had a scuffle, and he saw that the prisoner had something in his hand, which he believed to be a knife. He called out to prosecutor “Look out, Jim, he's got a knife in his hand”. They were then on the ground. Witness saw the knife picked up by some man present, but he could not say by whom, and he did not see what became of it. He believed the landlord took it. He heard prosecutor, after he got up, say he was stabbed. The men did not appear to be drunk.

Cross-examined by prisoner: I do not know what Simmons said when he received the knife. Some woman came in with you. She asked for some money. You were by the side of the bar when Simmons came round to you.

By the Bench: When the knife was found, prisoner said it was his. I did not touch it myself, and could not say whether there was blood on the blade or not.

Thomas Simmons, landlord of the Bouverie Arms, said he knew both prosecutor and prisoner. They were at his house on Saturday. He first saw them about two o'clock in the afternoon. They were there the whole of the afternoon. He left the bar about half past four and went to lie down. He came down about a quarter to seven. The two were sitting in the smoking room, side by side before the fire. They were having an argument. Whilst he was in the room, prisoner said to Laws “I am as good a man as you”. Laws said “Undoubtedly you are”. Prisoner said, with an oath “Yes; I am as good a man as you are at anything”. At the same time he got up and took off his coat and hung it on the back of the chair. Witness tapped him on the shoulder and said “My friend, put your coat on again. That won't do here, and if you don't leave my house at once, I shall fetch a policeman to eject you”.

Prisoner: Why don't you use the words you used then?

Witness: Laws said it should not occur in my house, and neither did he require anything of the sort, but if the prisoner did he must put up with the consequences. Prisoner said they had better go outside. Laws went out first, leaving his coat on the chair. Prisoner followed him, putting his coat on as he went out. The door was closed, and witness did not see what took place outside. The two returned in a few minutes, Laws going in first and the prisoner following him. Witness ordered prisoner to leave the house. After they returned they closed and fell, while they were in the taproom, and prisoner but Laws, who fell over a chair, on the thigh. Witness put prisoner out of the door and he went away. He was away about ten minutes and then came back to the private door. About twenty minutes after witness put prisoner out, he heard a row in the bar, and his son called for him to come. Witness returned immediately. Laws said he was stabbed. Both men were in the floor, and witness told those in the bar to hold prisoner down. Prisoner said “I have not got a knife”. At the same moment Alfred Goodchild picked the knife up off the floor and handed it to witness, who subsequently gave it to the police. The knife produced was the same one. Witness sent his son for the police and P.C. Reed returned with him. The men were sober.

Cross-examined by the prisoner: You were standing in the bar before I went upstairs. You did not ask me for the dice. There were none in the bar. I never handed you the dice at all. I did not know you had the cards in the room playing.

Mr. Bradley told prisoner that had nothing to do with the case. If he wished to get witness convicted for allowing gambling in his house he must proceed in a proper manner.

Cross-examination continued: I have no animosity against you.

P.C. Reed said he went to the Bouverie Arms on Saturday evening and received the knife produced from Mr. Simmons. Prisoner and prosecutor were both there. They were both excited, and each accused the other of an assault. Prisoner seemed to have been the most assaulted of the two.

Cross-examined by prisoner: You had blood on your face and looked as though you had been knocked about. I saw no marks of blood on the prosecutor.

Mr. William Bateman said prosecutor went to him on Saturday evening and said he had been stabbed. Before he took off his clothes, witness saw a hole in his waistcoat, and immediately under it there was a hole in the shirt and flannel. On the right side of prosecutor's chest, at the junction of the ribs with the lower part of the sternum, there was a small incised wound about an eighth of an inch in depth, and about a size that the point of the knife produced would make. There had been a small flow of blood from the wound, but not much, as it was only through the skin into the fatty matter below. The wound was just over the bone, and the bone was not laid bare. It was not a dangerous wound, but it was in a dangerous place if it had been deeper.

Prisoner: If the blow had been struck intentionally, would not a knife like that have gone in much deeper?

Witness: It happened to be in a place where it would not go through easily.

Wasn't it such a wound as might have been done in a scuffle?

Witness: It seems it was done in a scuffle. I can't say how it was done.

Superintendent Rutter said on Saturday evening, ten minutes after the prisoner was charged, he sent for the prisoner and asked if he understood the serious nature of the charge. Witness had the knife produced in his hand. Prisoner said “I'll swear that is my knife. I had it in my hand at the time, but I have no recollection of having used it. If they say so I suppose I shall have to put up with the consequences”. The prisoner was then the worse for drink.

Prisoner: Didn't I say “I'll swear I didn't use it”? – No

Prisoner wished to make a statement, and although advised by the magistrates' clerk that he had better reserve anything he had to say, he persisted. He said: When I left off work at one o'clock I went into the Bouverie Arms with another man. We had some beer. It was a public house quarrel from beginning to end. It commenced at five o'clock. We were sitting there playing cards. Prosecutor, me, and two more sat down to play. As we were playing we found some of one pack and some of another. One word brought up another. Prosecutor, being the strongest man, knocked me down. As soon as I could get clear of the house I ran away. I got down as far as the Rev. Hussey's school, and there I met my wife, who asked me where I had been and what I had been doing. I told her. We went back to get my bag and bottle, which I had left. As soon as I got inside I saw Laws in his shirt sleeves at the other end of the bar. He said “I'll give it to you, you ----, if you want anything”. He then rushed at me and knocked me down. When I was down he got my head between his legs. I said “for God's sake don't strangle me”. After a time, Laws let me get up. There was a man standing at the door, and he said “Here's a knife”. I said “That's my knife”. I can't account how it came out of my pocket. Laws said he was stabbed. I replied “I have not stabbed you. If there has been anything done in the struggle that should not have been done, I am sorry for it and I apologise”. If it had not been for Simmons, we should have made it all up between ourselves, but Simmons urged him to give me the law.

Prisoner was then committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Southeastern Gazette 9 April 1881.

Local News.

On Monday George Hawkins was charged with having, on the 2nd of April, unlawfully and maliciously wounded one James Law, contrary to the statute in such cases made and provided.

James Law, in giving evidence, stated that he was a bricklayer residing at Folkestone, and on Saturday, the 2nd April, was in the Bouverie Arms with the prisoner, when some quarrel arose between them about sitting in front of the fire. The prisoner took off his coat and squared up to them, the landlord thereupon ordering him out. He went but returned in a little while and knocked witness down and stabbed him with a knife. He did not see the knife but felt it.

In cross-examination by the prisoner he said that he played cards and had quarrelled about them.

George Austin said he was a carman and was in the Bouverie Arms on the day mentioned and saw the prisoner and the prosecutor scuffling together.

Thomas Simmons, the landlord of the Bouverie Arms, said that he also witnessed the quarrel. He had turned the prisoner out and it was not until he returned to the taproom that the quarrel took place. The knife produced was the one that the prisoner had used and he had delivered it to a police constable.

Dr. Bateman said that the prosecutor came to him on the evening in question and said he was stabbed. He found a wound on the right side of his chest, about one-eighth of an inch deep. It was in a dangerous place, and might have been caused in a scuffle.

The prisoner admitted having quarrelled with the prosecutor on the night in question, but said he wished to apologise for anything he might have done in the scuffle.

He was committed to the Quarter Sessions for trial.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 April 1881.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq.

George Hawkins, 36, labourer, was charged with unlawfully wounding James Laws, at Folkestone, on April 2nd, 1881.

Mr. Denman prosecuted.

As last week we gave a full report of the hearing before the magistrates, it is only necessary to remind our readers of the features of the case. Prisoner and Laws were quarrelling in the Bouverie Arms, which resulted in a scuffle, when prisoner was seen by a witness to have a knife in his hand, the witness crying out to prosecutor while they were scuffling “Take care, he's got a knife in his hand”. Laws, on rising, found himself bleeding from the side, and on going to Dr. Bateman it was seen that a wound which, had it been deeper, might have been dangerous, had been inflicted. The evidence against prisoner was very clear, although in defence he denied that he had any knowledge of using a knife, which was proved to be his property. The only discrepancy in the evidence was between the landlord of the Bouverie Arms, who swore prisoner was sober at the time, and the Police, who stated that he had been freely drinking when apprehended.

The Jury returned a verdict of Guilty, but added that they thought prisoner had received provocation. On being questioned by the Recorder, the Foreman said that they meant prisoner had lost his temper.

Prisoner, on being asked whether he had anything to say in mitigation of punishment, observed that it was nothing but a public house quarrel.

The Recorder, in passing sentence, observed that what with the use of the knife and revolvers, they lived in strange times, and he felt he could not give a less punishment than nine months' imprisonment with hard labour.

Prisoner: Thank you, Your Honour.

 

Folkestone Express 16 April 1881.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq.

he grand jury returned a true bill against George Hawkins, 36, a labourer, charged with unlawfully assaulting James Laws by biting him, and also unlawfully wounding the same James Laws.

Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty to the charge of stabbing. Mr. G.L. Denman prosecuted.

The facts of the case were fully reported in our last week's issue. The prosecutor and the prisoner were together in the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, on Saturday, and had been playing cards during the afternoon. A quarrel arose, which resulted in a scuffle between the two men, the prisoner biting prosecutor whilst they were both upon the ground. Prisoner was ejected from the house, but returned shortly before seven. A second encounter between the two ensued, and while they were on the floor in the bar the prosecutor received a slight wound in the side from the point of a knife which prisoner acknowledged belonged to him. Prosecutor went to Dr. Bateman, who found a small incised wound about an eighth of an inch in depth in the man's side.

The jury found the prisoner Guilty, and the foreman added that they considered the prisoner received provocation.

Prisoner asserted that the knife was in his bag, and that the wound was inflicted accidentally during the struggle.

The Recorder sentenced the prisoner to nine months' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 April 1881.

Quarter Sessions.

The Folkestone Quarter Sessions were held at the Town Hall on Wednesday, before the Recorder (J. J. Lonsdale, Esq.).

George Hawkins was charged with unlawfully and maliciously wounding and biting James Laws, at Folkestone, on the 2nd April, 1881. He pleaded not guilty of stabbing, but guilty of biting. Mr. Denman appeared for the prosecution, and the jury returned a verdict of guilty, but found that the offence was committed under provocation.

The Recorder sentenced the prisoner to nine months’ hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 June 1886.

Wednesday, June 23rd: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, and J. Holden Esq.

Annie Hancock was charged with attempting suicide from the harbour.

The particulars of this case were reported last week. Prisoner now expressed her sorrow for what she had done. She was under the influence of drink at the time but promised, if let off, not to attempt to take her life again.

Her sister, being in Court, promised to take care of her. His Worship, after pointing out the wickedness of the act, discharged the prisoner.

William Williams was summoned by Annie Hancock, the last prisoner.

Annie Hancock, sworn, stated that she was at the Bouverie Arms on the 15th June, when defendant made a row there, and told her not to come there again. He struck her, and she struck him back again.

In defence, defendant said he told her to keep away from his house, and not breed disturbances, when she struck him, and he called a witness named Louisa White, who swore that plaintiff was the assailant.

The Bench dismissed the summons.

 

Folkestone Express 10 December 1887.

Saturday, December 3rd: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Capt. Carter, Surgeon General Gilbourne, H.W. Poole, S. Penfold, E. Ward and W. Wightwick Esqs.

Charles Austin was charged with assaulting John Austin, his brother, on the 25th November. Mr. Minter appeared for the defendant.

Complainant said: I live at No. 8, Arlington, and am a labourer. Defendant is my brother. On the 25th November I was at the Bouverie Arms between ten and eleven at night. Defendant came in while I was sitting in the taproom. He called me a b----. I said “What do you mean?” He replied “I'll show you what I mean”, and knocked me backwards out of the seat. He hit me on the head and in the eye, and then pulled me off the floor. It is the third time he has assaulted me. I did not speak a word to him. I did not like bringing the matter forward, but I cannot put up with it. When he went out he said “I'll wait for you, and when you get outside I'll finish you off”.

By Mr. Minter: The landlord is not here. I have a witness, named Henry Marsh, who was in the room all the time. After he dragged me off the floor, I took a chair and threatened to knock him down. He complained that I had struck his child without a cause. I have never given him any cause to assault me.

Henry Marsh said defendant struck complainant twice whilst in the taproom. He said nothing to complainant before he struck him about the child. Complainant did not give any provocation.

The Magistrates' Clerk said defendant had been many times before them, and he had been bound over to keep the peace towards John Jones.

Mr. Minter: What, Mr. Jones the fruiterer? – I suppose so.

Mr. Minter: Two excitable beings together. (Laughter)

Supt. Taylor said there had been many summonses for assault served on defendant, but they hed been generally settled out of court.

The Mayor said the Magistrates could not dismiss from their minds that a gross and unprovoked assault had been committed, and defendant would be fined 20s. and 10s. costs, or 14 days' with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 May 1898.

Felix.

I understand that the locality of Cheriton Road will be shortly brightened up by some grand alterations to the Bouverie Arms, the appearance of which is to undergo a complete transformation.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 July 1898.

Wednesday, July 20th: Before Messrs. J. Banks, J. Pledge, J. Holden, and C.J. Pursey.

Mr. Albert Hart, of the Bouverie Arms, was granted permission to sell on the Football Ground at a fete to be held on Bank Holiday.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 July 1898.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday a licence was granted to Mr. Hart to sell at the Football Ground fete.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 23 July 1898.

Wednesday, July 20th: Before J. Banks, J. Pledge, J. Holden, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

A special licence was granted to the landlord of the Bouverie Arms for a football fete on the Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 20 May 1899.

Saturday, May 13th: Before The Mayor, J. Hoad, J. Pledge, G. Spurgen, W. Medhurst, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Mr. Albert Hart applied for extra licensing privileges on the occasion of the Football Fete on Whit Monday. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 September 1899.

Police Court.

On Wednesday Mr. Albert James Hart, of the Bouverie Arms, answered a summons charging him with failing to produce a stock book when asked by the officer of the Inland Revenue. The Supervisor from Canterbury put in an appearance to prosecute. He proposed, he said, to state his case and then ask for an adjournment, as his witness was not present.

Mr. Minter, counsel for Hart, objected, on the ground that as the Crown neither accepted nor paid costs, and this was a Crown prosecution, it would be decidedly improper to put his client to a second day's expense through the prosecution not being ready.

Under the circumstances the Bench dismissed the case.

The facts, as they afterwards transpired, were understood to be that a man who was an utter stranger to Mr. Hart called and demanded his permit book for inspection. Mr. Hart told the man that as he had never seen him before he would require him to show some documentary proof that he was authorised to demand inspection of the books. The man, who was really an excise officer, is said to have produced no authority. The prosecution was the result, and the intention was to make a test case as to whether a publican can demand an excise officer's card or other authority. As the prosecution fell through in consequence of the absence of the witness, the question remains unanswered.

 

Folkestone Express 11 November 1899.

Saturday, November 4th: Before The Mayor, Col. Westropp, J. Holden, J. Fitness, J. Pledge, W. Medhurst, T.J. Vaughan, J. Stainer, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Mr. Hart, of the Bouverie Arms, Folkestone, applied for an occasional licence to sell at the Fancy Dress Ball to be held on November 7th at the Town Hall.

The Bench granted the licence from nine till two.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 February 1900.

Wednesday, February 21st: Before Mr. J. Hoad and Colonel Westropp.

Albert Hart made an application for a licence to sell liquors, etc., at the Town hall on the 27th on the occasion of the Football Smoker. Granted.

 

Folkestone Express 24 February 1900.

Wednesday, February 21st: Before J. Hoad Esq., Lieut. Col. Keily Westropp, and J. Stainer Esq.

Mr. Albert Hart was granted an occasional licence to sell at the Town Hall from 7.30 till 10 on the occasion of the Football Smoking Concert on February 27th.

 

Folkestone Express 26 May 1900.

Saturday, May 19th: Before C.J. Pursey, J. Stainer, T.J. Vaughan and J. Pledge Esqs.

Mr. A. Hart, of the Bouverie Arms, was granted a temporary licence to sell beer on the Football Field at the Yeomanry Sports on the 23rd inst.

 

Folkestone Express 2 June 1900.

Wednesday, May 30th: Before J. Banks, W. Wightwick, J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert and W. Salter Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Mr. Hart, of the Bouverie Arms, was granted an occasional licence to sell on the Football Field on Whit Monday and Tuesday, when fetes will be held.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 May 1901.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Before Messrs. Hoad, Peden, Vaughan, and Pledge, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

Mr. Albert Hart was granted an occasional licence to sell intoxicating liquors, etc., on the Moorhall Football Ground next Monday, the occasion being the annual football fete.

 

Folkestone Express 25 May 1901.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Before J. Hoad, G. Peden, J. Pledge, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Colonel Keily Westropp.

Mr. A. Hart, of the Bouverie Arms, applied for a temporary licence to sell liquor on the Football ground on the occasion of the Bank Holiday fete on Whit Monday. Granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 May 1901.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Before Messrs. J. Hoad, J. Pledge, T.J. Vaughan, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Mr. Albert Hart was granted an occasional licence for the Football Ground, Morehall, on Whit Monday, on the occasion of a fete.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 June 1901.

Wednesday, June 12th: Before Messrs. Hoad, Pursey, Wightwick, and Pledge, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

Mr. A. Hart, of the Bouverie Arms, succeeded in obtaining an occasional licence for the Artillery Drill Hall, the event being the annual dinner of the Football Club on the 15th.

The Chief Constable said he believed the company would be a good one. Sir Edward Sassoon, M.P. would preside.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 May 1902.

We Hear.

That Mr. Albert Hart has initiated a first-class idea. He is presenting a massive silver cup to be competed for by the teams representing the various trades in the town. All matches will be played on the Folkestone Ground, and the proceeds, after paying expenses, will be handed over to the hospital. This should make Folkestone's football season next year doubly attractive.

 

Folkestone Express 2 August 1902.

Wednesday, July 30th: Before Alderman Banks, G.I. Swoffer, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

An occasional licence was granted to Mr. A.J. Hart to supply refreshments on the new Football Ground, Canterbury Road, at the fete on August Bank Holiday.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 August 1902.

Wednesday, July 30th: Before Aldermen Banks and Herbert, and Mr. Swoffer.

Mr. Hart applied for an occasional licence in the new Football Ground, Canterbury Road, for August Bank Holiday. Granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 December 1902.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Messrs. Wightwick, Swoffer, and Herbert, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

On the application of Mr. G.W. Haines, Mr. Albert Hart, landlord of the Bouverie Arms was granted permission to convert a stable connected with his house into an office. It was explained that no liquors would be consumed on the premises; the office was to enable people to give orders without going into the public portion of the premises.

The Chief Constable offered no objection to the alterations, as the facilities for drinking purposes would not be increased.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 December 1902.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Messrs. Herbert, Wightwick, and Swoffer.

Mr. A. Hart, landlord of the Bouverie Arms, submitted plans for an alteration in the rear of his premises. It was proposed to convert a stable into an office, where orders for delivery could be booked.

Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the applicant, and pointed out that it was not his client's intention to allow any liquor to be sold there.

Mr. Herbert suggested that it would be possible to sell liquor from this office.

Mr. Haines said that there could be no object in so doing. The house itself was quite near.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said that the alteration did not increase the facilities for drinking in any way. There was no extra provision made in the way of entrances, as the office would not adjoin the establishment.

The Magistrates approved of the plans, which were duly signed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 1st: Before Mr. W. Wightwick and Alderman Spurgen.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, was transferred from Mr. Albert Hart (who is sailing for South Africa) to Mr. Fredk. G. Lester.

 

Folkestone Express 4 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 1st: Before Alderman Spurgen and W. Wightwick Esq.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms Hotel was temporarily transferred from Albert Hart to Frederick George Lester.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 1st: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, and Alderman G. Spurgen.

An application for the transfer of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, from Mr. A. Hart to Mr. Frederick George Lester was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. T.J. Vaughan, and Mr. J. Stainer.

Following, in most cases, orders for temporary authority, full transfers of licences in relation to the following houses were granted:- The Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, from Mr. Alfred James Hart to Mr. Frederick George Lester.

 

Folkestone Express 11 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and J. Stainer Esqs., and Alderman Vaughan.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms Hotel was transferred from Albert James Hart to Frederick George Lister.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 July 1903.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The following licence was transferred: Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, from Mr. A. Hart to Frederick George Lester.

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Messrs. Spurgen, Carpenter and Fynmore.

The Bench approved plans for alterations at the Bouverie Arms.

 

Folkestone Express 15 April 1905.

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and W.C. Carpenter Esq.

The Bench approved of plans for alterations at the Bouverie Tavern (sic).

 

Folkestone Daily News 22 April 1905.

Saturday, April 22nd: Before The Mayor, Ald. Spurgen, Ald. Penfold, Ald. Vaughan, and E.T. Ward.

An application for a temporary licence on the occasion of a smoking concert at the Town Hall on April 27th was made by Mr. F. Lester, of the Bouverie Arms.

The Bench granted the licence from 7.30 to 10.30 p.m.

 

Folkestone Daily News 27 April 1905.

Thursday, April 27th: Before The Mayor, Ald. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

Geo. Marsh and John Tappenden were charged with being drunk on licensed premises, to wit, the Bouverie Arms, on Easter Monday, and refusing to quit when asked to do so.

P.C. Prebble deposed to seeing the defendants drunk near the Town Hall. They went into the Guildhall twice, and he fetched them out. They then went to the Bouverie Arms and called for beer, and the landlord (Mr. Lester) refused to serve them and ordered them out. Witness then asked them to leave. Tappenden left, but Marsh refused to go, and also refused to give his name and address. Witness therefore took him to the police station and got his name and address. Marsh then paid a second visit to the Bouverie Arms, and was again turned out. He afterwards went to the Gun Tavern, but could not get served there.

Frederick Lester, the landlord of the Bouverie Arms, deposed that both of the defendants were drunk and he refused to serve them. He corroborated the constable's evidence.

This was Marsh's first appearance, but Tappenden had four previous convictions against him.

The Bench fined Tappenden 10s. and 9s. costs, and Marsh 5s. and 9s. costs.

The Mayor said he was glad we had such publicans in Folkestone as Mr. Lester, who refused to serve such people as the accused.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 April 1905.

Thursday, April 27th: Before The Mayor, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. Pursey, and Mr. J. Stainer.

George Marsh and John Tappenden were summoned for being drunk on licensed premises.

P.C. Prebble stated that on Easter Monday afternoon he was on duty outside the Town Hall, when he saw the defendants, who were very drunk, enter the Guildhall Vaults. Witness requested them to leave, which they did. Subsequently he saw them enter the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road. They were requested to leave by the landlord, but refused, and witness ejected them. When outside he asked defendants their names. Marsh gave his, but Tappenden refused until he was taken to the police station. When released, defendant returned to the Bouverie Arms, but was again ejected.

Fred Geo. Tester (sic), landlord of the Bouverie Arms, stated that when defendants came to his house they were “Awfully drunk”.

Defendants expressed regret.

Marsh was fined 5s. and 9s. costs, in default seven days' hard labour. Tappenden, who had four previous convictions recorded against him, was fined 10s. and 9s. costs, or, in default, fourteen days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 29 April 1905.

Saturday, April 22nd: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Vaughan and Penfold, G. Spurgen and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Frederick George Lester, of the Bouverie Arms, was granted an occasional licence to sell refreshments in the Town Hall from 7.30 p.m. till 10 p.m. on Thursday, the 27th.

Thursday, April 27th: Before The Mayor, W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

George Marsh and John Tappenden, labourers, were severally charged with being drunk on licensed premises, the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, on the 24th April. They pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Prebble said at 4.20 p.m. on the 24th inst., he was on duty near the Town Hall when he saw the two defendants in company with a third man. They were all drunk. The omnibus conductor refused to take them to Cheriton because of this. They then went into the Guildhall Vaults and witness, having fetched them out, cautioned them. About ten minutes later prisoners again entered the same public house, and witness had to fetch them out again. After that prisoners went to the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, the third man having left them. Witness went into the public bar and heard both prisoners call for beer. The landlord, however, refused to serve them, and witness heard him say “No; you go out”. Tappenden then used obscene language, and witness asked him to leave the house. Tappenden went outside, but Marsh refused to do so. Witness then ejected him and told him he would be reported for being drunk on licensed premises. As Marsh refused to give his name and address, witness took him to the police station. When released he went straight back to the Bouverie Arms, and was turned out by the landlord. He also went into the Gun Tavern, Cheriton Road, and was ejected from there.

Frederick George Lester, landlord of the Bouverie Arms, said he knew Tappenden was drunk, but he did not notice the other man. He did not serve them with any beer.

Inspector Swift said that was Marsh's first appearance, but Tappenden had been convicted four times for similar offences, the last being in January.

Tappenden was fined 10s. and costs, or 14 days' hard labour, and Marsh 5s. and costs, or seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 April 1905.

Thursday, April 27th: Before The Mayor, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

George Marsh and John Tappenden were charged with being drunk on licensed premises, viz., the Bouverie Arms, on Easter Monday. They pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Prebble gave evidence.

The landlord of the Bouverie refused to serve the men.

Inspector Swift said Tappenden had a bad record relating to drink. He had four previous convictions. Marsh had not been charged before.

Tappenden was fined 10s. and 9s. costs, in default 14 days' hard labour. Marsh was ordered to pay a fine of 5s. with 9s. costs, in default seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 17 November 1906.

Local News.

Early on Sunday morning a burglar paid a visit to the premises of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road. To have gained access to the house he had evidently got upon a wall by the side of the building, and then climbed on to the flat roof of the bar. He then appears to have entered the house through a window, which had been left unfastened. In his wanderings he entered a bedroom occupied by the landlord's daughter, who gave the alarm. The burglar, however, escaped, but his haul was not a very large one – only a watch, a small clock, and a pair of girl's stockings being missed. A pair of grey socks was left behind, and no doubt the unknown visitor mistook the stockings for his own property, which he had probably taken off so that he could move more quietly about the house.

 

Folkestone Daily News 26 November 1906.

Monday, November 26th: Before Messrs. Banks, Vaughan, Ward, Fynmore, Carpenter, and Ames.

Charles William Flinders, on remand, was charged with attempting to commit a burglary at No. 1, Harvey Street.

The evidence given by the witnesses at the previous hearing was read over and signed.

The Chief Constable then said there was another charge against the prisoner, that of larceny.

Frederick Lester said he was the landlord of the Bouverie Arms. He went to bed at 10 minutes to 12 on November 10th. At about 1.30 he heard someone at the door. His daughter rushed into the room and made a statement. The window looked out upon a flat roof of the bar. The window was wide open, the bottom sash being up. Witness got outside and examined the roof. He found some vases outside that must have been removed from the room. In his opinion, access to the house must have been gained by that window. He made a search, and during the search P.C. Lemar came inside. On the floor of his daughter's bedroom he found a pair of socks. He missed a clock from his daughter's bedroom, and also a watch from the bedstead, where it was usually hung. All the drawers in the room were open, and had been disturbed. The bedroom window was partially open when he went to bed, but was wide open when he got up. He valued the watch at 1.

Ethel Lester, daughter of Mr. Lester, said she remembered the 10th November. She went to bed about 9.30. Her bedroom was at the back of the house. The watch and chain (produced) was her property. She hung the watch on her bedstead. She was awakened by the wardrobe squeaking. A small gas light was burning. She saw a man in a grey shirt standing beside the wardrobe, and her watch and chain had gone. She then ran into her father's room. The watch and chain (produced) were her property.

Horace Wood deposed that he lived at Military Avenue, Cheriton. On the 14th November he was in Risboro' Lane. The Leicestershire Regiment is stationed there. He knew the prisoner, who asked him to buy a watch and chain. He asked 8s. for it. Witness told him it was no use, as it was out of order. Prisoner said it was his own property. Prisoner then said “Can't you give me something for it? I am short of cash, and only want to sell it until Saturday”. Witness then gave him 4s. for it on condition that he came on Saturday and redeemed it. On the 22nd he handed the watch and chain to Detective Burniston.

P.C. Butcher said after searching the prisoner on the former charge, he found he was wearing a pair of stockings (produced), which had been identified by the daughter of Mr. Lester.

Detective Burniston said on Sunday, the 10th November, he went to the Bouverie Arms and examined the premises. He found access had been made to the house from the flat roof over the bar. Anyone of prisoner's height could reach the flat roof by standing on an adjoining wall. He found marks. On Thursday, the 22nd inst., he went to Shorncliffe Camp, and was handed the watch and chain by Wood, which had been identified by Mr. Lester. This morning at the police station he said to the prisoner “You will be further charged with stealing on the night of the 10th inst. from the Bouverie Arms a watch and chain, a pair of stockings, and also a clock, not recovered”. Prisoner made no reply.

Prisoner had no questions to ask, and was committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 1 December 1906.

Monday, November 26th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Colonel Fynmore, E.T. Ward, W.C. Carpenter, and T. Ames Esqs.

Charles William Flinders, a private in the Leicestershire Regiment, was brought up on remand, charged with burglary at No. 1, Harvey Street. He was also charged with larceny.

The Chief Constable said the evidence in the charge of burglary was complete, and after it had been read over, if the Bench were satisfied that a prima facie case was made out, he should ask them to commit the prisoner to the Quarter Sessions. He would then proceed to call evidence in connection with the second charge.

Prisoner had no witnesses to call, and did not wish to say anything.

The Magistrates committed him to the Quarter Sessions, bail being offered to him, himself in 20, and two sureties of 10 each.

The Chief Constable said the second charge was of stealing a watch and chain, a clock, and a pair of stockings from the Bouverie Arms during the night of Saturday, November 10th.

Frederick George Lester, the licensee of the Bouverie Arms public house, Cheriton Road, said on Saturday, November 10th he went to bed at ten minutes to twelve. He was awakened by his daughter at about twenty to two. She was sleeping in a room at the back of the house and on the same floor as the room in which he was sleeping. She made a statement to him which induced him to get up. He went into her room and examined the landing window, which looked out on the flat roof of the bar. The window was wide open, the bottom sash being pushed right up. He got out of the window, and on examining the roof he found some vases, which had been inside the window, standing outside on the roof. He thought access was gained by the window. He searched the house from top to bottom, and during the time P.C. Lemar came in. On the floor of his daughter's bedroom he found a pair of dirty socks (produced). He then missed a clock from the top of a chest of drawers, and also a watch and chain from off the bedstead. The drawers and the wardrobe were wide open, and the contents of each had been disturbed. From the top drawer he missed a pair of his daughter's stockings. The landing window was partially open at the top when he went to bed. The stockings produced by P.C. Butcher belonged to him, and the watch and chain produced by Detective Sergeant Burniston were the property of his daughter. He valued the articles at about 1.

The last witness's daughter said on Saturday night, November 10th, she went to bed at half past nine. Her bedroom was on the first floor. Before getting into bed she hung the watch and chain on the top rail at the head of the bed. She went to sleep, and she was woke up later by the “squeaking” of the bedroom door. When she went to bed she left a small jet of gas burning. When she looked up she saw a man in a grey shirt by the side of the wardrobe. She looked for her watch and chain and she then noticed it was gone. She then ran into her father's room. She noticed that the bottom sash of the landing window was open. She missed the pair of stockings produced from the wardrobe, and the last time she saw them was on the Saturday morning. The watch and chain were her property.

Horace Wood, a general salesman, of 34, Military Avenue, Cheriton, said on Wednesday, November 14th, he was in “Tin Town”, Shorncliffe, where the Leicestershire Regiment was stationed, when the prisoner came to him and asked him to buy the lady's watch and chain produced. He asked 8s. for it, and witness told him it was no use to him as it was out of order. Witness asked him if it was his own property, and prisoner replied “Yes”. He then said “Can't you give me something for it? I am short of cash and want to sell it until Saturday”. Witness told him he would give him 3s. for it if he would give him 4s. for it again on Saturday. Prisoner agreed to that. He then took the watch and chain and handed him 3s. On November 22nd he gave the watch and chain to Detective Sergeant Burniston.

P.C. Butcher said he arrested the prisoner on another charge on November 18th. He took him to the police station, and on searching him he found the prisoner wearing the stockings produced, which were identified by Mr. Lester and his daughter.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said on Sunday, November 10th, from information received, he went to the Bouverie Arms public house and examined the premises. He found access had been made to the house from the side of the premises in Millfield. The wall adjoining the premises was 4 ft. 6 in. high, and any person of the prisoner's height, standing on the wall, could gain access by climbing up the other portion of the bar, which was 6 ft. high, and so get on to the flat roof. There were several marks on the wall as if they had been made by a pair of boots. On Thursday, November 22nd, he went to the Camp and made enquiries. He saw Wood, who handed him the watch and chain produced. That morning at the police station he said to the prisoner, showing him the watch and chain and stockings, “You will be further charged with stealing, during the night of November 10th, from inside the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, this watch and chain, a pair of stockings, and a metal clock, not recovered”. He cautioned him, and prisoner made no reply.

The Chief Constable asked for the prisoner to be committed to the Quarter Sessions on this charge also.

Prisoner had no statement to make, and he was committed to the Quarter Sessions, bail being offered in similar amounts as in the first charge.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 December 1906.

Monday, November 26th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and R.J. Fynmore, Messrs. E.T. Ward and T. Ames.

Chas. Wm. Flinders, a private in the Leicestershire Regiment, was brought up on remand, charged with having been found in a dwelling house (No. 1, Harvey Street) with intent to commit a felony.

This case, it will be remembered, was one in which prisoner was remanded for inquiries to be made concerning another charge.

The Chief Constable asked the Bench to commit prisoner to Quarter Sessions. This was done, bail being fixed in prisoner's own recognisances of 20, and two sureties of 10 each.

Prisoner was also charged with stealing a watch and chain, a metal clock, and a pair of stockings from the Bouverie Arms on the night of November 10th.

Fredk. George Lester, lessee of the Bouverie Arms, said that he went to bed on November 10th at about ten minutes to twelve. About 1.30 he was awakened by his daughter, who slept in a room at the back on the same floor. She made a statement to witness which induced him to get up. Witness went into her room and also examined the landing window. That looked out on to the flat roof of the bar. The landing window was wide open, the bottom sash being up. He found some vases that had been standing inside the window had been taken outside. He thought access was gained to the house by that window. Witness searched the house from top to bottom, and during that P.C. Lemar came inside. On the floor of his daughter's bedroom he found a dirty pair of men's socks (produced). He missed the clock from his daughter's bedroom, and a watch and chain off the bedstead. All the drawers of the chest of drawers, and the wardrobe, were open, and everything had been disturbed. From the top drawer witness missed a pair of his daughter's stockings. The landing window was three or four inches open at the top when witness went to bed. He identified the stockings produced as his property, and the watch and chain produced as his daughter's. He valued the stolen articles at about 1.

Mabel Lester, a little girl of about 12, daughter of the last witness, said she went to bed about 9.30. Before going to bed she hung her watch and chain on the knob of the top rail of the bedstead. She was awakened by the squeaking of the wardrobe door. When she went to bed she left a small gas light burning. When she awoke she saw a man in a grey shirt by the wardrobe. She looked for her watch and chain, and found it was gone. She ren into her father's room, and on her way noticed that the landing window was wide open. She missed a pair of stockings and identified those produced as her property, also the watch and chain.

Horace Wood, a general salesman, living at 34, Royal Military Avenue, Cheiton, said on Wednesday, 14th Nov., at midday, he was in Tin Town, Shorncliffe. The Leicestershire Regiment was stationed there. Witness knew prisoner. On that day the latter came to him and asked him to buy a watch and chain (produced) for 8s. Witness said it was of no use to him, as it was out of order. He asked prisoner if it was his own, and the latter replied “Yes”. Prisoner then said “Can't you give me something for it, as I am very short of cash, and only want to sell it till Saturday?” Witness then offered him 3s. for it, and told him he could buy it back for 4s. on Saturday. This prisoner agreed to, and witness accordingly took the watch and chain. Prisoner never came to buy them back, and on the 22nd witness handed them to Sergt. Burniston.

P.C. Butcher said that on searching prisoner after arresting him on another charge on the 18th inst., he found he was wearing the pair of stockings (produced) identified by Mr. Lester.

D.S. Burniston said that on Sunday, 11th Nov., from information received, he went to the Bouverie Arms and examined the premises. He found that access had been gained from the flat roof of the bar through the central window of the landing on the Millfield side. There was a wall on that side about 4ft. 6in. high, and any person of prisoner's height, standing on that wall, could climb on to the flat roof of the bar, which was about six feet higher. There were several marks on the side of the premises as if made by the toes of boots. On Thursday, 22nd, witness went to Shorncliffe Camp and made enquiries, where he saw the witness Wood, who handed him the watch and chain (produced). That (Monday) morning at the police station, witness said to prisoner, showing him the watch and chain and stockings, “You will be further charged with stealing, during the night of the 10th inst., from inside the Bouverie Arms public house, Cheriton Road, this watch and chain, a pair of stockings, also a metal clock – not recovered”. Accused made no reply.

Prisoner, who made no statement, was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions, bail being offered in the same amounts as in the first case.

 

Folkestone Daily News 31 December 1906.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, December 31st: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

John Flinders pleaded Guilty to burglariously entering Mr. Lester's, of the Bouverie Arms, and also a cottage in Harvey Street, and stealing from the Bouverie Arms a watch and other articles. He pleaded for leniency, and a somewhat pathetic letter was read from his mother at Leicester.

The Recorder sentenced him to three months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 5 January 1907.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, December 31st: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Charles William Flinders, a private in the Leicestershire Regiment, was charged with burglariously breaking and entering the Bouverie Arms public house, Cheriton Road, and stealing a silver watch and chain, a metal clock, and a pair of stockings, the property of Frederick George Lester. He was also charged with burglariously breaking and entering No. 1, Harvey Street, with intent to steal the goods of Edwin Miller. The prisoner pleaded Guilty to both charges.

Mr. Weigall, in detailing the evidence on behalf of the prosecution, said the two offences were of a similar nature. In neither case was the property taken of any great value, but it was on each occasion a very determined case of burglary.

Det. Sergt. Burniston said on Thursday, November 2nd, he went to Shorncliffe Camp to make inquiries about the charge.

The Recorder: You apparently alighted on a man named Wallace Wood? How did you do that?

Det. Sergt. Burniston said he first of all made inquiries at the guard room, and he found that the prisoner had answered his name at 9.30 p.m. on December 10th, the night of the burglary at the Bouverie Arms, and again at reveille the next morning. On December 18th, the date of the second burglary, the prisoner again answered his name at 9.30 p.m., but the following morning he was marked absent. Wallace Wood was a hawker, and he obtained his livelihood in the Camp, where he had authority to hawk goods.

The Recorder said he would see Mr. Wood had nothing on the watch, and he gave it back to its owner, Miss Mabel Lester.

In reply to the Recorder, the man Wood said he had dealings with the Leicesters in underclothing and hosiery. He did not buy things very often, but he bought the watch from the prisoner as a great favour. Flinders had previously bought things from him.

The Recorder, addressing Wood, said if a man found a ready market in the lines without going into a shop it was rather a temptation to him. He advised him not to have any more transactions like that. He had a good mind not to allow him his expenses, but he believed he bought the watch in ignorance. However, he had the gratification of knowing that he could not get anything out of the watch.

An officer from the regiment stepped into the witness box, but when questioned by the Recorder, he said he knew nothing about the man's service and character.

A statement by the prisoner was read, and in it he stated that he had been in the regiment for two years and four months. He had been a teetotaller all his life until he mixed with some comrades from India and started to drink. It was on those occasions, after the public houses were closed, that he committed the offences. He was very sorry for what he had done, and he appealed for mercy, as he would afterwards be charged by the regiment and discharged for it, and thereby lose nine years' reserve pay.

The Recorder read a letter from the prisoner's mother, who pleaded for mercy.

Chief Constable Reeve said in 1899 the Leicester Magistrates sent the prisoner to an industrial school until he was 16 years of age for stealing. Since then he had worked at the tram stables. The tunic which the prisoner was wearing had two good conduct badges upon it, but it did not belong to him.

The prisoner explained that he had lent his tunic to a man who had gone on furlough, and the tunic he (the prisoner) was wearing belonged to that man.

The Recorder said if it had been an isolated case he might have felt inclined to do something for the prisoner, but he could not overlook the succession of burglaries. The sentence he should pass upon him was that he be imprisoned on each indictment to three months' hard labour, the sentences to run concurrently.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, December 31st: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Charles William Flinders was indicted for burglariously entering the dwelling house of the Bouverie Arms, and stealing therefrom a watch; and further with burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of No. 1, Harvey Street with intent to steal. He pleaded Guilty to both charges. Mr. Weigall appeared for the prosecution, and contended that it was a determined case of burglary.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said he went to Shorncliffe Camp to make inquiries about the charge.

The Recorder: How did you manage to drop upon the man named Wood? Is he a receiver?

Witness: I don't know. He is a hawker who sells goods on the Camp.

Mr. Wood (the man who bought the watch from accused), said he was a general salesman, and sold clothing, etc. He was in partnership with a man who supplied goods to the soldiers on the Camp. He did not buy things.

The Recorder: How did you come to buy these?

Witness: By favour; a great favour.

The Recorder: How many other things did you buy?

Witness: That is the only article.

The Recorder: Why did you want to do this man a favour?

Witness: Because it was only for a short time.

The Recorder told Wood that he had a great mind to disallow his expenses.

Witness: I bought it in ignorance.

The Recorder (sarcastically): Yes, I know you bought it in ignorance, but those people who refrain from asking questions in case they might know something very often find themselves in different places from witness boxes. It is a great gratification to me to know that you won't have the 3s.

His Honour read a letter from prisoner's mother at Leicester, in which she said she hoped he (the Recorder) would excuse her taking the liberty of writing to her. His father and herself grieved to hear about their son. They had always wished him well, and wished him to be honest. He had a good character from the tramway station when he enlisted in the Army, and she thought he had been in bad company. She had never had a night's sleep since she heard that.

The Chief Constable said in November, 1899, accused was charged before the Leicester Magistrates for stealing, and sent to an industrial school. After then he was working in the tramway stables.

Mr. William Forbes Panton, an officer in the Leicestershire Regiment, said prisoner had been in the regiment a month or two; he was taken over from the details. He could not speak as to prisoner's character, as his defaulter sheet had been sent abroad with the regiment.

Prisoner handed in a written statement to the Recorder, in which he stated that he had been a teetotaller all his life until he mixed with some comrades who had come home from India and started drinking. It was on two or three of these occasions, after the public houses were shut, that he committed the crimes he was charged with. He was very sorry for what he had done, and would promise never to touch the drink again. On returning to the regiment he would be tried again, and would probably be discharged from the Army in disgrace, thereby losing nine years of reserve pay.

The Recorder told accused he could not overlook that succession of burglaries within a period of eight or ten days. He understood that when prisoner was before the Magistrates the character he received from an officer who did know something about him was a bad one. However, as he had been in prison since the 26th November, the sentence he passed upon him was that he be imprisoned upon each indictment for three months with hard labour, the sentences to run concurrently.

 

Folkestone Daily News 27 November 1907.

Wednesday, November 27th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. Vaughan and Fynmore.

An application was made for the temporary transfer of the Bouverie Arms from Mr. F. Lester to Mr. E. Attwood. Granted.

 

Folkestone Express 30 November 1907.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday, before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore, the licence of the Bouverie Arms was temporarily transferred from Mr. S. Lester to Mr. Attwood, and the Castle Inn, Foord, was also temporarily transferred from the latter to his son, Mr. P.A. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 November 1907.

Wednesday, November 27th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore.

Applications for the transfer of the Bouverie Arms from Mr. Lester to Mr. W. Attwood, sen., and that of the Castle Arms (sic) from Mr. Attwood, sen., to Mr. Attwood, jun., were granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 4 December 1907.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. Herbert, Fynmore, Boyd, Carpenter, and Leggett.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms was transferred from Frederick Lester to William Attwood, and the licence of the Castle Inn from William Attwood sen. to Percy William Attwood jun.

 

Folkestone Express 7 December 1907.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs.

The following transfer of alehouse licence, for which temporary authority had been granted, was confirmed: Bouverie Arms, from F.O. Lester to Mr. W. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 December 1907.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and G. Boyd, Messrs. W.G. Herbert and R.J. Linton.

It was a special session for the transfer of licences. That of the Bouverie Arms was transferred from Mr. F.G. Lester to Mr. W. Attwood.

 

Folkestone Express 28 May 1910.

Wednesday, May 25th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, and R.J. Linton, and Major Leggett.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms was temporarily transferred from Mr. Attwood to Mr. A. Hart, a former tenant.

 

Folkestone Express 9 July 1910.

Wednesday, July 6th: Before Mr. R.J. Linton and Major Leggett.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, was transferred from Mr. Attwood to Mr. A. Hart.

 

Folkestone Daily News 11 September 1912.

Local News.

Harry Culver, a well-known man with a wife and family to provide for, lost his horse on Saturday. The horse was worth about 25 – a terrific loss for a man in his position, and one which will prevent him from obtaining a livelihood.

Fortunately Mr. Albert Hart, the proprietor of the Bouverie Arms, and the young and energetic Guardian of the Poor, who has saved the ratepayers so much by his skill and knowledge in building the new infirmaries, stepped into the breach and opened a subscription, which we publish in today's paper. It will be seen that some of Mr. Hart's influential friends have headed the same, and we trust that in a few days he will have received sufficient to replace Culver's loss.

Every subscription given to Mr. Hart will be acknowledged through our columns. We might note that every penny given will go to Culver, and no deductions will be made either for printing, postage, collecting, etc. Mr. Hart gives his services free, and any little assistance we can afford is also freely given.

 

Folkestone Daily News 22 May 1913.

Wednesday, May 21st: Before Messrs Herbert, Vaughan, Leggett, Morrison, Fynmore, Linton and Boyd.

Mr. Albert Hart applied for an occasional licence to supply excisable goods at the Town Hall on the occasion of the Football Smoking Concert on Monday night.

The application was granted, the hours being from 7.50 p.m. to 10 p.m., the Chairman announcing that the law did not allow a later hour.

 

Folkestone Express 24 May 1913.

Local News.

At a special licensing sessions on Wednesday an occasional licence was granted to Mr. A. Hart to sell at the Football Club smoker at the Town Hall on Monday evening from 7.30 to 10 o'clock.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 May 1913.

Wednesday, May 21st: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Major G.E. Leggett, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, and Mr. E.T. Morrison.

Mr. Hart applied for an occasional licence from 7.30 to 11 p.m. at the Town Hall, on the occasion of the smoking concert to be held in connection with the Folkestone Football Club. A licence from 7.30 to 10 p.m. was granted, it being pointed out that it was not legal to grant an occasional licence after 10 p.m.

 

Folkestone Express 18 September 1915.

Tuesday, September 14th: Before Alderman Spurgen, Col. Fynmore, Col. Owen, Aldermen Jenner and Pepper, and J.J. Giles Esq.

Albert James Hart, the landlord of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, was summoned for an offence under the lighting regulations on September 7th at 7.55 p.m. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Thorne said the electric lights shone through the open doors and windows of the house, throwing a ray of light across the road.

Mr. Hart said he would like to point out some of the difficulties the licensed victuallers had to contend with in connection with the lighting regulations. They were responsible for the sobriety of their customers, and that necessitated a good light inside their premises in order that those serving behind the bar might see the condition in which they were. That was a difficult matter in those times, because there were so many customers coming into their premises, not by ones and twos, but by tens and twenties. It was practically an impossibility to prevent the light shining outside through the doors, which were being continually opened and shut by a crowd of people. That state of things was made worse through the operation of the Children's Act, as if a man and his wife were out with their children, the man came into the house and took out a drink to his wife, who remained outside, thus causing the door to be opened when it might not be. They must have the windows open, as the heat and smoke inside would make the atmosphere unbearable. He asked the Bench to take those matters into consideration. Licensed victuallers did not wish to go against the order, for they were some of the most loyal people in carrying out the regulations. No sooner did the constable draw his attention to the lights than he immediately put them down. The lighting-up time on that particular night was 7.35. He believed the constable was brought to see the light by a Rev. gentleman. The street lamp, which had now been lighted opposite his premises, shed as much light on the road as his light did on that particular night.

Fined 10/-.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 September 1915.

Tuesday, September 14th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen and other Magistrates.

Albert James Hart, the licensee of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, was summoned for allowing a bright light to be shed outside his premises on September 7th. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Thorn deposed that the rays from an electric light inside the bars were shining across the road from the upper part of the windows and occasionally through the door. When he drew defendant's attention to it, he said “I am sorry; it shall be attended to at once”, and it was.

Mr. Hart said he wanted to point out to the Bench the difficulties that licensed victuallers had to contend with – they were different from those of other businessmen – in regard to the lighting order. They were responsible for the sobriety of all their customers inside their houses, which necessitated a good light to see the condition of the customers, especially at this time, when there were so many soldiers coming into their premises, net by ones and twos, but in tens and twenties. The constable had spoken about the light being shed through the doorway, but it was practically impossible for licensed victuallers to prevent a light shining through the doorway, simply because the door was continually being opened and shut by such crowds of people as they had at times. Also, there was the effect of the Children's Act; a man took drink outside a public-house to his wife, who had a child with her, and as he passed in and out of the door a light was continually being shed outside. They must have the window of the bars open, owing, to the atmosphere inside, otherwise the heat and smoke were practically unbearable. He asked the Bench to take those points into consideration. The licensed victuallers did not wish to go against the order: they were some of the most loyal people in carrying out the order. They were doing everything they possibly could, and in his own case, as the constable had said, no sooner had his attention been drawn to the matter than he at once put the lights down. The lighting-up time on the evening in question was 7.35, and the time when the constable called was only a quarter of an hour afterwards. He believed the policeman's attention was a called to the matter by a reverend gentleman, and he was brought from point duty some distance away to see his (defendant's) light. No sooner had he lowered his light than the Corporation immediately lit the street lamp outside his front door, which shed as much light there as he had had before.

The Magistrates imposed a fine of 10s.

 

Folkestone Express 30 October 1915.

Tuesday, October 26th: Before J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, E.T. Morrison, and C.E. Mumford Esqs.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms was temporarily transferred from Mrs. A.J. Hart to Mr. F.E. Hedges (sic).

 

Folkestone Herald 30 October 1915.

Tuesday, October 26th: Before Mr. H. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Councillor C. Ed. Mumford.

A protection order was granted to Mr. F.E. Hedges on taking over the Bouverie Arms from Mr. A.J. Hart.

 

Folkestone Express 27 November 1915.

Local News.

At a sitting of the Folkestone Bench on Wednesday, before E.T. Ward Esq., and other Magistrates, the licence of the Bouverie Arms was transferred from Mr. A. Hart to Mr. F.E. Hedges.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 November 1915.

Wednesday, November 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Councillor G. Boyd, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Col. G.P. Owen.

The Magistrates sanctioned the transfer of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, from Mr. A. Hart to Mr. F.E. Hedges.

 

Folkestone Express 24 June 1916.

Monday, June 19th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., and other Magistrates.

Walter Evans, described as a night porter at an hotel, was charged with giving three bottles of beer to a soldier.

Sergt. Major May, Military Foot Police, attached to the Town Commandant's staff, said about 2.35 the previous afternoon he was on duty in Bouverie Road West when he saw the prisoner, who was carrying a crate containing four bottles of beer, come from the Bouverie Arms. He proceeded up the road, so witness followed him. When near Castle Hill Avenue he stopped, placed the crate on the ground, took the bottles out, and threw the crate over the hoarding near Messrs. Muddle. He placed two bottles in his coat pockets, and picked the other two bottles up and carried them in his hands. He then proceeded in the direction of Trinity Gardens, and there turned into an opening. Witness passed him, but kept observation on him. Shortly after two soldiers came across, and the prisoner beckoned to one of them, who went over to him. He saw the soldier receive one of the four bottles from the prisoner and place it in his greatcoat pocket. Witness stopped the soldier and took possession of the greatcoat, and in it he found three bottles of beer in the pockets. Prisoner was eight to ten yards away, and he proceeded to walk off in another direction. He called to him, and prisoner stopped. He obtained his name and address and handed him over to a Corporal, who brought him to the police station. Prisoner at that time had only one of the four bottles in his possession.

In reply to the prisoner: He asked the soldier if he had paid anything to the prisoner for the bottles of beer, and he said that the man asked him 3s. or 4s. for them, but eventually said “Never mind, Scottie. I will treat you to them”.

Corporal J. Fairman, Military Foot Police, gave evidence of bringing the prisoner to the police station, and also as to Evans taking a bottle of beer from his pocket and throwing it into a garden in Bouverie Road West.

P.C. Pittock said the prisoner was brought to the police station, and in consequence of what the other witnesses said he charged him with the offence, and he replied “That's quite right”.

Prisoner said the soldier had been on leave for four days, and he was practically a free man. He understood from him that he had got his discharge, and he had no money in his pocket. He took compassion on him, and he was going to drink with him at the bottom of the allotment in Bouverie Road West. He (Evans) had been drinking.

Private Andrew Durwood, caretaker at the building occupied by the D. of R. and O., said he told the prisoner that he had no money. He had previously seen Evans at half past twelve in the Bouverie Arms. He did not make any arrangement to meet the prisoner. When he saw Evans with the crate of beer on his shoulder he made for him, as the man had promised him a drink about a week or two before.

Prisoner said he was a night porter, and he bought the drink so that he could have it at night when on duty.

The Chief Constable said the man had been in Folkestone for some months, and had been employed at an hotel.

Sir H.H. Raphael, Provost Marshal, said the military authorities that was a case in which there should be exemplary punishment. There was a great deal of that sort of thing going on, and they had great difficulty in maintaining order and discipline in consequence. Unless there was severe punishment there would be a recrudescence of it.

The Chairman, after the Magistrates had conferred together in private, said there was apparently too much of that sort of thing going on. He thought that the prisoner was being let off lightly in being sentenced to one month's imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1916.

Monday, June 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward and other Magistrates.

Walter Evans was charged with handing a bottle of beer to a soldier.

Evidence having been given, Sir Herbert Raphael, A.P.M., said he thought it was a case for exemplary punishment. There was far too much of this sort of thing, and the military authorities were having a great deal of trouble.

The Chairman said there was great difficulty in dealing with these cases. There was too much of this kind of thing going on. They were dealing very leniently with the accused in sentencing him to a month's imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 23 November 1918.

Thursday, November 21st: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Vincent Michael Griffin and Jules La Brosse, two soldier patients at Etchinghill Hospital, were charged with burglariously entering the Bouverie Arms on Tuesday evening.

Mr. F.E. Hdges, the landlord of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, said on Tuesday evening he closed the house at eight o'clock, and went to bed at 10.05 after securing the doors and windows, with the exception of a small cant, 18 inches wide. At 12.25 he was called up by P.C. Fox and came downstairs. He missed three bottles of whisky and a bottle of Kummel, valued at 43/-, from the bar. Later he was shown the practically full bottle of Kummel and an empty Black and White bottle.

Sergt. F.W. Budd, of the Military Police, stationed at Etchinghill Hospital, said about 2.50 on Wednesday morning, from information received, he searched the wards. In E Ward he found the two bottles produced under the bed of Pte. La Brosse, who was in bed. He placed the prisoner under arrest. Later he made a search of the ward. Griffin was standing at his bedside with an unopened bottle of whisky in his possession. He placed him under arrest, and asked him why he was in possession of the bottle, and he replied he had bought it. The men had been drinking.

P.S. Prebble said from information received at one a.m. on the 20th inst., he proceeded in company with P.C. Fox to the Military Hospital, Etchinghill, where he made inquiries. Later the two bottles produced were handed to him by Sergt. Budd. That morning he saw the two prisoners detained at the Guard Room, Etchinghill, and told them he was making inquiries as to the Bouverie Arms Hotel having been broken into. He cautioned them, and charged them with being concerned together in breaking and entering the Bouverie Arms and stealing the whisky and Kummel. Griffin said “We don't know anything about it”. La Brosse said nothing. At the Folkestone police station, when formally charged, they made no reply.

Sergt. Budd, re-called, said he could not say whether the men were absent the previous night or not.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said the men had only been arrested that morning, and the police had not been able to complete all their inquiries.

The men were remanded until today (Friday).

 

Folkestone Herald 23 November 1918.

Thursday, November 21st: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Councillor A. Stace, Councillor C. Ed. Mumford, and Mr. W.R. Boughton.

Private Vincent Michael Griffin, C.E.F., and Private Jules La Brosse, C.E.F., were charged with breaking into the Bouverie Arms and stealing three bottles of whisky and one of Kummel.

Mr. F.E. Hedges, landlord of the Bouverie Arms, said he retired to rest on Tuesday evening at 10.05 p.m. The premises were secured with the exception of a small cant window, which would not close. Witness was called up about 2.30 a.m. by P.C. Fox, and on entering the bar found that three bottles of Black and White and one of Kummel had disappeared. Witness could not identify the bottles produced as his property by any distinguishing marks, but there was one bottle with a stopper bearing the name of a wine merchant in the town. That was similar to the stopper he used. He valued the liquor at 43s. He did not know the prisoners.

Sergt. F.W. Burt said he was a provost sergeant at Etchinghill Hospital. On instruction he proceeded to “E” Ward about 2.50 a.m. on Wednesday and found under La Brosse's bed two bottles of whisky and one of Kummel. Witness then proceeded to “L” Ward, where he found Griffin standing by his bed. He had in his possession a bottle of whisky unopened. Both prisoners had been drinking.

Peter Shrubsole, in the employ of Mr. Smith, Cheriton Road garage, said two soldiers came to the garage on Tuesday night to hire a car. He was short-sighted and could not identify the prisoners.

Sergt. Prebble gave evidence of arrest at Etchinghill Hospital. Griffin replied, when charged, “We know nothing about it”.

Accused were remanded until yesterday.

Local News.

With reference to the charge of burglary reported on page 6, the accused were brought up on remand yesterday. Both denied that they were in Folkestone on Tuesday night. The Justices bound them over to be of good behaviour for 12 months.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 April 1922.

Local News.

An application was made by Mr. F.E. Hedges, of the Bouverie Arms, to the Folkestone Justices on Monday for an occasional licence to sell intoxicating drinks from 10.30 to 6 on the Martello Tower Ground at the west end of the Leas on Easter Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday, when the Hockey Festival will be held. The Magistrates granted permission to sell between the hours of 10.30 and 5.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 March 1929.

Felix.

“I thank you very much for your last week's article, and particularly that part referring to the Assembly (Corporation) meeting at the old Kings Arms Hotel and the Marquis of Granby”. Thus Mr. F. Hedges, of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, spoke to me on the bright and beautiful morning of Monday last. It is nice to have a “Thank you” now and then, because it is my main desire to please in these small weekly efforts of mine. I do not soar towards the impossible, viz., to please everybody. I remarked this much, many years ago, to a gentleman, who was then, as he is now, associated with the Folkestone Herald. His reply was brief and to the point. It was this “You will be a darned big fool if you try. Do the right as far as you can and let the rest alone”. I have tried to follow this advice. Now, to return to Mr. Hedges and his thanks. His establishment is a place where men congregate largely, and naturally many subjects crop up for discussion. There are arguments, friendly and sometimes highly controversial. It is the latter that this particular gentleman mostly dreads.

It appears one of the company at the Bouverie Arms on Saturday night, after reading my paragraph, asked of another “Where was the Marquis of Granby situate?” That was enough. The argument as to its whereabouts went on fully for a couple of hours, and it was only when the Speaker called “Time” that the controversy ceased. Now, to be fair, I must plead guilty to providing, what after all was a friendly argument, for discussion. In my last paragraph on this subject I declared the Marquis of Granby was situate in Seagate Street. This was wrong. It should have been High Street. I can't give the exact site, but there are those living amongst us who can. It is probably difficult for the present generation to realise that this present beautiful town of Folkestone was confined to three, four, or five thoroughfares (not paved in some cases) when the late Queen Victoria came to the throne in 1837. Such however was the case.

Perhaps the Cheriton Road unofficial debating Society would like to discuss the whereabouts of the Folkestone Arms. The site of it appears, as far as I can make out, to have been where now stands the commanding corner premises at the bottom of High Street at the junction formed by Harbour and South Streets. The Folkestone Arms, it would seem, was an important establishment in those days. I will prove it. Here is an extract from an old Kentish newspaper and it will be read, I feel sure, with interest by all true Folkestonians. “September 11th, 1812. Tuesday last being the Mayor's choice for the town of Folkestone, Thomas Baker Esq. was elected to the chair, who after taking the necessary oath adjourned to the Folkestone Arms Inn, accompanied by the jurats and the principal residents of the community, where a sumptuous and well-served dinner was prepared for them. After the cloth was drawn (removed), the following toasts, etc., were pronounced from the chair; “The King and God Bless Him”; “The Prince Regent” (and under his benign auspices may the Imperial Eagle be experimentally taught to fly the wing at the roaring of the British Lion); “The Queen and Royal Family”; “Alexander (and may the Gallic Cock (France) be finally brought to feel the ascending influence of the Northern constellation)”. Thus passed the fleeting hours, interspersed with convivial song and merry joke, until “Nox” was contemplating to withdraw her sombre curtain from the dusky landscape, which suggested to the company the idea of “iit domum”, and on which they unanimously rose and congratulated the Mayor (Thomas Baker) on his tenth election to the honour of the white wand”. The foregoing, although an involved and rather complicated composition, gives an insight into the life of Folkestone 117 years ago, and incidentally reminds us that our forefathers well enjoyed themselves in their own way, not only at the table, but with convivial song and merry joke.

Note: Felix again gets it wrong. The Folkestone Arms referred to was located at the top of High Street, and closed in 1846. The Folkestone Arms Tavern, at the bottom of High Street, opened in 1847.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1931.

Obituary.

We regret to announce the death on Tuesday at 3, Sunnyside Villas of Mr. Francis Edwin Hedges.

Deceased, who was 66 years of age, had resided in Folkestone practically all his life, and almost up to recently had led an active life. He will chiefly be remembered as being the proprietor of the fish and poulterer’s business at 17, High Street, which he disposed of a few years buck to a London combine, which, however, trades under the original business name. Later Mr. Hedges' activities found scope in taking over the Bouverie Arms in Cheriton Road, of which he wan the licensee at the time of his death. Deceased possessed a genial disposition, his face generally being lighted up with a pleasant smile. "Teddy” Hedges, as he was generally termed by his intimates, was one of Folkestone’s popular favourites, and his presence will be missed amongst a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. To his widow and children (two sons and a daughter) much sympathy is extended.

 

Folkestone Express 14 March 1931.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

On Wednesday, at the Folkestone Adjourned Licensing Sessions, the music and dancing licences were again granted, after the question had been adjourned for a month, it being explained by Alderman Wood that the conditions of the licences allowed vocal and instrumental music to be given during certain hours on Sunday.

The Magistrates on the Bench were Alderman R.G. Wood, The Mayor, Col. G.P. Owen, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Mr. F. Seager, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Mr. W. Griffin, Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, Alderman A. Castle, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

The licences of the Bouverie Arms and Alexandra Hotel were transferred to new tenants.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 March 1931.

Local News.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms, previously held by the late Mr. F.E. Hedges, has been transferred to Mr. Frederick G. Hedges.

 

Folkestone Express 22 September 1934.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday had before them applications in connection with the temporary transfer of licences until the next Transfer Sessions. On the Bench were Mr. J.H. Blamey, Dr. F. Wolverson, Alderman J.W. Stainer, and Judge H. Terrell.

The second proposed transfer was at the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, from the present licensee, Mr. F.J. Hedges to Mr. H.F. Funnell, of the “Bristol”, Folkestone, who is well known in the town as a hairdresser.

The Bench granted the protection order in each case.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 September 1934.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, from Mr. Frederick G. Hedges to Mr. Harold F. Funnell, of Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 13 October 1934.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates had before them on Wednesday an application for the transfer of licences. This was in respect of the Bouverie Arms, 33, Cheriton Road, from Mr. F.G. Hedges to Mr. H.F. Funnell, a well-known local hairdresser. The Magistrates granted the application.

 

Folkestone Express 14 December 1935.

Obituary.

It is with great regret that we have to announce the death of Mr. A.J. Hart at his residence, 5, Wear Bay Crescent, early on Wednesday morning, after an illness extending over several months. He was 72 years of age.

Mr. Hart was one of the best-known Folkestone men to the real Folkestonians, for he was a member of an old Folkestone fishing family, whose connections with the town went back for numerous generations. He had, during his life, a varied career, and saw quite a good deal of the world.

On leaving school he was apprenticed with the late Mr. George Prebble (Messrs. Prebble and Spain) as a carpenter and joiner, and while in their employ he assisted in making the coffins for the German sailors who were lost in the disaster to the German battleship, Grosser Kurfurst, which sank in the English Channel after a collision in 1878. Later on, after being employed in various parts of Kent in his trade, he became the proprietor of the Bouverie Arms in Cheriton Road. He devoted a good deal of time to the affairs of the Folkestone Football Club, and he filled the offices of Secretary and Treasurer. He was always a very keen sportsman and practically ever since the Club's formation he was one of its most ardent supporters. He was also prominently associated with football throughout the County, and was always heartily welcomed whenever he visited grounds or football gatherings in the whole of Kent.

After the Boer War was over he decided to go to South Africa to try his fortune in that country, his son having already received an appointment there. In South Africa he was employed in the building department of the South African railways. However, the climate was not altogether suitable to his health, so he returned with most of his family to his native home. He once again took over the proprietorship of the Bouverie Arms and then he began to take a big interest in local affairs. In 1910 he was elected as a representative of the North Ward on the Elham Board of Guardians.

In 1915, shortly after the commencement of the Great War, he relinquished his connection with the Bouverie Arms and took control of the Black Horse Inn at Swingfield. Shortly after his arrival there he was elected as the representative for Acrise on the Elham Rural Council, and therefore he again became a member of the Elham Board of Guardians. On both those bodies he did splendid work. No-one was more sympathetic or more concerned than he with regard to the poor people who had to seek the assistance of the Board of Guardians. He also did much good work on the Elham Council in connection with the roads and buildings, his practical experience being of great service to that body. He remained a member of the Elham Rural Council until last April, when he was compelled through illness to retire.

For four years he was an exceedingly useful member of the Folkestone Town Council, his practical experience here also resulting in great benefit to his fellow members and ratepayers. He was very keen in the development of the East Cliff and was one of the most prominent supporters of the East Cliff Pavilion and the provision of a licence there, although he held a licence in close proximity to the building there. He was the holder of the off licence at 31, Warren Road. He entered the Council as a representative of the East Ward when Councillor King-Turner was elevated to the Aldermanic Bench in 1931. At the election following the extension of the Borough boundaries in March last year he was returned to the Council by one vote over Councillor Gadd, who on that occasion lost his seat, and although he was successful he expressed his opinion that Mr. Gadd would have been the more suitable man to have been returned. Unfortunately his health became very poor and for several months of this year he had been unable to attend to his Council duties, and in November, when his period of office ended, he did not seek re-election.

Mr. Hart married in 1885 Miss Emily Jane Bull, the daughter of the late Mr. Bull, who had a bootmaker's business in Cheriton. With her, their son, a Revenue officer in Durban, and two daughters, one of whom lives with her husband and family at Detroit, U.S.A., and the other who resides in Narrabeen Road, Folkestone, the deepest sympathy will be felt in their great bereavement.

The funeral will take place at noon tomorrow (Saturday) at the Folkestone Cemetery at Hawkinge.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 December 1935.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death of Mr. Albert James Hart, which occurred on Wednesday, at his home, 5, Wear Bay Crescent, Folkestone.

Mr. Hart, who was very well known not only in Folkestone, but in the whole of the surrounding district, served as a Councillor on the Folkestone Town Council from 1931 to 1935, representing the East Ward. He was 72 years of age.

He was born in Folkestone and educated at St. Mary’s School. On leaving school he was apprenticed to Mr. George Prebble, a builder, and helped in the erection of a large number of shops in the town. For some years after his apprenticeship had expired he worked for various local builders. He was married in November, 1885, to Miss Emily Bull, the elder daughter of the late Mr. Charles Bull, a former bootmaker of Cheriton Road. From boyhood Mr. Hart was keenly interested in football, and although he never played himself he had been a great worker for the Folkestone Football Club since the Club started 50 years ago. At different times he occupied the post of Secretary, Treasurer and Committeeman.

In 1891 he became licensee of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, and remained there for eleven years. At the end of that time he went to South Africa with his family and worked as foreman carpenter for the Cape Government Railway. The climate did not suit his health, however, and he returned to England five and a half years later, leaving his only son in the South African Civil Service. On his return to Folkestone, Mr. Hart opened a business at the Guildhall Sweeteries (now Messrs. Pickford’s, Ltd., premises) but after about four years he returned to the Bouverie Arms Hotel. Whilst there he offered himself for election to the Town Council, but was unsuccessful.

In 1916 he took the Black Horse Inn, Hawkinge, where he remained until the end of the War. At that time he was elected to the Elham Board of Guardians as member for Acrise, and he served with that body until its dissolution. He was also a member of the Elham Rural District Council for many years. After the War Mr. Hart gave up the Black Horse Inn and returned to the building trade. He built the first bungalows to be erected at Hawkinge and lived in one himself for some time. Subsequently he came back to Folkestone again, taking an off-licence in Warren Road, Folkestone, in 1928. He was elected a member of the Folkestone Corporation for the East Ward in 1931. During his period of service as a town councillor he had served on the Health Committee, the Rating and Valuation Committee, the Parks Committee and the General Purposes Committee.

He was keenly interested in everything connected with the East Cliff. He realised that that part of the town had a great future and he had played no small part in its development. His term of office on the Council terminated last November. He did not seek re-election owing to his failing health. In the same month, although seriously ill, he was able to celebrate his Golden Wedding in a quiet way. He had recently moved from Warren Road to Wear Bay Crescent on account of his health.

He rendered great service to the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers’ Association, of which he was Hon. Secretary for some years. He only retired from the work when it became too onerous for him.

He leaves a widow, one son and two daughters. His son is in South Africa, and one of his daughters is in America.

The funeral takes place at noon today (Saturday) at the Folkestone Cemetery, Hawkinge.

 

Folkestone Express 3 September 1938.

Obituary.

Many Folkestone people will regret to hear of the death of Mr. William Attwood, one of Folkestone’s best-known figures, after an illness of about a week's duration at the residence of Mrs. A.E. Godden, his daughter, Enbrook Manor House, Cheriton.

The late Mr. Attwood played a big part in making Radnor Park the very delightful and attractive open space it is in the centre of the town, for he was for a number of years the Park-keeper in the employ of the Corporation. He was 78 years of age, and up to his last illness he was remarkably vigorous, and certainly appeared to be considerably younger than he was. A native of Rhodes Minnis, he came to Folkestone when quite a young man in order to work at the Manor Office under the late Mr. W.B. Radford, Lord Radnor’s agent. He subsequently entered the employ of the Corporation, and was Park-keeper for 20 years. Then be became the licence holder of the Castle Inn at Foord, and later took over the Bouverie Arms Hotel. He retired from that house previous to the war. On one occasion he sought election for the Town Council, but was not successful. He, however, always took a great interest in the town’s affairs. He was a well-known local sportsman, and was for many years a member of the Folkestone Club. He was one of the promoters of the Central Picture Theatre, and had quite a large financial interest in it until the local company sold it His wife predeceased him many years ago.

He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Godden, and one son, Mr. Pat Attwood, of the Shakespeare Hotel. One of his grandsons is the captain of the Folkestone Cricket Club.

The funeral will take place tomorrow (Saturday) at the Folkestone Cemetery, Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 September 1938.

Obituary.

Folkestone residents will learn with regret of the passing of one of the town’s most familiar figures for many years, Mr. William Attwood, who died at his daughter's residence, Enbrook House, Cheriton, on Thursday.

Mr. Attwood, who was 78, played a large part in the development of Radnor Park, and was for several years a park-keeper employed by the Folkestone Corporation. Despite his age he was exceedingly vigorous, and maintained to the last his keen interest in the affairs of the town.

Born at Rhodes Minnis, he came to Folkestone as a young man to work at the Manor Office under the late Mr. W B. Radford. After serving 20 years with the Corporation he took over the Castle Inn at Foord, later becoming licensee of the Bouverie Arms Hotel. He retired just before the Great War. Mr. Attwood always took a great interest in local affairs, and once stood unsuccessfully for the Town Council. He was a keen sportsman, and was for many years a member of the Folkestone Club.

Mr. Attwood leaves one daughter, Mrs. A.E. Godden, and a son, Mr Pat Attwood, of the Shakespeare Hotel. The Captain of the Folkestone Cricket Club, Mr. L.W. Godden, is his grandson.

The funeral will take place today at the Folkestone Cemetery, Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 June 1941.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday the licence of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, was transferred from Mr. Harold F. Funnell, the licensee, to Mr. R.P. Rawlings, Managing Director of Mackeson and Co. Ltd.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 October 1941.

Local News.

The licence of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, was transferred to Mr. A.C. Freeman at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 January 1943.

Local News.

A theft from a public house was described at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, when Dr. John Brown was charged with stealing an ornamental cigarette lighter, valued 25s., the property of Arthur C. Freeman.

Mrs. Winifred A. Naylor, Bouverie Arms, Chertiton Road, housekeeper to Mr. Freeman, the licensee, said on Saturday evening there was an earthenware cigarette lighter in the bar two or three feet from the public side. There were two soldiers in the bar during the evening, Brown being one of the two. Later she found that the lighter was missing.

Sidney Melbourne Mooring, 143, Cheriton Road, a maintenance engineer, said he was in the public bar of the Bouverie Arms on Saturday evening. He saw two soldiers come in and at 9.55 Brown reached over with his left hand towards the till and took the lighter which he put in his left hand pocket. Witness asked Brown to return the lighter and defendant turned round and told him to mind his own business. Brown and the other soldier were not drunk, but they were on the merry side.

Det. Const. Dearden said that morning he saw Brown and took him into custody. He said “I had too much to drink and was taking it (the lighter) back this weekend. The lighter is in my kitbag”.

Defendant, who pleaded Guilty, said he did not know it was a cigarette lighter, otherwise he would not have touched it. He was very sorry.

The Magistrates fined Brown 2, the Chairman (Alderman J.W. Stainer) telling him that the offence might have landed him in prison. “If you can't go into a public house without taking things which don’t belong to you, you had better stay outside”, added the Chairman.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 June 1964.

Local News.

Two youths involved in a fracas at the Bouverie Arms public house, Cheriton Road, from which, it was said, they had been banned, on March 13th, were charged with assaulting the landlord, Mr. Harry Elliott, at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday. The youths, who pleaded Not Guilty, were fined 3 each. Postle, however, chose the alternative of seven days' imprisonment.

Mr. Elliott said that at about 8.30 p.m. on March 13th the youths, Edward Postle (19), of 14, Samian Crescent, Folkestone, and Michael Huntley (18), of 56 Bradstone Road, Folkestone, were in the toilets at the back of his premises. A customer told him that there was a disturbance there and he went to investigate. “When I saw them I turned round and walked back to the door of the lounge bar”, witness said. “As I went in I was grabbed from behind and pushed into the bar. Postle did this. The other one went for my son and knocked him against the fireplace. I went to help him and there was a general scrimmage. I called for help and a customer from the saloon bar came through and helped me to get them out”. Witness said he was struck about the head and in the ribs, and later went to hospital for an X-ray. His wife and son were also involved.

The son, Jeffrey Elliott, said he stood at the door while his father went to investigate. When they went back they were grabbed. His father was pushed over the counter and he was pushed over the fireplace. Eventually his mother came along and took a reasonably active part in the scuffle. Witness said it was Huntley who tackled him and Postle who assaulted his father.

Leslie Avis, landlord of the Devonshire Hotel, said he was sitting in the saloon bar and on hearing two cries for help went into the other bar. “I went through”, he said, “and there was absolute chaos. Postle was pulling Mr. Elliott's tie and his son was grappling with Huntley on the fireplace”.

Huntley told the Court that he and Postle were walking along the road to go to a cafe and met a girl outside. They wanted to use Mr. Elliott's toilets, so they walked up the passage by the pub. There were a few cars parked there and they had to squeeze past a black car to get through. He tripped and they both fell through the bar door. Mr. Elliott and his son tried to push them out. Huntley continued “When we were pushed Postle went for the son and I held Mr. Elliott and kept him away from the scuffle. I could not have hit him as my hand was wrapped up in plaster. Mr. Elliott's wife came in and started hitting me over the head and kept saying “If you don't let my husband go I'll call the police”.

Postle gave similar evidence.

Miss Gwenda Mann said she met defendants by the Bouverie Arms and they went to use the toilets. When they had tried to squeeze past a black car they fell into the bar doorway. The landlord came out and pushed them back. She shouted “Please don't fight”.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 April 1965.

Local News.

Irish Labourer Joseph O'Loughlin struck a costly blow when he smashed the public bar window of the Bouverie Arms Hotel in Folkesrone on April 3. He was fined 5 by Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday for causing wilful damage, and ordered to pay 45 for the cost of repairing the window.

Chief Inspector Frank Corke, prosecuting, said that at about 11.45 p.m. the licensee of the Bouverie Arms, Mr. Harrv Elliott, saw a man trying to look through the saloon bar window. He did not take much notice of him and the man went away. Several minutes later, however, the public bar window, measuring over 6ft. by 2ft. 6in., was smashed. Mr. Elliott left the hotel, and saw O'Loughlin, the man who had tried to look into the saloon bar, in Millfield, holding one of his shoes in his hand. He handed him over to the police, who were told later by O'Loughlin “I did it because they said “Ignore him; he's a Paddy”.

O'Loughlin told the Court he had been drinking all that day.

 

Folkestone Gazette 5 February 1975.

Local News.

Two Folkestone public houses have won tankards in a national inter-pub competition to raise money for muscular dystrophy sufferers. The Martello Hotel raised a total of 300.25 and the Bouverie Arms, 111. A total of 550 houses throughout the country took part and raised 84,000. The winner, from Glasgow, was appropriately named the Muscular Arms. Customers there raised a mammoth 3,100, which was 800 more than their nearest rival. The contest was sponsored by Richard Attenborough.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 April 1975.

Local News.

Two men were taken to hospital on Thursday night after a fight in a town centre pub in which a knife was used. Folkestone ambulance men took them to Kent and Canterbury Hospital for treatment. The injured men later discharged themselves against doctor’s advice.

The incident took place at the Bouverie Arms in Cheriton Road. Police went to the pub. The landlady, Mrs. Christine Foster, said yesterday “It was a very small thing. The police had to be called because I understand a knife was used. I was upstairs at the time and did not see what happened”.

Police said that no complaint had been made in connection with the incident.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 August 1975.

Local News.

Peter Roger Sinclair, aged 27, of Victoria Road, Folkestone, was jailed for a total of 30 months at Maidstone Crown Court on Wednesday. He was found guilty of assaulting police constable Bruce Abbott in the execution of his duty and of assaulting him, causing him actual bodily harm. Sinclair admitted assaulting Mr. Kenneth Tyrrell, causing actual bodily harm. He was cleared of wounding Mr. Tyrrell with intent to cause grievous bodily harm. It had been alleged that Sinclair had stabbed Mr. Tyrrell in the Bouverie Arms public house, Folkestone. The jury also acquitted Sinclair of wounding Mr. Peter Arthur with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, and wounding Mr. Stuart Hibbert with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.

It had been alleged that Sinclair stabbed them while in a flat in Alexandra Gardens, Folkestone, on April 17. Most of the evidence was given last week when the jury heard about drug taking that went on in Folkestone. It was described by Sinclair’s defence counsel, Mr. H.M. Boyd, as “the twilight world of the petty criminal drug addict”.

Sinclair, who made a statement from the dock, said he had taken drugs at the time he went to the Bouverie Arms. He was confused and mistook Mr. Tyrrell for another man. There was a scuffle and he thought the man might have been stabbed with a dart. At the flat in Alexandra Gardens afterwards, Sinclair said, Arthur accused him of giving him heroin that was no good and threatened him with a chisel. Hibbert got between them, and the stabbings occurred. Sinclair said he never produced a knife at any time. In an incident with police lie was struck with a truncheon.

Called by the defence to give evidence, Mr. Hibbert said on Monday that he was given a fix of tuinal when he went to Mr. Arthur’s flat on April 17. The effect caused him to fall back on to a chair and he passed out. When he came around Sinclair was arguing with Mr. Arthur. He jumped up between them in an attempt to stop them. A fight started and then he felt blood on his coat. He could not remember exactly what happened next, but he knew he had been stabbed. He did not know who did it.

Detective Sergeant John Heap said that Sinclair was released from prison in March of last year following a five-year sentence imposed for assault on a police officer in June, 1970.

Passing sentence, Judge James Scarlett said Sinclair had a bad record for offences of violence. Sinclair was given a 12 months sentence for the assault on Mr. Tyrrell; an 18 months sentence, consecutive, for assaulting a police officer in the execution of his duty; and 12 months, concurrent with the 18 months, for the assault causing the officer actual bodily harm.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 November 1975.

Local News.

Two men took a sawn-off shotgun to a Folkestone public house where they tried to sell it to the landlord as an antique, a court was told on Monday. But earlier one of them had tipped off the police who surrounded the pub, the Bouverie Arms, and found the shotgun hidden under a jacket, it was alleged at Canterbury Crown Court.

Before the court was 24-year-old Ronald William Harrison, of Fairview Gardens, Sturry, Canterbury, who pleaded Guilty to possessing a firearm in August and possessing a firearm within five years of release from prison. Harrison also pleaded Guilty to charges of possessing a controlled drug in Canterbury in March and theft of two bottles of whisky from Sainsbury's in Folkestone in August.

David Appleby, of Station Road, Lydd, who denied the offences of being in possession of a firearm and possessing one within five years of release from jail, together with a further charge of theft, was granted an adjournment before he stood trial, because his wife, described as an essential witness, was in hospital expecting a baby.

The Recorder, Mr. M.L.N. Chavasse, sentencing Harrison, told him “I accept that you had no connection with that horrible weapon except on the day in question. It is such a dreadful weapon that one cannot overlook your limited degree of possession, but I would have regarded it as quite different if your possession of it had been any greater”.

Harrison, who had appeared before the Courts on a number of previous occasions, was sentenced to three months concurrent on both the shotgun offences. For the theft from Sainsbury's and possession of one Mandrax tablet he was also sent to prison for three months, to run consecutively to the first, and for two breaches of conditional discharges he was ordered to serve two months concurrently. A suspended sentence of 12 months for offences of dishonesty was brought into effect, making a total of 19 months.

Mr. Harry Turcan, prosecuting, said that the police received a telephone call from a man they were satisfied was Appleby saying that he had seen Harrison in possession of a shotgun. The police went to the Bouverie Arms, where they saw Harrison go in by a side door. The surrounded the pub and a short time later Harrison and Appleby came out and Harrison was concealing a sawn-off shotgun, which was in three parts. Earlier the same day the licensee of the pub had been approached by Appleby, who asked him if he wanted to buy an antique shotgun, and arrangements were made for Appleby to return to the pub with the gun. As soon as they showed it to the licensee he realised what it was and said he was not interested. The prosecution believed that Appleby was the prime mover in the attempt to sell the gun, said Mr. Turcan, and all that Harrison did was to carry it into the pub.

Mr. Edwin Glasgow, defending, said Harrison seriously believed that the shotgun was an antique gun. For a considerable time Harrison had been addicted to drugs but he was now living with a woman who exerted “a remarkable influence” over him and helped him enormously.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 May 1976.

Local News.

A 23-year-old former Folkestone man was jailed for two years at Margate Crown Court on Friday after being convicted of two firearm offences.

David Patrick Appleby, of King Street, Brenzett, denied possessing a sawn-off shotgun on August 23 without a proper certificate and having the weapon within five years of being released from prison. He was jailed for 15 months concurrently for each offence, and a nine month suspended sentence of which he was in breach was brought consecutively into effect.

Mr. C. Hookway, prosecuting, said the double-barrelled gun was of Belgian origin and in working order. The barrel had been shortened to just under 12 inches and the butt shortened to form a pistol grip. “This makes it a very serious offence”, he said. “Sawn-off shotguns should not be in the hands of the general public”. Appleby, with a man called Harrison, spoke to Mr. Peter Buckland, the landlord of the Bouverie Arms public house in Cheriton Road, Folkestone, about lunchtime on August 23. “Appleby asked him if he wanted to buy an antique shotgun and Mr. Buckland told him to return with it that evening at opening time”, said Mr. Hookway. Harrison later returned and asked Mr. Buckland to go to look at the gun in a car park, but he said “No” and closed the door. Ten minutes later both Harrison and Appleby were outside. Appleby told Harrison to close the curtains then produced a plastic carrier bag containing the weapon in two pieces”, said Mr. Hookway. He put it together but Mr. Buckland was not interested. “He said he was not going to buy a gun of that sort”, continued Mr. Hookway. “He called them a taxi, and when they got outside they were stopped by the police”. Ronald Harrison was currently serving a three month sentence for similar offences.

Harrison told the Court he went to Appleby's flat, then at Marine Crescent, Folkestone, and there he saw the gun which they took to the Bouverie Arms.

Appleby claimed the gun was Harrison's, and told the Court that when he knew about it he telephoned the police to warn them.

Sergeant William Wharf said “I had a telephone call about 3.30 p.m. at Folkestone police station and recognised the voice as Appleby's. He said “You know I don't like shooters. Ronnie Harrison is running around with a sawn-off shotgun in a carrier bag. I don't want to get involved”.

Appleby told the jury Harrison had first approached him to sell him drugs then asked if he wanted to buy the gun. “I wasn't interested”, he said. “I telephoned the police and told them about it, then just tagged along with Harrison. He carried the gun and assembled it but I had nothing to do with it. Up till then I wasn’t expecting to be arrested and was very frustrated when I was”.

Appleby was said to have a number of previous convictions.

 

Folkestone Gazette 4 August 1976.

Local News.

A labourer was told he had behaved in a disgraceful way after he was found not guilty of assaulting a police officer by Folkestone Magistrates on Friday. Twenty-six-year-old Michael Bullard, of Montgomery Way, Folkestone, had pleaded Not Guilty. Presiding magistrate Mr. John Bonomy said "We would like to put it on record that you have behaved in a disgraceful way. You could have done a lot more to avoid this incident and the trouble that everyone has been put to. We lay no criticism at all on the police in the way they dealt with this matter. You can consider yourself a very lucky man because you are having your case dismissed in this manner”.

P.C. Ronald Wright said he went to the Bouverie Arms public house where he was asked to intervene in an incident by the licensee, Mr. George Buckland. P.C. Wright, who told Bullard to leave the pub three times, said “A number of men were on the floor and Bullard started accusing the licensee of pushing his friends around. He was using abusive language and waving a finger in the licensee’s face. The third time I tried to persuade him by grabbing hold of his left arm. When I did so he twisted and tried to get out of my grip. He swung back and his forearm caught me in the chest”.

Mr. Buckland told the Magistrates that he thought Bullard's action was accidental. “He did not like being manhandled and just pulled away from the police officer”, he said.

Bullard said “I hit the officer by accident as I pulled away”.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 February 1980.

Local News.

Window cleaner Leonard White stood in the middle of a busy Folkestone street waving his arms about and shouting obscenities at passers-by. A policeman stopped White going into the Bouverie Arms Hotel, in Cheriton Road, Folkestone, and told him to go home. But White, of Augusta Gardens, Folkestone, refused and swore at the officer. He appeared before Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday and admitted being drunk and disorderly on Saturday, February 9. He was fined 5.

White, 33, said he had been drinking heavily for about 18 years and needed medical treatment. “I am going to see a doctor for treatment and try to get the help of Alcoholics Anonymous”, he said. “I will do my best to lead a respectable life and not do it again”.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 April 1981.

Local News.

Charrington Bass pubs in Folkestone have been hit by a drayman's strike at the Canterbury depot. Draymen are striking because of what a spokesman described as an internal dispute. The strike is expected to last until after Easter, and deliveries to three Charrington Bass pubs in Folkestone have been affected.

Mr. Clive Simpson, of the London and Paris said “We are all right at the moment and we will get through Easter, but I don't know what will happen after that”.

Mr. Michael Wildey, manager of the Bouverie Arms, said “We are well-stocked and will survive Easter, a very busy period”.

 

South Kent Gazette 17 February 1982.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Publicans' applications for transfer agreed by the Bench include: The Black Bull, Folkestone (music and dancing); Bouverie Arms, Folkestone; Honest Lawyer, Folkestone; Old Harbour Crab and Oyster House (extension to cover restaurant area); Royal George, Folkestone. Approval of plans to alter Folkestone's Pullman Wine Bar was given.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 January 1986.

Local News.

Pub landlord David Robinson was let down badly on Saturday after thugs slashed two tyres on his Ford Granada car. The vehicle was parked near Mr. Robinson's Bouverie Arms pub in Folkestone's Cheriton Road and damage done will cost 120 to repair.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 March 1987.

Local News.

A man had his 500 gold bracelet stolen from him in a pub on Sunday night. Mr. Albert King, of Connaught Road, Folkestone, was at the Bouverie Arms when two strangers admired his bracelet and offered to buy it from him. Mr. King left the bracelet with the men as he went to the toilet, and when he returned they had disappeared with his jewellery.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 August 1987.

Local News.

Vandals caused 40 damage to a window at the Bouverie Arms pub, in Bouverie Road West, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1988.

Local News.

Pint-size grandmother Jeanne Robey is clean, well-dressed and politely spoken. Yet she is banned from at least five pubs in Folkestone alone. As soon as she walks into the bar, customers and publicans threaten her, call her names, refuse to serve her, and then demand that she leaves. Her crime? The 5ft 2ins gran works on a P&O cross-Channel ferry.

The 46-year-old grandma was a geriatric nurse for eight years before accepting a job with the ferry company last May when money ran short.

Now, the extra cash in her pocket has meant that Jeanne has to pay heavily in another way. Once a bar assistant and regular in a handful of pubs in Folkestone’s town centre, she is now booted out of those same drinking holes, threatened with vicious beatings and vulgar jibes.

This week, after hearing of her story, the Herald insisted on checking the facts.

On Monday, usually a quiet night, Jeanne and I walked into The Earl Grey in the Old High Street and quietly asked for a drink. Minutes later we were hand-clapped out of the pub. Even before we reached the counter, a young man sitting in the comer got up, and told the landlady “Don’t serve her, she’s a scab”. The landlady then refused to serve us, saying “You’re not welcome in here. I’m on strike and it’s against my morals to serve you”. We left.

At the Portland in Langhome Gardens, landlord Brian Godfrey immediately refused to serve us, saying “Jeanne, you know you’re not allowed in here”. When asked why, he said “She causes too much aggravation”.

But the worst treatment came at the Bouverie Arms at Cheriton Road, Folkestone. As soon as we walked through the door, a customer sitting near the doorway, yelled “F.... scab” at Jeanne. As we walked towards the bar, he continued swearing and shouted “You’re not allowed in here. Get out”. We were refused drinks at the bar, and as we walked out, a customer threatened “If you come back, I’ll get the whole pub to walk out.” Genuinely afraid, Jeanne left immediately. I then asked the man why he treated Jeanne like that. He said “She’s a scab. She knows she’s not allowed in here. This is not a pub for scabs. If she stays in here, I’ll get the whole pub out. I’ve done it before, and I know they’ll walk out again if I told them. Scabs don’t drink in here”.

Jeanne was convinced we could drink at The Imperial, in Black Bull Road. She’d worked there as a barmaid and had known landlord Mr. Vic Clark as a friend for 20 years. She was wrong. As we walked in, the pub went quiet. The landlord told Jeanne “I can’t serve you. I’m on the line. I’ve got the boys in here”.

Jeanne says she can count another four pubs in Folkestone who have also banned her. Bitter Jeanne said “I have lived in this town all my life. My father had a tobacconists shop in Tontine Street for over 50 years. Now I am being threatened and always have to watch my back. It is terrible that P&O workers have to be careful where they drink. Surely in this free country, people who want to work should be allowed to without recriminations”, she said.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 September 1999.

Local News.

A derelict old pub has become a colourful children's nursery with one wave of owner Nola Yarney's magical wand. “I'm known as the Peter Pan of Folkestone”, said Mrs. Yarney, who has been in the nursery business for 37 years. “They think I'm going to stay young forever and just keep going”.

It took slightly longer than a wave to restore the Bouverie Arms to accommodate children from the Millfield Nursery, but it has now been completely transformed. “It was just an empty shell when we started. Now there is everything a child could possibly dream of – it really is a house for children”. With different play areas, sand pits and computer rooms, as well as a pet corner and library, children are not short of stimulation. The nursery opened on Wednesday, and there will be an open evening for parents on Tuesday.

The project ran smoothly until one Saturday three weeks ago, when the original Bouveria Arms sign was stolen. “These signs are worth about 500. We have had to have a new one made of aluminium, which will go up very shortly”, said Mrs. Yarney.

The nursery is for children aged three to five, while an all-day Saturday Club caters for children up to 10. For details contact Mrs. Yarney on 01303 251060.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

KIRBY James 1855-61 Bastions

BAKER Thomas 1861-63 BastionsPost Office Directory 1862

HOBDEN J 1863-64 Bastions

ELLIOTT H Next pub licensee had 1864-65 Bastions

Last pub licensee had TIDMARSH Sarah 1865-73 (age 71 in 1871Census) Bastions

HOGBEN George 1873-74 Next pub licensee had Bastions

SIMMONS Thomas 1874-91 (age 50 in 1881Census) Post Office Directory 1874Post Office Directory 1882Post Office Directory 1891Bastions

HART Albert James 1891-1903 Kelly's 1899Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903Bastions

LESTER Frederick 1903-07 Bastions

Last pub licensee had ATTWOOD William 1907-10 Bastions

HART Albert 1910-15 Post Office Directory 1913Bastions

HEDGES Francis 1915-31 Post Office Directory 1922Bastions

HEDGES Frederick E 1931-34 BastionsKelly's 1934

FUNNELL Harold Frank 1934-41 Post Office Directory 1938Bastions

RAWLINGS R P 1941

FREEMAN Arthur 1941-47 Bastions

HOARE William 1947-56 Bastions

STEWART John 1956-59 Bastions

THOMSON George 1959-63 Bastions

ELLIOTT Harry 1963-69 Bastions

SHAW Charles 1969-73 Bastions

FOSTER Harry 1973-75 Bastions

BUCKLAND Peter & WEST John Next pub licensee had 1975-79 Bastions

RUGG-GUNN James 1979-82 Bastions

ROBINSON David 1982-86 Bastions

THOMSON Graham 1986-89 Bastions

JUKES Barry 1989-94 Bastions

JUKES Jacqueline 1994-95 Bastions

CORCORAN Timothy & DOWNING Anthony 1995 Bastions

HALE Craig & BEDFORD Sarah 1995-96 Bastions

BEDFORD Sarah & MCCARN Linda 1996-97 Bastions

 

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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