DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 14 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1854

White Lion

Latest 2007

70 Cheriton High Street

Cheriton

White Lion 1904

Above postcard, postmarked 1904.

White Lion

Above photo kindly sent by Chris Excell, date unknown.

White Lion 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

White Lion, Cheriton

Above photo showing the White Lion in Cheriton, date unknown.

King George V and Lord Kitchener 1915

Above photograph, outside the White Lion on 2nd September 1915, showing the walk-past of King George V and Lord Kitchener.

White Lion

Above showing the sign to the "White Lion" just out of picture on the left. Date unknown.

White Lion Hotel date unknown

"White Lion" date unknown, by kind permission of the "Black Horse," Densole.

White Lion, 2010 White Lion 2010

Picture taken from Google Maps 2010.

White Lion 2012

Above photo kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

 

Earliest mention as the "White Lion" is in 1855, but there is a chance this could also have been the "Red Lion" and going back to 1717 and perhaps earlier from a mention in Thomas Baker's Quarry Book of the same year.

The pub was frequented by Irish labourers during the building of the Dungeness Nuclear Power Station in the 1960s, and it is said they were the cause of many a fight after a few beers.

Between 1988 and 1990 the premises went under the name of "Banjos."

 

In 1899 owners George Beer brewers of Canterbury decided the pub needed rebuilding and when completed by Mr. Adcock of Dover who incidentally built the "Metropole Hotel" on the lease and the pavilion on the Promenade pier in Dover, from plans by Mr. Jennings of Canterbury, it had one of the largest bar areas in the country, capable of satisfying the needs of 400 customers, and also space for men and women only bars, billiards and a clubroom.

Troops from the nearby Shorncliffe barracks frequented the premises during both world wars and during the second world war the army commandeered a large back room and placed a gun in the school play-ground next door. The troops at the time were not allowed to venture into the town any further than this pub, but were allocated a supply of beer for them at this pub.

The pub changed ownership to Fremlins during Joseph Smiles reign. Incidentally he ran the public house with his son Roy.

 

The pub was renamed "Banjos" in 1988, but apparently wasn't a success under this name and Chamberlain was declared bankrupt in 1991 and the following year the pub reverted back to the "White Lion."

Tony Leeves allowed the Den Community Church to hold Sunday services on the premises in1996 before opening time.

Latterly the pub again changed chains to be under control by Shepherd Neame. 2006 witnessed an 18 year old man shot in the leg while drinking at the pub and due to the firearms offence Shepherd Neame closed the pub.

 

The pub is still closed today, 2010, but in October 2007, there was talk about redeveloping the area.

 

Southeastern Gazette 7 February 1854.

Petty Sessions: Before David Major, Esq.

George Stone, a private soldier in her Majesty’s Royal Horse Guards, was charged with uttering a piece of counterfeit coin, apparently resembling a sovereign, and haying another of the same sort in his possession.

Mrs. Collins, the wife of Benjamin Collins, landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton, proved that the prisoner that morning tendered her what appeared to be a sovereign in payment for some beer, and although she had a notion it was light, she still believed it to be a sovereign, and upon the prisoner’s representation that he had on the previous day received it of his pay sergeant, she gave him change for it, with which he went away. When her husband came home he at once detected its spurious nature, and went in search of the prisoner.

Superintendent Steer proved apprehending the prisoner at the Swan, Dover-road, and upon searching him found, besides 1 3s. 9d. (consisting partly of the money he had received from Mrs. Collins) another similar counterfeit sovereign.

The prisoner, after receiving the usual caution, stated that he had received from his Quartermaster in Hydo Park barracks, on Sunday last, a 5 note, which he got changed at a gin palace near the foot of London bridge, and that he did not know the change was bad money.

The prisoner was remanded till Saturday, bail being accepted, and the superintendent was directed to communicate with the authorities at the Horse Guards. On Saturday the prisoner was fully committed for trial, the answer received from the paymaster of the regiment being that the prisoner had asked for four days’ leave to bury his father, and that he only received a few shillings from him ; thus proving both his statements to be false, the father being alive and well.

Note: Seems to give earlier start date for White Lion.

 

Southeastern Gazette 28 March 1854.

Kent Assizes.

Tuesday, March 21st.

George Stone, a soldier in the Artillery, was charged with uttering a counterfeit sovereign, at Cheriton, having at the same time other counterfeit coin in his possession.

Prisoner went to Mr. Collins’s, the White Lion, at Cheriton, on the 1st February, for a pint of porter, for which he tendered to Mrs. Collins what she supposed to be a sovereign, and received the change. On her husband’s return, she gave it to him, when it was found to be spurious. Prisoner had told her that he had received it from his pay- sergeant.

Mr. Collins having given information to the Folkestone police, Superintendent Steers apprehended the prisoner at about 11 o’clock in the morning, at the Swan, in the Dover Road. He acknowledged that he had changed a sovereign that morning, and took from his pocket five half-crowns, two shillings, and the piece produced, resembling the tendered coin. He said he had received a 5 note from his pay-sergeant about two days previous, which he had changed at the foot of London-bridge. The coins had a man on a horse on one side, and “To Hanover” on the reverse.

Prisoner said he had received the coins in change for the note. He produced a good character from his commanding officer.

He was found guilty of putting off the piece knowing it be counterfeit.

The learned Sergeant said that he had a document before him, which gave prisoner a good character, but stated that all that he had received from the regiment was 11s. 4d. He then sentenced him to five months’ hard labour, and ordered the change of the sovereign found on him to be given up to Mr. Collins.

Note: Date for Collins is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Kentish Gazette 15 June 1858.

In the Court of Bankruptcy on the 5th instant the first meeting was held for the proof of debts and choice of trade assignees under the Bankruptcy of Henry Clements, corn factor and coal merchant, of Hythe. Messrs. Lawrence, Plews and Boyer appeared on behalf of the petitioning creditor, Mr. Wm. Gilbert, of Cheriton, innkeeper, who procured the adjudication in bankruptcy on the 24th ult. for a debt of 69 14s. 1d.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 September 1858.

Hythe Police Court.

At the Magistrates' Clerk's office on Wednesday, before T. Denne and T. Du Boulay Esqs., William Crane, Joseph Poynts, Vincent Gsoford, Peter Daley, Francis Donnelly, Thomas McHugh and Bugan Barden appeared in answer to a summons, charged with creating a riot at the White Lion, at Cheriton, and doing a great deal of damage to the premises. There were eighteen panes of glass broken, and the total amount of damage was estimated at 1 14s. 6d. by Mr. Gilbert, the landlord. The three first-named men were non-commissioned officers in the Coldstream Guards stationed at Shorncliffe Camp for the purpose of drilling the 100th Canadian Regiment, the remainder being privates in the 11th Foot, both of which regiments are now stationed at the Camp. The evidence brought forward to substantiate the case was only sufficient to convict two of the men, Joseph Poynts and Thomas McHugh, who were fined 2s. 6d. and costs, to be paid in one week, in default to be committed to St. Augustine's for one month.

Note: Date for Gilbert is at Variance with More Bastions.

 

Southeastern Gazette 11 January 1859.

Local News.

On Thursday last, James Payne, James Scott, William Rutledge, John Yates, and James Farrell, all soldiers, stationed at Shorncliffe, were charged before T. Denne, G. Gidley and W.F. Browell Esqs. with stealing an 8 day clock, 6 large gilt-framed pictures, and a quantity of linen clothes, valued at 3 17s., the property of Mr. Gilbert, landlord of the White Lion public house, Cheriton. It appears that the prisoners, with one or two other soldiers, went to the White Lion at about twelve o'clock on the night of the 5th inst., and called the prosecutor up, threatening that if he did not let them in and draw them some beer, they would break the door open and help themselves. The prosecutor, to save having the door broken open, came down and let them in, when they called for some rum, which he would not let them have without the money. They then began to make a disturbance, and swore that they would have something to drink, the prisoner Farrell at the same time attempting to get into the bar, and calling the others to come and help him. Prosecutor then gave them some beer, and tried to persuade them to leave the house, and while he was in conversation with another soldier, named Bartholomew Griffin, a drummer in the 11th Regt., who is a witness in the case, the other prisoners succeeded in carrying the things before-mentioned from the parlour, out of the house; the prisoner Scott, as it appeared in evidence, going upstairs and stealing the linen clothes from off the landing. The prisoners were all taken into custody early in the evening by Sergeant Smith, K.C.C., and some of the stolen property found upon the persons of Payne and Scott. The whole of the property was found in the course of the morning. The pictures were thrown away, not far from the house; the clock was taken by Scott to a man, who was asked to take care of it for him, as he had won it at a raffle. It was not proved that Rutledge, Yates and Farrell had anything to do with taking the things away; they were therefore discharged with a caution. Payne and Scott were committed for trial at the Assizes.

 

From The Dover Express, Saturday, January 15, 1859; pg.4; Issue 24.

COUNTY INTELLIGENCE. CHERITON. DARING ROBBERY.

Last week James Payne, James Scott, William Rutledge, John Yates, and James Farrell, all soldiers, stationed at Shorncliffe, were charged before T. Denne G. Gidley, and W. F. Browell, Esqrs., with stealing an 8-day-clock, 6 large gilt framed pictures, and a quantity of linen clothes, valued at 3 17s., the property of Mr. Gilbert, landlord of the "White Lion" public-house, Cheriton.

It appears that the prisoners, with one or two other soldiers, went to the "White Lion" at about twelve o'clock on the night of the 5th inst., and called the prosecutor up, threatening that if he did not let them in, and draw them some beer, they would break the door open and help themselves. The prosecutor, to save having the door broken open, came running down and let them in, when they called for some rum, which he would not let them have without the money. They then began to make a disturbance, and swore that they would have something to drink, the prisoner Farrell at the same time attempting to get into the bar, and calling to the others to come and help him. Prosecutor then gave them some beer, and tried to persuade them to leave the house, and while he was in conversation with another soldier, named Bartholomew Griffen, a drummer in the 11th regt., who is a witness in the case, the other prisoners succeeded in carrying the things before-mentioned, from the parlour, out of the house: the prisoner Scott, as it appeared in evidence, going up stairs and stealing the linen clothes from off the landing. The prisoners were all taken into custody early in the evening, by Sergeant Smith, K.C.C., and some of the stolen property found upon the persons of Payne and Scott. The whole of the property was found in the course of the morning. The pictures were thrown away from the house; the clock was taken by Scott to a man, who was asked to take care of it for him, as he had won it on a raffle. It was not proved that Rutledge, Yates, and Farrell had anything to do with taking the things away; they were therefore discharged with a caution. Payne and Scott were committed for trial at the assizes.

 

Southeastern Gazette 22 March 1859.

Crown Court.

James Scott, 21, and James Payne, 24, soldiers, were indicted for having stolen some pictures and other articles, the property of William Gilbert, at Cheriton, on the 6th January. Mr. Barrow was for the prosecution.

The prosecutor is landlord of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, and on the above night the prisoners, with other soldiers, went there, and calling him up, threatened to break into the house if he did not give them admittance. They consequently were admitted, and supplied with some drink, for which they refused to pay. They behaved in a very violent and disorderly manner, but ultimately went away. The prisoners were subsequently found in possession of a considerable number of articles which had been taken from the house.

They were both found Guilty, but recommended to mercy, as the jury believed they had committed the act through drunkenness. Each one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 December 1860.

Death.

Dec. 15th, at Endbrook Farm, Cheriton, Mr. William Gilbert, late of the White Lion Inn, aged 60 years.

Note: This is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Observer 30 March 1861.

To be Let.

With immediate possession, the White Lion Public House at Cheriton.

Apply to W. And J. Pledge, Auctioneers, &c., Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 April 1861.

County Court.

Wednesday April 24th:- Before Charles Harwood Esq., Judge.

Dawson v Benjamin Collins: This was an action for 1 6s 8d for meal supplied to the defendant, who recently kept the White Lion Inn at Cheriton. The defendant did not appear. Ordered to be paid forthwith.

Note: How recently? Collins listed in More Bastions to c 1859.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 July 1861.

Notice.

Whereas a petition of James Kirby, formerly of Tovil, near Maidstone, in the County of Kent, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then of the Bouverie Arms, in the town of Folkestone, in the County of Kent, Beershop Keeper, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then of the same place Licensed Victualler, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then in lodgings in the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, in the County of Kent, out of business or employment, then living in furnished lodgings at Cheriton Street aforesaid, Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, then and now of Cheriton Street in Cheriton aforesaid, Journeyman Plumber, Painter, and Glazier, an Insolvent Debtor, having been filed in the County Court of Kent, holden at Folkestone, in the said County, and an Interim Order for Protection from Process having been given to the said James Kirby, under the provisions of the Statutes in that case made and provided, the said James Kirby is hereby required to appear in the said Court, to be holden at Folkestone aforesaid, before the Judge of the said Court, on the twenty fourth day of July, 1861, at ten o'clock in the forenoon precisely, for his First Examination touching his debts, estate, and effects, and to be further dealt with according to the provisions of the said Statutes: And Notice is hereby given that the choice of Assignees is to take place at the time so appointed.

All persons indebted to the said James Kirby, or who have any of his effects, are not to pay or deliver the same but to Ralph Thomas Brockman, the Registrar of the said Court, at his Office at Folkestone, the official Assignee of the Estate and Effects of the said Insolvent.

William Venables, High Bailiff,

Messenger of the said Court.

 

Southeastern Gazette 10 September 1861.

Hythe County Petty Sessions.

Thursday: Before The Rev. E. Biron, T. Denne, J. Kirkpatrick, G. Gidley, and W.F. Browell Esqs.

James Mitchell, innkeeper, Cheriton, 3 quart measures and a pint measure unjust; Fined 1, and 8s. costs.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 17 May, 1862. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

STEALING A WHIP

Wednesday May 14th:- Before General Sandlands.

Henry Greening was brought up and charged with stealing a whip of the value of 2s. 6d., the property of William Godfrey, of Cheriton, on 12th instant.

Mr. Fox of Dover appeared for the prisoner.

James Ellis Smith, K.C.C., on the 12th instant went in pursuit of the prisoner, and met him on Grace Hill, Folkestone, and said to him “I must take you into custody on a charge of stealing a whip”. He said “I don't know anything about stealing a whip; I know nothing about a whip being stolen”. Witness then reached forward onto his wagon and found the whip produced. It was under a sack or nose bag, and four inches of it could be seen. The prisoner's wife was sitting on top of the things covering the whip. When witness was pulling the whip out prisoner said “Ah, that whip Tom Pay gave to me at The "White Lion." I was going to take the whip back again when I had gone round there”. Witness did not see any other whip there. He met the prisoner in the street at Dover last night and was about passing him when either he or his wife beckoned him, and he said “You are after me, I suppose”, or words to that effect, and he then said “Well I was just coming round to the "Royal Oak"”. Witness understood Pay's proper name was Fagg.

William Godfrey, labourer, living at Folkestone, on Monday last went into the "White lion," at Cheriton, between 12 and 1 o'clock. Two of Pickford's carriages stood outside. Witness went in and had a pint of beer, and laid his whip down on the form in the tap room – the whip produced was the one he laid down. He saw a man pick it up and give it to the prisoner in the room – the prisoner walked out with it. Witness went out after him and saw him put it under his seat and drive away. The value of the whip was 2s. 6d. When the man gave the whip to the prisoner he did not say anything. Witness did not think it was taken by mistake. He had been convicted of felony himself – it was 10 or 15 years ago.

For the defence Mr. Fox called Alfred Fagg, who said he lived at Folkestone, and was in the employ of Messrs. Pickford & Co. The prisoner was also in their service. On Monday, between 12 and 1 o'clock, witness met the prisoner at the "White Lion," between the Camp and Folkestone. They were employed in carrying luggage between the Folkestone station and the Camp. They went in to get some beer. He saw the prisoner lay some money down on the table; the prosecutor picked it up and put it in his mouth. The prisoner said “That is my money”; the prosecutor then said “I always pick up all that lays in my way”. After they had drunk the beer they both came out of the house. Before they came witness picked up the whip produced, from off a form between the prisoner and himself – the prosecutor could see what they were doing. Witness either handed the whip to the prisoner or took it out and threw it on the straw in the wagon. He thought it was the prisoner's whip.

Thomas Greaves, clerk to Messrs. Pickford & Co. at Dover said the prisoner was employed by him yesterday delivering goods out of the Dover Hoy. The prisoner returned to Dover about half past 10 o'clock on Monday night. He had been in their service about 3 months – he had been a steady, honest, sober and industrious man.

The prisoner was discharged.

 

Southeastern Gazette 13 January 1863.

Hythe County Sessions.

At these sessions, on Saturday, James Mitchell, landlord of the White Lion public house, Cheriton, was charged with having his house open for the sale of beer during the prohibited hours on the 25th Dec; also with resisting and obstructing P.C. Stanley, K.C.C., in the execution of his duty.

Stanley stated that he visited the White Lion at a quarter to twelve on the above night, and found nine persons drinking in front of the bar; six of them were soldiers. There were also several other persons drinking in one of the rooms.

Mr. Minter, for the defendant, called two witnesses, who stated that there were only two soldiers in the house when the policeman came.

The case was dismissed.

The second charge was then gone into.

The officer stated that he met two of the soldiers whom he had previously seen at the White Lion, about half-past twelve the same night. They informed him that there were several people in the house drinking and fighting. He accordingly proceeded thither, and heard a great noise inside the house. He was about going into one of the rooms, when the landlord prevented him, and struck at him, at the same time making use of abusive language. He also set a large dog on to witness. The house was reported as a badly conducted one.

The same witnesses were called for the defence as in the former case, but the magistrates fined defendant 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs.

The defendant appeared in court very drunk, and several times interrupted the witnesses.

 

Folkestone Observer 17 January 1863.

County Sessions.

Saturday January 10th 1863.

James Mitchell, landlord of the White Lion public house, Cheriton, was charged with having his house open for the sale of beer during the prohibited hours on the 25th December: also with resisting and obstructing P.C. Stanley K.C.C. in the execution of his duty. Stanley stated that he visited the White Lion at a quarter to twelve o'clock on the above night and found nine persons drinking in front of the bar; six of them were soldiers. There were also several other persons drinking in one of the rooms. Mr. Minter, for the defendant, called two witnesses, who stated that there were only two soldiers in the house when the policeman came. Case dismissed.

The second charge was then gone into. The officer stated that he met two of the soldiers whom he had previously seen at the White Lion about half past twelve the same night. They informed him that there were several people in the house drinking and fighting. He accordingly proceeded thither, and heard a great noise inside the house. He was about going into one of the rooms when the landlord prevented him, and struck at him, at the same time making use of abusive language. He also set a large dog on to witness. The house was reported as a badly conducted one. The same witnesses were called for the defence as in the former case, but the magistrates fined defendant 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs.

The defendant appeared in court very drunk, and several times interrupted the witnesses.

 

Kentish Gazette 17 February 1863.

Hythe Petty Sessions, Thursday, 12th: Before Thomas DuBoulay Esq., Chairman, the Rev. E. Biron, T. Denne, G. Gidley, W.F. Browell and W. Deedes Esqs.

Thomas Hammon and Rhoda Ann Morford appeared to summonses, charged with having committed wilful and corrupt perjury in their evidence as witnesses in the case of an information laid by Stephen Stanley, police constable, against James Mitchell, of Cheriton, alehouse keeper, for having his house open for the sale of beer after eleven o'clock in the afternoon of Christmas Day. The case was heard before the Bench at Hythe on the 1st January last, and dismissed.

Mr. Minter appeared for the defendants.

Superintendent English applied for an adjournment till the 26th inst., as Stephen Stanley, a material witness, is dangerously ill. The hearing was accordingly adjourned till that day.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, Tuesday, 17 March, 1863.

CHERITON. Perjury.

The charge against Rhodi Ann Morford and Edward Thomas Hammon, which has been adjourned two or three times on account of the illness of P.C. Stanley, was investigated on the 9th inst., at Hythe, before the Rev. E. Biron (chairman) G. Gidley and W. F. Browell, Esqs.

Mr. Creery, of Ashford, instructed by Captain Ruxton, the chief constable, appeared on behalf of the prosecution, and Mr. Minter for the prisoners.

From the evidence given, which was very voluminous, the hearing of the case having occupied upwards of six hours, it appears that on the 1st Jan. last, on the hearing of an information laid by Police-constable Stanley against James Mitchell, the landlord of the “White Lion Inn,” Cheriton, for having his house open for the sale of beer after 11 o'clock in the evening, Stanley deposed that on entering the house at a quarter before twelve he saw here six soldiers and two or three civilians standing in the passage; that there was a glass of beer standing on the bar, and one of the soldiers asked him to drink. Mrs. Morford, a sister-in-law of Mitchell's, and Hammon, who lives with Mitchell, were called for the defence, and swore that there were not any soldiers in the passage; there were only two in the house, and they came to tea, and were in a private room; and that there was no provost in the house.

The provost was now called, and he stated that he was there when the policeman came in. He was standing in the passage, and on his right hand were standing two men of the 9th Lancers and an artilleryman. Four men of the 9th Lancers also said that they were in the house at that time.

The justices committed both prisoners for trial at the ensuing assizes, but accepted bail for their appearance.

 

Southeastern Gazette 17 March 1863.

Hythe County Sessions.

Perjury.—At the County Sessions Hall, on Monday (before the Rev. E. Biron, G. Gidley, and W. F. Browell, Esq.), Rhoda Ann Morford and Edward Thomas Hammon were charged by Supt. English, K.C.C. with committing wilful and corrupt perjury on giving their evidence as witnesses, on the 1st January last, on the hearing of an information laid by P.C. Stephen Stanley, against James Mitchell, of Cheriton, alehouse keeper, for having his house open for the sale of beer after 11 o’clock on the evening of Christmas-day.

Mr. Creery, of Ashford, appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Minter for the defence.

Supt. English and Sergeant Smith proved that they were present at the petty sessions on the 1st January. P.C. Stanley then stated that he entered the Lion public house at Cheriton, kept by Mitchell, about a quarter to 12 on the evening of Christmas day; that when he went in he saw six soldiers standing in the passage opposite the bar, and two or three civilians; that one of the soldiers was a provost. Rhoda Ann Morford and Edward Thomas Hammon were on that occasion called as witnesses for the defence, and said that when P.C. Stanley went in there were no soldiers in the passage; that there were only two in the house, that they were in a private room, and that there was no provost there.

Joseph Rush worth, a soldier, was now called, and said that he was a provost on Christmas day, and was standing in the passage of the Lion, when P.C. Stanley went in. There were also in the passage, standing by him, two men of the 9th Lancers and an Artilleryman.

Four privates of the 9th Lancers also stated they were in the house when Stanley went in.

Committed for trial at the assizes, but admitted to bail.

 

Southeastern Gazette 26 May 1863.

Hythe County Sessions.

James Mitchell, landlord of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, was fined 2, costs 10s 6d., for keeping open his house for the sale of beer after 12 o’clock on the night of Saturday, the 25th ult. P.O. Winter, K.C.C., proved the case.

 

Southeastern Gazette 13 February 1866.

Hythe County Sessions.

Thursday: Before the Rev. E. Biron, T. Denne, Esq., and Capt. Kilpatrick.

Charles Loveland, landlord of the White lion Inn, Cheriton, was charged with assaulting George Thomas, on the 29th Jan. Mr. J. Minter appeared for the complainant.

Complainant stated that he was at the defendant’s house on the evening of Monday, the 29th ult. He and the landlord quarrelled, and the complainant knocked him down, and afterwards struck him.

For the defence, Joseph Eldridge stated that the complainant was drunk; defendant tried to put him out of the house and the complainant fell down.

The case was dismissed.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Southeastern Gazette 22 May 1866.

Local News.

At the county petty sessions, on Thursday, Charles Loveland, of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, was charged with assaulting William New, on the 27th April. Mr. W. S. Smith, from the office of Mr, Edward Watts, solicitor, Hythe, appeared for the complainant, and Mr, John Minter, of Folkestone, for the defendant.

Complainant is foreman to a company engaged in some drainage works at Shorncliffe Camp. From his statement it would appear that on the 27th ult., be returned from Folkestone to Cheriton with Loveland, and on their arrival they went into the latter’s house. New put down a sovereign on the counter to be changed, and defendant sent someone upstairs, as he said, for the change. Not receiving any change, complainant asked the defendant for it, when Loveland declared that he had not had the sovereign. An altercation ensued, and in the end Loveland struck the complainant a violent blow in the face. He proceeded to further violence, pushing New about, and at length striking him again in the face. There were several other persons in the room when the sovereign was put down.

Defendant was fined 2 and 2 costs.

 

Folkestone Express 6 March 1869.

Robbery.

A female, who represented herself as the wife of a private of the fourth Dragoon Guards, took lodgings at the White Lion Inn a few weeks back. On Saturday afternoon last she left, and Mr. Hammon, the landlord of the inn, missed a gold watch and gold chain, two seals, a pair of earrings and several articles of underclothing. He immediately communicated with the police, and from enquiries that have since been made it appears that a person pawned the jewellery at Mr. Hart's, Folkestone, and took lodgings at the Wheatsheaf Tavern on Saturday night with her supposed husband. They proceeded from Folkestone to London by train on Sunday, and up to the present time have succeeded in eluding the police.

Note: This date for Hammon differs from information in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 29 January 1870.

Local News.

The perpetrator of the robbery at the White Lion Inn nearly twelve months since has just been apprehended, and sufficient evidence adduced before the County Magistrates at Hythe, to commit the prisoner for trial. The name of the accused is Harriet Pragnell, and the property, which belonged to the landlord, Thomas Hammon, consisted of a gold watch, a gold chain, two seals, and a pair of earrings was pledged at Mr. Hart's, High Street. The prisoner denied committing the robbery, alleging that the property was taken by her paramour, a private in the 4th Dragoon Guards.

 

Folkestone Express 19 November 1870.

Inquest.

The danger of level crossings was further shown on Tuesday evening last by a fatal accident which happened to Private J. Slater of the 10th Hussars. There are three level crossings in Cheriton Street, and this is the second fatal casualty that has occurred by persons crossing the line. Of course, great carelessness was exhibited in each case, but the majority of railway accidents are caused by carelessness – sometimes on the part of the public and at other times by the railway officials themselves. Everything should be done to prevent the possibility of an accident occurring, and we hope the Company will agree with the jury and admit the necessity by erecting a bridge, which is necessary at this spot for the convenience and safety of the public.

The deceased, it appears, was on furlough from his regiment, which is stationed at Brighton. On Tuesday last, in company with a female, he visited Folkestone and Shorncliffe Camp, and by the time for him to return to his lodgings at Cheriton, had imbibed so much drink that he was not capable of going home without assistance. Two drivers of the Royal Artillery accordingly accompanied him. On arriving at the railway crossing he rushed on the rails, heedless of an approaching train and the warnings of his conductors. The buffer of the train caught him and he was hurled a distance of twenty yards, being of course killed on the spot. The female had a narrow escape, being struck down as well by a portion of the train. The remains were picked up and conveyed to the White Lion Inn, Cheriton.

The inquest was held at the White Lion Inn before the Deputy Coroner, W. Furley Esq., and a jury on Thursday. After viewing the body, which presented a shocking appearance, the following witnesses were called:

James Reed, an engine driver in the employ of the S.E.R. Co., who said: I was the driver of the 8-50 train from Charing Cross on the 15th. After leaving Hythe and passing Cheriton Bridge I did not see anything, but heard the stones flying about, and I though the engine had passed over something. At Shorncliffe Station I gave information of the circumstance to the Company's officers. I examined the engine and found some particles of blood and flesh on the front of the buffer plate. We do not whistle before passing a crossing; there is no printed instruction to that effect. There is no curve within a mile of this crossing. We have two good headlights to the engine.

Elizabeth Hood said: I formerly lived at Folkestone but now reside at Dover. I have known deceased about twelve months. I was in Folkestone all the evening in company with him; he was very drunk and had a job to walk. About half past eleven I was with him at Cheriton Crossing. I was in front and he was walking just behind with two or three other men, soldiers in the Artillery. I do not know their names or if they were sober. I walked half way across the line, when I heard the train coming; it was very near before I noticed it. I heard the deceased running after me. He was helloing out for me to wait for him. I was obliged to go forward for fear of the train, and I told him not to come across. In a moment the train rushed by. The train was going very fast, and it caught my dress. The crossing is in a deep cutting. When I came to myself I ran home. I did not see anything of him, but I heard the chaps cry out he was dead. The train caught my dress and I fell down on the irons. I have not seen the body since. I do not know his age.

John Reynolds, a driver in the Royal Artillery, said: I knew the deceased, and I was with him on the night of the 15th near Cheriton Crossing. He was not sober, but could walk and that was all. He got over the stile by the crossing first, and I followed him. I heard the train coming and I said to the deceased “Do not go over the line yet, Jem. A train's coming”. He replied “Come along, Jack, we shall be over before the train comes”. I said “No we shan't. Don't you go”. He ran down the hill, however, and I stood there and said “He's killed” to my companion. I knew this because there was not time to cross. I looked about and found him about 15 to 20 yards from where he crossed. He made one groan; he was lying on his back; his head appeared fractured and his thigh broken. I saw the train when I was on the stile, and I am sure he had no time to go across.

William Price, the other driver in the Royal Artillery who accompanied the deceased, corroborated the evidence of the last witness.

Dr. J.W. Howard deposed to the nature of the injuries received by the deceased. He considered they were caused by being struck by a train as described.

The Coroner summed up the evidence. The death of the deceased was no doubt caused by his crossing the line. Whether they thought there was any carelessness by the driver or not sufficient protection on the part of the Company was for them to say. The man was not sober, and drunken men were in the habit of doing rash things.

A juryman considered that the Company should put a bridge across at this spot; it was very dangerous. The Cheriton Schools were on the other side of the railway, and between 30 and 40 children crossed the line at this spot every day.

The Coroner said that if that was their feeling he would write to the Company about it. He thought at least they should whistle at every crossing.

Mr. Keefe, station master at Shorncliffe, who represented the South Eastern Railway Company, said it would be impossible to whistle at every crossing, and besides that the inhabitants each side of the line would be the first to complain of the practice.

The Coroner: Professional inconvenience is not so important as saving human life. Mr. Keefe might represent the feeling of the jury that a light bridge might be thrown across here. It would not be an expensive thing for a large Company like the South Eastern.

Mr. Keefe said he would report the recommendation to the Company; at the same time he would remind the jury that although this crossing had been used for a great number of years, there had only been two fatal accidents at this crossing, and they were both caused by drunkenness.

After a few more remarks the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Southeastern Gazette 19 November 1870.

Inquest.

On Tuesday a very melancholy occurrence took place at Cheriton Street. A little to the west of the Village Hall two footpaths cross the railway, which runs here in a cutting about twenty feet deep. It appears that a private of the 10th Hussars, named James Slater, had obtained leave of absence on furlough, and, having made several acquaintances at Shorncliffe Camp during the short time the troops lay there last year, he determined to visit them. On the day in question he proceeded to Folkestone in the company of a woman, and afterwards visited the camp. As he was drunk, two drivers of the Royal Artillery volunteered to assist him home, and the female preceded the party on the way to his lodgings, at Cheriton Street. They arrived at the last crossing, leading from the camp to Cheriton Street just as the 8.50 train from Charing Cross, which is due at Shorncliffe at 11.30 p.m.,was approaching the spot. The female hurried across the line, and the deceased, although warned by the shouts of his companions, ran after her. The train caught the dress of the female and knocked her down, and deceased was struck by the buffer of the engine, hurled about 20 yards from the spot, and so dreadfully injured that his death must have been instantaneous; the female was only stunned by the fall, and ran screaming home, while the two drivers of the Royal Artillery picked up all that remained of their boisterous companion, and conveyed him to the White Lion Inn, Dr. Howard, of Sandgate, being instantly fetched, but of course life was extinct.

An inquest was held at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, on Thursday, when the jury brought in a verdict of “Accidental death.” The jury, however, expressed their opinion that the crossings in question were very dangerous, and that the South Eastern Railway Company should, in the interest of the public, throw a foot bridge across the line at the spot.

 

From the Whitstable Times, 26 November, 1870.

SHOCKING DEATH OF A SOLDIER.

James Slater, aged 31, a private in the 10th Hussars, now stationed at Hounslow, met with a shocking death on Tuesday night last. Deceased was visiting Shorncliffe—where he has previously been stationed—on furlough, and on the night in question was in company with two former comrades of the Royal Artillery and a prostitute, and was proceeding in a drunken state to Cheriton, when in crossing the railway he was knocked down and killed by the express train, which was due at Shorncliffe station at 11.45. An inquest was held before Walter Furley, Esq., deputy coroner, at the “White Lion Inn,” Cheriton, where the body had been conveyed, on Thursday afternoon.

Evidence having been heard, the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death.”

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 May 1871.

Melancholy Fate.

An inquest was held at the White Lion, Cheriton, before T. Delasaux Esq., on Tuesday last, on the body of a farm labourer named Laws, who had been employed at Denton Farm. It would appear that the deceased met his death by falling into a pond near the Tile Kiln, on Sunday evening, when returning from a visit to his friends at Hawkinge. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

 

Folkestone Express 20 May 1871.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, on Tuesday on the body of Thomas Laws, aged 23 years. The deceased was found the previous morning in the Brickyard pond. The evidence showed that the deceased resided at Mr. Frederick Brockman's farm at Cheriton, where he was “second man”. On Sunday afternoon he had dinner with the bailiff; left soon afterwards, being then in his usual health and spirits. About quarter past six in the evening he appears to have called on his uncle at Hawkinge, and having remained an hour at his house gone on to Folkestone, where he called at the Blue Anchor where he had two pints of beer and left about a quarter to ten.

The next morning about a quarter to six a man named Hobday, when going back to work, saw a hat just above the water in the brickpond by the side of the turnpike road, and on going to the pond saw the body of a man in it. He immediately went for assistance and the deceased was taken out of the pond and removed to the White Lion Inn. It would seem that he had been on his way home, and in the dark, attempting to take a short cut, walked into the pond. When searched, a silver watch, the hands of which were stationary at 25 minutes to eleven, was found on him as well as several other articles, including 4s. 6d. in silver and 1d. in coppers.

The jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Express 9 November 1872.

Saturday, November 2nd: Before The Mayor and T. Caister Esq.

Thomas Hammond, White Lion Inn, Cheriton, was summoned on a charge of having wilfully and fraudulently passed through the Sandgate Toll Gate without paying the toll due. Defendant pleaded Guilty.

The toll keeper said defendant passed through the gate about twelve o'clock on the night of the 26th October. After witness had opened the gate, defendant “flogged” his horse and drove on without paying the toll (3d.), saying he was going to meet the mail train at Shorncliffe Station, and that was the third or fourth time he had driven through in that manner.

Defendant said he told complainant that he had no money, but would pay when he returned, as he was in a hurry to meet two gentlemen who were coming by the mail train, which had already reached Shorncliffe Station. He was going through empty, and had paid twice before on that day. He asked complainant to trust him. He did not “flog” the horse to force his way through the gate. He passed through the gate 500 or 600 times in a year, and complainant therefore knew him very well, and he thought it very unjust and very unfair that he should be summoned.

The Mayor said as defendant had pleaded Guilty the Bench had no alternative but to fine him. He must pay 3d, the toll, 1s. penalty, and 9s. costs.

The Clerk told complainant that when he knew a person he ought to try and get the money before taking out a summons.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 6 March, 1874. Price 1d.

IN LIQUIDATION, DOVER, KENT

Important sale of an old-established and well-arranged BREWERY, together with 13 Freehold and Leasehold Public and Beer-houses, a Private Residence, Malt-house, Stabling, &c.

WORSFOLD, HAYWARD, & Co. Have received instructions from the Trusteee of the Estate of Mr. G. S. Page (in liquidation by arrangement, in connection with the Mortgagees, to Sell by Auction, at the “Royal Oak Hotel,” Dover, on Tuesday, 24th March, 1874, at three o'clock precisely, in one or right lots, the following important and Valuable Property.

LOT3.

A valuable long Lease hold, Country Roadside, Public-house, known as the “White Lion,” Cheriton. Situate near to Shorncliffe Camp and within a mile and a half of Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 9 May 1874.

Wednesday, May 6th: Before The Mayor, J. Hoad and J. Kelcey Esqs.

Thomas Hammon, Lion Inn (sic), Cheriton, was charged with being drunk whilst driving a hackney carriage on the 24th April. He was also further charged with driving furiously to the danger of the public on the same day.

Defendant, on being asked to plead, said: It will not make much difference whether I plead Guilty or Not Guilty. I had some idea of engaging a counsellor, but I will leave it in the hands of your Worships to settle as easily as possible. I admit I am Guilty. Defendant also pleaded Guilty to the second charge of furious driving.

Supt. Wilshere said he was going up Shellons Street about ten minutes past six on the evening of the 25th April, when he saw several people running, and defendant was coming down from the direction of Bouverie Square, driving a cab at a furious rate. He was flogging the horse, and it was a miracle that he did not come into collision with a carriage belonging to Mr. Daniels. He drove up against the wall of Christ Church School, and then turned round and lashed the horse again. Witness then put up his hand and stopped him, as he saw he was not in a fit state to drive. The horse was as quiet as possible, but was sweating very much.

Although defendant had pleaded Guilty to being drunk he said he could bring fifty witnesses to prove he was not so. He knew the Superintendent had been to several people to ask them to say he was drunk.

Several previous convictions for being drunk and furious driving were put in.

The Mayor said defendant had rendered himself liable to a fine of 5, and if he were brought before them again he would be severely dealt with. He would have to pay a fine of 1 and 8s. costs in each case, and as that was the third time he had been convicted of furious driving, the Magistrates would be obliged to report the affair to the Watch Committee in order that they might decide whether his license should be suspended. In default of paying 2 16s. he would have to go to prison for a month's hard labour.

Defendant: Go to prison for nothing; that's a fine idea. No doubt another time I shall defend the case.

Defendant then paid the money, thanking the Bench as he left the Court.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 April 1876.

On Thursday evening last a shocking affair occurred at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton Road. A soldier named William Hart was drinking in the house. He was quarrelsome, and asked for more beer, which the landlord, Thomas Hammond, refused to let him have. The landlord then endeavoured to eject Hart from the premises, and in the struggle he struck Hammond, who fell down and instantly expired. Hart was immediately taken into custody, and will be brought before the magistrates at Hythe on Monday. An inquest will probably be heard by the county Coroner, Mr. T. Delesaux, on the body of deceased today (Saturday). The affair has created considerable excitement as deceased was well known in the neighbourhood.

 

Folkestone Express 1 April 1876.

Local News.

Late on Tuesday evening a shocking affair occurred at the White Lion, Cheriton Road. It appeared that a man named William Hart had been drinking in the house and asked for some more beer. The landlord, Thomas Hammond, refused to serve him and words ensued, resulting in the landlord attempting to eject Hart. The latter struck Hammond and knocked him down, death resulting almost instantaneously. Hart was at once taken into custody, and yesterday (Friday) morning was brought before the County Magistrates at Hythe, and remanded until Monday.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 April 1876.

On Friday afternoon an inquest was held before T.T. Delasaux upon the body of the unfortunate man, Edward Thomas Hammond, landlord of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, who met with his death under such shocking circumstances.

Mary Hammond, widow of the deceased, said: William Thomas Hart came into the White Lion Inn between six and seven o'clock on Thursday evening, in a state of intoxication. He went into the tap room and commenced making a noise, and using improper language. Deceased requested him to go home and get his supper, but he refused, whereupon deceased opened the back door and again requested him to leave. Hart then said “Do you mean to turn me out?”, and immediately caught hold of the collar of his coat with both hands, and shook him against the door post, and ultimately threw him on the ground and fell partly on him. Assistance was obtained, and deceased was taken into a small room and placed on a sofa, when he almost immediately died.

The Court was then adjourned until Tuesday next.

On Friday William Thomas Hart was brought before the Hythe magistrates on the charge of wilful murder.

Richard Waghorne said that he lived at Cheriton, and the prisoner worked with him. On Thursday evening he was at the White Lion and saw the prisoner, who was the worse for liquor. Deceased asked him to go home, but he refused to do so. He then saw deceased go and open the back door. He afterwards saw prisoner take hold of the deceased, and a struggle took place. They fell, the prisoner falling upon deceased.

Mary Hammond repeated the evidence she gave at the inquest.

P.C. Jordan deposed to apprehending the prisoner.

The case was adjourned until Wednesday, when Mr. Minter appeared for defendant, and the following additional evidence was taken.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said that on the evening of the 30th of March he was called to the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, and found the deceased lying on the sofa quite dead. On the following day he made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and found at the base of the brain that a large vessel had been ruptured, causing an effusion of blood. There was no fracture of the skull, but there was a slight bruise at the back of the head. There was also one or two bruises about the back and shoulders. He made no further examination, because in his opinion the effusion of blood at the base of the brain was quite sufficient to cause death.

By Mr. Minter: The bruise on the back of the head might have been produced by a fall, or by being knocked up against the wall. I should say, by the position, it was caused by the fall. The bruises I have referred to are very slight. From the appearance I noticed on removing the skull, I should say that the deceased had been drinking, as there were symptoms of inflammation. The blood vessel referred to would be much more easily ruptured in a man given to drinking than in a man of sober habits. The vessel could not have been ruptured by simply knocking about.

After some corroborative evidence was given by a labourer named Coleman, Mr. Minter, in defence, asked them not to send the prisoner for trial, as it was a case of misadventure.

The Bench committed prisoner to Maidstone on the charge of manslaughter. Bail was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 8 April 1876.

Local News.

In our last impression we gave a brief account of the death of Mr. Edward Thomas Hammon, landlord of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton. We then stated that on Thursday evening a man named Hart was in the house and became very noisy and the landlord attempted to eject him, when by some means the landlord fell and was killed on the spot.

On Friday afternoon the inquest upon the unfortunate man was opened at the White Lion before T.T. Delasaux Esq., Coroner for the Eastern Division of the county.

Mary Hammon, widow of the deceased, said: William Thomas Hart came into the White Lion Inn between six and seven o'clock on Thursday evening, in a state of intoxication. He went into the tap room and commenced making a noise and using improper language. Deceased requested him to go home and get his supper, but he refused, whereupon deceased opened the back door and again requested him to leave. Hart then said “Do you mean to turn me out?”, and immediately caught hold of the collar of his coat with both hands and shook him against the doorpost, and ultimately threw him to the ground and fell partly on him. Assistance was obtained and deceased was taken into a small room and placed on a sofa, when he almost immediately died.

At this stage of the proceedings the inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday the 11th inst., at the Rose Inn, Sandgate.

On Friday, William Thomas Hart was taken before the County Magistrates at Hythe and charged with the wilful murder of Edward Thomas Hammon, when the following evidence was taken:

Richard Waghorn said: I live at Cheriton and the prisoner worked with me. On Thursday evening I was at the White Lion and saw the prisoner, who was the worse for drink. Deceased asked him to go home, but he refused to do so. I then saw deceased go and open the back door. I afterwards saw the prisoner take hold of the deceased, and a struggle took place. They fell, the prisoner falling upon deceased.

Mary Hammon said: I am the widow of the deceased. On Thursday night the prisoner was in our house. He was in liquor. He was making a noise and my husband begged him to go home. He refused to do so and used foul language. My husband said “That's enough. You had better go home”. Prisoner said “Do you mean to put me out?” He then took hold of my husband by the throat and pushed him against the back door, and prisoner fell on him. I sent for a doctor from Folkestone, but when he arrived my husband was dead.

P.S. Jordan, K.C.C., said: I was sent for to the White Lion on Thursday evening. I found deceased lying upon a sofa. He was quite dead. I apprehended the prisoner in the house and charged him with causing the death of Edward Thomas Hammon. Prisoner said “All right. He is dead”.

At this stage of the proceedings the inquiry was adjourned until Wednesday.

On Wednesday morning William Thomas Hart was brought up on remand charged with the wilful murder of Edward Thomas Hammon.

Mr. Minter defended the prisoner.

The evidence as given above having been read over, the witness Waghorn, in cross-examination by Mr. Minter, said: Deceased's back was towards the door. The door was open. There is a door sill above the level of the floor. I think deceased fell before he got to the sill. I think it was quite an accident.

Mrs. Hammon was re-called, and in answer to Mr. Minter, said: My husband took hold of the prisoner first. I was in the bar, and pushed the door to on account of the foul language the prisoner was using. I did not see the whole of the struggle. The witness Waghorn saw all that went on. My husband and the prisoner were good friends, except when they were tipsy. My husband was sober at the time. My husband has not been drunk from day to day for a year past. When I saw them, the prisoner had got hold of my husband. He fell half in and half out of the doorway.

By the Bench: They had words when they were both in drink.

Mr. Richard Mercer: I am a surgeon, practicing at Folkestone. On the evening of the 30th Martch I was called to the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, and I arrived there about eight o'clock. I found the deceased lying on the sofa quite dead. On the following day I made a post mortem examination of deceased, and found at the base of the brain that a large vessel had been ruptured, causing an effusion of blood. There was no fracture of the skull, but there was a slight bruise at the back of the head. There were also one or two bruises about the back and shoulders. I made no further examination, because in my opinion the effusion of blood at the back of the brain was quite sufficient to cause death.

By Mr. Minter: The bruise on the back of the head might have been produced by a fall, or by being knocked up against the wall. I should say from the position it was caused by the fall. The bruises I have referred to were very slight. From the appearance I noted when removing the skull I should say that deceased had been given to drinking, as there were symptoms of inflammation. The blood vessel referred to would be much more easily ruptured in a man given to drinking than in a man of sober habits. The vessel could not have been ruptured by simply knocking about.

John Wilson Coleman: I am a labourer, living at Elmstead. On the 30th March at about six o'clock I went into the White Lion, Cheriton. I saw the prisoner and Mrs. Hammon at the bar. Deceased was inside the bar and the prisoner outside. I heard deceased tell prisoner, more than once, to go home or to go to the stable and lie down. I then went into the tap room. I heard deceased tell prisoner again to go out, or he would put him out. I saw deceased take hold of the prisoner, who then took hold of the deceased. A struggle took place in the passage. Deceased's back was then towards the bar door, but during the struggle he turned round and fell. The back door was open. Deceased fell through the doorway. I think that his heels must have caught against the sill. Prisoner was standing in the passage talking loudly. I went to him and set him down in a chair in the dining room. I gave him over to another man. I was sober, but prisoner was not. I did not observe whether deceased was under the influence of drink or not. He spoke civilly to me.

By Mr. Minter: I heard deceased say to prisoner “If you don't go out I shall put you out”. Deceased then took hold of prisoner and tried to put him out.

This was the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Minter said: Under the circumstances I ask the Bench to say that there is no case to send for trial. I submit that it is a case of misadventure. I am sure that no-one regrets the circumstance more than the prisoner. If the Bench looked at the evidence it could not be held that the prisoner had any intention of causing the death of the deceased. They could not say that the prisoner was morally or criminally liable. The witnesses all said that deceased asked the prisoner to leave, being in a state of intoxication. Deceased, as they had heard, gave the prisoner really good advice, but the prisoner did not appear to have followed it. There is nothing to show that the prisoner was making any disturbance, but not leaving the house, the deceased tried to pull him out. They fell through the doorway, and the last witness says that his heels must have caught against the door sill. I feel convinced that no jury would ever say that the prisoner has been guilty of any offence. The parties had been acquainted for many years, and according to the evidence had been on good terms. There was not the slightest evidence of the prisoner having any intention to do harm.

The Court was cleared for a few minutes, after which the Chairman (Mr. Mackeson) said that the prisoner would be committed to take his trial on the charge of manslaughter at the next county assizes at Maidstone.

Mr. Minter applied for bail, as the assizes had just been held, and the prisoner would consequently have to be in gaol for a considerable time.

Mr. Mackeson said that under the circumstances he did not feel justified in accepting bail.

The Court was crowded during the hearing of the case.

 

Southeastern Gazette 10 April 1876.

Local News.

At the Town Hall, Hythe on Friday William Thomas Hart, 35, labourer, was charged before H.B. Mackeson, Esq., with the wilful murder of Edward Thomas Hammon, at Cheriton.

Mary Hammon, the widow of the deceased, stated that her husband kept the White Lion Inn, Cheriton. On Thursday night the prisoner was in the house. He was in liquor. He was making a noise, and deceased begged him to go home. He refused to do so and used foul language Deceased said “That’s enough, you had better go home.” Prisoner said Do you mean to put me out?” He then took hold of deceased by the throat, pushed him against the back door, prisoner falling on him. When a doctor from Folkestone arrived, deceased was dead.

A man named Richard Waghorn corroborated the evidence of Mrs. Hammon, and P.S. Jordan proved apprehending the prisoner, who, when charged, said “All right, he is dead.”

Prisoner was then remanded until the following Wednesday.

The inquest on the body of the deceased was also formally opened and adjourned on the 31st ult. at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, before T. T. Delasaux, Esq., coroner.

Mrs. Hammon repeated the evidence she had given at Hythe, and the enquiry was then adjourned until tomorrow (Tuesday).

On Wednesday the prisoner was again brought up at Hythe before H. B. Mackeson, Esq. J. Taylor, Esq., and the Rev E. Biron, were also present. Mr. Minter, solicitor, appeared for the prisoner, having been instructed by his employer, Mr. Henry Wood. The evidence taken on Friday was read over.

Richard Waghorn, in answer to Mr. Minter, said that Hammon fell before he got to the sill of the back door. In witness’s opinion the affair was quite an accident.

Mrs. Hammon, on cross-examination, said her husband was sober both on the day of the occurrence and the day previous. It was not the fact that he been drunk day after day for the past year.

By Mr. Mackeson: Prisoner had frequented the house ever since witness and her husband had been there. Altercations had occurred with the prisoner on previous occasions; when the prisoner was in liquor he was always abusive.

Richard Mercer, surgeon, assistant to Mr. Bateman, Folkestone, deposed: I was called to deceased on the evening of March 30th, and saw him about 8 o’clock. He was lying on a sofa, quite dead. I made a post-mortem examination of deceased. I found that at the base of the brain a large vessel had been ruptured, causing an effusion of blood. There was no fracture of the skull, but there was a slight bruise at the back of the head, and one or two bruises about the back and shoulders. In my opinion the effusion of blood at the base of the brain was quite sufficient to cause death.

By Mr. Minter: The bruise on the back of the head was such as might have been produced by the fall, or by knocking up against the doorpost. I should say it was most probably caused by the fall, from its position. From the appearances that I noticed on removing the top of the skull, I should say the deceased had been a man given to drinking.

By Mr. Mackeson: The symptoms I saw only went to show that deceased was an habitual drinker, not that he was intoxicated at the time of his death, and they might have arisen from other causes.

By Mr. Minter: The blood vessel would be more easily ruptured in a man of drinking habits than in other persons.

John Wilson Coleman, who was in the bar at the time of the occurrence, stated that Hammon’s back was turned towards the doorway in the struggle; he fell through the doorway, and witness thought his heels must, have gone against the sill of the doorway.

Mr. Minter asked the bench to say there was no case to send for trial, the death of the deceased having resulted according to his construction of the evidence from misadventure only. He urged that, although the landlord might have been justified in attempting to put the prisoner out of his house, it was not illegal in the prisoner to resist being ejected. The evidence of Coleman he thought showed clearly that the deceased tripped over the door sill, and that his death occurred from a misadventure for which the prisoner could not be held criminally responsible.

The Bench, however, decided to commit the prisoner for trial at the assizes, on the charge of manslaughter, bail being refused.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 April 1876.

T.T. Delasaux Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday resumed and concluded the inquiry into the cause of death of Thomas Hammond, of the White Lion Inn at Cheriton, who died after a quarrel with a man named Hart. The jury eventually returned a verdict of Accidental Death. Hart has been committed for trial by the magistrates on a charge of manslaughter.

 

Folkestone Express 15 April 1876.

Editorial.

A mmost remarkable conception of the law has been exhibited by the “powers that be” during the past week. We refer to the case of William Thomas Hart, who on Wednesday, the 5th of April, was committed by one magistrate on the charge of manslaughter.

The particulars of the case will be fresh in the recollection of our readers. Hart went into the White Lion Inn, at Cheriton, and had a dispute with the landlord, Edward Thomas Hammon. A struggle ensued, and the parties fell, the result being the death of the landlord.

In due course Hart was apprehended and taken before Mr. Mackeson, at Hythe. A considerable amount of evidence was adduced, and the Magistrate, acting as the Bench, committed the man, Hart, on a charge of manslaughter, at the same time refusing bail.

It is not our intention to question the legality of Mr. Mackeson's decision, but we are bound to observe that at the time such decision was given the inquest had not been held, and also that we think such a course of proceeding is almost unprecedented. True, the inquest had been formally opened on the previous Friday, but only sufficient evidence was taken to justify an adjournment for the purpose of a post mortem examination. The Coroner for the Eastern Division of the County ordered this to be made on the following day, and for some unexplained reason adjourned the enquiry for ten days. The enquiry was accordingly resumed on Tuesday last, when the evidence given before the Magistrate was repeated. The Coroner in summing up called the attention of the jury to the evidence of the widow of the deceased, and remarked that “the jury must be perfectly satisfied as to whether at the time she gave such evidence she was in such an excited state of mind that her evidence could be so much relied upon as that of a disinterested person”. He also stated that he “thought very little of the evidence of the witness Waghorn, as it was not of a nature that they (the jury) could strictly rely upon”. The result was the jury, after a long deliberation, returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”, and this after the man had been committed to take his trial at the ensuing Assizes at Maidstone on the charge of manslaughter.

Such an instance is almost without a precedent, and it must be clear to all that had the inquest been held before the magisterial investigation (as is usually the case), the man Hart would now be at liberty. As it is he has to lay several months in gaol, though a jury of his own countrymen have decided that the deceased came to his death accidentally.

Inquest.

The adjourned inquest touching the death of Edward Thomas Hammon was held at the Rose Inn, Sandgate, on Tuesday last before T.T. Delasaux Esq., Coroner for the Eastern Division of the County.

The following evidence was taken:

John Wilson Coleman said: I live at Elmstead, and am a labourer. On the 30th March at six o'clock I was returning from my work at Newington and went into the White Lion at Cheriton. Deceased was inside the bar; I did not see his wife. Deceased and Hart were talking loudly together, and I heard deceased ask Hart to go home, or go in the stable and lie down. I then went into the tap room, and placed one foot between the door and it's post, and the other foot in the passage, looking towards them. I heard deceased tell Hart more than once to go out of his house. Hart asked him to draw him some beer. Deceased again asked him to go out, stating that if he did not go out he would throw him out. Deceased then took hold of Hart and a struggle took place. The back of the deceased was towards the bar, but he turned and they went towards the back door, which was open. They fell together out of the door. The heels of deceased were resting on the door sill. I am satisfied that his heels were not clear from the door sill. Hart rose as soon as he could, and began talking loudly in the passage. I took hold of him and pulled him into the dining room. He did not struggle with me. He was not sober. I did not notice whether deceased was sober or not.

By the foreman: Deceased commenced the struggle. His heels were level with the door sill. There were no blows struck. I do not think it was done intentionally.

Richard Waghorn said: I live at Cheriton, and am a labourer. On the 30th March I was in the White Lion Inn, Cheriton. I had been to work with Hart at the Camp. Soon after I got in the White Lion, Hart came in. It was between six and seven o'clock. Hart went into the tap room. I was in the passage. Hart was rather the worse for liquor, but not so bad but that he could go and do his work. Deceased asked him to go home and have his supper. I then went out of the house, and shortly afterwards returned, when I saw them both in the bar. Deceased was behind the counter. There was some conversation between them, but I did not notice. I heard deceased say “We've had enough of that”, and then came out of the bar and opened the back door. He then took hold of Hart round the waist to put him out, and very nearly threw him down. Hart recovered himself as soon as he could and then took hold of the deceased. They were scuffling about a little time, and then they stood and talked. They then turned round and deceased had his back to the door. They again began pushing about and deceased fell through the doorway. Hart also fell, but I cannot say whether he fell on deceased. Hart got up again and stood in the passage. I then left the house.

By the jury: From the time I left Hart at the Camp to the time he came into the house was about two hours. I did not hear Hart say anything when he got up. There were no blows struck.

Mr. Richard Mercer, M.R.C.S., said: I am a surgeon, practicing at Folkestone. On the 30th March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was sent for to the White Lion Inn, Cheriton. I went and found him lying on the sofa in the parlour quite dead. On Saturday, April 1st, I made a post mortem examination. I found a large vessel at the base of the brain had been ruptured, causing effusion of blood. The skull was not fractured. There was a slight bruise at the back of the head. There were also a few bruises on the shoulders and back. The cause of death was the effusion of blood at the base of the brain. The bruise at the back of the head might have been caused by a fall or being pushed against a doorpost.

A juryman: I don't think we are of much use. The man has been committed for manslaughter before the inquest has been held.

The Coroner: We have nothing to do with that. This is a distinct inquiry.

The Coroner addressing the jury said that they must dismiss from their minds anything they might have heard with respect to the case, and also what had taken place before the Bench of Magistrates at Hythe. They must really rely upon the evidence brought before them. He entreated, he would also crave of them, not to notice any outside talk which they might have heard, and he also entreated them not to take into consideration the fact that the man Hart had been sent to gaol on the charge of manslaughter. He wished to impress that upon them most emphatically. Of course, as Coroner, he was bound to take the verdict of the jury, and he would therefore tell them the law with regard to manslaughter. It was the greatest crime that could be attached to a man killing another without malice, and before they returned their verdict they must be satisfied that the man had done something to make him criminally liable. The Coroner then read over the evidence of the widow, as given in our last issue. He then said if they believed the evidence of the widow, their verdict would be that of manslaughter, but they must be perfectly satisfied as to whether at the time she gave such evidence she was in such an excited state of mind that her evidence could be so much relied upon as that of a disinterested person. Coleman's evidence showed that there was an act of violence on the part of the deceased. If the jury were of that opinion, their verdict could not be manslaughter. But of course that was for the jury to consider. He thought very little of the evidence given by the witness Waghorn, as it was not of a nature that they could strictly rely upon. The cause of death had been clearly shown by the evidence of the medical man, and it was for them to say whether it was done by unlawful conduct on the part of the man Hart. He urged them to bear in mind the evidence that had been brought before them, and to come to a conclusion upon that, and not upon what they might have heard outside.

The room was then cleared, and after deliberating for upwards of two hours, the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 15 April 1876.

Local News.

Cheriton.

T. T. Delasaux, Esq., coroner, on Tuesday resumed and concluded the inquiry into the cause of the death of Thomas Hammon, of the White Lion Inn in this village, who died after a quarrel with a man named Hart. The jury eventually returned a verdict of “Accidental death.” Hart, it may be remembered, has been committed for trial by the magistrates on a charge of manslaughter.

 

Folkestone Express 15 July 1876.

Assizes.

Monday, July 10th: Before Mr. Baron Huddlestone.

William Thomas Hart (37), labourer, was indicted for the manslaughter of Edward Hammon at Cheriton on the 30th March last.

Mr. R.H.B. Marsham prosecuted, and Mr. Barrow defended.

This case arose out of a disturbance that took place at the White Lion public house, of which the deceased was the landlord. The prisoner entered the house between six and seven o'clock the worse for liquor, and went into the tap room. The landlord asked him to leave the premises, but he refused, and after some altercation between the parties the deceased said “I shall not have much more of this”, and leaving the bar went and opened the back door for the purpose of ejecting the prisoner. The two closed, and Hammon fell, his head falling outside the doorway on the brick; prisoner fell upon him. The deceased was picked up and carried indoors, and died in a very short time. Supt. Jordan, K.C.C., apprehended the prisoner, who was then in a drunken state, and in reply to the charge he said “All right”.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, Folkestone, deposed to making a post mortem examination of the body. He found no fracture of the skull, but there was a bruise on the right side of the head, which, in his opinion, was caused by the fall.

By His Lordship: He did not think a blow from a fist or being pushed against a doorpost would have caused death.

Witness said he attributed death to the rupture of a blood vessel, caused by the fall.

Cross-examined: I consider the deceased to have been a free liver. A light blow would have had more effect upon the deceased than a temperate man.

Mr. Barrow, for the defence, contended that the man's death was the result of a sheer accident.

His Lordship, in summing up, told the jury that a landlord had a perfect right to eject a person from his house if he was creating a disturbance and refused to leave when requested to do so, and if the jury were of opinion that this sad occurrence was due to any unjustifiable act on the part of the prisoner resisting the deceased then they must return a verdict of Guilty, but if they thought it was due to an accidental circumstance the prisoner was entitled to an acquittal.

The jury, after deliberating about ten minutes, found the prisoner Not Guilty.

 

Southeastern Gazette 15 July 1876.

Assizes.

William Thomas Hart, 37, labourer, was indicted for the manslaughter of Edward Thomas Hammon, at Cheriton, on the 30th March. Mr. E.H.B. Marsham prosecuted and Mr. Barrow defended the prisoner.

Mary Hammon, the widow of the deceased man, deposed that her late husband kept the White Lion Inn, Cheriton. On the 30th March the prisoner was in the house, he being at the time the worse for drink. Mr. Hammon desired him to go home on several occasions, and he replied that he did not want to. The prisoner used bad language, and repeatedly refused to go. Mr. Hammon then opened the back door and said to Hart “Come, out and come home,” the reply being “Oh you mean to chuck me out, do you?” Prisoner then caught hold of the arms of the deceased so that he could not move and pushed him against the door post. Deceased begged him to leave go of his coat, and reminded him that there was a witness present. Witness then took hold of the prisoner, shook him and asked him to leave go, but she was pushed on one side. Hart then tried to throw deceased out of the door, but his head caught against the post, inflicting a severe blow on the back of the head. Deceased then fell backwards, and as he was falling witness saw a change in his countenance. His head fell on some bricks outside the back door. The prisoner fell on him—across his legs. Witness bathed the face of her husband, but he never came to.

By Mr. Barrow: Mr. Hammon was perfectly sober on the afternoon in question; he was the worse for drink on the previous Monday. He was generally a sober man. He opened the back door, because the prisoner was kicking up a noise. He did not proceed to put the prisoner out of the house; he never gave him a misword that day. Witness did not think that the deceased stumbled over the sill of the door. He fell with the back of his head on the bricks.

By Mr. Marsham: The prisoner dropped his hold of deceased as he fell.

Richard Waghorne deposed that he worked with the prisoner. Witness was at the White Lion on the evening in question. The prisoner entered while he was there; he was the worse for drink, and he created a disturbance. Witness heard deceased say “I shan’t have much more of this,” and he then opened the back door. He took hold of the prisoner and was going to put him out. The prisoner immediately took hold of Mr. Hammon, and after pushing about a little while the deceased fell out at the back door, the prisoner falling on top of him. Mr. Hammon fell partly in the door and partly outside. The door sill was a little raised.

By Mr. Barrow: The deceased might have stumbled over the door sill.

Sergeant Jordan, K.C.C., apprehended the prisoner and charged him with causing the death of Thos. Hammon. He said, “All right.” He was drunk at the time.

John Wilson Coleman, a labourer, was at the White Lion on the evening in question. He saw the prisoner and the deceased there. Hart was in the passage and Hammon inside the bar. The deceased asked the prisoner more than once to either return home or go and lie down in the stable. The prisoner said he had no cause to do so. Mr. Hammon opened the back door and told the prisoner he would put him out of the house. He caught hold of the prisoner with both hands, and the prisoner then took hold of him. Mr. Hammon had his back to the door; his heels rested against the sill of the door, and they both fell, the deceased being underneath.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, practising at Folkestone, made an examination of the body of the deceased on the Saturday following the death. There was no fracture of the skull, but there was a bruise on the right side of the head and a rupture of a vessel at the base of the brain. The injury was such as would have been caused by a f ll; he did not think it could have been the result of the blow. Death was attributable to the rupture of the vessel.

Mr. Marsham, in summing up his case to the jury, told them that if the death of the deceased was accelerated by any act of violence on the part of the prisoner, that would be equivalent to manslaughter.

Mr. Barrow, in defence, contended that Mr. Hammon’s death arose from a pure accident, and that the evidence adduced by the prosecution, especially the testimony of the two last witnesses, fully bore out the view that deceased first took hold of prisoner, and, in the struggle which naturally arose, tripped against and fell over the door sill.

His Lordship told the jury that if they were of opinion that there was an unjustifiable amount of resistance on the part of the prisoner, and that the unhappy man came by his death in consequence of that resistance, then they would return a verdict against Hart; but, on the other hand, if they were of opinion that the death arose from a pure accident, as suggested by the learned counsel for the defence, then they might acquit him.

The jury returned a verdict of Not Guilty, and his Lordship, after pointing out to the prisoner the trouble into which he had fallen through drink, ordered him to be discharged.

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 November 1879.

Kent and Sussex Assizes: Wednesday.

William Steel, 26, soldier, and William Bogue, 28, ditto, were indicted for burglary and stealing a bottle of whisky, a bottle of gin, and a bottle of rum, value 8s. 6d., the property of Henry Baldock, at Cheriton, on the 31st July, 1879. The prisoners pleaded guilty, and were sentenced to nine months’ hard labour.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 2 September, 1881. 1d.

WEST CLIFF BREWERY SALE

A country roadside public-house, known as the “White Lion, in the parish of Cheriton, near Shorncliff Camp, and within a mile of the town held under lease from Earl Radnor for 99 years, from the 29th September, 1847, at a ground rent of 5, was after a brisk competition, bought by Messrs. Kingsford Brothers for 1,120.

 

Folkestone Express 3 September 1881.

Local News.

On Tuesday afternoon Messrs. Worsfold and Hayward, auctioneers, offered for sale by auction at the Royal Oak Hotel, Dover, the old established brewery known as the West Cliff Brewery, Limekiln Street, Dover, with twenty two freehold and leashold public houses and beerhouses and other property. The brewery, with twelve quarter plant and the Lord Clyde public house constituted the first lot, and this was not sold.

The White Lion, Cheriton, brought 1120, being knocked down to Messrs. Kingsford.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 June 1882.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, by the County Coroner, on the body of Mary Merton, aged 42, the wife of Henry Merton, a labourer, of Tile Kilns, Cheriton. The deceased, who had been in desponding state for some time, was found by her father at eight o'clock on Saturday morning, hanging by a rope to a beam in her own house, quite dead. A verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 August 1885.

Inquest.

An inquest was held by the East Kent Coroner (R.M. Mercer Esq.) on Saturday, at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, on the body of Jane Smeed, a single woman, aged 21, who committed suicide under the following circumstances.

Christiana Bridge, a sister of deceased, deposed that she had been staying with her for the last three months. She last saw her alive between a quarter and twenty minutes to eight on the previous evening, when she seemed very low spirited. Deceased had been melancholy, and crying seemingly without cause, while she had been with witness. Deceased went out behind the house and she did not see her until she was brought in dead soon after eight o'clock. Her sister had received a letter on Thursday evening, stating that she must not be surprised to hear of the death of George Cook, to whom she was engaged, and who was in the Brompton Hospital for consumption. Deceased failed in business some three months ago, and that had greatly upset her.

Arthur Henry Bridge, husband of the last witness, stated that a little before eight he saw a slipper on the side of the well on Mr. Bowley's premises, which he recognised as that of the deceased. He took it and showed it to his wife, and she also recognised it as belonging to deceased. He took a grappling hook and went to the well. Looking down, he saw a dress. Matthew Winser prepared to go down the well, and then witness went away, but came back after deceased had been brought up and laid by the side of the well. He then had her conveyed to his house.

Matthew Winser, a butcher, living at Cheriton Street, said he went down the well, as mentioned by the last witness, and there found deceased lying face downwards in the water. He attached a rope to deceased's body, and it was with his assistance removed to the top of the well. She must have fell down head first.

The jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst temporarily insane.

 

Folkestone Express 1 August 1885.

Inquest.

Mr. R.M. Mercer held an inquest at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, on Saturday, on the body of Jane Smeed, a single woman, aged 21. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had been staying with a married sister, whose husband is bailiff to Mr. Bowley, for some time past. On Friday morning deceased left the house between seven and eight o'clock, and shortly afterwards she was found in a well at the Fir Tree Farm. Deceased was promptly taken from the well, and life was found to be extinct. The reason assigned for the rash act was that the unfortunate young woman had some misunderstanding with her friends. The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide during temporary insanity”.

 

Folkestone News 1 August 1885.

Local News.

On Friday morning a distressing case of suicide occurred at Cheriton Street. A young girl of the name of Smeed, aged twenty one, deliberately threw herself head foremost down a well. The only reasons that can be assigned for the sad act are chiefly domestic troubles which had preyed on the poor girl's mind for some time, although she had never shown any symptoms of attempting to take her own life. The body was discovered in the well a short time after she was missed, when a man descended by a ladder and affixed a rope to her, by which means the body was drawn to the surface. The head was much bruised through coming in contact with the side, and the face was also disfigured. An inquest was held on Saturday at the White Lion Inn before the East Kent Coroner, when the jury brought in a verdict of Temporary Insanity. The funeral took place on Sunday, great sympathy being felt towards the relatives and friends of the deceased.

 

Folkestone Express 23 October 1886.

Hythe Petty Sessions.

Thursday, October 21st: Before Dr. Kirkpatrick, Col. Symes. Mr. Alured Denne, and Mr. H.C. Wildash.

George Smith and Thomas Compton were charged with being drunk on licensed premises, and refusing to quit the White Lion, Cheriton. It appeared from the evidence that defendants, in company with four others, were out driving when they called at the public house. Compton asked for half a gallon of beer and was refused. Smith, hearing this, then went and used abusive and threatening language towards the landlord. They had been previously drinking. Compton was fined 1, and Smith 1 10s. including costs.

 

Folkestone Express 22 October 1887.

Hythe Borough Bench.

Thursday, October 20th: Before Major Kirkpatrick, Colonel Symes, J. Du Boulay Esq., Dr. Wildash, and H. Mackinnon Esq.

John Tappenden was charged with assaulting Henry Baldock at Cheriton on the 6th inst.

The defendant did not appear, his wife stating that he was suffering from a sore throat, but he was ready to submit to any fine the Bench might inflict.

The complainant, landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton, said that on the occasion in question he was driving in Newington parish, and he met defendant driving in a cart. He made out as if to hit the pony, and instead of that he reversed the whip and struck him, the whip running round his neck. The man was the worse for drink, and he believed the act was an intentional one.

A witness named Golden, who was riding with defendant, gave evidence proving that defendant struck complainant without a cause.

Defendant was also summoned for an assault on an old man named Netley. The complaint in this case was the same as in the last. The cart passed the old man, when he was savagely struck with a whip by defendant.

The defendant's wife pleaded Guilty on behalf of her husband.

In reply to the Bench, complainants said they did not press for a heavy penalty.

The Bench characterised it as a most wanton assault, and but for the leniency of complainants he would have been very severely dealt with. He would be fined 30s. with costs in each case, the time for payment of the same being a fortnight, or in default a month in each case.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 31 July 1891.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Military Hospital on Saturday morning by Mr. Fielder (Deputy Coroner), on the body of Thomas Neal, a corporal in the 5th Battalion Rifle Brigade, whose body was found in a copse in the Moors on Friday last.

The first witness called was John Hughes, who said he was a sergeant of C Company, 5th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (Militia), and was stationed at Shorncliffe. He last saw him alive on Thursday evening. He (witness) and Corporal Wilson were sitting in the White Lion public house about 7 p.m., when deceased came in by himself. He was quite sober, and had a glass with them, and kept them company till they left the house at a quarter past nine. They left deceased there. He was then the worse for drink, but was not quarrelsome, nor was he talking to anyone in particular. There were other soldiers there, but there was no quarrelling with any of them. Deceased was addicted to drink, but when drunk was quiet. He was popular among the men, and he knew of no-one having a grudge against him. He again saw deceased at ten minutes to ten in Camp. He then had his sidearms on, and was going up the lines alone as if to answer his name at the staff parade. He was very much the worse for liquor, and staggered. He did not speak to him. He saw no more of him till about half past six next morning, when Private Davis told him there was a man strung up by his neck in the pea field. He went to the place. It was over a fence, and there was an incline of about 16ft. to 18 ft. There was a footpath at the top, but no fence. He found deceased with his head fixed tight between two trees. He was quite dead. The body was twisted round, and the weight of it had apparently strangled him. There was no appearance of a struggle. He ran for a constable, and the body was taken out and conveyed to the Hospital. There was no doctor present. The trees were about 12ft. from the top of the bank. Deceased must have fallen over the bank. His stick or belt were not there, but they were afterwards found. He must have broken out of Camp after answering his name. Hid did not suspect any foul play, or had he any reason to believe there was any.

Robert Davis said he was a private in deceased's regiment, but did not know him. About six o'clock on Friday morning he met Private Charles, who told him he had found a dead man. There was no appearance of any struggle, and there were none of deceased's possessions about. He had not heard anything to show that there was any ill-feeling against him.

Edward Charles, another private in the same regiment, said he did not know deceased, but he and Private Connor found him quite dead on Friday morning about six o'clock. He was lying round a bush with his head wedged tightly in between two small branches. There was no appearance of a struggle. They had to lift the boughs to get his head out. He did not think anyone could have placed him in that position. (Witness here described the exact position the body was in.) He naturally thought deceased had fallen down the bank.. It was quite possible to fall between the trees. As soon as he saw deceased he went back to the Camp for assistance, and he was removed to hospital. The Provost Marshal seemed to think deceased had fallen over.

Superintendent Maxted described the place where the body was found, and said it was quite possible for deceased to have fallen over the bank, and in the position in which it was stated he was found. He was not able to give them much information, as no notice was given to the police till the body was brought to the hospital.

Surgeaon J.P.S. Hayes, of the Medical Staff, said he saw the deceased between seven and eight o'clock on Friday morning at the Hospital. He could not give the cause of death. There was froth at the mouth, that looked as if deceased had been strangled. There also seemed to be a fracture at the base of the skull, and there was a wound at the back of the neck, as though the skin had been torn off by nails.

The Deputy Coroner said there must be a post mortem examination.

Private John Connor corroborated the evidence of the witness Charles as to finding deceased. They thought he was asleep. He knew him well at home. He was not a married man, was about 35 years of age, and was quite a respectable chap. He liked a drop of beer, but he never saw him in any row. He had heard of no ill-feeling against him, and had no reason to suspect foul play.

Frederick Melchior Raphael, a lieutenant in the 5th Battalion Rifle Brigade, deposed to being called to the scene of the accident about twenty five minutes to seven on Friday morning. He described the exact position in which the body was found. Both sides of the neck were compressed. The branches above seemed swept down from the bank.

At this point the inquest was adjourned till Monday.

The adjourned inquest was held on Monday, the jury having previously viewed the spot where the body was found.

Dr. J.P.S. Hayes said he had made a post mortem examination of the body. He examined the lungs and trachea, and found the cause of death was strangulation, and, in his opinion, it was quite possible to be caused by the head being fixed between the two trees. There were some scratches on the face due to thorns, two bruises on the right arm, and one at the back of the neck, and over the right eye. There was no sign of any struggling. Deceased's clothes were dirty in front, and there was blood on the coat collar. He thought he must have been stunned by the blow over the right eye, and was not able to extricate himself from between the two trees. The marks round his neck, which looked as if he had been strangled by a cord, were due to the collar of his tunic becoming stretched round it. Deceased was a powerful man, and it would have taken a number of men to have strangled him and place him in the position as described, unless he was under the influence of narcotics, but there was nothing in the stomach to lead him to believe that any narcotic had been used. He believed that deceased met his death by falling over the bank, and he did not suspect foul play.

Lieutenant Raphael was re-called. He said he was present when the body was removed, and considerable force had to be used to get the head out from between the trees.

Harry Mount, 12 years of age, residing at Enbrook Manor Farm, said he discovered the deceased about a quarter to six on Friday morning. He thought he was asleep, and went up to him to try to wake him. He could not do so, and he then thought he was the worse for drink. He met two other soldiers of the same regiment, and told them, but they did not go to him. He then went home and told his father. He did not see any stick or belt there.

Frederick Peden, a market gardener, of 2, Enbrook Villas, Cheriton, said he was near the scene of the accident about a quarter to eleven on Thursday evening. He saw a soldier of the Rifle Brigade sitting close to the road. When the latter saw him he got up and began to walk, but after going about six yards fell down across a small stream. He got up, but fell down again after going about the same distance. He was drunk and rolled about. He last saw him going through the corner of the hedge, and knowing he was on the right road to the Camp, took no more notice of him. There was no-one else about. The belt was found in the field where deceased had probably taken it off while sitting on the ground.

A few remarks were then made by the Deputy Coroner, and the jury, after a short consideration, gave a verdict of “Accidental Death”, but they added a rider to the effect that the police should have been communicated with before the body was removed from the spot.

The Deputy Coroner quite concurred with the jury, and said if that had been done it would have simplified the case, and there probably would have been no need for any adjournment.

Some of the jurymen remarked that they had been on two or three inquests connected with the Camp during the past year, but neither they nor the police got the help from the military authorities that they ought to have.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 9 January 1892.

Local News.

Andrew Trod, a private in the King's Dragoon Guards, was charged at the County Petty Sessions at Hythe on Thursday, with assaulting Sarah Baldock, wife of the landlord of the White Lion public house, Cheriton, on the 25th ult.

Mr. Minter, who appeared for Mr. Baldock, said that the defendant and several companions went into the White Lion on the evening in question and called for drink, but Mr. Baldock refused to serve them as they were the worse for drink. They got very noisy and threatening. Mr. Baldock had occasion to leave the bar, leaving his wife in charge. Defendant asked her to supply him with drink, and on being refused, he insisted on getting behind the bar to serve himself. She refused to let him, and he immediately struck at her head, but she received the blow on her shoulder. Mrs. Baldock struck out at defendant with a pot she had in her hand and “landed him one” between the eyes. He struck at her several times after that, and began smashing the counter, and then left. Mr. Baldock went to the Camp next morning to identify the defendant, but did not get much assistance from the military authorities. Defendant afterwards went to him and apologised, but he would not accept it, as it might be said he was encouraging drunkenness. He wanted to conduct his house in a proper manner, and refused to serve anyone in drink.

Sarah Baldock corroborated what Mr. Minter had said. The defendant used violent language. She felt the blow on her shoulder ever since. On being refused liquor he attempted to break through the bar, and did damage to the bar fittings. Her husband had gone for assistance, but before he got back defendant and his companions had left.

John Shedd deposed to seeing defendant strike at Mrs. Baldock three times, and also damage the counter.

Mr. Baldock said he refused to serve defendant as they had had sufficient. He went to the Camp for assistance. The damage done would cost about 10s. to repair. The next morning he went to the Camp and informed the Military Police of the row. He did not go to the regimental authorities, as he knew it was no good, because if there was a parade the defendant was never there.

Defendant said he did not strike at Mrs. Baldock, but at the engine to get the beer. He was angry at being refused drink. The landlady afterwards let them have the drink. He went to Mr. Baldock the next morning to apologise and pay for the damage, but he said he should show him up.

Two other soldiers corroborated what defendant said, but Mrs. Baldock denied serving them.

Police Sergt. Styles deposed to being called to the White Lion on the 25th a little before nine o'clock. Defendant was in the house. He did not see Mrs. Baldock serve him with drink. He went away quietly. He was not asked to eject him.

The Sergt. Major of defendant's troop gave him an excellent character. He was one of the best men in the troop, and previous to leaving India was a teetotaller for three years.

Mr. Minter said after hearing defendant's character, and considering the time of the year, prosecutor did not wish to press the charge, but merely to get protection.

The Chairman of the Bench (Mr. Du Boulay) said that when the licences were last granted they impressed upon landlords that they must not serve men in drink, and the Bench wished to make it known that they were determined to support the law in this respect.

Defendant was fined 10s. and 17s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 16 January 1892.

Local News.

Mr. DuBoulay, in commending Mr. Baldock, of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, for refusing to serve a soldier with liquor when he showed signs of having had enough, at the last County Petty Sessions, Hythe, has done a good turn to publicans. He has thereby shown that when they do their duty the magistrates appreciate their conduct. A publican wo desires to retain the respectability of his house will unhesitatingly refuse to serve a man in liquor, for, in the first place, such a one is a nuisance to the other customers, secondly, he is a reflection on the credit of the establishment, and thirdly, a just landlord will say, in consequence of the man's indiscretion something serious might happen, and I, at least, will not be responsible for the consequence. Houses conducted in this fashion deserve the warmest support of the Bench, when an example is sought to be made of an obstreperous and insulting would-be customer.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 27 July 1892.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at Cheriton on Monday morning before Mr. Coroner Mercer and a jury, upon the body of a labourer named Frederick Day, who lost his life the previous Friday. Considerable talk had been occasioned in the village, as it was rumoured that the accident was due to the necessary precautions having been neglected in connection with the work in which the deceased was engaged at the time of his death. The evidence of two witnesses (the only ones called), however, effectually disposed of this, and proved that it was due to causes which the most careful foresight could not have prevented. The unfortunate man, who was 35 years of age, and a native of a village near Maidstone, was engaged in laying the pipes in connection with the new Cheriton drainage, of which Mr. Conley is the contractor. The portion in which he was working, in company with a couple of other navvies, was situate in Tile Kiln Lane. It had been sunk to a depth of 7 ft. 3 in., and the width was 2 ft. 6 in. While the three men were at work, the two men named Goldsack and Pain working about six feet from the deceased, the latter noticed the earth giving way, and they shouted out to Day. Goldsack managed to creep into the tunnel, and Pain jumped upon the heading, and both thus escaped, although Goldsack's arm was badly bruised by the falling mass. Day, however, was unable to get out of the way in time, and he was covered by the debris up to his neck, death being instantaneous. It took about an hour to get the body out. Both of the witnesses – Goldsack having had twenty years' experience as a navvy – declared that when they went down into the pit they considered it quite safe or they would have had the sides shored up, there being plenty of wood lying about for the purpose. The deceased was a man who had also worked at navvying for years, and he made no complaint. They were of opinion that the fall of earth was caused by a “wane” in the clay, which no-one would notice. The Coroner put it to the jury whether they considered there had been any negligence, and they replied in the negative, returning a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 July 1892.

Inquest.

A shocking accident, resulting in the death of a labourer named Frederick Day, occurred at the new drainage works at Cheriton on Friday afternoon. The work, which is being carried out by Mr. Councillor Conley, had proceeded as far as Foster's Steam Laundry, and it was at this point that the unfortunate man was engaged, when the earth on the side of the road nearest Rose Cottages gave way and buried him. Three other workmen had very narrow escapes, one man, named Goldsack, receiving slight injuries to his arm. A great many rumours were scattered broadcast reflecting negligence on the part of the contractor for not having strutted the cutting, but, whether or not there was any justification for them, the public can best gather from the proceedings at the inquest, which was held at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, by the County Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer), at the untimely hour of 8.30 on Monday morning.

The jury having viewed the body, which was lying in the adjoining skittle alley, the Coroner remarked that he should want their assistance in this case, as it would require special enquiry, and he trusted the jury would ask any questions they thought necessary.

William Goldsack was then called, and stated that he was a navvy, and lived at 3, Oak Cottages, Cheriton. He had known the deceased for the last four years. He was a general labourer, and lived in Chapel Street, Sandgate, with a man named Trice. During the time he had known him, he had been about the country “navvying”. He had worked with him at Sheerness and Ramsgate, on drainage works and shifting earth. He did not know his age, but he should judge him to be about 35. He told witness that he belonged just about Maidstone. Yalding, he thought he said. He was with the deceased on Friday when the accident occurred. They were working together in the cutting when the earth came in.

The Coroner: What were you doing? – We were digging, sir.

Were you close to him? – Yes, sir.

How close? – About six feet from him.

Were you both down in the cutting? – Yes, sir.

How deep was the cutting? - 7 ft. 3 in.

Both where you were standing, and where the deceased was standing also? – Yes, sir.

Were you working behind or in front of him? – In front, sir; we were working to meet each other.

There were more men there, I suppose? – Two more, sir; there were four men in the trench altogether. One man saw it coming, and jumped into the heading. He got out at the other end. The heading is a little tunnel. The deceased was working with a shovel when the stuff came in.

Did you see the earth fall? – Yes; I saw it coming just in time to jump by it. It only fell on one side – on my right hand side. I jumped on the opposite side to get out of the trench, and the stuff caught my arm. Which way I got out, I can't say. There was a benching – what we call a benching – in the trench, and I had just got one leg out when it caught my arm. It held me there about a minute. I managed to disengage myself and get out.

Was there any ladder in the trench? – No, sir; I got up on the benching.

And what's a “benching”? – Well, a part of a trench which is not sunk down so deep as the other. When I got up I saw that the deceased was buried. His head was out. We could see his head. He looked very pale, and we could see that he was dead.

He was buried up to where? – Up to his shoulders.

His head was not hurt, was it? – He was smashed, I think, sir. You see, it was a very narrow place.

How wide was it? – Two feet.

Do you mean to say that when you got up on to the road he was dead? – Yes, sir.

It did not take a minute, then? – No, sir; not half a minute. The man never spoke.

Did you assist afterwards to get him out? – Yes, I did my best. I couldn't do very much, as my arm got hurt. There were plenty of other men there.

How long was it before the body was rescued? – It took about an hour, sir. His shovel was broken when we dug it out.

Was the deceased standing perfectly erect? – Yes, sir; it being a narrow place, it could not very well knock him down.

How long have you been on this job? – About a fortnight.

With the deceased? – Yes; he was there five days before I was.

How far have you worked in the fortnight? – We were working up the other street before we went down there.

Was that as narrow? – No, sir; that was 3 ft. 6 in.

Is 2 ft. 6 in. the usual width? – That's the proper width, sir.

Do you go down wider if you are going down 14 or 15 feet than you would if you were only going down four or five feet? – No, sir; 2 ft. 6 in. is the proper width for a 12 in. pipe.

If you were going down fourteen feet you would shore it up with boards, wouldn't you? – Yes, sir.

Then the timber would take up a little bit of room? – Yes, a little bit.

Did you shore up any of this work? – No, sir, not there.

Why not? – We didn't think it wanted it amongst that clay.

Was the soil dry? – Yes; it was dry clay. It is for the man in charge to put the timbers in if they are wanted. The contractor generally puts a timber-minder on, if any wants doing.

You are paid by the day. And the deceased and the other men, I suppose? – Yes, sir.

There were four of you doing navvying work, as you call it. Was anyone in charge? – The ganger was not far away. There were 13 or 14 men in the gang. Some of them were working further up the road. The ganger looks after the whole of the work.

Is he the man who would have the looking after the timber? – Yes, sir.

If you had thought it dangerous, should you have asked him to shore it up? – We would have got out of the hole. I should have refused to work in it if I had thought it dangerous.

Was there any timber there if you wanted it? – Yes, it was lying close to the work.

If you want timber at any time, is there any objection to it? – No, sir; there is always plenty of timber if we think there is any danger. They will always put it down if we want it.

Does he never say “I think you had better have the timber down there”? – No, I have never heard him say so.

What made the earth fall in, do you suppose? – There was a wain (seam) about four feet from the bottom, and that caused it to slip. It slipped from the bottom first.

Mr. Conley: How long have you been accustomed to navvy work? – Twenty years – close on it.

William Pain was the next witness. He said he lived at 3, Oak Cottages, Cheriton, and was a labourer in the employ of Mr. Conley. He was working at the drainage works with the deceased, and was about eight feet away from him at the time of the slip. He heard a man shout out and then saw the earth fall. The first piece fell between deceased and Goldsack. He then turned himself round to make for the heading and, as witness could not get up, he went into the heading also. The earth nearly all came in at once. It caught the deceased. His feet seemed to have got entangled with his shovel, as they were twisted under it when they got him out.

The Coroner: Was the heading safe? – Yes, sir; as soon as the earth had done falling, I got a pick, and began to clear it away from the deceased.

Did he speak? – No, he was buried up to the shoulders.

How long were you getting him out? – About twenty minutes, sir.

Did you have to widen the trench? – No, he was killed instantly.

Did you see any movement on his face? – No.

Why didn't you have the place shored up? – We thought it was safe enough without.

Did you speak about it? – No, sir.

Was there any timber by? – Yes; we could have had it put down if we had spoken about it.

How long have you been used to navvying work? – About four or five years; in places where it has been shored up, and places where it hasn't.

Have you ever had to ask for cuttings to be shored up? – Never; it has always been put in. I I thought this place was dangerous, I should not have worked there.

Did anyone speak about it? – I never heard anyone, and there were good deal older men than me there.

The Coroner (to the jury): The real question is, gentlemen, whether there was any negligence. Both witnesses state that they did not consider it was dangerous, or they would have had it shored up.

The foreman said it was not usual to put in timber for that depth.

The Coroner: But it seems a big depth?

The Foreman: It is not a very unusual depth to work without timber. Plenty of men work lower without it.

Mr. Kesby asked if there would not be some oscillation from the steam laundry just at that point.

The Foreman: I dare say it might make a difference.

A juror remarked that the occupant of a cottage on the opposite side of the road said the machinery fairly shook the house.

The jury did not consider it necessary to call any further evidence, and returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally killed by earth falling on him.

 

Folkestone Express 30 July 1892.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the White Lion, Cheriton, on Monday morning, on Frederick Day, 36, navvy, who came to his death under the following circumstances:

Robert Goldsack stated that he was at work on Friday, the 22nd inst., in Tile Kiln Lane, near Mr. Foster's Laundry, engaged in excavations for drainage purpose. Deceased was standing in a trench seven or eight feet deep. He saw the earth slip and contrived to get on a ledge and thus managed to escape. The workmen did not think the spot dangerous, for they were asked whether they thought it desirable to shore up the earth, and were of opinion that such a precaution was not necessary. When the earth fell in witness almost immediately saw deceased with his body covered up to his shoulders. He then appeared quite dead.

William Pain, another workman, said he was working within three feet of deceased. He saw a lot of earth fall and managed to step into a hole close by. He did not think at the time when they were on the work that any shoring was necessary.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 July 1892.

Inquest.

Last week we reported the particulars of a fatal accident which occurred on Friday afternoon, whereby a navvy, named Frederick Day, aged 35, who was engaged in the Cheriton drainage works, lost his life. This formed the subject of an enquiry held before Mr. Coroner R.M. Mercer, at the White Lion inn, before a jury.

Only two witnesses were called, William Goldsack and Geo. Payne, both navvies, who were working with deceased at the time of the fatality. Their evidence was very conclusive, and showed that it was a pure accident. It appeared that they had been engaged in digging a trench for the laying of the pipes for the drainage. The part in which the deceased and the other two men were working was about 7 ft. in depth, not 11 ft., as we stated in our report last week. In one portion of the trench, close by, was what is known as a “heading”, which reduced the depth in that particular part to about 4 ft. The width of the excavation was 2 ft. 6 in. At various points the road had not been trenched, but tunnelled for short distances. During the afternoon, whilst the three men were at work in the trench, a fall of earth took place. Goldsack saved himself by jumping on the heading, not before, however, his arm had been severely bruised by the debris. Payne, who had also seen it coming, got into the tunnel, and thus was out of harm's reach.

The unfortunate man Day, however, seems to have been either unable to get out of the way or not to have seen his danger, for in a moment he was penned in by the earth up to his shoulders. The witnesses stated that his death was instantaneous – in fact he never spoke or moved after the earth had fallen upon him. He was standing upright at the time, and when after an hour's work the body was got out it was found that one of his legs had been twisted round the spade with which he had been working.

The two men were closely questioned by the Coroner and jury as to whether or not the sides of the excavation ought to have been shored up, but they both agreed – and Goldsack had had 20 years' experience in similar work – that as fas as they could judge there was not the slightest necessity for it. In fact, they both said “We should not have gone down had we thought there was any danger”. They also added that there was plenty of timber lying about close to their work for them to have shored up the sides if they had considered it necessary, and they had only to speak to the ganger to have it done. The fact was, said Goldsack, there was a “wane” there. By a “wane”, which is a term in use among navvies, is meant, we believe, a hidden fissure which has been eaten away by the water, and which would escape the minutest examination. This had weakened the soil, and hence the catastrophe.

The only question, said the Coroner, addressing the jury, is “Was there any negligence?” The jury emphatically replied in the negative and returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

The deceased was an unmarried man, and a native of a village near Maidstone. He was buried on Monday at the expense of Mr. Conley, the contractor of the works, who with Mrs. Conley sent a beautiful wreath to lay upon the coffin. A large number of the poor fellow's comrades attended the funeral, and after the lesson a short and feeling address was given by the vicar, the Rev. W.B. Buckwell.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 June 1893.

Local News.

On Thursday evening last, Mr. Baldock, landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton, narrowly escaped being gored to death by a bull. He was on his farm at Newington, when, without the slightest warning, the infuriated animal knocked him down, inflicting frightful injuries upon him. Three of his ribs were broken, his face lacerated, and clothing torn to shreds. The bull pinned him with it's horns to the earth, Mr. Baldock crying for assistance. This was happily soon forthcoming. Mr. Tom Turner, with considerable presence of mind, ran for his gun, which happened to be in a cart close by. He fired a volley of shot at the animal, and this had the effect of frightening it away from Baldock, who was with difficulty rescued. By this time several others had appeared on the scene, and after eight shots had been fired the bull, which was in a terrible rage, was dispatched by Mr. Lipscombe. On enquiry yesterday afternoon we were informed that Mr. Baldock was in a serious condition, consequent on the shock and the injuries he has received.

 

Folkestone Express 10 June 1893.

Local News.

A very serious accident happened on Thursday to Mr. Baldock, landlord of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, who was gored by a bull on his farm at Newington. The bull is kept for stock purposes. Mr. Baldock went into the enclosure where it was kept, carrying in his hand a pitchfork. The bull rushed at him, knocked him down, trampled upon him, and gored him, with the result, it is said, that three ribs were broken, his face was bruised, and he was otherwise injured. Mr. Thomas Turner, son of Mr. Turner of the Waterworks, was near, and he had a shot loaded gun, but feared to fire at the bull's head, lest he should injure Mr. Baldock. But he fired at the animal's side and drove it back. It was, however, despatched by a shot from Mr. Lipscombe, Mr. Brockman's steward. On Thursday Mr. Baldock was progressing favourably.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 March 1894.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, on Monday afternoon, before Mr. R.M. Mercer, Coroner for East Kent, on the body of Harriett Sarah Jane James, a single girl, aged 18, who met her death through accidentally treading on a rusty nail.

The deceased, who was, we believe, a native of Battersea, London, was employed at Foster's Steam Laundry. She was an orphan, but that she was held in good repute is evidenced by the fact that her fellow works, and others employed in adjoining laundries, subscribed to defray the expenses of her burial, which took place at the Cemetery on Tuesday.

The Coroner explained that it was an extraordinary case, and he was compelled to hold an inquest, as neither himself nor the doctor could give a certificate when death had occurred from other than natural causes.

Mr. Pilcher, builder, was the foreman of the jury as the two following witnesses were called.

Dr. Henry Albert Powell stated that the deceased came to him at his office in Cheriton on Monday, the 19th February, about midday. She complained of stiffness in the jaws after injury to her toe with a rusty nail, which she stated had occurred through running the nail into her foot. She was going to the Post Office when a gust of wind took her, and, in whirling her round she trod upon the nail. He examined her foot. There was a punctured wound on the big toe. She asked if she should go to the hospital, and he told her no. The reason he did so was because the hospital was in want of funds, and could only take urgent cases. She said she had no money, but he told her not to mind; that he would look after her case. He attended her up to the time of her death, seeing her at nine o'clock on the previous evening. She had convulsive seizures, due to contraction of the muscles. There were tetanic symptoms, but she did not die from lockjaw, but from exhaustion, brought about by the fever, induced by tetanus. The nail went right through the leather of the boot, and the wound was about an inch in depth. Deceased was in a very good state of health, but the wound did not bleed, and consequently there was no exit for the poisonous microbe.

Mrs. Elizabeth Denne stated that deceased came to lodge with her at 5, Ashley Villas at the beginning of last July. She was nineteen years of age on the 1st of last January. On the 12th February the deceased had been to take a letter to the post for her between eleven and twelve. When she returned in about a quarter of an hour's time, she complained that she had run a nail in her big toe. She still had it in her foot at the time, having walked home with it, as she could not get it out. Witness helped her to pull it out. It had gone through the boot by a little over an inch. When they pulled it out she nearly fainted, and remarked that her toe felt numbed. She afterwards poulticed it. On Monday, when she saw the doctor, she complained very much of stiffness in her jaws, and was very much afraid of lockjaw. She died on Friday, about seven in the morning. She would take food, except when she had the fits. Then she had to be fed.

The jury returned a verdict that death was due to tetanus, caused by accidentally running a nail into her foot.

 

Folkestone Express 29 September 1894.

Hythe County Sessions.

Thursday, September 27th: Before Dr. Alston, Captain Baldwin, A.S. Jones Esq., and Captain mansell, R.N.

Robert Gibson Templeton, a private in the Scots Fusiliers, was charged with stealing a quart pewter pot and a glass, the property of a publican named Mr. Baldock, landlord of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton.

The prisoner was in the house just before closing time, and the pot was missed after he left. P.C. Patrick went in search of the prisoner and found him in company with others in Risborough Lane. One of the military police found the glass in his overcoat, and the quart pot was discovered in an adjoining garden. When prisoner was brought to the landlady for identification she said she had seen him in the bar drinking, before the articles were missed.

Prisoner declared that the glass had been given to him by a comrade who had gone to India, and that he knew nothing about the pewter pot.

An officer gave prisoner an excellent character, and intimated that he was included in the next draft of the regiment for India.

The Chairman said the charge had been proved. They were inclined to look upon it as one of those foolish drunken freaks of which, unhappily, some young men were guilty. He would strongly advise prisoner to sign the pledge before he went to India. Drink was a curse to the country, ruining body and soul, and was the direct traceable cause of most of the military offences brought before them. They were dealing lightly with prisoner by discharging him, and in binding him over in his own surety of 10 to come up for judgement when called upon.

The Superintendent said there had been great complaints against soldiers taking away glasses from public houses. The landlord of the White Lion had lost several in a week. He hoped that this case would put a stop to the practice.

 

Folkestone Express 22 June 1895.

Hythe Police Court.

Thursday, June 20th: Before J. DuBoulay and A.S. Jones Esqs., Dr. Alston, Captain Mansell R.N., and F.D. Brockman Esq.

Henry Feldwick, a private in the 7th Dragoon Guards, was summoned for being drunk, and refusing to quit the White Lion, Cheriton, on June 14th. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty to being drunk.

Mr. Haines, who appeared for Mr. Baldock, briefly stated the case. The hearing occupied a very long time, and in the result defendant was fined 10s. and 41s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 December 1895.

Local News.

Much excitement was caused in Cheriton on Thursday morning when it became known that overnight a burglary had been committed under exceptional circumstances at the White Lion Inn, Cheriton. So many wild rumours have been in circulation in regard to this matter that we at once despatched a representative to Cheriton to find out the true facts of the case, which are as follows;-

Mr. and Mrs. Baldock had retired to rest and the former was soon asleep, whilst the latter lay awake, and in the dead of the night she heard strange sounds below. Mrs. Baldock aroused her husband, who hastily dressed himself, opened the bedroom window gently, crept stealthily along the outside verandah, to the place from whence the sounds proceeded. In the dim light Baldock espied something lying at full length on a bank a few feet off, but it turned out to be a suit of men's clothes and a pair of boots. These the landlord secured, and creeping round the house he securely locked them up in one of his outhouses. Baldock then entered the house, and the honest watch dog barked loudly. On entering the bar it was found that the place was topsy turvy, that the till had been robbed, and that a pane of glass about 20in. by 10in. had been broken. On further examination, and much to Bladock's surprise, a man, almost in a state of nudity, bounded out from his place of concealment, and made for the central entrance. Before he could gain this, a terrific struggle took place, and the intruder repeatedly threatened to shoot Bladock with a revolver. Eventually a light was secured, and of all the persons in the world the burglar was found to be no other than Corporal Spicer, of the Military Police, who resides in Cheriton. The landlord being unarmed, and knowing this man, and under further threats, was induced to hand over to the burglar his clothing, and after getting outside, Mr. Baldock allowed the burglar to proceed to his home, and in the meantime communicated with the police.

Two constables at once proceeded to Spicer's house, one went to the front, the other at the back. Seeing that resistance was futile, the Military Policeman surrendered “hands down”, but not before he had thrown a bag out of the window, which it was subsequently discovered contained 5 in various coins of the realm. Prisoner was at once marched off to Seabrook, and charged with the offence.

Spicer has served in the Army 12 years, and has been married five months. As a guardian of law and order he was much respected in Cheriton, and his capture is the sole topic of conversation in the neighbouring community, the inhabitants of which are naturally considerably alarmed.

 

Folkestone Express 11 December 1895.

Local News.

Additional light was thrown upon the extraordinary circumstances connected with the burglary at the White Lion, Cheriton, at the Magisterial proceedings which were conducted before the Hythe County Magistrates on Thursday, when the accused, Richard Lee Spicer, a corporal in the Military Police, was indicted for burglariously breaking into the dwelling of Henry Baldock, and stealing money and articles to the value of 5 5s. 10d., on the 4th December.

Sarah Baldock said: I am the wife of Henry Baldock, licensed victualler, and live at the White Lion, Cheriton. I and my husband retired to rest about 10 minutes to 12 on the 4th of December. The house was properly locked up. I was awakened about 10 minutes to one by a noise as if someone was forcing a door or a window. I listened for a little while, and then heard it again. I called for my husband, who got up, dressed, got out of the bedroom window, and went along the lead to the end of the bar, where there was a lead light. He got down into the garden, and I heard his voice. I dressed and went to the bar, and found the till had been forced open. There was some money on the counter, and different things strewn about. The cardboard box now produced, with money in it, was on the counter. The small cigar box produced was in the till, and contained 3s. 3d. worth of stamps. I had seen money in the till before it was locked up, about 4 or 5 in silver and coppers. I picked up the shirt produced outside the centre door of the house. There was some money in it, about 1 0s. 1d. I know the prisoner, and I recognised his voice when he was in the road talking to my husband. I saw him walk up the road with my husband. It was moonlight, and the prisoner had only his trousers and shirt on.

Henry Baldock deposed: I am the landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton. On the 4th of December I locked my house up at eleven o'clock, and also locked the till, in which there was about 5 worth of silver and copper. I took the gold out. The small cigar box now produced was in there with some stamps in it. About one o'clock my wife woke me up, and I heard a noise, as of someone breaking something. I dressed, got out of the bedroom window, and went along the lead verandah. I saw some clothes, and a pair of jackboots, that seemed to me to be laying in the same way a man might. I took the boots and clothes and put them in a wood lodge. They were laying close to the window, in the garden. I saw the glass of the window was broken. The window, which was fastened overnight, was shut, but not fastened. I went into the yard, and my dog barked, and I heard someone moving in the house. I walked up the road about ten rods, to go for the police. I returned again, and the prisoner came out of the middle door of the house. I heard him unlock it. I heard him drop something in the road, close to the door, and he said “You have captured me, have you. I will give myself up. I have already done 12 years and have lost 40”. I asked him to go with me to the Sergeant of the Police, and he went with me about 10 or 12 yards. He then said “I will not go any further without you give me my clothes. If you don't, I will blow your brains out with my revolver”. I said “We'll go back and see”. When in front of the house we had a struggle, and he again threatened me. I took him to where I had put his clothes, and he put on his overcoat and also his boots. He got his cap from near the window. I did not see the revolver. He said “I want to get away”, and as I knew him, I let him go, and gave information to the police. I went back to the house with P.S. Wenham, and found the till and two other drawers had been broken open, and things lying all over the place. I went with P.S. Wenham to the prisoner's house, and P.C. Wenham arrested him. I then drove them to Seabrook. I saw the tool now produced in the bar. The cigars are my property. When I first saw the prisoner he had a shirt and knee breeches on, but no boots.

By prisoner: I am positive you threatened to shoot me.

Witness: Prisoner threatened to shoot me first about ten yards from the house.

Maria Read, living at Leopold Villa, Cheriton, said the prisoner lodged with her mother. He came in about three minutes past one on the morning of the 5th inst. She heard him come upstairs.

P.S. Wenham said: About 1.30 on the morning of the 5th inst., from information I received from Mr. Baldock, I went down to his house and found a window in the bar broken. I examined the place and found the till had been broken open. I found the screwdriver produced on the floor near the till. I also found sixpence on the floor. I saw 6d. and 15 farthings lying on the counter, and 9 farthings and three half-pence on the dresser, 1 cigar in the public bar, 1 cigar in the bar where they served, three on the dresser, a box containing 13 on the dresser, and a cardboard box with copper in it on the counter. The coppers in the bag I received from Mrs. Baldock. I picked 8d. up outside the door. The hole in the window was large enough for a man to get in. It was the top pane. The window was not fastened when I got there. I then went with P.C. Martin and Mr. Baldock in search of the prisoner. I went to Shorncliffe Camp, and afterwards to prisoner's house at Cheriton. I saw the prisoner, arrested him, and charged him with burglariously entering the house of Mr. Baldock, the White Lion, Cheriton, and stealing money, cigars, and postage stamps. He made no reply, and was then taken to Seabrook. He was searched in my presence; 3s. 3d. in stamps was found on him, and 3s. 9d. in silver. After I returned to Cheriton, I received the handkerchief and 1 3s. 5d. in silver and coppers now produced from P.C. Martin.

P.C. Martin said: About 5 a.m. on the morning of the 5th of December, I went with the last witness to prisoner's house. Sergeant Wenham went inside, and I remained outside. I saw prisoner throw something out of the window. I afterwards searched for it, and found the handkerchief now produced and 1 3s. 5d. in it. I subsequently handed the same to Sergeant Wenham.

When asked to make a statement, prisoner said “I do not wish to say anything”. He was then committed for trial at the Kent Assizes.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 11 December 1895.

Kaleidoscope.

Burglars in the district are on the increase. The latest burglary was at the White Lion public house, Cheriton, on Wednesday night or Thursday morning. It appears that when Mr. and Mrs. Baldock retired late at night, they left the premises perfectly secured. It was some time before Mrs. Baldock went to sleep, and she was somewhat startled to hear sounds as though someone was in the rooms below the bedroom.. She awake Mr. Bladock, who made his way to the place from where the sounds came.

He was astonished to see a man almost devoid of clothing. He arrested the man, and after a struggle he was surprised to find that the burglar was none other than a corporal of the military police, who was resident at Cheriton.

Mr. Bladock, previous to finding his man, found his clothes lying outside the premises, and when he made certain that it was Spicer, the corporal, he let him go. In consequence of the threats used by the soldier, however, Mr. Baldock found it necessary to give information to the police, with the result that soon afterwards Corporal Spicer was arrested at his own house. Previous to this, however, he threw a bag out of one of the windows, and this bag was afterwards found to contain a sum of 5 – the proceeds, it is supposed, of Mr. Baldock's till, which had been ransacked.

Corporal Spicer was married only a few months ago, and during the time that he has resided in the village, he was esteemed and respected by his neighbours, with all of whom he has always been on the most friendly terms. This burglary has caused quite a sensation in the village.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 December 1895.

Local News.

At the Hythe County Police Court on Thursday, Robert Lee Spicer, a corporal in the Military Police, was charged with breaking into the White Lion Inn, at Cheriton, and stealing therefrom money and goods to the value of 5 5s. 10d., the property of Henry Baldock.

Sarah Baldock said: I am the wife of Henry Baldock, licensed victualler, and live at the White Lion, Cheriton. I and my husband retired to rest about 10 minutes to 12 on the 4th of December. The house was properly locked up. I was awakened about ten minutes to one by a noise, as if someone was forcing a door or a window. I listened for a little while, and then heard it again. I called my husband, who got up, dressed, got out of the bedroom window, and went along the lead to the end of the bar, where there was a lead light. He got down into the garden and I heard his voice. I dressed and went to the bar, and found the till had been forced open. There was some money on the counter, and different things strewn about. The cardboard box now produced, with money in it, was on the counter. The small cigar box now produced was in the till the night before, and contained 3s. 3d. worth of stamps. I had seen money in the till before it was locked up, about 4 or 5 in silver and coppers. I picked up the shirt produced outside the centre door of the house. There was some money in it, about 1 0s. 1d. I know the prisoner, and I recognised his voice when he was in the road talking to my husband. I saw him walk up the road with my husband. It was moonlight, and the prisoner had only his shirt and trousers on.

Henry Baldock deposed: I am the landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton. On the 4th of December I locked my house up at eleven o'clock, and also locked the till, in which there was about 5 worth of silver and copper. I took the gold out. The small cigar box now produced was in there with some stamps in it. About one o'clock my wife woke me up, and I heard a noise as of someone breaking something. I dressed, got out of the bedroom window, and went along the lead verandah. I saw some clothes, and a pair of jackboots that seemed to be laying in the same way a man would. I took the boots and clothes and put them in a wood lodge. They were laying close to the window, in the garden. I saw the glass of the window was broken. The window, which was fastened overnight, was shut, but not fastened. I went into the yard, and my dog barked, and I heard someone moving in the house. I walked up the road about ten rods to go for the police. I returned again, and the prisoner came out of the middle door of the house. I heard him unlock it. I heard him drop something in the road, close to the door, and he said “You have captured me, have you. I will give myself up. I have already done 12 years, and have lost 40”. I asked him to go with me to the sergeant of the police, and he went with me about ten or twelve yards. He then said “I will not go any further with you. Give me my clothes. If you don't I will blow your brains out with my revolver”. I said “We'll go back and see”. When in front of the house we had a struggle, and he again threatened me. I took him to where I had put his clothes, and he put on his overcoat, and also his boots. He got his cap from near the window. I did not see the revolver. He said “I want to get away”, and as I knew him, I let him go, and gave information to the police. I went back to the house with P.S. Wenham, and found the till and two other drawers had been broken open, and things lying all over the place. I went with P.S. Wenham to the prisoner's house, and he arrested him. I then drove them to Seabrook. I saw the tool now produced in the bar. The cigars are my property. When I first saw the prisoner he had a shirt and knee breeches on, but no boots.

By prisoner: I am positive you threatened to shoot me.

Witness: Prisoner threatened to shoot me first about ten yards from the house.

Maria Read, living at Leopold Villa, Cheriton, said the prisoner lodged with her mother. He came in about three minutes past one on the morning of the 5th inst. She heard him come upstairs.

P.S. Wenham said: About 1.30 on the morning of the 5th inst., from information I received from Mr. Baldock, I went down to his house and found a window in the bar broken. I examined the place and found the till had been broken open. I found the screwdriver produced on the floor near the till. I also found sixpence on the floor. I saw 6d. and 15 farthings lying on the counter, and 9 farthings and three half-pence on the dresser, 1 cigar in the public bar, 1 cigar in the bar where they served, three on the dresser, a box containing 13 on the dresser, and a cardboard box with copper in it on the counter. The coppers in the bag I received from Mrs. Baldock. I picked 8d. up outside the door. The hole in the window was large enough for a man to get in. It was the top pane. The window was not fastened when I got there. I then went with P.C. Martin and Mr. Baldock in search of the prisoner. I went to Shorncliffe Camp, and afterwards to prisoner's house at Cheriton. I saw the prisoner, arrested him, and charged him with burglariously entering the house of Mr. Baldock, the White Lion, Cheriton, and stealing money, cigars, and postage stamps. He made no reply, and was then taken to Seabrook. He was searched in my presence; 3s. 3d. in stamps was found on him, and 3s. 9d. in silver. After I returned to Cheriton, I received the handkerchief and 1 3s. 5d. in silver and coppers now produced from P.C. Martin.

P.C. Martin said: About 5 a.m. on the morning of the 5th of December, I went with the last witness to prisoner's house. Sergeant Wenham went inside, and I remained outside. I saw prisoner throw something out of the window. I afterwards searched for it, and found the handkerchief now produced and 1 3s. 5d. in it. I subsequently handed the same to Sergeant Wenham.

When asked to make a statement, prisoner said “I do not wish to say anything”. He was then committed for trial at the Kent Assizes.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 January 1896.

Winter Assizes.

Monday, January 20th: Before Mr. Justice Cave.

The prisoner Spicer, soldier, who had pleaded Guilty on Saturday, was now brought up, and bound over in his own recognisances to come up for judgement when called upon.

 

Folkestone Express 25 January 1896.

Local News.

At the Assizes Richard Ley Spencer pleaded Guilty to burglary at the White Lion, Cheriton. He received a good character, and was bound over to come up for judgement if called upon.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 January 1896.

Local Jottings.

At the Kent Assizes, before Mr. Justice Cave, Richard Ley Spicer, 26, soldier, pleaded Guilty to burglariously entering the dwelling house of Henry Baldock, and stealing 4 9s. 10 d. in money, and various articles, belonging to the said Henry Baldock, at Cheriton, on the 5th December. It appeared that prisoner had served about five years in the Dragoons, and also about five years in the Mounted Military Police. The articles stolen by prisoner had, it was stated, been recovered. Prisoner was given a good character by a sergeant-major of the Military Police. He was bound over to come up for judgement if called upon.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 29 January 1896.

Notes.

The military policeman who broke into the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, got off very lightly at the Court of Assize. He was bound over to come up for judgement when called upon. This was because he had previously borne a good character. Doesn't this show the importance of always maintaining a good character?

 

Folkestone Herald 29 August 1896.

About the Neighbourhood.

The great beer question is not yet settled over at Cheriton, and the community is now discussing the chances of the rival applicants for licences at the coming Sessions at Hythe and Elham. That another licensed house, tavern, or hotel is wanted here there is no room at all for doubt. We have not arrived at a time when the world is made up entirely of teetotallers, and so we must take things as they are. Cheriton is growing by leaps and bounds. The population is that of a good-sized town, and there is only one inn, the White Lion, to supply the whole community. Now, I have not a single word to allege against Mr. Baldock's conduct of his establishment, but it is a notorious fact that on certain occasions the resources of the White Lion are severely taxed, and that the landlord is at his wits' end to keep pace with the demands of the customers. At holiday times, for instance, crowds of people have been seen to drink their beverage in the public highway, there being no room within the inn. Here is proof at once that more accommodation is required.

 

Folkestone Express 7 November 1896.

Local News.

Stephen Tutt was charged at Hythe on Thursday last with being disorderly and refusing to quit the White Lion, Cheriton. Mr. Haines prosecuted on behalf of the Folkestone Licensed Victuallers' Association, and the Bench inflicted a fine of 1 and 9s. costs, or in default one month's hard labour. He was afterwards charged with being drunk and disorderly in Cheriton Street on the same date, and a further penalty of 10s, including costs, was imposed. P.C. Wenham proved the cases.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 January 1897.

Inquest.

An inquest on the body of Michael Reilley, a private in the Army Service Corps, who was run over and cur to pieces by a goods train on Saturday morning, was held at the Red Lion (sic), Cheriton, on Monday afternoon, before the County Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer).

Charles Uden, living at 24, Longfield Road, Dover, said he was the driver of a goods train on the South Eastern Railway from Ashford to Dover, which left Ashford at 4.05 a.m. on Saturday.

The Coroner: I don't understand. It has been reported to me that this train left London at ten minutes to eight the night before.

Witness: I can explain how that mistake arose, sir. A London man works the train from London to Ashford, and I take the train from Ashford to Dover.

Continuing, he said about six a.m. on the morning of 2nd January they ran over something between Cheriton Junction and Shorncliffe Station, but could not see what it was as it was quite dark. On arrival at Shorncliffe Station he reported the matter to the signalman there.

P.C. Drury, stationed at Cheriton, said about a quarter to seven on the morning of the 2nd he received information that a man had been run over up the line, and he proceeded to the spot where he had been told the occurrence took place. He found deceased, in uniform, lying in the six foot way. He was quite dead. His skull was smashed, his left foot cut off, and his right limbs and side smashed. He got assistance and brought the remains to the White Lion. From enquiries he subsequently made he found he was in the Army Service Corps, and he been on guard all night. He could find no trace of him from the camp to the spot where the accident took place.

Corporal George Reeves, of the 2nd West Yorkshire Regiment, said he knew deceased. His name was Michael Reilley, and he was a shoeing smith in the Army Service Corps. He was twenty two years of age. He last saw him at three minutes to five on the morning of the 2nd. He was in command of the picquet, and ordered him to go and call the cook. Deceased had been on duty since 6.30 the previous evening, but had been relieved twice. He told him to return to the guard room to attend to the early morning stable duties at five, so he only had three minutes. He did not see him alive after that, but he did not know he was missing till 5.30, when he was told a man had been found on the line. No-one saw him leave the Camp, although the place where he was found was more than 600 yards away.

The soldier who relieved him during the night incidentally told the Coroner that when he gave deceased his supper he remarked “I don't suppose you'll get it in for me any more”. He was quite sober.

Lieut. Atkinson, the officer in command of the Army Service Corps, said deceased was a native of Black Rock, Dublin. He was 22 and single. He was usually a very quiet and perfectly sober man, he had only one case of drunkenness marked against him in 1895. Prior to their arrival at Shorncliffe he had been very ill, and had laid six weeks in the hospital at Aldershot suffering from pneumonia. He had never been on foreign service.

Mr. R. Hill (a juror): Were any letters found upon him?

The Coroner: Nothing of any kind.

Mr. Hill: Had there been any row or disagreement that night?

Lieut. Atkinson: Not that I am aware of.

The Coroner having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane.

 

Folkestone Express 9 January 1897.

Inquest.

About 8.30 a.m. on Saturday morning the body of a soldier in the uniform of the Army Service Corps was discovered, horribly mangled, on the line near Cheriton. An inquest was held at the White Lion, Cheriton, on Monday afternoon, before Mr. R.M. Mercer (the County Coroner), when the following facts were elicited:-

Charles Uden, living at 24, Longfield Road, Dover, said he was the driver of a goods train on the South Eastern Railway from Ashford to Dover, which left Ashford at 4.05 a.m. on Saturday.

The Coroner: I don't understand. It has been reported to me that this train left London at ten minutes to eight the night before.

Witness: I can explain how that mistake arose, sir. A London man works the train from London to Ashford, and I take the train from Ashford to Dover. Continuing, he said about 6 a.m. on the morning of the 2nd of January they ran over something between the Cheriton Junction and Shorncliffe Station, but could not see what it was as it was quite dark. On his arrival at Shorncliffe Station, he reported the matter to the signalman there.

P.C. Drury, stationed at Cheriton, said about a quarter to seven on the morning of the 2nd he received information that a man had been run over up the line, and he proceeded to the spot where he had been told the occurrence took place. He found deceased in uniform lying in the six foot way. He was quite dead. His skull was smashed, his left foot cut off, and his right limbs and side smashed. He got assistance and brought the remains to the White Lion. From enquiries he subsequently made, he found that he was in the Army Service Corps, and had been on guard all night till five o'clock. He could find no trace of him from the Camp to the spot where the accident took place.

Corporal George Reeves, of the 2nd West Yorkshire Regiment, said he knew the deceased. His name was Michael Reilley, and he was a shoeing smith in the Army Service Corps at Shorncliffe. He was 22 years of age. He last saw him at three minutes to five on the morning of the 2nd. He was in command of the picquet, and he ordered him to go and call the cook. Deceased had been on duty since 6.30 the previous evening, but he had been relieved twice. He told him to return to the guard room to attend the early morning stable duties at five, so he only had three minutes. He did not see him alive after that, but did not know he was missing till 8.30, when he was told that a man had been found on the line. No-one saw him leave the Camp, although the place where he was found was more than six hundred yards away.

The soldier who relieved deceased during the night incidentally told the Coroner that when he gave deceased his supper he remarked “I don't suppose you'll get it for me any more”. He was quite sober.

Lieut. Atkinson, the officer in command of the Army Service Corps, said deceased was a native of Black Rock, Dublin. He was 22, and single. He was usually a very quiet and sober man, and he only had one case of drunkenness recorded against him. That was in 1895. Prior to their arrival at Shorncliffe he had been very ill, and had laid six weeks in the hospital at Aldershot, suffering from pneumonia. He had never been on foreign service. No letters were found upon deceased, and witness was not aware that there had been any disagreement.

The Coroner having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of “Suicide while temporarily insane”.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 January 1897.

Inquest.

Last Saturday morning a very sad affair occurred on the South Eastern Railway line, near the Cheriton Junction, in the vicinity of the Shorncliffe Camp. It appears that at about six o'clock that morning as the goods train from Ashford to Dover was passing that spot, the driver felt a jerk, denoting that the engine had run over some obstacle on the line. On reaching the Shorncliffe railway station he reported the matter to the station master, Mr. Butler, and the local police were at once communicated with. On the search party going along the line to the place indicated, the dead body of a soldier who had belonged to the Army Service Corps was found in the six foot, clothed in his military uniform. The man had sustained very severe injuries, the head having been battered in, one of the thighs smashed, one foot completely severed, and the second almost cut off. The body was taken to the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, to await the Coroner's inquest. Inquiries made by the authorities led to the discovery that the deceased was named Michael Riley, and that he was a native of Blackrock, a pretty coast town near Dublin. He was only 22 years of age, single, and had a reputation of being a very steady young man. It was also elicited that he had been suffering from an attack of pneumonia, at Aldershot, and that he had been discharged from the Military Hospital. An inquest was held on the afternoon of Monday last at the White Lion, before Mr. Mercer, Coroner for East Kent. Mr. R. Pilcher was foreman of the jury, and the proceedings were watched on behalf of the South Eastern Railway Company by Mr. Butler, the excellent Station Master at Shorncliffe. Lieutenant Atkinson attended the Court on behalf of the military authorities. Appended is a report of the evidence taken at the inquiry, which opened at 4 o'clock:-

Charles Wesley Uten, engine driver, 24, Longfield Road, Dover, said he was the driver of a goods train for the South Eastern Railway Company between Ashford and Dover. Another driver took the train from London to Ashford, and thence he took it to Dover. He left Ashford on Saturday morning, January 2nd, at 4.05, and at 6 a.m. reached between Cheriton Junction and Shorncliffe Station. There is no station at Cheriton Junction. It was quite dark at the time. The train ran over something, but he could not tell what it was. He reported this on arriving at Shorncliffe to the station master there.

P.C. Drury, stationed at Cheriton, who had charge of the case, said that on Saturday, 2nd January, at about a quarter to seven, he received information and went to the spot, where he found deceased lying in the six foot way. He was in uniform and quite dead. The skull was smashed, the left foot cut off, and the thigh smashed. Witness obtained assistance and brought the body there. He had since made inquiries and found that the deceased was a shoeing smith in the Army Service Corps, and had been on duty all night till five o'clock in the morning when he was found dead. Witness had found nothing on looking between the spot and the Camp.

Corporal George Reeves said he was in the West Yorkshire Regiment. He knew the deceased, who was 22 years old. He last saw him alive at about three minutes to five on Saturday morning. The deceased had been on guard that night, and witness dismissed him and sent him to call the cook, Driver Johnson. The deceased had also been on guard on the previous night. When witness told him he had just time to go and call the cook and be at the stables at five o'clock, and he ought to have gone to stables. That was the last time witness saw him. He did not know deceased was missing until half past eight, when he was sent for and told. He had not heard anything from anyone about the deceased going in the direction of the railway. It was about 600 yards from the Camp to the railway.

Driver Randall said that he spoke to the deceased for five minutes at about a quarter to nine on the night before he was killed.

The Coroner said he would not require this evidence. Ten or twelve people had seen the deceased in the Camp, but no-one appeared to have seen him when he left it.

Lieutenant Atkinson, in reply to the Coroner, said the deceased was a native of Blackrock, Dublin. The deceased was aged 22, and unmarried. He was a sober man, and not quarrelsome, and had not been on foreign service. He had suffered from pneumonia, but had been discharged from the hospital at Aldershot.

Mr. Butler: May I be allowed to say ... ?

The Coroner: Do you want to give evidence?

Mr. Butler: I am the Station Master at Shorncliffe, and ....

The Coroner: I do not think I need trouble you. It is not a question of the Company.

A Juryman: Has any letter been found on the deceased?

The Coroner: Nothing, I understand.

The Coroner asked the constable if he had made the further inquiries he told him to make.

P.C. Drury said he had, but could only find that the deceased was dismissed at 5 o'clock and told to call Driver Johnson, which he did.

Mr. Butler explained that there was no crossing on the railway at that place, and it was fenced in, but not far away there was a footbridge over the railway, so that deceased was a trespasser on the line.

The Coroner said he had not come there without viewing the locality, and most of the jury were also acquainted with it.

The jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

 

Sandgate Weekly News 9 January 1897.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at Cheriton on Monday by the County Coroner, touching the death of Michael Reilly, a private in the Army Service Corps, who was run over and cut to pieces by a goods train on Saturday morning at Cheriton.

Charles Uden, the driver of the train, said that at about six o'clock on Saturday morning they ran over something between Cheriton Junction and Shorncliffe Station. It was dark and he could not see what it was, and he reported the matter to the signalman at Shorncliffe Station.

P.C. Drury, stationed at Cheriton, said about a quarter to seven on Saturday morning he received information that a man had been run over up the line, and he proceeded to the spot where he had been told the occurrence took place. He found deceased in uniform, lying in the six foot way. He was quite dead. His skull was smashed, his left foot cut off, and his right limbs and side smashed. He got assistance and brought his remains to the White Lion. From enquiries he subsequently made he found that he was in the Army Service Corps, and had been on guard all night. He could find no trace of him from the Camp to the spot where the accident took place.

Corporal George Reeves, of the 2nd West Yorkshire Regiment, said he knew deceased, who was a shoeing smith in the Army Service Corps at Shorncliffe. He was twenty two years of age. He last saw him at three minutes to five on the morning of the 2nd. He was in command of the picquet, and he ordered him to go and call the cook. Deceased had been on duty since 6.30 the previous evening, but had been relieved twice. He told him to return to the Guard Room to attent to early morning stable duties at five, so he only had three minutes. He did not see him alive after that, but he did not know he was missing till 8.30, when he was told that a man had been found on the line. N o-one saw him leave the Camp, although the place where he was found was more than 600 yards away.

The soldier who relieved him during the night incidentally told the Coroner that when he gave deceased his supper he remarked “I don't suppose you'll get it for me any more”. He was quire sober.

Lieut. Atkinson, the officer in command of the Army Service Corps, said deceased was usually a very quiet and perfectly sober man. Prior to their arrival at Shorncliffe he had been very ill, and had laid six weeks in the hospital at Aldershot, suffering from pneumonia. He had never been on foreign service. No letters were found on him, and so far as he was aware there had been no row or disagreement that night.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide while temporarily insane”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 12 January 1897.

Inquest.

Mr. R. M. Mercer (the East Kent Coroner), held an inquest at the White Lion, Cheriton, on the 4th inst, touching the death of Private Miohael Reilly, of the Army Service Corps, stationed at Shorncliffe, who met his death by placing himself in front of a goods train on the previous Saturday.

Charles Wesley Uden, an engine driver of Dover, stated that he was driving a goods train on the South Eastern Railway from Ashford to Dover on Saturday at 4.05 a.m. and when going from Cheriton to Shorncliffe he ran over something. It was quite dark, and he reported the circumstances on arrival at Shorncliffe, He heard no cry.

P.C. George Edward Drury deposed that on Saturday morning he was called about seven o’clock and told about the affair. He went at once to the place, where he found the body of deceased in uniform, lying on his back quite dead. His skull was smashed and his left foot was cut off and lying in the four-foot way on the down side of the line. His right thigh was fractured and his right foot nearly cut off. On making inquiries he found that deceased was a shoeing smith in the Army Service Corps stationed at Shorncliffe camp. He had been on duty all night till five in the morning, when relieved by Private Greensmith, of the West Yorkshire Regiment. The deceased was sent on an errand and nothing more was heard of him. The deceased was a native of Black Rock, County Dublin, and was a married man aged 22.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide whilst temporarily insane.”

 

Sandgate Weekly News 13 March 1897.

Inquest.

The East Kent Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer) held an inquest at the White Lion on Monday, touching the death of Richard John Shorter, a little boy, aged seven.

The evidence went to show that deceased and another little boy were playing together on Saturday, February 27th, when they both fell down, the other boy stepping on deceased's ankle. The leg did bad, and deceased was kept in bed on account of the pain in the leg. Medical evidence stated that the leg was much swollen, enlarged, and tender, with signs pointing to inflammation of the bone. Fever intervened, which brought on violent delirium. The leg subsequently did better, but symptoms of brain fever were marked. He died on March 6th from exhaustion, consequent on meningitis, which was set up by the injury to the bone of the leg.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

 

Folkestone Express 5 June 1897.

Hythe Petty Sessions.

Thursday, June 3rd: Before J. DuBoulay and W. Wightwick Esqs.

William Waller and George Barton were charged with being drunk and disorderly and refusing to quit at the White Lion, Cheriton, on May 24th.

Mrs. Baldock, wife of the landlord, who appeared for the prosecutor, said on the day in question, defendants were disorderly, and on being asked to go, said they would not go for anyone. She then called in Sergeant Wenham, who ejected them.

P.S. Wenham said about half past eight on May 24th he was called in by Mrs. Baldock to eject the prisoners. He had to use force to get them out. They were the worse for liquor.

Barton, who was fined 10s. and 19s. 3d. costs, remarked on hearing the decision of the Bench “I think this is thick”. Waller, who had been four times convicted under the Highway Act, and once for cruelty to a mare, was fined 5s. and 19s. 3d. costs.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 5 June 1897.

Hythe Petty Sessions.

Thursday, June 3rd: Before J. DuBoulay and W. Wightwick Esqs.

William Waller and George Barton were charged with being drunk and disorderly and refusing to quit the White Lion, Cheriton, on May 22nd.

Barton, who was fined 10s. and 19s. 3d. costs, on hearing the decision of the Bench, said “I think this is thick”. Waller, who had been four times convicted under the Highway Act, and once for cruelty to a mare, was fined 5s. and 19s. 3d. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 July 1897.

Tuesday, July 27th: Before The Mayor and Mr. Herbert.

John Baldock, landlord of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton, applied for a licence to sell intoxicating drink on the football ground on Monday next, on the occasion of some sports in connection with a sick club. As he was not able to give any further particulars respecting the meeting, he was told by the Bench to renew his application on the following day, and in the meantime Superintendent Taylor would make some enquiries. The application was granted on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Express 31 July 1897.

Local News.

On Wednesday an occasional licence was granted to Mr. Baldock, of the White Lion Inn, Cheriton to sell liquor at the fete to be held in the football field on Bank Holiday.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 January 1898.

Local News.

The East Kent Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer) held an inquest on Tuesday at the White Lion on the body of a female child, which was found on the 23rd inst. in a well near Shorncliffe Camp, by Corporal W. Hunt, of the Military Mounted Police.

It appeared that he was lowering his bucket on the rope when he noticed something floating on the water. He obtained a drag hook to get the body up. It had on a flannel petticoat, fastened by a safety pin and some small pins. The well was open to the public.

Mr. Herbert Henry Powell, surgeon, of 44, Sandgate Road, Folkestone, made a post mortem on the body, and gave it as his opinion that the child was fully developed, and had been dead at least a week. The cause of death was asphyxia, which might have happened naturally, or been caused by accident or design.

The inquest was adjourned.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 January 1898.

Local News.

On Wednesday an inquest was opened at the Lion, Cheriton, on the body of a child which had been found in a well by one of the military police. The Coroner adjourned the inquiry until February 15th, in order that inquiries may be made by the police.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 February 1898.

Local News.

The East Kent Coroner, on Tuesday last, resumed his enquiry at Cheriton into the cause of death of an unknown female child, whose body was found in a well at Risborough Lane, Cheriton.

Charles Pettett, a baker, deposed that he had drawn water from the well daily since November 28th last. He drew water on the morning of the 23rd ult., and noticed what he thought to be a piece of deal board in the water in the well. He did not bring it up, but later he heard of the child's body being found.

The jury returned an open verdict.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 February 1898.

Local News.

On Tuesday afternoon at the White Lion, Cheriton, the inquest touching the death of a female child found in a well at Cheriton on the 23rd January was resumed by the East Kent Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer).

Charles Pettett, baker, Risborough Lane, Cheriton, deposed that on Sunday, 23rd ult., he went to the well shortly before the child was found. The pail was one-sided, and on looking down the well he noticed what he thought to be a bit of deal board. He had been drawing water since the 28th November. The water drawn up was used for drinking purposes, and they drank it the morning the child was found.

Dr. Powell stated that he said the baby was put in the water when it was dead, it was not drowned.

The jury returned a verdict that the child was found, it died of asphyxia prior to having been placed in the well, but how the child was asphyxiated, or by whom, there was no evidence to show.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 April 1898.

Hythe Divisional Sessions.

On Thursday morning – before Messrs. DuBoulay, Wightwick, F.A. Mackinnon, Sir Charles Maclean, Captain Mansell, and Captain Smythies – the Bench approved of plans put before them on behalf of the owners of the White Lion, Cheriton, of a proposed new house.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 May 1898.

Felix.

I hear that the well-known White Lion at Cheriton is shortly to be pulled down, and rebuilt at a cost of 5,000. Our old friend Mr. Baldock, the present proprietor, will retire in the near future, and his place will be filled by Mr. Sid Saunders, of the East Cliff, Folkestone.

The cause of the brewers does not appear to be languishing in these parts, that is if one may judge of the number of licensed premises in the town that have lately been re-built or undergone alterations. There appears to have been quite an epidemic amongst the owners in this direction. Whether it is palatable or not it may safely be taken, I think, that prosperity continues to shine on this favoured and beautiful district.

 

From the Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, 16 July, 1898.

LICENSING.

A temporary authority was granted to Mr. Saunders for the White Lion, Cheriton.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 16 July 1898.

Hythe County Bench.

Thursday, July 14th: Before J. Du Boulay, W. Wightwick, E.S. Thompson, and A.S. Jones Esqs., and Captain Mansell.

Mr. Saunders, who for thirteen years has been the tenant of the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, was granted a temporary authority to sell at the White Lion, Cheriton.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Hythe Reporter 16 July 1898.

Hythe County Sessions.

Before Messrs. Du Boulay, A.S. Jones, E.S. Thompson, W. Wightwick, and Capt. Mansell.

Mr. Saunders applied for the transfer of the White Lion, Cheriton. The Magistrates expressed a wish that Mr. Saunders would carry on the house in the same orderly manner as his predecessor, Mr. Baldock, had done.

The transfer was granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Hythe Reporter 17 September 1898.

Hythe Police Court.

Monday, before Mr. F.D. Brockman and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Roland Bailey and Charles Cooper were charged with stealing a quantity of road lead, valued at 8s. The lead had been taken down from the White Lion, Cheriton, which house was being rebuilt. The lead had been left in the open, and the two prisoners had taken it away in a sack. P.C. Drury proved the case. The Bench took into consideration the fact it was a first offence, so gave prisoners the option of a fine of 2 each. A week was allowed to pay in each case.

On the conclusion of the case the Magistrates expressed to P.C. Drury their admiration of the way in which he had traced the offenders, and thanked him on behalf of the public.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 September 1898.

Hythe Licensing Sessions.

The Adjourned Licensing Meeting for the Elham Division of Kent was held at Hythe on Thursday before Captains Baldwin (Chairman), Mansell, and Smythie.

Mr. Saunders applied for a transfer of the licence held by Mr. Baldock for the White Lion, Cheriton. This was allowed.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 October 1898.

Hythe Divisional Sessions.

On Thursday – before Mr. Du Boulay, Captain Smythies, Captain Mansell, and Mr. Brockman – Stephen Tutt was summoned for doing damage to nine glasses, the property of Joseph Sidney Saunders, to the value of 3s. He pleaded Guilty.

Prosecutor, landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton, deposed that on the day in question defendant was in the house, and made a complaint that he had given half a sovereign instead of 6d. He saw that was untrue. Defendant was sober. He knocked the glasses off the counter, the damage amounting to 3s. He was in the bar.

Mr. Minter said it was felt by the landlord, and the Society of which he was a member, the Licensed Victuallers' Society, that it was a case that ought to be brought forward. Defendant was a notorious character, the terror of every landlord in the neighbourhood. In some cases they refused to serve him.

The defendant further pleaded Guilty to using profane and obscene language, contrary to the bye-laws.

P.C. Poole deposed that the defendant was ejected from the White Lion, and used the expression complained of, just before he heard the smashing of glass. Defendant appeared greatly excited, but witness did not think he was the worse for drink.

The defendant said he did place half a sovereign on the counter. He knew what it was, and wanted to change it. The door of the till was blocked open. During the time they were talking, three or four of the barmen went to the till. He said he wanted them to search the till, count the money, and look at the register. He lost his temper, and some glasses were broken. He was requested to go, and did so. Outside he stopped two or three minutes till the police came. He did not use the expression mentioned.

Mr. Saunders, re-called, said he counted the money. There was no half sovereign. There was a separate till for sixpences. There might have been half sovereigns in the till, but they would have gone in the half sovereign department. The money balanced within 1s. 7d. The drawer was open, and there was room enough for someone to have picked it out of the till.

Superintendent Waghorn, in answer to defendant, said he was told frequent disturbances were caused in Cheriton Street by defendant.

The Bench inflicted a fine amounting, with costs, to 3 2s. altogether; in default, one month's imprisonment in one case, and 14 days in the other.

 

Hythe Reporter 22 October 1898.

Hythe County Sessions.

There were a large number of cases to hear at the Sessions on Thursday last. But they mostly emanate from Cheriton, which seems to be in a constant state of civil war, if we may judge of the evidence in such cases. Even the Chairman of the Magistrates was appalled and asked if there had been a Carnival at Cheriton.

One worthy had distinguished himself at the White Lion by declaring he had given a sovereign, while the barman only received 6d. To compensate matters the customer commenced to sweep all the glasses off the counter. The barman, however, stopped further proceedings by ejecting him.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 April 1899.

Local News.

We regret to have to record the death of Mr. T. Baldock, of Cheriton, one of the most respected men of the township, which occurred on Easter Sunday morning. Mr. Baldock has never been the same man since he was so severely mauled by a young bull at Newington five or more years ago, and received internal injuries. The bull had broken loose, and fearing it might in its mad condition be the cause of serious danger both to life and limb if it got away, he attacked it with a pitchfork, and a desperate struggle ensued, and had not Mr. Lipscombe succeeded in shooting the bull, things would have gone very differently with Mr. Baldock. As it was, he received fearful injuries, but, thanks to a strong constitution, he survived them. Mr. Baldock was landlord of the White Lion for nearly nineteen years, and was the largest employer of labour in the parish, having a large carrier's business in addition to the public house. In addition he rented farms at Hemsted, Newington, and Saltwood. On leaving the village inn he still continued the carrier's business and the farms, and his death will be the means of throwing many out of employment. At the election for the first Parish Council Mr. Baldock headed the poll, and he also represented Saltwood on the Rural District Council. The Cheriton Brass Band owe much to him for the position they hold today. The Cheriton Benefit Society also received every encouragement at his hands, and in him the Carnival Society have lost a strong supporter.

We regret to learn that Mr. David Thompson, landlord of the Harbour Hotel, died suddenly on Tuesday morning. Mr. Thompson was a well known and most popular man among the employees at the Harbour and Harbour Works. Sympathy with his bereaved brother, Capt. Thompson, has been generally manifested.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 May 1899.

Local News.

The old White Lion Inn has been this week demolished, and the new White Lion Hotel opened. The street needed widening at this point, and a great improvement has been effected. The bars of the new White Lion are capable of accommodating over 100 customers at one time. It is said no other public house in East Kent is able to find room for so large a number.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 June 1899.

Felix.

Whether it is a sign of general prosperity or otherwise there is quite a “boom” in local public houses. There is scarcely a place which is not being rebuilt or smartened up. I note in this connection that the Shorncliffe Hotel, which for years was tenanted by the late Mr. Quested, has now passed into the hands of Mr. Bull, of Folkestone, and that the Globe Hotel, on The Bayle, is now held by Mr. Faber, who for a long period of time was head waiter at the Queen's and also at the Lord Warden and the Dover Castle Hotel, Dover. Mr. Faber ought to know something of the business, and I shall be very much surprised if he does not make things hum all round. The new White Lion at Cheriton, too, admirably conducted by Mr. Sid Saunders, is a grand improvement to the locality. Of course there are those in the world that would raze all public houses to the ground, but when a publican conducts his business in an honourable and respectable manner, then he is entitled to the highest esteem. Mr. Saunders is one of these. He is essentially the right man in a difficult place. His new bar is one of the largest in the country, and is capable of accommodating a large number of customers. The house is well fitted from top to bottom, and is a credit to the builders. I note that Mr. Cliff Willars, the upholsterer of Folkestone, has been entrusted with furnishing the bars, etc., and right well he has carried out his work.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 July 1899.

The New White Lion.

At the expense of many thousands of pounds, Messrs. Beer and Co., the well-known Kentish brewers, of Canterbury, have latterly altered the appearance of Cheriton Street by the erection of a palatial building, known as the White Lion. Readers will recall the old, low-pitched building, with its inadequate accommodation, and non-attractive appearance. Cheriton is growing by leaps and bounds, and the population has more than doubled itself in a few years. With the exception of the Unity Inn, which, by the way, has just been purchased by the Government, no fully licensed house, with the exception of the Lion, is to be found in the place. Applications have been made to the Magistrates from time to time by various brewers for full licences, but these have ultimately been refused, whether at the local court or on appeal. The logic of facts pressed it home to Messrs. Beer and Co. that if the White Lion was to continue to exist it must either be enlarged or rebuilt. Things were coming to such a pass that the old house was fast becoming a centre of disturbance and trouble. It was a case of trying to squeeze a bushel of wheat into a gallon measure. It was eventually decided that a new hotel should be erected, and the fine red brick building that has only recently opened its doors to the public is the result. The new Lion is from the designs of Mr. Jennings, of Canterbury, and was built by Mr. Adcock, of Dover, who, it will be recollected, built the Hotel Metropole.

Through the courtesy of Mr. Sid Saunders, I was enabled a few days ago to explore the new hotel from cellar to ceiling. The builder's name is sufficient guarantee that the thing has been done well. No expense or thought appears to have been spared in bringing about so grand a result. In every way the comfort and general convenience of the public appears to have been studied. Deplore the fact as we may, Englishmen will have their beloved national beverage, and this fact was brought home to my mind when, “down in the cellar cool”, I noticed the scores of huge barrels of “Kentish sherry” ready waiting to slake the thirst of thirsty Cheritonians. I understand this cellar is generally admitted to be a model one for keeping “John Barleycorn” in splendid condition. It is spacious, cool, and airy, with a concrete flooring. Bottling is also carried on here. Ascending the stairs, my cicerone conducted me through the various public rooms. There is a friendly club connected with the house, and for this and other similar organisations there is a very fine apartment, which can easily be doubled in size by the removal of a partition. There are other cosy little rooms on this floor, to which access can be had by entering at the private entrance of the hotel. Mr. Sauders intends to cater largely for cyclists, and is determined that his accommodation in this respect shall be acceptable to any lady or gentleman, irrespective of social position. After inspecting the thoroughly up to date kitchen and culinary departments, which appear to be capable of meeting any demands put upon them, Mr. Saunders conducted me to the interior of the bar, which is allowed to be one of the largest in the county, as many as 400 people having been served here at one time.

Similar to the policeman's, the licensed victualler's life is not all honey. His path is not always bestrewn with roses. Said Mr. Saunders, “When I first took over this place, and been in possession about a week, I was fairly sick at heart. The place appeared to be so rough, and it appeared to be a hopeless task to enforce any sort of order. I can tell you, I felt like throwing it up, as the conduct of the house was a source of great anxiety to me. However, I made up my mind to stick to the guns, and by the exercise of a little tact and forebearance, I think I may claim that I have effected some improvement in establishing comparatively good order. You will note that in the arrangement of the bars, I have had a compartment specially fitted for a bottle and jug department. No men are served here. On the other hand, I have a compartment for men only. Of course there is the main public bar, which is open to all. Working hand in hand with the police, with the object of having the licensing laws obeyed, I am hoping to make the Lion a credit to the neighbourhood. I have one rigid rule, and of which all my employees are made aware, that no man who is suspected of having imbibed too freely is to be served. You will appreciate my position. Surrounded with the military element, and a large working population which numbers many women, I have to exercise great watchfulness. However, it is my one desire to serve my customers well, and be loyal to the law and the general public in the bargain”.

The bar is splendidly fitted with polished pine and cathedral glass, and is a credit to the decorators.

Mr. Saunders then led me to the rooms above, which are very spacious, lofty, and airy. One of the apartments is a billiard room. The table is by Thurston. It is in splendid condition, and has already earned a famous name at the old Pavilion Hotel.

Of course our genial proprietor and his amiable partner have not been able to get everything in apple-pie order. This is a work of time, but from a further inspection of the hotel, I have come to the conclusion that in all departments the new Lion is bound to succeed. “Give a dog a bad name and it will stick” is the old proverb. There is no doubt about it, the White Lion of other days did not smell particularly sweet in the nostrils of the public. That is a chapter of the past. The house was always worked under difficulties, but I firmly believe with perseverance and with a laudable desire to do his duty to all, Mr. Saunders will make the Lion worthy to rank with the best of the licensed houses in this neighbourhood. Our old friend kept the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, for many years, and the manner in which he conducted that establishment is yet the theme of general praise in the neighbourhood.

 

Folkestone Express 4 November 1899.

Hythe County Petty Sessions.

Thursday, November 2nd: Before J. DuBoulay Esq., Capts. Mansell and Baldwin, and E.S. Jones and J. Quested Esqs.

William Gower, a private of the Dorset Regiment, was charged with stealing four glass tumblers, value 1s., from the White Lion, Cheriton, and also with stealing a bridle and bit, value 15s., from the same house, the property of Timothy Coltham, Royal Artillery.

P.S. Amos Stone said about ten p.m. on Tuesday he was on duty outside the White Lion, when he saw prisoner putting something into his pockets. He afterwards went towards Folkestone. As he was passing by witness, he noticed his pockets were bulky/ Accompanied by a military policeman he followed him, and they caught him up. Just before doing so, the sergeant heard a ring of glass over a wall. He went round and found a glass. He then searched prisoner's pockets and found three more glasses. In another pocket he found a bridle and bit.

Walter Ashby, servant to Timothy Coltham, R.A., proved that the bridle was stolen from him while he was having a drink.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty to the first charge, but not to the second.

The Bench found prisoner Guilty of both charges, and sentenced him to two months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 November 1899.

Hythe Divisional Sessions.

William Gower, a private in the Dorset Regiment, was charged with stealing, taking, and carrying away four tumblers, value 1s., at Cheriton, the property of Joseph S. Saunders.

Mr. Joseph Sidney Saunders, the landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton, deposed: On Tuesday night, between ten and eleven, P.S. Stone brought the defendant to my place, and asked me if I could identify four glasses. I did so. We often miss glasses. It is the first time we have found it out.

P.S. Stone deposed: At ten p.m. on the 31st I saw defendant standing outside of the bar doors of the White Lion, apparently putting something in his pocket. He left the door in company with other soldiers. As he passed me going down the road towards Folkestone, I noticed that his pockets were bulky. I got the assistance of one of the Military Police and stopped defendant 100 or 150 yards away from the house. I hear the ring of a glass as though it left defendant's hand. Believing one was thrown in the garden behind, I found the tumbler there. I then searched the defendant and found three glasses in a pocket of his overcoat. I took him back to the White Lion, and in his presence prosecutor identified the glasses. I charged him and he made no reply. As I was leaving the house with the defendant, he bolted, and after about a quarter of an hour I found him again, with the assistance of the Military Police. He was sober.

Defendant pleaded Guilty.

P.S. Stone deposed: Whilst searching defendant on the night in question, I found a bridle and bit in his pocket. I told him it would save me some trouble if he would tell me where he got it from. He said “You find out”. I did so. He since told me that he was taking care of it for the prosecutor. I searched the other two men with defendant. Defendant said that they had nothing to do with it. I found this at the same time as the glasses.

Defendant pleaded Not Guilty, and elected to give evidence on oath. He deposed: On Tuesday night I saw Driver Ashby in the White Lion with the bridle and bit produced. I saw him place it under a seat. I saw him leave without them. I said to the party that I was with that “that young fellow has gone off without the bit and bridle”. I knew the fellow by sight. I thought that I had better take charge of it until I saw him again. I went out at 10.10 down the street. I told the Sergeant, when he stopped me for the glasses, that the bridle belonged to a man in the Artillery. The corporal of the picket took the bridle. About twenty past ten I saw the Artillery party come up, and he said “That's mine”. I was going to return it to him. I had drunk beer, but I could not tell you how many quarts I took. There were three in the company. Between 7.15 and 10.15 I went out once.

Lieutenant Hysslop produced the defaulter's sheet, and said that defendant's character was indifferent.

It appeared that the Regiment was not ordered abroad, but a draft would be going out shortly.

The Bench sentenced him to 30 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 4 November 1899.

Hythe County Police.

Thursday, November 2nd: Before J. Du Boulay Esq., Captain Mansell, Captain Denne, A. Jones and G. Thompson Esqs., and Colonel Frewin.

William Garr, of the Dorset Regiment, was charged with stealing four tumblers, the property of Joseph Sydney Saunders, landlord of the White Lion, Cheriton.

Saunders said Sergeant Stone brought the glasses to him between 10 and 11 at night, and asked him if he knew them. He had often missed glasses, including these. He had not seen the prisoner in his house.

Sergeant Stone said that at 10 p.m. on the night of the 31st he saw prisoner standing outside one of the bar doors of the White Lion, putting something in his pocket. He went off towards Folkestone with other soldiers. Witness noticed his pockets were bulky, so he got the assistance of the military police and stopped prisoner, who threw a glass into a garden. Witness searched the prisoner and found three glasses in his overcoat pocket. He took the prisoner back to the White Lion, and Mr. Saunders gave him in charge. Prisoner bolted, and Stone recaptured him with the assistance of the military police.

There was a further charge against prisoner of stealing a bridle and bit, value 15s., the property of Mr. Timothy Cong, riding master, Royal Artillery, Shorncliffe Camp.

Artillery Driver Walter Ashby said he went into the White Lion and put down the bridle and bit under a seat while he had his drink. He saw the prisoner in the bar, and when he finished his drink and looked round the prisoner and the bit and bridle had gone.

Sergeant Stone said while searching the prisoner on the night mentioned he found the bridle in one of his pockets. He said to prisoner “If you tell me where you got this it may save trouble”. Prisoner replied “Find out”. Later prisoner said he was minding the bridle for the prosecutor.

Prisoner gave evidence in his own behalf, and said he saw the driver Ashby in the White Lion place the bit and bridle under a seat. He saw Ashby leave without the things, so he said to a friend “I'll take care of that till I see the bloke again, or he'll get into trouble. I know him and will meet him again”. When the Sergeant asked him about the bridle he replied that he didn't know the artillery man's name, but he knew him by sight, and would be sure to meet him. He had no intention of stealing the bridle, but intended to return it to the man it belonged to. He had been drinking, he admitted. He had looked for the artilleryman, but could not find him, so decided to take the bridle to barracks with him. He was in the bar from 7.30 to 9.45. He did not know how many quarts he had.

Robert Maxwell Hislam, second lieutenant in the Dorset Regiment, produced the prisoner's sheet, which showed he had been in regiment since August, 1893, and his character had been indifferent. The regiment was not ordered abroad, but there would be a draft from it going to India, and prisoner would be in that draft.

The Chairman of the Bench: I don't know what you called your officer for, for your report sheet shows you to be a very serious defaulter. Perhaps you wanted to make your case very black, as you are likely to be ordered to go to India.

Prisoner was found Guilty, and sentenced to two months' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 January 1900.

Hythe Police Court.

Thursday, January 11th: Before Mr. Du Boulay, The Mayor, Capt. Smythies, Capt. Baldwin, Mr. Brockman, Mr. A.S. Jones, and Mr. Denne.

Thomas Myers was charged with being in a pair of military boots, value 10s., the property of Her Majesty, the Queen.

P.C. Wratten deposed that on the 8th inst., at 4 p.m., he was on duty in the market at Cheriton, and saw defendant leave the White Lion. He had something concealed under his coat. Witness asked what he had got. He said “What has it to do with you?” Witness took him into a stable, and defendant produced the pair of boots in question. Witness asked him how he came to be with them, and defendant said that he had bought them from some soldiers in the White Lion for 4s. Witness asked if he knew the soldiers from whom he had bought them. He said “No, I should not give the man away if I picked him”.

Defendant said that he stated that, under the circumstances, he really did not know the man. He bought the boots.

Capt. Arthur Slessor, Derbyshire Regiment, stationed at Shorncliffe, deposed that the pair produced were regulation boots. The stamp “R.I.” presumably meant Royal Irish. No authority had been given to dispose of the boots. There had been a company of the Royal Irish as mounted infantry.

P.S. Stone, of Cheriton, deposed that on the day mentioned he was on duty at the White Lion, and visited the house, where he saw about a dozen of the Royal Irish Regiment offering boots for sale, including the pair produced. A number of the men were arrested. He was present when the defendant left the house with the goods in his possession. Witness asked him who he had bought them off. He said “Of some soldiers in the White Lion”. Witness told defendant that it would be as well for him to go and identify the man. Defendant said that he did not think he could.

Defendant, who said that he was a labourer, stated that a soldier offered him the boots, and he paid for them. He put them under his coat.

Corporal Viney, Military Police, said they were ammunition boots.

Fined 1, and the costs 1 17s. 6d.

Defendant said that it was too much money.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 February 1900.

County Police Court.

Monday, 12th February: Before Capt. Baldwin and Mr. H. Strahan.

Henry Loveday, a labourer, was charged with breaking a plate glass window at the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, on the previous Friday, and doing damage to the extent of 50s.

Joseph Sidney Saunders, landlord, stated that the man came into the house shortly before dinner time, but as he appeared to be of a quarrelsome character he refused to serve him. The defendant took off his coat and struck at the barman, and witness then tried to persuade the man to go away, but he would not do so. He then ejected him from the premises, and when outside the prisoner struck at him. Witness then went in, and Loveday ran up to the door and put his fist through the embossed plate glass of the door.

Sergt. Stone stated that when he went to arrest prisoner, the latter refused to come, and he had to handcuff him and take his boots off before he could get him to the station. The man afterwards told him that he had been discharged from the Elham Workhouse Infirmary that morning after having been in three weeks with bronchitis, and he had had a little drink, which overcame him.

It was stated that the prisoner had been convicted eleven times since 1883, and the Magistrates sent Loveday to prison for six weeks with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 17 February 1900.

Hythe Police Court.

Monday February 12th: Before The Mayor and Captain Baldwin.

Henry Loveday was charged with wilfully smashing a window and doing damage to the amount of 2 10s. to the property of Mr. Saunders, of the White Lion public house, to which he pleaded Guilty.

Joseph Sidney Sauders said on the 9th February he was in his room when defendant went in and asked for some Jamaica rum. As he was rather quarrelsome he was refused. He then took off his coat and waistcoat and struck the assistant and challenged him to a fight. Witness tried to persuade him to leave the house, which he refused to do. Prisoner then wanted to fight a soldier, and afterwards wanted a few rounds with witness, who ejected him from the premises and shut the door. Prisoner returned, and finding he couldn't get it, deliberately put his fist through the window. Witness then sent for Sergeant Stone. He estimated the damage at 2 10s.

Sergt. Amos Stone, stationed at Cheriton, said about one p.m. on Friday he was sent for by last witness, who charged prisoner with wilfully breaking a pane of glass. He told prisoner he should take him into custody, when prisoner “set about him”. Witness threw him to the ground and handcuffed him, and also took off his boots, as he was very violent.

The Clerk then read out eleven previous convictions for similar offences against the prisoner since 1883. Defendant said he had just come out of the Infirmary at Elham Union.

The Bench sentenced him to six weeks' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 February 1900.

Hythe Sessions.

On Monday, before The Mayor and Captain Baldwin, Thos. Geo. Loveday, a seaman, of Folkestone, was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and doing wilful damage at the White Lion Hotel on the 9th.

Fined 2, in default 6 months' hard labour.

There were 14 previous convictions against the defendant.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1900.

Hythe Divisional Sessions.

Thursday, March 8th: Mr. J. Du Boulay presiding.

William Sands was summoned for being drunk and disorderly at Cheriton on the 24th February.

A constable deposed that at 10.30 p.m. he saw the defendant in a mad state of drunkenness, making use of very bad language. He first saw him close to the front door of the White Lion. He said he had been thrown out by Mr. Wilson.

P.S. Stone also gave evidence, and deposed that at 12.30 the same night he saw the defendant in the road with his coat off.

The defendant said that he was wild at the time, being thrown out. Were they supposed to keep a potman in the public house to “chuck” him on the back and put him out of the door? They put him out for nothing, for he did not speak a word to anybody. He did not say anything to Mr. Wilson. He was talking about the plough, so defendant said “You know nothing about ploughing”. He said “Darkie, I shall chuck you out”.

Fined 5s. and 10s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 July 1900.

Hythe Police Court.

At Hythe, on Thursday, Alfred Freid, who was summoned for refusing to quit the White Lion, on Sunday, when requested to leave by Mr. Saunders, the landlord, was fined 5s. and 10s. costs. The evidence went to show that defendant was not drunk, but excited. A week allowed for payment.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 October 1900.

Hythe Divisional Sessions.

On Thursday last, before Mr. J. Du Boulay, the Mayor, Capt. Mansell, and Mr. A.S. Jones, Mary Ann Fraser, whose husband is at the front, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly on the 17th September.

P.S. Stone, of Cheriton, saw her carrying a young child in a careless manner, and swearing because the landlord of the White Lion refused to serve her. She wanted gin to put in the baby's bottle.

Fined 11s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1901.

Hythe County Sessions.

Thursday, January 10th: Before J. Du Boulay, A.S. Jones, and H. Strahan Esqs., and Capts. Mansell and Baldwin.

John Steinbach was summoned for being drunk at Cheriton on Sunday, December 23rd. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.S. John Stevens said about 8.30 p.m. on the 23rd December he saw the defendant leave the White Lion. He went into the highway and fell down. Witness helped him up and found he was incapable, and he was obliged to see him home.

Defendant, who is an old man, said there were a lot of rough stones, and he tripped up.

The Bench dismissed him with a caution.

 

Folkestone Express 2 November 1901.

Hythe County Sessions.

Thursday, October 31st: Before J. Du Boulay, A.F. Mackinnon, A.S. Jones, F.D. Brockman, H. Strahan, O.H. Smith and E.C. Lane Esqs., and General Knowles and Captain Baldwin.

A temporary transfer of the licence of the White Lion, Cheriton from Mr. Ed. Saunders to Mr. J. Smiles, late of the Railway Bell, Folkestone, was granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 19 April 1902.

Hythe County Sessions.

Thursday, April 17th: Before J. Du Boulay, A.S. Jones, J.E. Quested, and E.C. Lanes Esqs., and Captain Mansell.

Driver Fredk. Cavendish, R.F.A. was fined 1s. and 9s. costs for being disorderly on Easter Monday at Cheriton.

Sergt. Stevens, who proved the offence, said the defendant had been ejected from the White Lion because he would fight. He then shouted “If anyone wants to fight, follow me!” One soldier did so, and a fight ensued under the railway arch.

 

Folkestone Express 4 October 1902.

Hythe Police Court.

Thursday, October 2nd: Before A.S. Jones, W. Wightwick, R.T. Denne, and J.H. Du Boulay Esqs.

Mary Bone, who did not appear, was summoned for sending her daughter, who was under fourteen years of age, for liquor.

Sergt. Stevens said about 9.30 p.m. on the 13th Sept. he saw Laura Bone leave the White Lion Hotel with a pint of stout in an unsealed bottle. The same evening he saw the defendant, who admitted sending the child for beer, but said she was over 14 years of age. Witness said the child had not left school, and then defendant said “Yes, I am very sorry”. The next day witness went to defendant's house, and saw the following entry in the family Bible “Laura Bone, 3rd Feb., 1889”. Witness took the girl back to the White Lion and saw Mr. Smiles, the proprietor. The girl then admitted having repeatedly told the proprietor she was 14 years of age, and said he mother had told her to say so.

Joseph Smiles, landlord of the White Lion, said he had asked the child her age on several occasions and she had told him fourteen years of age. He had a notice in the bottle and jug department stating that children under fourteen years of age would not be served, and he also kept a record of when the children were asked their ages and what replies they gave. The girl looked fourteen years of age.

The Superintendent said he had reported the circumstances to the Chief Inspector, who instructed him to prosecute Mrs. Bone only.

The Chairman said as it was the first case of the kind to come before them the Magistrates would deal leniently with defendant and fine her 1s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 July 1903.

Hythe County Bench.

Thursday, July 9th: Before Capt. Baldwin, Messrs. Jacques and Johns.

Thomas Collins was summoned for unlawfully sending a child, under fourteen years of age, to fetch intoxicating liquor in an unsealed bottle on June 23rd last. Defendant pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Stephen deposed to seeing the boy, named Frederick Forman (of whom defendant is the step father), outside the front premises of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, on the day in question, with a quart of beer in an unsealed bottle. He asked the boy who sent him for the beer, and he replied his father, meaning the defendant. He (witness) took the boy to his step father, who admitted sending the boy for the beer, but said he meant him to go and meet his sister and tell her to get it. The age of the boy was 12 years and 8 months.

Defendant said his wife was ill in bed, and he was going to stop with her, so he sent the boy for the beer. He had been sitting up with his wife for the last three nights.

A fine of 1s. with 4s. costs was imposed, defendant being allowed fourteen days in which to pay.

 

Folkestone Express 25 July 1903.

Inquest.

On Friday the East Kent Coroner, Mr. R.M. Mercer, investigated at an inquest at the White Lion Inn, the circumstances attending the death of Elizabeth Gosford, and the evidence showed that deceased had literally drank herself to death.

Dr. Madden deposed that he only knew the cause of deceased's death from hearsay. He made a post mortem examination and found the body covered with small haemorrhages, which indicated a very low state of health. The right lung was much contused, and the left lung slightly so. The brain was congested, and the liver enlarged. Death was due primarily to alcoholism, secondly to congestion of the lings due to alcoholism, and thirdly of heart failure due to congestion of the lungs.

Maria Godden, of 12, Primrose Villas, said that about 10 days previously deceased stopped her in the street and asked where she could procure rooms, and witness took her to a Mrs. Hopkins, who resided at No. 8, Camden Terrace. On Thursday morning, about 10.15, witness was working at a house next door to Mrs. Hopkins when she was called to No. 8, Camden Terrace by the tenant, who asked her to go into the room as she thought there was something wrong with deceased. On entering a back bedroom on the ground floor witness saw deceased lying on the floor between the door and fireplace. Witness roused deceased's husband, who was lying on the bed, but he appeared to be in a dazed condition, and witness could make nothing of him, so sent for the police.

In answer to the Coroner, witness said she only saw a small glass on the table, but P.S. Stevens stated that there were two lemonade bottles in the room.

Emily Hopkins, of No. 8, Camden Terrace, said deceased came to lodge with her on Monday week. The previous day, on opening the bedroom door, she saw deceased lying on the floor, and thinking there was something wrong sent for Mrs. Godden, who went in, and at once said “It didn't want any looking as as the woman was dead”. Deceased drank a good deal, but she never saw her drunk.

The Coroner: What do you call drunk? – When they lie down helpless.

Where did she get the money? – I think she had it left her.

Had she paid you? – Yes, one week.

The Foreman: Are you in the habit of taking people into the house, and then sending for drink when they have been refused it at public houses? – No.

Did you send for drink for this woman? – Yes, on Wednesday.

How much? – Two half pints of whisky in the morning.

How many half pints did they have during the day? – Five or six.

Deceased's husband stated that his wife was 58 years of age, and a native of Wigan. She was a laundress, and had a legacy of 100 in April last.

The Coroner: Have you been out lately? – Yes, I have been to the Victoria, but never had anything to drink.

They refused to serve you? – Yes; there, and here, too.

You sent other people for drink? – Yes, now and then.

How much did you drink on Wednesday? – I don't know. I don't recollect anything lately.

The Coroner: I don't wonder! Did you go to bed on Wednesday night? – Yes. I have had plenty of sleep lately.

When did you wake up? – At 10 o'clock on Thursday morning, and then saw my wife lying on the floor.

Do you know the doctor says she died of drink? – Perhaps so.

Have you nothing to say to that? – No. I would like to excuse her if I could.

The jury returned a verdict of “Death from alcoholic poisoning”.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1903.

Inquest.

The East Kent Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer) held an inquest at the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, on Tuesday evening, touching the death of Vincent Gosford, 68 years of age, formerly a colour sergeant in the Grenadier Guards.

It will be remembered that some two months ago deceased's wife died from excessive drinking, and at the time Mr. Mercer warned the husband that he would also die from the same cause unless he was very careful.

Emily Hopkins, of No. 8, Camden Terrace, said that deceased had lodged with her for some time and occupied the same room in which his wife died. On Saturday afternoon witness saw deceased sitting in a chair, and on Sunday morning, on her entering the room, deceased was lying under the bed with only his feet showing. In the afternoon deceased was still in the same position, and witness asked whether he would have a cup of tea. He, however, told her to clear out as he did not want anything to eat or drink. On Monday morning deceased was lying in the same position, but as witness could get no answer from him she went for Sergt. Stevens. He had not been in bed since Saturday.

The Coroner: When did he have any food? – On Saturday morning.

What sort? A herring and bread and butter.

Had he been drinking? – Not so much lately. On Saturday morning I fetched him a quart of stout, and 1s. worth of ginger brandy in the afternoon.

This man has been living in the room since his wife died. He eventually died after lying under the bed for two days. Why did you not send for a doctor? – On Saturday I asked whether I should send for a doctor, and he said no. He once threatened to shoot anyone with a revolver who went in and disturbed him, and I was afraid of him.

The Coroner: I think you should give up keeping lodgers. You are rather unlucky. – I think I shall after this.

P.S. Stevens said that he was called by the last witness at 9.30 the previous morning to No. 8, Camden Terrace. He there saw deceased lying under the bed with his head in the corner of the room.

The Coroner: How high was the bed from the floor? – About 18 inches.

Then he must have crawled there? – Yes.

Continuing, witness said that he found several papers lying near the body. They were mostly respecting the transfer of his wife's money to him.

The Coroner: How much had he left? - 40.

Hadn't they 70 when his wife died? – They had about 60.

They had two separate accounts? – Yes; one in the Post Office and also some money in Lloyd's Bank. Deceased gave the last witness and another woman 2 each for attending to his wife, and he had also paid a solicitor for the transfer of the money, so that was where the rest had gone. There was 6s. 6d. on the body.

In answer to the Coroner, witness said that on the table there was a herring, and also some bread and butter, none of which had been touched.

Dr. Madden deposed that he had that afternoon made a post mortem examination. Witness had been told that deceased talked a great deal in his sleep, and was always fancying that he could see the face of his dead wife. His lungs were congested; the left very much so; his liver and heart were fatty – in fact he had a drunkard's liver. The primary cause of death was alcoholism, and the secondary cause was congestion of the lungs. The hallucinations from which deceased suffered and the fact that he was found in such a peculiar position led witness to suppose that deceased suffered from delirium tremens, and had crawled under the bed to escape imaginary faces.

Sergt. Stevens, in answer to the Coroner, said that he could find no trace whatever of any relatives, and the Coroner therefore ordered the money, &c., to be hand over to Supt. Hollands.

The jury returned a verdict of “Death from alcoholism”.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 September 1903.

Inquest.

On Tuesday evening, at the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, the Coroner, Mr. Mercer, held an inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Vincent Gosford, an army pensioner, formerly colour sergeant in the Grenadier Guards, who was found dead, lying underneath his bed, on Monday morning.

Emily Hopkins, widow, was the first witness called. She said that deceased lodged with her at No. 8, Camden Terrace. On Monday morning she went to his room and found him lying under the bed. She went to police sergeant Stevens and asked him to come, as she thought deceased was dead. The policeman came and saw the body with witness. On Saturday at 3 p.m. witness saw deceased sitting in a chair in his room. On Sunday morning she saw him lying on the floor underneath his bed in the same position as when found dead. At five o'clock in the afternoon she again saw him lying in the exact same position. She asked him if he wanted a cup of tea, and he replied “No”. He spoke quite plainly and told her to “clear out”. He had not been in his bed since Saturday. He last had food, to witness's knowledge, on Sunday morning, when she took him a herring and some bread and butter. He had not had much drink at that place lately, witness fetching him the last on Friday. He had been in his room all alone since his wife died. On Saturday morning witness asked him if she could clean his window, but he told her he had got a six chambered revolver and if she did not clear out he would shoot her. She asked him on Saturday if she should send for a doctor, and he replied “No”. She felt nervous as he had told her he had a revolver, and left.

Police Sergeant Stevens, stationed at Cheriton, deposed that on Monday morning at 9.30, from information received, he went to No. 8, Camden Terrace, where he found deceased lying underneath the bed, on his back, with his head up in the corner of the room. The bed was only about eighteen inches from the floor, and deceased must have crawled there, it being impossible for him to have fallen in the position in which he was. Deceased was infirm, having something the matter with his foot. He had 40 in the bank. In the pockets of decease, witness found 6s. 6d. There was a herring and some bread and butter lying in the room, untouched, but no intoxicating liquor whatever, nor any signs of any.

Mr. F.B. Madden, medical practitioner, Morehall, said Mrs. Hopkins informed him the last Wednesday morning deceased complained to her of feeling poorly. He was shaking and trembling very much. He had kept constantly talking at night lately, so that the other lodgers in the house complained of it. On one occasion he told Mrs. Hopkins that he had seen his dead wife. Witness, continuing, said he had made a post mortem examination of the body. Externally there were no signs of injury whatever. Internally the lungs were congested very much, and the heart and liver were flabby. The trembling and constant talking at night, and the hallucination, pointed to delirium tremens, and the condition of the lungs, liver and heart were quite in keeping with alcoholism. He attributed death primarily to alcoholism.

In reply to the Coroner, Mr. Madden said in his opinion death took place at least thirty six hours before he had examined the body. He thought that deceased had died soon after the first witness last saw him alive.

After a short consultation the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 August 1904.

Folkestone Gossip.

Mr. J. Smiles, of the White Lion, Cheriton, has resigned his seat as a Guardian for the North Ward of Folkestone, and been returned unopposed for Cheriton in the place of Mr. Peter Kesby. This changing of horses in the middle of the stream will throw the cost of a by-election upon Folkestone. The Hon. Miss Daly is a probable candidate for the Folkestone vacancy.

 

Folkestone Express 1 April 1905.

Hythe County Police.

Thursday, March 30th: Before J. Du Boulay Esq., Col. Hutchins, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, F.E. Burke, F.D. Brockman, A.S. Jones, T. Amos, F.A. MacKinnon and H.P. Jacques Esqs.

Frederick Barker was summoned for refusing to quit the licensed premises of the White Lion Hotel when requested to do so by the landlord, Mr. J.G. Smiles, on March 17th. Defendant pleaded Guilty. Mr. B.C. Drake prosecuted on behalf of the complainant.

Mr. Smiles said on Friday, March 17th, there were a number of men in the house, when he was sent for by his son into the bar. He asked a man to go out because he had had sufficient to drink. Defendant then began to use obscene language, and complainant asked him to go out three or four times, but he refused to do so. He used more bad language, and eventually defendant went out on the arrival of a policeman. Defendant was not drunk.

Defendant said under the circumstances he was a bit put out. His comrade was “chucked” out of the house, and he felt “a kind of hurt” about it.

Fined 10s. and 35s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 April 1905.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, March 30th: Before Mr. J. Du Boulay, Councillor T. Amos, Councillor H.P. Jacques, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Colonel Hutchins, Messrs. A.S. Jones, F.E. Burke, and F.D. Mackinnon.

Fredk. Barker, an out porter, of Cheriton, was summoned for refusing to quit the White Lion, Cheriton, on the 17th March.

Mr. Drake, who appeared for complainant, said that the White Lion was a licensed house which had always been conducted in a proper way, and if people were allowed to come in and be abusive, it would become very difficult to carry on the house as it should be. The licensee was determined to let the public know that the house was to be conducted as it had been in the past.

Mr. Joseph G. Smiles, landlord of the White Lion, said that on the 17th March he was called into the bar to ask a man who had had enough to drink to leave the premises. Defendant, who was in the bar, declared that the man was sober, and interfering, he became quarrelsome. The defendant protested against the man being put out, and witness advised him to go. He refused to go, and witness sent for a constable, who took his name. The defendant was not drunk, and had only had a half of ale on the premises.

Defendant pleaded Guilty, and explained to the witness that his reason for interfering was because he thought it was right to stick up for a mate.

To the Bench he said “My comrade was chucked out, and I felt a kind of hurt”.

He was fined 10s. and 35s. costs.

Defendant asked for a month in which payment would be allowed, and the Bench agreed to let him pay half in fourteen days, and the remainder in another fourteen days.

The Chairman pointed out that the Magistrates were very severe with publicans if they allowed certain people to remain on their premises, but when those people obstructed the licence holders and were summoned, then the Bench had no sympathy with them.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 June 1905.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, June 8th: Before Capt. Mansell, Capt. Hutcheson and Mr. F.E. Burke.

Thomas Sutton was summoned for being drunk and disorderly at Cheriton.

P.C. Stevens stated that on Saturday evening, May 27th, he saw the prisoner in High Street very drunk. He entered the White Lion Hotel, but was ejected by the landlord. When outside he became very excited, and after considerable persuasion his friends succeeded in taking him home.

Defendant, who pleaded Guilty, was fined 10s. and 11s. costs, or in default 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 3 February 1906.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the White Lion, Cheriton, on Monday, by the County Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer), respecting the death of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Giddy, of 25, Dunnett Road, which was suffocated on Friday morning.

Alfred James Giddy said he was an agent for an assurance company. He was 25 years of age and had been married about fourteen months. Deceased was his child. It had not been registered or christened. It was born on January the 23rd. About half past two on Friday morning he heard the baby crying. At three o'clock he got up and made some tea for his wife. She asked him to put deceased on the pillow, which he did. Upon his wife asking him if deceased was all right, as she thought he looked funny, witness looked at him and put his lips to deceased. They felt clammy, and holding deceased to the light, he saw his face was blue. He then sent for Dr. Madden. Witness's mother was present.

Mrs. Giddy corroborated, adding that deceased must have been suffocated against its mother's breast.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

In dismissing the jury, the Coroner said it was ridiculous so many men having to be taken away from their work to attend that inquest. He hoped the new Parliament would do something to reduce the number of the Coroner's jury.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 February 1906.

Inquest.

An inquest was held by the East Kent County Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer), at the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, on Monday, regarding the death of the infant son of Mr. A.J. and Mrs Giddy.

Alfred Jas. Giddy stated that he was 25 years of age, and had been married fourteen months. He lived at 25, Dunnett Road, and was an agent for the Prudential Insurance Company. The child was born on January 23rd, and had neither been registered or christened. On Thursday evening he went to bed as usual, and on rising in the morning got some tea for his wife. She asked him to remove the baby, which was lying face downward on her breast, so that she might take it. He did so, and discovered that its face was blue. He concluded that the child was dead, but sent for Dr. Madden. His mother was there, and she was an experienced person.

Mrs. Giddy (the last witness's mother) stated that she was there when the doctor came, and he stated that the child had been suffocated. She stripped the child while he was there, and found that there were no marks of violence on the body; only those indicating suffocation.

The Coroner said he was sorry for the parents. What was true years ago was true today. They preached against mothers taking the children to sleep with them, but they would do it. It was rather ridiculous that thirteen men should be taken from their work to hold that enquiry, and he hoped that the new Parliament would do something to reduce the number of inquests.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Express 11 May 1907.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at Cheriton on Tuesday afternoon by the East Kent Coroner (Mr. R.M, Mercer) respecting the death of Mary Dow (61), who met with a fatal accident at 5, Albert Road, Cheriton, on Saturday morning.

Henry Dow, widower of deceased, said he was an Army pensioner. He came home at 11.30 on Saturday morning. Deceased was washing, and he said he had better get the dinner. Deceased went downstairs, and then witness heard her fall. Witness went down and saw her at the bottom of the stairs. She came up the stairs carrying a kettle. Deceased was 61 years of age. She had never suffered from fainting fits, and witness could not account for the accident. Witness sent for a doctor, and he came at 12.30. Deceased died at 4.30 in witness's presence.

Henry Moseling, barman at the White Lion Hotel, said he heard the accident at ten minutes to twelve. He went to the house and found deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs. She was unconscious. Witness bathed her head and got deceased upstairs. A nurse came soon after and witness then left. Deceased was not able to tell witness how it happened.

Dr. Walter W. Nuttall, practicing at Folkestone, said he arrived at the house at 12.40. Deceased was lying in bed. Her head was bandaged and she was unconscious. Witness examined her and found she had a cut on her head about an inch and a half long. There was another large bruise on the right forearm and the skin was broken. Witness advised deceased's removal to the Hospital, but there was some difficulty in obtaining an ambulance, and she was not removed. Witness did not see deceased again. He could not say what the specific injury was from which she died. Presumably it was shock, but he could not say for certain.

The Coroner advised the jury to bring in a verdict that death was due to injuries received from accidentally falling downstairs, and a verdict was returned to that effect.

The Coroner then asked if anything had been done with reference to having a medical officer nearer to the district. He had written to the Clerk to the Guardians, and was assured they would take it into consideration. What had been done he did not know.

Mr. Smiles, a Guardian, said the Board had communicated with the Local Government Board, but as there was no medical man resident in the district the Guardians could not alter the existing state of affairs.

The Coroner said he did not think they had got any more forward.

Mr. Smiles said they were very reluctant to appoint a doctor for that district alone.

The Coroner said he could not help thinking something ought to be done, and intimated that he would see into the matter.

 

Folkestone Express 2 July 1910.

Hythe County Police.

Thursday, June 30th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Capt. Mansell, and Messrs. F.E. Burke, A.S. Jones, H.P. Jacques, R.J. Linton, E. Tudor Johnson, and A.M. Curteis.

Joseph Smith, a groom in the employ of an officer in the Artillery at Shorncliffe, was summoned by his brother-in-law, John Allen, of 2, Somerset Road, Cheriton, for assaulting him on Saturday night.

Complainant's story was that on Saturday afternoon he went home and complained to his wife about a pair of trousers and a shirt being washed. He went out, and returned shortly after eleven o'clock, when his son-in-law hit him three times in the chest, knocking him down once.

The Clerk: Does he live with you?

Complainant: Yes, he does, worst luck.

Continuing, he said he was sober, but the defendant never was. He picked up a jug for self-protection, as the defendant said he would kill him. Smith was a common soldier, at eight “bob” a week. It was not the first time he had knocked him down.

Defendant went into the box and said the house was now in his name. On Saturday night he saw his father-in-law being turned out of the White Lion by Mr. Smiles, because he was drunk. He therefore took his (Allen's) fish barrow home. Complainant arrived home five minutes after him, and he commenced to use bad language. As there were children about, he (defendant) told him he ought to be ashamed of himself. Allen then picked up a jug to aim at him, and it broke, with the result that his (defendant's) finger was cut. Allen's daughter got between them, and she pushed her father down. It was untrue that he put a hand on the man.

Lily Allen, the complainant's daughter, corroborated her brother-in-law's story, and when she was giving her evidence her father frequently interrupted her, and he would not be quiet until the Magistrates told him he would be ejected from the Court. The witness said her father was drunk, and she denied that her brother-in-law struck him.

The Bench dismissed the case, and ordered the complainant to pay 3s. costs.

 

Folkestone Daily News 19 June 1911.

Local News.

On Wednesday the Justices were occupied for two hours in adjudicating whether John Lilley, a military policeman, stationed at Shorncliffe Camp, was the father of a female child that Emily Jane Atkins, formerly a servant at the White Lion Hotel, had given birth to in October last.

Mr. H. Myers appeared for the young lady, and Mr. W.G. Haines defended the policeman. The facts were simple, and a number of letters were put in, which furnished the necessary corroboration. Defendant displayed some levity, laughing at the plaintiff, who was in a highly nervous state, which called forth a stern and severe rebuke from Mr. Herbert, the chairman of the Bench.

Plaintiff's story was that she walked out with Lilley on several occasions, which resulted in the birth of a female child on the 21st of October, 1910. When she told him of her condition, he promised to marry her as soon as he was able, and in the meantime sent her money amounting to about 4 or 5 at various intervals. This was borne out by the letters that were produced. He had also bought her an engagement ring at Joseph's, in Tontine Street. An elder sister corroborated her evidence as to an interview both before and after the child was born.

Lilley admitted walking out, etc., with the plaintiff, but disputed various dates. He also charged her with walking out with a Lance Corporal named Hawkes. A military police regulations book was produced by a Corporal from the Camp, which tended to prove that he was on duty on the dates on which Atkins swore she was walking out with him.

The justices, after retiring for some time to consider the matter, adjudicated defendant the father of the child and ordered him to pay 2s. 6d. a week until it is 16 years of age, and also to pay the costs.

 

Folkestone Express 24 June 1911.

Wednesday, June 21st: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and J. Linton, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and G. Boyd Esqs.

Corpl. Lilley, of the Military Foot Police, was summoned to show cause why he should not contribute towards the support of the illegitimate child of Emma Jane Atkins, a single woman, formerly in service at Cheriton. Mr. Myers appeared for the complainant, and Mr. G.W. Haines for the defendant.

Complainant stated that she was now residing at 27, St. John's Road, Folkestone. On the 21st of October she gave birth to a female child, of which defendant was the father. She first met him in February, 1910. She detailed the various interviews she had had with the defendant, who promised to marry her and had paid her several sums of money, amounting altogether to about 4. She produced several letters the defendant had sent her.

In cross-examination the complainant appeared to be quite unable to fix the year when she first met defendant, but it was eventually accepted that it was in 1910, and not 1909. She admitted that she had walked out with Lance Corporal Hawkes, but her relations with him were not similar to those she had with the defendant. She never told the defendant that she was sorry she had put it on to him. Defendant had spoken to her about Hawkes, and since then he had paid 15s. for the child and 5s. for herself.

Elizabeth Atkins, of Linton, said she was sister of the complainant. She saw the defendant at Maidstone in September, and he said he would find a home for the girl and do the best for her. Defendant said they would settle down and look after her. He also mentioned a man named Hawkes. She had received several postcards from the defendant, who had told her that the child did not belong to him. In February last, at her home, the defendant offered to pay 2s. 6d. a week towards the maintenance for the child.

Corpl. F. Green, of the Military Foot Police at the Camp, said he produced Army Book 125, which related to the duties of the military police. The entries were in his handwriting. In the details as to duty on Sunday, Feb. 6th, 1910, Lilley was on duty from eight p.m. until the streets were cleared – about half past eleven. He was on duty in uniform.

Defendant, on oath, said he first knew the complainant on 30th March, 1910. He fixed that date because it was the day after his birthday. Prior to that date he had never been out with her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Myers, defendant said the second time he went out with the complainant was on April 6th, and he walked out with her several times up to May 8th. He was not the father of the child. He thought once he was the father, but he discovered in October that he was not. Since that date he had sent her money. He thought a lot of the girl, and that was the reason he sent it. In February last he promised to assist her, as she said she was “hard up” and had no clothes until she got employment. He told her on several occasions that she should apply to the right man for the maintenance of her child.

The Bench retired, and on their return the Chairman announced that the Bench were unanimously of the opinion that the case was proved against the defendant, who would have to pay 2s. 6d. a week from that day until the child was 16 years of age.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1911.

Wednesday, June 21st: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggett, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd.

William John Lilley was summoned by Emily Jane Atkins to show just cause, etc. Mr. Myers appeared for the plaintiff, and the defendant was represented by Mr. G.W. Haines.

Complainant stated defendant was a Lance Corporal in the Military Police, and she first knew him in February of 1910.

Defendant denied the paternity, but he was ordered to pay 2s. 6d. a week till the child was 16 years of age, and also the costs of the case.

 

Folkestone Express 28 October 1911.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, October 26th: Before E. Garnet Man, J. Du Boulay, F.E. Burke, A.S. Jones, J.E. Quested, R.J. Linton, M. Curties, T. Maltby, and H. Lee Esqs.

William Newington, a private in the 11th Hussars, was summoned under the Bastardy Act. Mr. De Wet appeared on behalf of the defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Florence Wilson, a single woman, of 144, High Street, Cheriton, said the defendant was the father of her child. She first met him in August of last year, and on the 14th December she told him of her condition. He said he could not pay anything while he was in the Army, and refused to have anything to do with the child. The child, a female, was born on the 14th September last. Defendant admitted the paternity of the child in witness's mother's presence, but he had not paid anything.

Eliza Finn, of 77 Ashley Avenue, Cheriton, said the last witness was her daughter. When she found out her daughter's condition, she wrote to the defendant. He came to see her and said he would see the complainant righted. On Whit Sunday night he promised to marry her, but could not until he was out of the Army. Witness put in a letter in defendant's handwriting, in which he said he would take the matter to the civil court and see the case right through.

Mrs. Wise said she lived with Mrs. Finn and had seen the defendant and complainant at the house.

Defendant then gave evidence. He said he was a private in the 11th Hussars, stationed at Aldershot, and was an officer's servant. Continuing, he said he was introduced to complainant at the White Lion, Cheriton, on the first Thursday evening in August, and they went to 104, High Street, and he stopped there all night. The next morning the regiment went off to manoeuvres, returning in October. On the 18th December he went away on furlough for eleven weeks. He came back on March 14th, and was quartered at Sandgate. Complainant visited him at Sandgate on three occasions, but he told her he could do nothing, because it was nothing to do with him. He had never made any admission of the paternity, and there was no truth in the statement that he was the father of the complainant's child.

Ernest Morris, private in the 11th Hussars, corroborated.

This concluded the case, and the Magistrates retired. On their return the Chairman said they had come to the conclusion that there was not sufficient corroborative evidence to support the summons, and therefore they dismissed it.

The complainant said she should appeal.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 May 1912.

Elham County Bench/

Thursday, May 16th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Commander A.B. Mansell, Mr. J. Du Boulay, Mr. F.E. Burke, Mr. A.M. Curties, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. E. Tudor Johnson, and Mr. W.G. Tester.

Edwd. Dorrell was summoned for being drunk and disorderly on the 12th inst. at Cheriton.

P.C. Kenward stated that he saw the defendant from his house. Dorrell was acting in a very disorderly manner, and on going to him he found that he was drunk.

The Chairman: Where did he get his liquor from?

Witness: Well, I have since found out that he had visited the Working Men's Club, and afterwards went to the White Lion, where, it appears, some customer put whisky in his beer.

The Chairman: Then he didn't get drunk purposely. Do you know who the customer was?

Witness: No, sir. I couldn't find out.

The Rev. John Daniel, Baptist Minister at Cheriton, said defendant was a member of his church, and they had missed him lately. He could speak for his good character.

The Chairman said the Bench would not convict in this case, but defendant would have to pay the costs (6s. 6d.). And Mr. Garnet Man added “And mind you keep out of the public houses in future, but it was a Working Men's Club, wasn't it? Well, keep away from that, too”.

 

Folkestone Daily News 23 April 1913.

Extract from The Cheriton News.

Why should Cheriton wait for more adequate licensing accommodation? There are at present only three licensed houses in Cheriton proper, one being a very small off licence, which can hardly be taken into account.

The White Lion Hotel practically possesses a monopoly unequalled in England. It is situate on the main road, and also faces the main road to the Camp. It has front and side frontages, and bar accommodation of about 150 feet, five splendid bars fitted up equal to those in the best London and suburban thoroughfares. It is equipped with five or six registered tills and staffs in the bars that can cope with four or five hundred customers. It also owns and has control of the frontage apart from the main road, and the enormous amount of business that we have noticed on Sunday evenings in the summer has been marvellous.

It now adjoins the only picture palace in Cheriton, and is also surrounded with laundries and other manufactories; in fact, on the north side of the railway it may be said to be the only place of public accommodation.

When population, rateable value, and everything is considered it seems marvellous that such a monopoly could exist.

In the exercise of our duty of looking into public matters, we imagined that this large hotel would probably be very valuable and would contribute largely towards the rates of Cheriton. We imagined that it would have been an asset to the ratepayers of Cheriton somewhat in comparison with the large hotels in Folkestone, and that it would command a somewhat similar rent.

By reference to a column of the Folkestone Daily News, which appears in this paper, it will be seen that the Queen's Hotel is rated at 850 per year. We really thought that the White Lion Hotel, with all its facilities, would have been valued at something approaching that figure. On making enquiries we were amazed to find that the gross annual figure fixed by the Overseers of Cheriton for this magnificent hotel was only 210 per annum gross, and only has to pay rates on 168 per year.

Where are the enterprising brewery companies, wine and spirit merchants, etc.? They are complaining of depression of trade. We should think that with such premises so low rated they might be induced to erect buildings, obtain licences, and provide Cheriton with the increased hotel and licensed accommodation that is necessary.

We are so amazed and startled at the figures of this hotel that we visited the only other hotel, viz., the Victoria, which is situate in Risborough Lane on the main road to the Camp. This is a modern hotel, well fitted with two bars, and capable of accommodating about 100 persons. The frontage is a little over 50 feet, and we consequently thought that, taking the assessment of the White Lion as a basis for Cheriton's rateable value, this place should have been assessed at about 60 per annum.

Oh, ye Gods! Judge our surprise at finding that the Victoria Hotel is rated at 200 per year gross and 160 rateable, within 8 of its competitor, which is practically three times as large, and maintains such a unique position.

We are only interested in these matters for the public, but we can imagine brewery companies and others fighting shy of Cheriton, and declining to provide necessary accommodation, when the assessment is carried out on such lines.

How do the Overseers and others arrive at their figures, and how do they draw their comparisons? What is the excise valuation of the White Lion? Surely those authorities would not be content with such a moderate assessment.

 

Folkestone Express 15 November 1913.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, November 13th: Before E. Garnet Man Esq., Dr. Tyson, A.S. Jones, F.E. Burke, R.J. Linton, and W.G. Tester Esqs.

Jesse Jaye, a builder's labourer, was summoned for refusing to quit the licensed premises of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton. He was further summoned for assaulting Henry Ward, the manager of the hotel. Mr. A. Atkinson represented Mr. J.G. Smiles, the proprietor of the hotel, and Mr.H.W. Watts appeared for the defendant.

Harry Ward, the manager of the hotel, said on Friday evening, the 17th October, the barman called his attention to Jaye, who was worse for drink. He had had trouble with the defendant before, and they had had to eject him four or five times since July. He asked Jaye to leave the bar, and he opened the door. He refused to go, so he asked him altogether three times to leave. Witness went towards him, and the defendant went out. Five minutes after, the defendant said “You're no man; come outside”. He (witness) told him not to come back again, or he would get into trouble. He (witness) went behind the bar, and the defendant remained on the premises. Defendant came up again, and remained at the corner of the front of the house. Defendant took his coat off, and they eventually had a struggle.

Cross-examined, witness said they did not want the defendant on the premises at all, whether he was drunk or sober. He did not push the defendant as he was going out of the door. Jaye, when he came back, looked in the door, but he was on licensed premises. When P.C. Kenward told the defendant to go away, he went.

Frederick Hogben, barman, said on the evening of October 17th he saw the defendant come into the house the worse for drink, so he called the manager's attention to him. Defendant had on many occasions been ordered to leave the house. He heard the manager three times request the defendant to go out of the house.

Cross-examined, witness said Jaye did not ask for any drink.

Mr. J.G. Smiles said the defendant was well-known to him, and was a nuisance to everyone when he had a little drink. He had had to eject the defendant no less than twenty times. The defendant was all right when he was sober.

Cross-examined, witness said he had forbidden the man the house, as he had jeopardised his licence.

P.C. Kenward said about 10 p.m. on October 17th he went to the east end entrance of the White Lion Hotel, where he saw the defendant and Mr. Ward. Jaye was the worse for drink, and he (witness) advised him to go home.

Cross-examined, witness said no-one went home with defendant.

Edward Philpott, who was called by the defendant, said he was in the White Lion when Jaye came in. The defendant was sober, and spoke to him about some work. Ward came up and ordered the defendant out of the house. He opened the door, and as Jaye was going out of the door, Ward gave him a violent push. Jaye offered no resistance. Later, the defendant looked in at the bar again, and afterwards he saw Jaye and Ward struggling on the ground.

Cross-examined, witness said he heard the defendant requested to leave the bar on other occasions.

Arthur William Stapleton, an insurance agent, said he saw the “scrap” between Ward and Jaye. He walked home with the latter, who was excited, but quite sober.

George Knight, a painter, said he was in the White Lion Hotel, when he heard Ward ask Jaye to leave the premises. Jaye was asked three times altogether to leave. Defendant was excited, but he could not say that he was drunk; he might have had a glass or two of beer.

Cross-examined, witness said he had known trouble in the Lion with the defendant before.

Defendant said he might have had two pints of beer before he went into the White Lion Hotel. He was speaking to Mr. Philpott when Mr. Ward told him to go outside. As he was going out of the house Mr. Ward pushed him out. He admitted he returned, but only put his head in the doorway.

The Bench retired, and on their return into Court the Chairman said the Magistrates had decided to convict.

Supt. Hollands proved three previous convictions against the defendant for being drunk and disorderly, the last occasion being on October 2nd.

The Magistrates decided to bind defendant over to be of good behaviour for twelve months, and made it a condition that he was not to go into the White Lion Hotel.

The summons against Jaye for assault was withdrawn.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 November 1913.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, November 13th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. R.J. Linton, Dr. Tyson, Mr. F.E. Burke, and Mr. W.G. Tester.

Jesse Jay was summoned for refusing to quit licensed premises when requested. There was a further summons for assaulting Mr. Harry Ward, the manager of the White Lion, Cheriton, but this was withdrawn. Mr. A. Atkinson represented complainant, and Mr. H.W. Watts, defendant.

Mr. Harry Ward, manager of the White Lion, Cheriton, under Mr. J.G. Smiles, at whose instance the summons was taken out, said he remembered Friday evening, October 17th, when the barman called his attention to prisoner, who was very drunk. Prisoner was not a stranger to witness; he had had trouble with him four or five times since July. Witness requested him to leave the premises, but he did not go. Witness went to the door and opened it, and again asked him to go. When he had been asked three times, prisoner went out. Five minutes afterwards he returned and said to witness “You're no man. Come outside”. Witness told him not to come back again, or he would get into trouble.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watts: Defendant did not call for a drink; he was talking to a man named Edward Philpott. Witness told him to leave the premises because he was drunk, and because he had had instructions not to allow him on the premises. If he had been perfectly sober, he would have been told to go. Witness did not push defendant out into the street.

Mr. Fredk. Hogben, a barman at the White Lion, said he called Mr. Ward's attention to defendant, who was drunk. Defendant had been in the house many times before, and had on several occasions been a nuisance. For that reason the house was barred to him. Whenever he came in he nearly always started an argument, whether sober or drunk; he was a nuisance to the other customers.

Mr. J.G. Smiles, the proprietor of he White Lion, said defendant was one of the best of men when he was sober. It did not take very much to make him drunk, and he would drink. When he was under the influence of drink he was very argumentative. He bore the man no malice, but he jeopardised his (Mr. Smiles') licence, and for that reason he had given orders that he was not to be allowed to use the house.

P.C. Kenward stated that he went to the east entrance to the hotel, where he saw Jay, who was drunk. Later he saw defendant having a “scrap” with Ward. He advised defendant to go home, which he did. He stumbled in his walk, and his speech was not coherent. Witness did not know that Mr. Stapleton accompanied defendant to the end of his street.

This ended the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Edward Philpott, a labourer, said that defendant came into the bar to speak to him about some work for witness. He was perfectly sober. After he had been there about five or ten minutes Mr. Ward asked him to go out, which he did immediately. As he was going through the door Ward gave him a violent push, which nearly knocked him on his face. Jay offered no resistance, and he walked quite steadily.

Mr. Arthur Stapleton, an insurance agent, living at Cheriton, said that he walked with defendant to the end of his street. He was perfectly sober, and his talk was quite sensible.

Mr. George Knight, a painter, said he was in the bar when Jay came in. Ward asked him to go out, which he did. As he was going through the door, Ward pushed him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Atkinson, witness said Jay might have had a drink or two. He was not drunk. He did not have anything to drink in the White Lion, to witness's knowledge.

Defendant, on oath, said he was a builder's labourer. On the day in question he went into the White Lion to speak to Philpott about some work he was doing for him. He did not call for a drink, and did not have any while he was in there. When he had been in there for about five or ten minutes Ward asked him to go out, which he immediately did. As he went out Ward pushed him very violently.

It was stated that the last time prisoner was convicted was in October, when he was charged with being drunk and disorderly. Previous to that he had not been before the Court for twelve months.

Prisoner was bound over in his own recognisances in the sum of 5 to keep the peace for twelve months, a condition being that he did not enter the White Lion.

 

Folkestone Express 3 October 1914.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, October 1st: Before E. Garnet Man, F.E. Burke, A.S. Jones, A.M. Curties, E.J. Bishop, H.P. Jacques, and W.G. Tester Esqs.

Edwin Goldsmith, 110, High Street, Cheriton, was summoned by William Dowley for assaulting him. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty.

Prosecutor said he lived at 7, Albert Road, Cheriton. On September 22nd, he had been out, and stood at the bottom of the road at 9.05, when defendant and his wife came along. Defendant struck him, but the defendant said nothing to him, only he said to Goldsmith “You are an old man, and short-sighted”. Defendant struck him again, and he remembered no more until he was picked up. Defendant called him a “Dirty dog”. He had never spoken to the man in his life, and had given him no provocation whatever.

P.S. Curties said he received information that a man was lying in Albert Road. He went to the spot, and there saw three of Lord Kitchener's Army, who had lifted the man up and taken him to his lodgings in Albert Road. He went to the house and saw the complainant, who had a good deal of blood about his face. He was the worse for drink.

Defendant said at 8.15 the complainant was in the White Lion, abusing a woman with whom he (Dowley) at one time lived. A soldier told him if he did not go away he would give him a good hiding. Complainant went away, but came back again about ten minutes afterwards. The soldier went for him, and punched him, when the plaintiff bolted up Sidney Street. When he (defendant) went along Albert Road, complainant said to him “I will give you a ---- good hiding, as you are the cause of all the trouble”. He struck at him, but he stopped the blow and hit the complainant, knocking him down. Dowley got up, but he (witness) hit him again.

The Chairman said it was clear Dowley got a tremendous hammering. The defendant, however, was not satisfied with knocking him down once. He would have to pay a fine of 5/- and 12/- costs.

A fortnight was allowed for payment.

 

Folkestone Express 14 November 1914.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, November 12th: Before E. Garnet Man Esq., Sir Clarence Smith, F.E. Burke, A.S. Jones, W.G. tester and E.J. Bishop Esqs.

Alfred Freed, of Cheriton, was summoned for refusing to quit the licensed premises of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, on October 26th, and also for assaulting Charles Palmer, the manager of the hotel, on the same day. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. H. Stainer, who appeared on behalf of the licence holder (Mr. J.G. Smiles), said he wished to emphasise the fact that with so many troops about that support should be given by the Magistrates to licence holders who endeavoured to conduct their business properly.

Mr. Palmer said he was manager of the White Lion Hotel for Mr. J.G. Smiles, the licence holder. On October 26th the defendant had been in the house some time with some others, and they began to get a little merry. He gave instructions that they were not to be served with any more drink. The defendant was refused, and he leant over the bar and pushed a nine gallon jar of ginger beer over, and broke the corner. He told the defendant he would not have that sort of nonsense there, and asked him to go out. He tapped him on the shoulder, but the man refused to go, so he called in P.C. Saunders. The man then went out. About half an hour after he came back again, so he (complainant) went outside to look for a constable. He defendant followed him in the street and struck him in the mouth, knocking him into the road. Freed was not under the influence of drink, but he had had enough.

George Clayson, barman at the White Lion Hotel, said Mr. Palmer gave him orders not to serve the man and others with him. He refused to serve him, and just afterwards the defendant pushed the ginger beer jar on to the floor. Mr. Palmer asked the man to go out, but as he would not a police constable was fetched. Defendant came in again about 20 minutes later.

P.C. Saunders gave evidence of being called to the White Lion Hotel, and having to order the defendant off the premises.

Defendant, in the witness box, said he admitted he was a little stubborn in refusing to quit the licensed premises. With regard to the assault, the manager of the hotel pushed him, and somehow or other he hit him (defendant) under the chin. He thereupon struck him. That was all he did, and it was really nothing but a schoolboys' fight. The reason he went back into the house a second time was to ask what damage had been done by the ginger beer jar.

Mr. Stainer said Mr. Smiles did not press for a heavy penalty.

The Chairman said the Magistrates felt it their duty to protect publicans in a case such as that. The defendant would have to pay a fine of 5/- and 10/- costs in each case, or 30/- in all.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 November 1914.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, November 12th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Sir Clarence Smith, Mr. F.E. Burke, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. W.G. Tester, and Mr. E.J. Bishop.

Alfred Preed was summoned for refusing to quit the White Lion at Cheriton, and for assaulting Vincent Charles Palmer. Mr. H. Stainer prosecuted.

Mr. V.C. Palmer said that he was the manager of the White Lion for Mr. Smiles. On October 26th the defendant was refused drink at about 12.45 p.m., whereupon he reached out and pushed over a nine gallon ginger beer barrel. P.C. Saunders was called in, and defendant then went out, but he came back in about half an hour. He was again refused drink, and as he would not leave, witness went out to look for a policeman. Defendant went out also, and met him; witness said to him “Now, be a good fellow, and get off home”, and at the same time tapped him lightly on the shoulder. Thereupon defendant hit him in the mouth. Preed was not drunk, but had had enough.

Geo. Chason, barman, corroborated part of the manager's evidence.

P.C. Saunders said that when he was called to the White Lion the defendant went out after some hesitation.

Defendant, on oath, admitted being a little stubborn, but said he went out. He met Mr. Palmer, who pushed him a bit, and that led up to what he might term a little childish play. He had gone back to the house to ask the manager what damage had been done, but the manager would have nothing to do with him.

Mr. Stainer said the prosecutor had no wish to press the charge, and did not want a serious fine imposed; it was simply desired to stop this kind of thing at a time when a licence holder had special difficulty.

The Chairman said the Bench felt it their duty to support publicans when they tried to conduct their houses properly. Defendant would be fined 5s. for each offence and the costs (1), 30s. altogether.

A month was allowed for payment.

 

Folkestone Express 8 January 1916.

Local News.

Yesterday (Thursday) at a sitting of the Elham Petty Sesions, the licence of the White Lion, Cheriton, was transferred from Mr. J.G. Smiles (who is well known as the Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians), to his son, Mr. Roy S. Smiles.

Major D'Aeth, who was on the Bench, said he would like to take the opportunity of saying a few words to the new licensee on behalf of the military authorities, and through him, to all the publicans. He wished to say that they had rather more trouble in Cheriton with regard to drink than in most of the other parts of the neighbourhood, but they had no complaint against any individual public house. The publicans generally were playing the game, and were helping the military authorities to encourage and maintain sobriety. Every night, however, after closing time in Cheriton, there were from ten to thirty women who had bottles of drink with them. Now there was nothing illegal in that, but where the publicans could help the military authorities very much was by not letting the women have drink. Especially if it was suspected it was going to soldiers. He believed it was an offence to supply a civilian with liquor if it was known it was going to a soldier. If they could ever trace the fact that these women had been supplied with liquor for the purpose of giving it to soldiers, or taking soldiers afterwards to their homes, the General would take every step in his power to put it down, and the General's powers, as they knew, were wide. Concluding, Major D'Aeth remarked that he had nothing to say about the White Lion.

The police did not oppose the transfer, which, as stated above, was granted.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 January 1916

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, January 6th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Major D'Aeth, Mr. E.J. Bishop, Mr. A.M. Watney and Mr. H. Strahan.

The licence of the White Lion, Cheriton, was transferred from Mr. J.G. Smiles to Mr. R.F. Smiles.

Local News.

At the Elham Petty Sessions at Seabrook on Thursday, Major D'Aeth, sitting as a Magistrate, remarked, when the question of the transfer of the licence of the White Lion, Cheriton, was before the Bench that the occasion of transferring a licence was one suitable, he thought, to bring to the notice of the new licensee the importance of using every care in the sale of intoxicating liquors. The military authorities had rather more trouble at Cheriton than in any other part of the district, but they made no complaints against any licensee. Still, he would like to impress upon licensees the great necessity for using every precaution. It was in the knowledge of the military authorities that every night at closing time some twenty or thirty women were to be seen in the streets of Cheriton carrying bottles of liquor of some kind, and in this matter the military authorities desired the cooperation and help of the public. There was no offence, so far, in any woman carrying a bottle of ale or anything else, but it was an offence to supply that liquor to any soldier. He warned all parties that if they found women procuring drink for that purpose, the General Officer Commanding the district would take every step in his power to put a stop to it, and they knew that the General had very great powers, which, if applied, would make matters very disastrous, not only for licensees, but for others. He hoped, therefore, that licence holders of every kind would use every precaution, and that the general public would give them every assistance too. No doubt the Press would make a note of these observations, meant to be a warning to all parties concerned. Major D'Aeth expressed his thanks to the Chairman and brother Magistrates for allowing him to make these remarks.

The Chairman expressed a hope that all publicans would note the warning given, and that the public would support them in every way, for this was good for the welfare of the troops.

 

Folkestone Express 22 January 1916.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, January 20th: Before E. Garnet Man, A.S. Jones, J.E. Quested, C.E. Mumford, H. Strahan, H.P. Jacques, F.E. Burke, E.J. Bishop and A.N. Watney Esqs.

The licence of the White Lion, Cheriton, was permanently transferred to Mr. R.S. Smiles from Mr. J.G. Smiles.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 June 1917.

Felix.

There were lamentations in the Cheriton district on Saturday night last. The White Lion had “gone dry” of fivepence per pint beer. Customers could have a glass of bottled Canterbury ale for fourpence, but that was too much even for Canadians, and so it came about that several Maple Leaf boys and others boarded the buses for Folkestone, only to find that other “Kentish sherry” establishments had “gone dry” also.

 

Folkestone Express 29 March 1919.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, March 27th: Before Mr. J.E. Quested, Dr. Tyson, Messrs. A.S. Jones, C.E. Mumford, Jacques and Deedes.

The licence of the White Lion, Cheriton, was transferred to Mr. R.S. Smiles from his wife.

Notes: Date is at variance with More Bastions. No record of Mrs. Smiles.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 March 1919.

Thursday, March 27th: Before Mr. J.E. Quested and other Magistrates.

The licence of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, formerly held by Mr. R.S. Smiles, and transferred to Mrs. Smiles during the period he was on active service, was now re-transferred to him.

Notes: Date is at variance with More Bastions. No record of Mrs. Smiles.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 January 1920.

Local News.

We regret to announce the death of Mr. Sidney (Sid) Saunders, of the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. Deceased, who was widely known, went out on Tuesday night on business and did not return. The next morning the deceased was found in a small greenhouse, having passed away suddenly in the night. His death was due to natural causes. Much sympathy is expressed with the family. The late Mr. Saunders came to Folkestone many years ago as a carpenter, and was formerly proprietor of the East Cliff Tavern. He subsequently became proprietor of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone, and the Fountain, Seabrook.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 November 1920.

Local News.

On Thursday the Elham Bench granted Mr. R. Smiles, of the White Lion, Cheriton, an extension, on Wednesday, November 17th, from ten to eleven p.m. for the dinner of the Cheriton Gardeners' Society.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1920.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, November 18th: Before Sir Clarence Smith, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. A.N. Watney, Mr. H. Strahan, the Mayor of Hythe, Mr. C. Ed. Mumford, and Brigadier General W. Tylden.

An application for the extension of the licence of the White Lion, Cheriton, on December 1st, on the occasion of the Cheriton Gardeners' Society's annual dinner was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 15 January 1921.

Local News.

Mr. J.G. Smiles, of Cheriton, the Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians and a member of the Cheriton Urban Council, about ten days ago left for Switzerland for the winter sports. Early this week notification was received from Switzerland that he had met with an accident, as a result of which pleurisy had ensued. Mr. Roy Smiles, his son, who was in Scotland at the time of the receipt of the news, returned to Cheriton, and has left for Switzerland in order to be near his father.

It will be the sincere wish of Mr. Smiles' numerous friends in Folkestone, Cheriton, Hythe, and the surrounding district that he will have a speedy recovery.

Yesterday (Thursday) intimation was received that Mr. Smiles broke his collar bone. His condition was more reassuring.

Local News.

In another column reference is made to an accident to, and the illness of, Mr. J.G. Smiles. Last (Thursday) evening information was received from Switzerland that he was suffering from double pneumonia.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 January 1921.

Local News.

Many people will regret to hear that Mr. J.G. Smiles (Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians and a member of the Cheriton Council) has met with an accident whilst on holiday with Mr. T. Fentiman, at Grindelwald, Switzerland. Whilst enjoying the sport of tobogganing he fractured his collar bone, and since then had developed double pneumonia. The latest cable (received on Thursday) states that he is no worse and the fever is abating.

Mrs. J.G. Smiles and Mr. Roy Smiles (son) left this week for Switzerland, where it was expected they would arrive yesterday (Friday) afternoon. The many friends of Mr. Smiles will hope for his complete and speedy recovery.

 

Folkestone Express 22 January 1921.

Obituary.

Last week we reported that Mr. J.G. Smiles, who resided at Brier Lea, Ashley Avenue, Cheriton, was seriously ill in Switzerland with double pneumonia, following an accident, which had resulted in a broken collar bone and two broken ribs. We now regret to have to record his death, which took place on Saturday morning, and the news of which was received later in the day at Cheriton. His demise, we are sure, be received with the greatest regret of a large circle of friends and acquaintances, not only in Folkestone, but in the surrounding towns and district, for wherever Mr. Smiles went he was exceedingly popular. He was always full of geniality, and wherever he went he speedily won the affections of those who came in contact with him. His sympathy, particularly for those who were in straightened circumstances, was very great, and he was ever ready to help in alleviating the wants and sufferings of those who, unfortunately, had to seek help. As Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, he was particularly solicitous of those who had to seek assistance of that body, but he always placed such people who had to come before the Board at their ease in a quiet manner. He did great good by stealth, and many people will be the poorer in friendship and in various other ways by his death.

Mr. Smiles went with Mr. Fentiman, of Folkestone, to Switzerland to take part in the winter sports there shortly after Christmas, proceeding to Grindelwald. On January 6th he was tobogganing when he crashed into a fence, and the force of the collision was such that he sustained the injuries previously mentioned. On Monday, January 10th, pneumonia developed, and it was then that Mr, Fentiman wired to Mr. Smiles' family at Cheirton stating that Mr. Smiles had met with an accident, and that pneumonia had set in, and suggesting that members of the family should go out to Switzerland. Mr. Roy Smiles, his son, had been to Scotland, and was at Leeds on Tuesday. Mrs. Smiles and Roy Smiles decided to go out to Switzerland late on Tuesday night, and they sought the aid of Mr. G. Harvey in obtaining passports for them. Mr. Harvey proceeded to London by the eleven o'clock train on Wednesday morning, and by one o'clock had obtained the necessary passports from the Passports Office. He visited the French and Swiss Offices in order to get them visaed, and the passports were in the possession of Mrs. Smiles and her son shortly after six o'clock. They, however, decided not to proceed on their journey to Switzerland until Thursday morning, when they travelled via Dover to Calais. Unfortunately they arrived too late to see Mr. Smiles alive.

Mr. Smiles was 62 years of age. He leaves a widow and three sons, Mr. Roy Smiles, the licensee of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton; Mr. Horace Smiles, who is in Australia, and who served in the Australian Forces during the war; and Lieut. Eng. Percy Smiles, R.N. His eldest son, Mr. Joe Smiles, died two or three years before the war from pneumonia, when about to take over the Shakespeare Hotel, in Folkestone. Mr. Smiles' father is still alive, and is 88 years of age. With Mrs. Smiles and the members of the family the greatest sympathy of the whole community in the district will be extended.

Mr. Smiles had many activities, and was very keen on all kinds of sport. He was an enthusiastic supporter of football, cricket, and hockey, and one of his chief delights was to have a good walk.

Mr. Smiles associated himself a great deal with the public life of the district. At the time of his death he was Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, a position he had filled with conspicuous ability for eight years. He was also Chairman of the Assessment Committee, the Finance Committee, and the House Committee. He had been a member of the Board for 21 years, during which time he had shown the greatest sympathy with those who had to seek assistance from the Guardians. He had represented the Board frequently at the meetings of the Poor Law Unions Association.

In politics Mr. Smiles was a Unionist, and an ardent supporter of Sir Philip Sassoon and the late Sir Edward Sassoon.

As a member of the Cheriton Urban Council he had always been characterised as one of the ablest representatives of the ratepayers, for whose interests he had the greatest consideration. He had served on that body for over eighteen years, and in this direction his loss will be deeply felt. He associated himself with everything for the good of the community of Cheriton and any good cause had his ready assistance. He was a vice president and the Treasurer of the Cheriton Gardeners' Society. It can be truly said of Councillor Smiles that he was a man who was fearless in his public duty and imbued with the spirit to do the best he could for his fellow men.

Previous to going to Cheriton to take over the White Lion Hotel in 1903, Mr. Smiles resided at the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone, and at various times was connected with other Folkestone hotels.

Councillor Smiles was a sidesman at All Souls Church, Cheriton, and was one of the managers of the schools.

At the meeting of the Elham Board of Guardians yesterday (Thursday) a vote of sympathy was passed with the widow and family.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 January 1921.

Obituary.

There was a genuine ring in the feeling of regret expressed by the local community as the news of the death of Mr. J.G. Smiles spread through the town and district. He was a man honoured by his fellows above most men. As Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, and as a member of the Cheriton Urban District Council he had rendered valuable services to the public, and his death is a distinct loss to both those authorities, who thoroughly appreciated his sound advice and his native common sense. His unfailing urbanity, his ready tact, his unvarying kindliness of heart, his complete lack of ostentation – these were some of the characteristics which combined to make him a loveable man who made friends wherever he went, and among all classes of the community. There is no exaggeration to say that his death is a real loss to his fellow citizens.

Local News.

News was received on Saturday last that Mr. Joseph George Smiles, of Brier Lea, Ashley Avenue, Cheriton, the Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, had died at Grindelwald, Switzerland. The intimation was received with deep regret on all hands. He was sixty three years of age.

As was stated in our last issue, Mr. Smiles met with a serious accident while tobogganing at Grindelwald, whither he had gone on a brief visit with his close personal friend, Mr. A. (Tommy) Fentiman, and subsequently he had developed double pneumonia. He passed away at 3.15 on Friday afternoon last week. His wife and eldest son (Mr. Roy Smiles) did not arrive till ten a.m. on the following morning, their journey having been delayed owing to the necessity of obtaining passports. Mr. George Harvey (who was on intimate terms with the late Mr. Smiles) made a special journey to London in order to secure the passports, which were promptly forthcoming. But the mere fact of the necessity of obtaining the passports prevented Mrs. Smiles and her son from starting as soon as they wished.

There were several formalities to be gone through at Grindelwald, and the widow, Mr. Roy Smiles, and Mr. Fentiman did not arrive home till Thursday night. The body was to follow by a later train and boat.

Mr. Roy Smiles kindly granted an interview to a Herald representative, and in the course of his statement said: My dear father, in company with Mr. Fentiman, left England for the winter sports at Grindelwald (Switzerland) on the 4th instant, the accident occurring on the following Sunday (January 8th). Snow was already on the ground, but it rained and subsequently froze hard. Thus the surface of the hillsides and roads was similar to a sheet of ice. It was under these conditions that father tobogganed (face downwards) on the side of a slope (calculated at about two hundred yards) which I can only describe for steepness as resembling Sugar Loaf Hill or the sides of Caesar's Camp. It is calculated by eye-witnesses that when the accident happened my father was travelling at the rate of thirty miles an hour. It was whilst gliding at this rate that the toboggan crashed into a projecting fence, with the result that my father sustained not only a fractured collar bone, but a broken rib. Assistance was at once forthcoming. A sledge was secured, and he was driven to the Belvedere Hotel, Grindelwald, about three quarters of a mile distant. Dr. P. Strasser was at once sent for and promptly arrived. Immediate attention was given to the injuries, but double pneumonia supervened. Two nurses for two days and nights, together with the doctor, were in constant attendance at the bedside, but in spite of all their efforts, my father passed away on Friday afternoon.

The greatest sympathy was extended to us by the visitors at the hotel, and the villagers generally. The principal official or representative of Grindelwald (Mr. A. Borhren) called at the hotel to express the sympathy of the inhabitants, and also asked the acceptance of a laurel wreath and flowers. Wreaths and expressions of condolence were also tendered by the guests of the hotel, where a short and impressive service was held by the resident chaplain before we left for England. It was a source of much consolation to my mother that Mrs. Carpenter (late of Folkestone and Lyminge) was staying at the hotel. She was devoted in her attentions, which proved a great comfort to us both, and especially to my mother”.

The late Mr. Smiles came to Folkestone between thirty and forty years ago, when he became proprietor of the Railway Bell Hotel (opposite the Junction). He next took over the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, subsequently retiring and taking up his residence at Brier Lea, Ashley Avenue. He was for a considerable period Chairman of the local Licensed Victuallers' Association, and his wise and imparted conduct in the chair was fully recognised by his fellow members. He took a deep interest in Poor Law administration, becoming a member of the Board of Guardians in 1900, and subsequently representing Cheriton. He showed such marked ability and aptitude for his duties that he was chosen Chairman in 1913, a post he held up to the time of his death. In this capacity he won both the warm esteem of his colleagues and also of the various officials. Never did a sour word escape his lips whilst he was in the chair, and if ever a “breeze” arose he was ever ready with his tact to smooth over any difference. He was also a member of the Assessment Committee and here again his advice was invaluable.

His interest in the inmates of Hill House was not perfunctory. If ever a man had the true human touch in his character, it was Mr. Smiles. It was his real delight to pay not only official, but private visits to Hill House and Cottage Homes. His constant care was for the comfort of the inmates especially those in the sick wards. Such words as “workhouse” and “pauper” were scrapped for “Institution”, “inmates”, and so on. At the Cottage Homes, amongst the children, his presence was always welcome. During the war, when the inmates were boarded out at Tenterden, Eastry, Brighton, etc., his visits were many, and he always remembered his duties to those belonging to the Union who were also inmates of the Chartham Asylum.

As a member of the Urban District Council, Mr. Smiles was constant, regular, and punctual in his duties, ever taking a keen interest in all that appertained to the welfare of Cheriton. His aim was to secure efficiency and to keep the rates within bearable limits. In this, with the assistance of his colleagues, he succeeded. He was a regular worshipper at All Souls Church, of which he was a sidesman.

Deceased was a member of the Masonic Order, and was widely esteemed by his brethren.

He sustained a great loss in 1913, when he lost his eldest son, Mr. Joseph Smiles, a bright young fellow who will be remembered, not only as a lover of manly pastimes, but as a trooper in the Royal East Kent Yeomanry.

Councillor Smiles leaves a widow and three sons, Mr. Roy Stuart Smiles, Mr. Horace Smiles, and Mr. Percy Smiles. One of these is in Australia, and a few years back deceased went out on a visit to him. It was his purpose, we understand, to have paid a return visit during the present year. Mr. J.G. Smiles is survived by his father, who is in his eighty ninth year and in good health. He lives with Mr. Roy Smiles.

Touching his private life it could be said of the late Mr. Smiles it could be said that he was geniality personified. He abhorred the petty, and was ever ready to discern the best and not the reverse in any man. There was much good that he did openly, but there was a great deal more (known only to his intimates) that he did by stealth. A useful citizen, a manly man, a kind friend, the whole community is the poorer for his death. To his widow and family we tender our heartfelt sympathy.

We are unable to state the date of the funeral owing to the uncertainty of the arrival of the body, which is being conveyed by a later and slower train. In all probability, however, the funeral will take place at St. Martin's Churchyard in the early part of next week.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 November 1921.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, November 17th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. H. Strahan, and Brig. General W. Tylden.

Mr. R. Smiles, of the White Lion, Cheriton, was granted an extension from 10 to 11 p.m. for the annual dinner of the Cheriton Gardeners' Society on November 23rd.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 April 1922.Local News.

At the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, on Tuesday evening a series of presentations were made to Mr. V.C. Palmer, who after serving eight years as the Manager of the White Lion Hotel, is relinquishing that position in order to take over the proprietorship of the Liverpool Arms, Margate. As a mark of respect Mr. John Hennessy, on behalf of the members of the White Lion Sports Club, presented Mr. and Mrs. Palmer with a beautifully designed clock in a mahogany case, the gift bearing an appropriate inscription. The Secretary of the Ladies' White Lion Outing Club also made a presentation of half a dozen silver afternoon tea spoons. Mr. Roy Smiles, proprietor of the White Lion, on behalf of Mrs. Smiles and himself, handed to Mr. and Mrs, Palmer a small silver table service in appreciation of their faithful service. Complimentary speeches were made, and both Mr. and Mrs. Palmer suitably expressed their thanks.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 August 1922.

Local News.

The licensed victuallers and clubs who are interested in the formation of a Folkestone Dart League, kindly send in their names to Mr. Smiles, White Lion, Cheriton, before August 31st.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 January 1923.

Felix.

The game of darts is not much heard of in Folkestone at present, but it bids fair to become very popular. Mr. Roy Smiles, proprietor of the White Lion, Cheriton, has long advocated that reasonable recreation (without the element of gambling) should be provided in licensed houses. And in this respect he practices what he preaches by throwing open a large room for games to the great satisfaction of his customers. Mr. Smiles holds the view that a licensed house is not for drinking alone, but for reasonable recreation and sociability. He has advocated this view at the meetings of the Licensed Victuallers' Society, with the result that that organisation has offered a seven guinea challenge cup for a dart competition. Suitable rules have been drawn up. One of these imposes strict silence during the playing of the competitions. This is to the good. How would this apply to football? The darts matches will take place in turn at the Valiant Sailor, West Cliff Shades, Railway Bell Hotel, Harvey Hotel, Black Bull Hotel, Richmond Tavern, Royal Standard Inn, Wellington Inn, and George III Inn. Mr. H.W. Cork, of the last named hostelry, is the Secretary. As I have already stated, no gambling will be allowed. Some excellent sport may be anticipated.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1923.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, January 21st: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson and other Magistrates.

Mr. R. Smiles applied for an extension of the licence of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, until 11 o'clock on Wednesday, 31st January, on the occasion of the annual dinner of the White Lion Sports Club. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 November 1923.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, November 15th: Before Mr. W.G. Tester, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. H.P. Jacques, Mr. H. Strahan, and Mrs. Galpin.

Mr. Roy Smiles, of the White Lion, Cheriton, applied for an extension of his licence from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. on November 28th, on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Cheriton Gardeners' Society.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 May 1924.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, May 29th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. A.S. Jones, Judge Terrell K.C., Mr. H.P. Jacques, Mr. H. Strahan, Mr. A.N. Watney, Alderman C. Ed. Mumford, and Mr. J.S. Clark.

Roy Smiles, landlord of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, was summoned for allowing a child under the age of 14 years to be on licensed premises on the 10th inst. Defendant, who was represented by Mr. Rutley Mowll, of Dover, pleaded Not Guilty.

Detective Constable Belsey said at about 8.45 p.m. on the 10th May he entered the saloon bar of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton. He there saw a child apparently under the age of 14 years. Sitting near the child was apparently her mother, who informed him the child was eight years old. He drew the attention of Mr. Smiles to the fact that the child was in the bar. When told that he would be reported, defendant said “I did not know she was in here”.

Cross-examined, witness said he had not been in the house some time. He went to the house to make certain enquiries for the police. He interviewed Mr. Smiles with regard to another matter. He went into the saloon bar, and that was where the child was found. He remained in the house about six minutes the first time. In connection with his enquiries Mr. Smiles went to the telephone and rang up a Mr. Church. Defendant next went to the tap room to make other enquiries. The person Mr. Smiles saw could no give the information he wanted. Defendant then interviewed someone else. He came back and told witness the result of his enquiries. There were several customers in the saloon bar, and Mr. Smiles arranged to ring him up in the morning and give him further information. Witness then went out of the bar. He returned in about five minutes time. When he was in the bar the first time Mrs. Huntley, the mother of the child, was also there. When he left the house the first time he did not notice the child. He saw her standing in the doorway. When he returned no-one was behind the counter. While he (witness) was talking to the mother, defendant appeared. He made a statement to Mrs. Huntley. It was to the effect “You know your child is not allowed in this bar”. Mr. Smiles said he did not know the child was in the bar, and he (witness) had no reason to disbelieve that. The people in front of the child were rather bulky, and it was possible the child could not have been seen from the counter.

The Magistrates retired, and upon their return the Chairman said the case would be dismissed.

Emily Huntley pleaded Not Guilty to allowing her child to be on the premises. Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for defendant, and entered a plea of Not Guilty.

Detective Constable Belsey stated that when he spoke to defendant about the child being in the bar she said “I brought the child in here. She came in for her daddy”.

By Mr. Mowll: It was very wet on the night in question. The child was seated amongst a number of people. The proximity of the child to another lady caused him to address that lady as the mother of the child in the first instance.

Defendant said she lived at 79, Chart Road, Folkestone, and was the wife of Maynard Huntley. On this evening she went out with her little girl to do some shopping. She went into the Jug and Bottle Department of the White Lion, which was reserved for ladies. She sent her daughter to the fish shop, and told her to wait for her. Whilst she was in this department Mr. Smiles told her that her husband was in the saloon bar. She went in there, but her husband had gone. Whilst she was waiting to speak to Mr. Smiles the detective addressed Mrs. Tyler about the child. She (witness) did not know her child was in the bar. She did not tell Detective Belsey she brought the child in.

By the Clerk: She first saw the child there when the detective called her.

By Supt. Russell: She had not been warned on a previous occasion to keep her child out of the premis.

The case was dismissed.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 November 1925.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, November 26th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. W.G. Tester, Alderman C.E. Mumford, and Mr. J.S. Clark.

Mr. Roy Smiles, licensee of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, applied for an extension of hours from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. on December 9th on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Cheriton Gardeners' Society. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 January 1926.

Obituary.

We regret the death, at the Swan Inn, Dover Road, of Mrs. Annie Buller Saunders, at the age of sixty years. Deceased was the widow of the late Mr. “Sid” Saunders, who was successively landlord of the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone; the White Lion, Cheriton; East Cliff Tavern, and the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. Her happy and cheerful disposition endeared her to all. To do a good and deserving turn to others afforded her real joy. To her only child, Mrs. Herbert, the wife of Mr. S. Herbert, of the Swan Inn, sincere sympathy is extended.

The funeral took place at the Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1926.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, March 4th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. W.G. Tester, Mr. C. Sheath, Mr. H.F. Jacques, Mr. H. Strahan, Colonel R. Wayland, and Mr. J.S. Clark.

Mr. Roy Smiles, of the White Lion, Cheriton, was granted an hour's extension on March 17th on the occasion of the dinner of the White Lion dart Club.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 June 1926.

Friday, June 4th: Before Mr. G. Boyd and Dr. W.W. Nuttall.

Leonard Dennis Boorn was charged with an indecent exposure in Radnor Park on Thursday, June 3rd. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Evidence was given by two girls, aged 13 and 10 years respectively, their testimony differing considerably, and by Mr. Drury, the park-keeper.

The Chairman said there was not enough evidence to convict, and the case would be dismissed.

Prisoner was further charged with a similar offence in Radnor Park on April 18th. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Evidence was given by two little girls and by Detective Constable Budgen, who stated that the prisoner was paraded for identification with nine other men, and the two witnesses pointed him out without hesitation. When charged, defendant said “It is false”.

Prisoner gave a complete denial to the charge, and said no man in his sane senses would do such a thing.

The Magistrates intimated that they considered the case proved.

Inspector Pittock said prisoner was born in Folkestone in 1876. He went to St. Mary's School, and on leaving was employed at the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton. He then left Folkestone, returning in 1914, when he joined the army, and served until 1918. Since then prisoner had been licensee of a public house at Elham. He had now retired, and was living in St. John's Street, having a wife and one child. The police had had many complaints about indecent exposure in the Radnor Park, and they attributed most of them to the prisoner. In one case before them the parents would not allow the children to come forward, and the police could not proceed with it. There were no previous convictions against the defendant.

The Chairman said the Bench were quite satisfied that prisoner was Guilty. He was a public nuisance, and would be sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment with hard labour.

Prisoner: The sentence is not just.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 November 1926.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, November 11th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. W.G. Tester and Mr. C. Sheath.

Mr. R.S. Smiles, of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, was granted an extension of licence on November 12th until 11 p.m. on the occasion of a dinner in connection with the Cheriton and Morehall Branch of the Conservative Association. He was granted a similar extension on November 24th, the occasion being the annual dinner of the Cheriton Gardeners' Society.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1927.

Elham Annual Licensing Sessions.

Thursday, February 3rd: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Alderman E.J. Bishop, Alderman C. Ed. Mumford, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. W.G. Tester, Mr. R. Rigden, and Mr. C. Sheath.

The Superintendent of the Elham Division, K.C.C. (Supt. F.H. Golding) presented the following report: I have the honour to submit to you my annual report on the licensed houses within the Elham Petty Sessional Division, the number and description being as follows: Ale houses, 26,; beer houses on, 8; beer houses, off, 3; grocers, etc., 5; Total 42.

The population of the Division is 17,310, which gives a ratio of one licence to 412 oersons. During the past year the licences of four ale houses and two beer houses have been transferred. One licensee has been proceeded against for an offence against the Licensing Act, and the case was dismissed. No proceedings have been taken against any person during the year for drunkenness. The number of persons proceeded against dor drunkenness during the past eight years is as follows: 1919, 1; 1920, 2; 1921, 1; 1922, 3; 1923, 2; 1924, 2; 1925, 2; 1926, nil.

All the licensed houses have been generally well conducted during the past year, and I have no objection to the renewal of any of the licences.

The Chairman said that the Bench had pleasure in signing the report as satisfactory.

Mr. Rutley Mowll, of Dover, applied on behalf of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association to extend the permitted hours under the Licensing Act, 1921.

Mr. Mowll said he appeared to ask the Magistrates to remove a curious anomaly that had arisen with regard to the licensing hours in the district. Since he had the honour of appearing before the Magistrates on a similar application the circumstances had, he ventured to say, very much changed to the advantage of the applicants, as they had now got on either side of their jurisdiction the very conditions prevailing which he was asking the Bench to apply to its jurisdiction. That was to say Hythe had got the privilege, and so had Folkestone, so that on either side of them they had got the licensing hours during the seasonable months extended from 10 until 10.30. He was there to ask the Magistrates to do that for the licensees in their district in their desire to cater for the needs of the public. When it was last before the Bench it was a little uncertain as to whether the Folkestone Magistrates would assent to that very reasonable course. They did assent, and he though the was right in saying that it had been found to work most satisfactorily both at Folkestone and also at Hythe. He thought that they wanted no more striking illustration of the ridiculous way in which the matter worked out at the present time than to take the town of Sandgate. It was true that Sandgate had not a Mayor and Corporation of its own; it was ruled by a District Council and consequently came within the Elham Division area. Suppose anybody arrived by bus at 10 p.m. at the foot of Sandgate Hill. The Fleur de Lis, at Sandgate, was within the jurisdiction of the Folkestone Magistrates, and consequently customers arriving by bus could go and get a drink there at ten o'clock, and remain there until 10.30. Immediately opposite was the Military Tavern, which was within their jurisdiction, and unless they granted the facility for which he applied, the Military Tavern had to close its door at ten o'clock, and therefore the Fleur de Lis had that advantage over the Military Tavern. Persons who wanted intoxicating liquor had to leave the Military Tavern at ten o'clock, and they could walk across the road and get those facilities at the Fleur de Lis. It was laughable; it did not want any comment by him. That was the position. The only difficulty the Magistrates had in his mind in assenting to the proposition was the fact that within their jurisdiction were a number of houses in a purely rural area. If they examined the type of trade, the quantity of trade that was done in their urban houses, as distinct from their rural houses, they would find that by far the larger portion was done in the urban houses. Let them take such houses as the White Lion at Cheriton, or the Victoria Hotel in Risborough Lane – they were obviously, to all intents and purposes, town houses. Within half a mile of the White Lion, such was the need for licensing facilities, there was an application now pending before the Folkestone Bench to grant a full licence; to transfer, in fact, a hotel licence from the Borough of Folkestone to that point to a place called the Morehall Wine and Spirit Stores. If that was granted – he was not pre-judging it at all – there would be an anomaly there. That house would be open until 10.30 under the rule of the Folkestone Magistrates, and the adjoining house, the White Lion, would have to close at ten o'clock. The thing was absurd. What he was asking the Bench to do was to have regard to the majority of the needs of the district, to say that they were not going to penalise the licensed victuallers who came within their district by prohibiting them from having the privilege which the licensed victuallers on either side of them enjoyed. They could not have a better record than that which they had heard in Superintendent Golding's report; not a single licensed victualler convicted of any offence and not a single case of drunkenness. If they could not trust those licensed victuallers he did not know who they could trust. He asked the Bench to grant the application. He would point out to them if they felt any difficulty regarding the rural area that while he did not think they had any right to split up their licensing district – he thought one rule must apply throughout the district – if their rural houses did not require that facility there was no reason on earth why they should use it. The facility was needed for the urban houses. They had every reason to need it and he was suggesting to the Bench that it was only fair and right that they should have it. Every Bench had to decide for itself, but it must be within their knowledge that the facility for which he was asking was already enjoyed in one for or another by almost every other town on the coast in Kent. They had got it at Dover, at Deal, Folkestone, Hythe, and they had got it at places like Margate and Broadstairs. There was only one place he knew of where it was not granted in those seaside towns and that was at Ramsgate, but it could not be long before common sense prevailed there. He asked for common sense to prevail in their Division, and he appealed to the Bench to help the licensed victuallers under their jurisdiction to carry on their business at a time when all seaside people were making their living.

After a brief retirement of the Magistrates, the Chairman announced that the hours would remain the same as last year.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 March 1929.

Local News.

Sincere regret is felt in Cheriton at the approaching departure of Councillor Roy Smiles, licensee of the White Lion, Cheriton, who is leaving Cheriton after residing there 30 years. Mr. Smiles will leave Cheriton on April 8th for Southall, Middlesex, where he will take up the proprietorship of the Marching Hotel. Mr. Smiles is the son of the late Mr. Joseph Smiles, best known as a splendid Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, besides filling other important offices.

Owing to a nervous breakdown on the part of his father, Mr. Roy Smiles took over the reins of business. Originally he intended to become a tailor, and was apprenticed in this connection to the tailoring trade to Mr. H. Charles Lye, of Guildhall Street, Folkestone. Subsequently he proceeded to Leeds, where he became very popular. He returned to Cheriton, and took over not only his father's business, but identified himself with many public movements. When war broke out he volunteered for duty, joined the ranks of the Royal Garrison Artillery, and went on active service to France, leaving his business at the White Lion in charge of two managers and staff. Mr. Smiles was a member of the Elham Board of Guardians for seven years, and for a similar period served Cheriton well as a member of its Urban District Council.

It may be mentioned that Councillor Smiles was one of the principal founders nine years ago of the Cheriton Christmas Dinner Fund – an organisation which has done untold good amongst the poor. Mr. Smiles – always out to do good – established some years ago a Thrift Club. In the first year of its existence 400 was paid in and distributed. So great was the enthusiasm which Mr. Smiles put into the organisation that the club has paid out at Christmas time 1,000 and over to its men and women members.

A footballer himself, he it was who ran the Cheriton Football Club for some years.

The Cheriton Gardeners' Society, too, realise that they are losing a good and practical friend. He has acted for years as the Society's hon. Secretary and helped its progress in many ways, and to the extent of placing his beautiful annexe at the disposal of the Society for its monthly meetings.

Councillor Smiles, amongst other activities, has interested himself greatly in the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association, of which he was Chairman and is now President. His aim has always been to elevate the tone and raise the status of the trade in this district. In this connection it is interesting to note that he is a past Chairman of the No. 10 District of the National Licensed Victuallers' Association, which embraces the counties of Kent, Sussex and Middlesex.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 March 1929.

Local News.

An application by Mr. Roy S. Smiles, of the White Lion, Cheriton, who is shortly leaving the district, for the temporary transfer of the licence to Mr. P.S. Moss, of Gillingham, was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 8 June 1929.

Thursday, June 6th: Before Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Alderman C.E. Mumford, Mr. F. Seager, and Alderman T.S. Franks.

Rose Braden was charged that on the 4th June in this Borough she stole from Daniel Addley, the sum of 14 10s. Thomas David Braden and Archibald Parry were charged with having received that money knowing the same to have been stolen. The three prisoners pleaded not guilty.

Daniel Addley, a visitor staying at 13, St. Winifred Road, a labourer, said on Tuesday last he went into the White Lion Inn in Cheriton at 11.10 a.m., and there saw all three prisoners. They were strangers to him. He entered into conversation with them and had several drinks which he paid for, and stayed there until twenty past two. When he went into the hotel he had 17 in notes on him. He left the house in company with prisoners. When he left the house he had 14 10s. He was under the influence of drink himself. He lost his memory to an extent end could not really say where they went. The next thing he remembered he was lying on some grass on a piece of waste ground in Cheriton Road. His head was clear, but he was paralysed. Nobody to his knowledge was with him, but eventually - he was in a doze - the female prisoner said “Give me that money”, and she took the money from his inside breast pocket It was loose. Prisoners must have seen the money when he took out the notes to pay for the drink in the public house. He never recovered any portion of the money.

Rose Braden: Do you remember going into the coffee shop?

Witness: No.

Thomas David Braden: How much money do you think you spent?

Addley: I had about 14 left.

Do you remember dropping any money? - No.

When we left the house had we had a bottle of whisky and four quarts of beer? - I don’t know.

You gave my wife 4 outside the coffee shop? - No.

Miss Charlotte Morton, employed at her mother’s restaurant at 39, High Street, Cheriton, said the last witness and David Braden came into the shop on the 14th June. The latter ordered two dinners. She went to serve them, and when she came back the woman prisoner and Parry had come in. David Braden ordered dinner for them. The last witness could not eat his dinner. She thought he was ill. The other people had a bottle of beer, which they poured out into cups and drank with their dinner. The woman prisoner said she was going to take the last witness to have a sleep, and they went away towards Folkestone. Several minutes after she returned, and had tea with the two men who had remained. They were whispering between them. Then the woman went out again alone, and did not return. A minute or two after the other two prisoners left. Braden went first, and then Parry. That was the last she saw of them.

Rose Braden: That was quite right what the young lady saw.

Miss Morton, recalled, said Addley paid for the dinners. He gave her 4s. in silver. She did not see him with any notes. She saw no notes with any of them.

Patrick Whelan said about a quarter to three on June 4th he was working on a building at 29, High Street, Cheriton, and noticed the woman prisoner with Addley. In his opinion if she had let go of him he would have fallen. They went to a field 50 yards away behind some boarding. They sat down, but were not there a few minutes before the woman left the man and returned to the cafe. She came out again, and went to the man, who was still lying on the ground. She bent over him for a minute and then ran away across the road. He saw nothing of the two men.

P.S. Marsh said he received on the 4th June certain information, and in consequence ho went to Ashley Park allotments and saw a man lying near the bill posting hoarding in a drunken stupor. About three yards from him he saw a wallet (produced). It contained no notes, He aroused the man, and from what he said he made enquiries, and then communicated with the Folkestone Police.

Mr. Turner, landlord of the Little Rose Inn, Canterbury, said on the evening of the 4th June, at about 7 o'clock, the three prisoners came in and had some drink. The woman paid with a 1 note. They remained until 8 p.m., and had some more drinks. Whilst they were in the bar, the woman pulled some paper money out of her stocking. They were green notes. She was showing them to some old lady. They spent about 10s. altogether in the house.

Det.-Sergt. Bowe said in consequence of inquiries he made on the 4th June, Parry was arrested at Canterbury and the other prisoners at Chatham. He saw the Bradens at Chatham, and told them he would take them to Folkestone on suspicion of being concerned together with stealing! about 14 10s. from a man of whom they were in company at Folkestone. Thomas Braden replied “We were having a few drinks in the pub with him, but I know nothing about the money”. Rose Braden said "We had some drink with him in a pub, and he took us in a coffee shop and gave us dinner. He went out and he left us in there and we never saw any more of him. He was chucking his money about in the pub, and he gave me four quid. Prisoners were then brought to Folkestone where all three were later charged. They were cautioned and Rose Braden replied “I’ll say nothing”. Tom Braden said “I reserve my defence”. Parry said “I have nothing to say about it.” None of the notes had been recovered.

Rose Braden said the old gentleman (Addley) said “Would you mind your wife taking me to the corner to see me home?” and her husband said “Certainly”. When they got outside Addley said "I am going to treat you”,and he gave her 4. He then said “Let me lie down”, and went and sat down on the grass. She went back to the coffee shop* j and then said “I am going to see if the old gentleman is all right”, and went over and then returned to the shop.

David Braden said on that particular morning he had been mending chairs in Cheriton Road. He met Parry and told him that if he would like to wait until he had finished the chairs, he could have a drink. They then went to the White Lion and met Addley, who asked if he would like some drinks, which he gave them. As for the money, he (Braden) knew nothing about it.

Parry: I can’t say any more than my mate said.

Braden said he earned sometimes 2 or 3 a day, and he was not always drinking.

The Chairman said the Bench found Rose Braden guilty of the charge and dismissed the case as regards the other two prisoners.

Inspector Pittock said the woman had a terrible record. There were five convictions against her for drunkenness, two for obscene language, nine as a riotous prostitute, five for soliciting, one for sleeping out, two for indecent behaviour, and one for obstructing the police. She had been indicted at the West Kent Sessions for five cases as an incorrigible rogue and was given twelve months on each occasion. So far as he knew there were no charges of felony against her.

The Chairman said she would be sent to prison for three months and any money found on her was to be returned to the prosecutor.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 June 1929.

Local News.

A remarkable story of the theft of 14 10s. from a visitor at Cheriton was told to the Folkestone Magistrates on Thursday, when Rose Braden, who, to quote a police inspector, had a “terrible record”, was sentenced to three months hard labour for the offence.

The woman was charged with stealing the money from the person of Daniel Addley, and Thomas David Braden, her husband, and Archibald Perry were charged with having been concerned together in receiving from her the money, well knowing it to have been stolen. All three prisoners pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Daniel Addley, of Mile End Road, London, a visitor, staying at 13, St. Winifred's Road, Folkestone, a labourer under Stepney Borough Council, said that on June 4th he went into a public house at Cheriton at 11.10 a.m., and there saw the three prisoners in the public bar. They were strangers to him. He entered into conversation with them, and they all had several drinks, for which he paid. He stayed with them in the public house until twenty minutes past two in the afternoon. When he went into the public house he had 17 in notes in his possession. Whilst in there he took out the notes to pay for the drinks. When he left the house at 2.20, in company with the prisoners, he had about 14 10s. on him. He was under the influence of drink. He lost his memory to an extent, and could not really say where they went. The next thing he remembered was that he was lying on some grass in a piece of waste land in Cheriton Road. It was raining. It was just inside some hoardings. He was in a daze, nut as he woke he saw the woman prisoner was leaning over him. She said “Give me that money”, and away she went. He saw her take the money, which was in an inside breast pocket.

In reply to the woman prisoner, prosecutor said he did not remember going to a coffee shop after leaving the inn.

Replying to Thomas Braden, witness said he did not remember dropping any money in the public house. He did not remember having four dinners in the coffee shop. He denied giving Mrs. Braden 4.

Mrs. Charlotte Morton, employed at a restaurant at 39, High Street, Cheriton, said that on June 4th Thomas Braden and the prosecutor came in together and had two dinners. Afterwards the other two prisoners came in and Braden ordered two dinners for them. Prosecutor, whom she thought was ill, could not eat his dinner. The prisoners had beer with them, and this they drank with their dinner. After the meal the woman said she was going to take prosecutor to have a sleep, and went out with him, assisting him along. A few minutes afterwards she came back alone and had tea with the two men who had remained there. They whispered together. The woman went out alone again and did not return. The men left a minute or two afterwards, one at a time. Prosecutor paid for the meals in silver. She saw no notes at all.

Mr. Patrick Whelan, of High Street, Cheriton, said that at 2.45 on the day in question he was working on a building opposite Ashley Park. He saw the woman prisoner come along with Addley. She was supporting him and if she had let him go he would have fallen down. They went behind the hoardings. They sat down, and after a few minutes the woman left. She went into the cafe. A few minutes later she came out, and went straight to the place where she had left the man. She went to the man, who was lying on the ground, and he saw her bend over him. Then she went away at a sharp walk – practically running.

Sergeant Marsh, K.C.C., stationed at Cheriton, said that at about 4 p.m. he went to the Ashley Park allotments, where he saw the prosecutor lying near the billposting hoardings in a drunken stupor. About three yards from him he saw a wallet. It contained no notes.

Mr. Addley identified the wallet as his property.

Proceeding, Sergeant Marsh said he roused the man and from what he said made certain enquiries and communicated with the Folkestone police.

Mr. Thomas Edward Turner, landlord of the Little Rose, East Street, Canterbury, said that on the evening of the 4th the three prisoners came into his inn together about 7 o'clock. The woman paid for drinks with a 1 note. He saw her pull some green Treasury notes from her stocking and show them to an old lady in the bar. They spent about 10s. in his house.

Detective Sergeant Rowe said that the previous day he caused Parry to be arrested at Canterbury and the other two prisoners at Chatham as they were getting off the train. At Chatham, when he told the two Bradens he would take them to Folkestone on suspicion of stealing the money, Thomas Braden replied “We were having a few drinks in the pub with him, but I know nothing about the money”. The woman said “We had some drinks with him in a pub, and he took us in a coffee shop and gave us dinner. He was chucking his money about in the pub and he gave me four quid”. They were brought to Folkestone, where all three were later charged and cautioned. The woman replied “I say nothing”. Thomas Braden replied “I reserve my defence”. Parry said “I have nothing to say”. None of the notes had been recovered.

The woman told the Magistrates that in the public house prosecutor said to her husband “Would you mind if your wife takes me as far as the corner to see me home?”, and her husband said “Yes, there's no harm in that”. When prosecutor got outside he said “I am going to treat you, my girl”, and gave her 4. Then he said “Let me go and lie down”. She put him on the grass and left him. She went back and told the men and afterwards went back to see if prosecutor was all right.

Thomas Braden said prosecutor “stood” them a number of drinks. “As for touching anything belonging to that man, I know nothing about it” he declared.

Parry had nothing to say.

Thomas Braden said there were many days when he made 1 or 30s. a day mending chairs.

The Chairman (Mr. L.G.A. Collins) said the Magistrates found the woman Guilty, but dismissed the case with regard to the two men.

Inspector Pittock said the woman had a terrible record. She had five convictions against her for drunkenness, two for obscene language, nine as a riotous prostitute, one for sleeping out, two for indecent behaviour, five for soliciting, one for obstructing the police, and had been indicted on three different occasions at the West Kent Sessions as an incorrigible rogue and sentenced to 12 months on each occasion. She was before that court on April 22nd on a charge of being drunk and disorderly. The case was proved against her but she was discharged on promising to leave the town.

Sentencing prisoner to three months' hard labour, the Chairman said the money found on her would be returned to prosecutor.

 

Folkestone Express 13 September 1930.

Elham Petty Sessions.

Thursday, September 11th: Before Sir Henry Dering and other Magistrates.

Charles Abbott (34), of 12, High Street, Cheriton, was summoned for using obscene language, and he pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Hurst said that on the 30th August he saw the defendant standing near the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, arguing with two other persons. Mr. Moss, the licensee, who was in an upstairs window, spoke to him about the language he was using, but he remained in the same place. He (witness) told him to move on, and he walked about five feet away from him and again commenced to use obscene language. He went up to him and told him he would report him, and he replied “I am deaf. I did not hear anybody tell me to move on. I was telling the boys what to do when at work”. He produced a written example of the language used by the defendant.

Defendant, after reading the statement, said it was quite right. He had nothing to say. It was just a heated argument.

Superintendent F.H. Golding said that there were three previous convictions against the defendant at the Folkestone Borough Police Court. On 18th August, 1919, he was fined 5s. for being drunk and disorderly. On 19th December, 1926, he was fined 2 for a similar offence. On the 29th August he was fined for common assault. He was a single man, was a labourer, but was at present out of work.

In reply to the Chairman, defendant said he was getting 17s. 6d. a week from the dole.

The Chairman said he would be fined 1, and would have a month in which to pay.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 September 1930.

Local News.

Charles Abbott, of 121 High Street, Cheriton, described as a labourer, was fined 1 and costs at the Elham Petty Sessions on Thursday for using obscene language at Cheriton. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Hirst said that at 11.45 a.m. on August 30th he saw defendant near the White Lion Hotel, at Cheriton, in conversation with some other persons. Mr. Moss, the licensee of the hotel, who was in the hotel with his wife and daughter, told Abbott about the obscene language he was using, and asked him to move on. Witness also asked defendant to move on, and he (Abbott) moved about five feet away when he started using more obscene language. When witness spoke to him again he said he was deaf and had not heard anyone tell him to move on.

Superintendent Golding said defendant had been fined in 1919 and 1926 at Folkestone Police Court for being drunk and disorderly, and again in 1926 he was fined 10s. for common assault. He was a single man, and was at present out of work, drawing 17s. 6d. a week unemployment pay.

 

Folkestone Express 30 July 1938.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a protection order in respect of the licence of the White Lion at Cheriton, from Mr. P. Moss to Mr. Herbert Joseph Samway, formerly licensee of the Fleur de Lis, Sandgate, for eight years. Mr. Moss had been at the White Lion for nine years.

 

Folkestone Express 14 January 1939.

Local News.

The licensee of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, Herbert Joseph Samway, the secretary of the dart club, James Betts, of 3, Cobden Road, Cheriton, and his brother, Albert Edward Betts, of 7, Cobden Road, Cheriton, appeared at Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday to answer summonses relating to raffles held at the hotel in December.

Samway, who was summoned for permitting the premises to be used for purposes connected with the promotion of a lottery, was ordered to pay 5 7/- costs and the summons was dismissed.

Eight summonses against James Betts alleging that he sold certain tickets and used the White Lion Hotel for purposes in connection with a lottery, were dismissed on payment of 2 13/- costs.

One summons against Albert Edward Betts for having in his possession tickets for the purposes of sale in the lottery, was dismissed.

The magistrates were Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Alderman J.W. Stainer and Eng.-Rear-Admiral L.J. Stephens.

Mr. B. H. Bonniface prosecuted on behalf of the Police, Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for Samway and Mr. H.G. Wheeler for the Betts brothers.

Mr. Mowll and Mr. Wheeler objected to all the summonses being heard together, Mr. Mowll suggesting that the case against his client should be heard first. It was decided that two summonses against James Betts on December 19th should be taken first, and a plea of “Not Guilty” was entered by Mr. Wheeler on behalf of his client.

Mr. Bonniface said the defendant was charged under Section 22 of the Betting and Lotteries Act, 1934, with selling chances in a lottery and also using certain premises. The Act of 1934 declared by Section 21, subject to the provision of the Act, all lotteries were unlawful. Among the offences under Section 22 was “Whosoever shall sell or have in his possession for the purpose of sale or distribution any ticket or chance in a lottery shall be guilty of an offence”. Continuing, Mr. Bonniface said Sections 23 and 24 dealt with certain private lotteries, namely, the small lottery incidental to certain entertainments and the exemption of private lotteries, run in connection with any particular society, it might be a dart club. He mentioned it because he did not suggest, should there be any question of a dart club Christmas Draw being held, that there was any offence committed. The dart club draw which was being run there was technically illegal.

Observation, he said, had been kept on the premises for several days, and on the night of December 19th P.C. Walsh went into the White Lion Hotel, and he there saw a man he knew as “Jim”, who had a number of cloakroom tickets and was raffling a number of articles in the public bar. Among the things he raffled at twopence a time were cigarettes, chocolates and a number of other things. The officer having seen the raffles take place and a warrant having been issued to enter the premises, he came out and telephoned the police station and Chief Inspector Hollands and Inspector Heastie went to the premises, and they would hear that in “Jim's” (James Betts) hat was found a number of tickets crumpled up and ready to be drawn out of the hat.

P.C. Walsh said he went to the White Lion at about 7.30 p.m. on December 19th. He was wearing plain clothes. There were about 25 men in the public bar when he arrived. A man he knew as “Jim” (James Betts) was present and he took a book of cloakroom tickets from his pocket. He tore several tickets from the book and spread them on the table, saving “Tuppence a ticket, two prizes”, and held up two 25 boxes of cigarettes. Witness said he bought a ticket from the defendant. The counterfoils were screwed up and placed in a cap. “Jim” held the cap and different people picked out the tickets. The prizes were given to the people who held the tickets corresponding to the first two tickets drawn out of the hat. Witness left the hotel and telephoned to the police station and afterwards returned to the hotel. When he got back he saw several people round the tables and several tickets on the table. The same procedure was adopted and cigarettes were offered as prizes. Witness bought another of the tickets. When Chief Inspector Hollands arrived there was a draw for a small carton of cigars in process, for which he (witness) had a ticket.

Mr. Wheeler: Do you know there is a dart club in connection with the White Lion Hotel?

Witness: I believe so.

Do you know whether the lottery in which you took part had any connection with the dart club? – No.

You did not enquire whether it was or not? – No.

Did anyone invite you to buy a ticket? – Not on this occasion.

What did you do? – I stopped at a table and placed my money on a ticket.

Do you happen to know whether or not the other people in the bar were members of the dart club? – I do not know.

Did anyone invite you to purchase a ticket? – No.

Did you know at the time you purchased it you were unwittingly contributing to the funds of the dart club? – No.

Mr. Bonniface: Are you a member of the dart club?

Witness: No.

Inspector Heastie said he accompanied Chief Inspector Hollands to the White Lion. He went into the public bar, where there were about 35 people present. A number of people were standing round a table on which there were a number of cloakroom tickets, of which he took possession. There were some screwed up tickets in a cap on the corner of the table. He took possession of the tickets and the cap was claimed by Betts. There was nothing on the tickets to show that they were being used for a dart club draw.

Chief Inspector Hollands said when he entered the premises under a warrant on December 19th there was a crowd of men standing round a table. There were about 35 people. P.C. Walsh pointed out the defendant to him and he said “Are you the man called ‘Jim’?” and the defendant replied “Yes”. Witness told the defendant that he would be reported for selling the tickets and using the premises for the sale of the tickets. Betts replied “Only for the dart club”. He said he was secretary of the club and handed witness a book saying “Here is my book. I am secretary of the dart club. They are the names and addresses who have had tickets”.

Mr. Bonniface said that completed the case for the prosecution against James Betts on December 19th.

The defendant said he was secretary of the White Lion Dart Club, which was started in August, 1938, and had a membership of 150, including 17 women. The subscription was twopence a week, which he collected. The money was then handed to the club treasurer, Mrs. Samway.

The defendant also said there were dart players with money who were members of the club, but they could not play darts for toffee.
“We have got to have men who can win us games”, he continued, “and to get these men we have to call upon men who are out of work and they have to have their expenses paid”. Continuing, witness said the team had their expenses paid for away matches and the supporters had half their expenses paid. They took as many as 30 people away with them for some games. On the evening of December 19th there were 30 to 40 people in the public bar. He saw P.C. Walsh and at the time took him to be a working lad, but did not invite him to buy a ticket in the raffle. He did not see him take a ticket at all. On two or three occasions he told people in the bar that only members of the dart club could purchase tickets. On December 19th, only members of the club bought tickets.

In reply to Mr. Bonniface, witness said the majority of the people in the bar were members of the dart club.

Mr. Bonniface: You had an official dart club Christmas draw?

Witness: Amongst our members, yes.

Mr. Wheeler submitted that the raffle was a private lottery in which persons taking part were members of the dart club of the White Lion. So far as was humanly possible, his client took steps to see that only members of the club participated in it. The police officer bad told them that he was not invited to take part in the draw.

The Chairman said the magistrates were satisfied that an offence had been committed.

Albert Edward Betts was then summoned for having in his possession tickets for sale in the lottery.

Inspector Heastie said when he went to the hotel on December 19th he saw tlie defendant sitting at the table with a book of tickets in his hand. He also pulled out eight other tickets from his pocket. Witness told him he would be reported and he made no reply.

P.C. Walsh said he saw the defendant in the bar with a book of tickets and tearing the tickets out.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not see the defendant offer anyone a ticket. He was spreading them on the table.

Defendant, giving evidence, said his brother asked him to roll up the counterfoils and place them in a hat. He did not sell any of the tickets.

James Betts said he asked his brother to roll up counterfoils, but he did not offer any for sale. He had no authority to do so.

Mr. Wheeler said the defendant was merely asked by his brother to fold up some ot the tickets and place them in a hat. He was not authorised to sell any of the tickets and did not do so.

The Chairman said the case against Albert Edward Betts would be dismissed.

The summons against Herbert Joseph Samway, the licensee, for knowingly permitting the White Lion Hotel to be used for purposes connected with the promotion of a lottery, was then heard.

Mr. Rutley Mowll pleaded not guilty for Samway.

Mr. Bomiiface said the whole of the public bar could be seen from the server. On one occasion Samway was asked by Betts to have the last ticket in the book, but before he could get his money out somebody else put twopence on the ticket and he did not participate. As serious as the matter would be for the licensee, he would ask the Magistrates to convict him, after the evidence had been heard.

P.C. Walsh said the public bar was a fairly large room. From behind the counter the whole of the room could be seen. After telephoning the Inspector, witness said he went back to the hotel and saw Samway behind the bar. He was looking towards the table where “Jim” was standing. The tickets were spread out on the table and a lottery for cigarettes was taking place. “Jim” said to the landlord “Do you want the last one?” and the defendant put his hand in his pocket, but a man standing near by threw twopence on the table and picked up the ticket.

Cross-examined, witness said there was a slight bend in the servery and the table referred to was right in front of the bar. The people interested in the raffle were standing between the bar and the table.

Chief Inspector Hollands said he saw the defendant and explained to him that he had a warrant. He replied “The only tickets we have here are those we had printed for the dart club draw. A book of tickets was given to each member and as far as I know no-one else had one”.

Witness pointed out to Samway that “Jim” had been running a lottery in his bar, and he said he knew nothing about it. He said the dart club wanted to hold a draw so he had some tickets printed, but with regard to the other draws referred to, he had no knowledge that they were being held.

In reply to Mr. Mowll, witness said the White Lion was a busy house.

Mr. Mowll: Is this about the busiest house in Folkestone?

Chief Inspector Hollands: I don’t know about that.

From A to Z Mr. Samway told you lie knew nothing about this? - Yes.

Addressing the magistrates, Mr. Mowll said it was a very flimsy case against the licensee of the White Lion. There was only one little incident which was mentioned to show that Mr. Samway knew what was going on. Mr. Betts asked him if he would “have one”, whatever that might mean. “I think it is used in other connections than with lottery tickets”, added Mr. Mowll. The most that was suggested against Mr. Samway was that he put his hand in his pocket. At that moment, according to the evidence, somebody else took the ticket. That seemed to have been the full extent of what was alleged against his client. It was an anomaly that the laws relating to lotteries were so complicated. It was admitted that so far as a dart club was concerned there was no reason at all why a lottery confined to the members of the club should not be perfectly legal. What those people were doing there on that evening might or might not be in connection with a dart club. The onus had been on the prosecution to prove that the licensee had permitted it. The evidence was that there was a crowd of people there. If there was a crowd of people interested in what was going on at the table, with their backs to the servery, it would make it very unlikely that the landlord, even if he was in the bar, could see exactly what was going on. “My submission”, continued Mr. Mowll, “is that the case against the land lord is not strong enough for you to record a conviction against him”.

The Chairman said the Magistrates found Samway Guilty, but they were not going to register a conviction against him, but he would have to pay the costs of the prosecution, amounting to 5 7/-.

Mr. Mowll said the brewers had a very high opinion of his client and they thought, on the whole, that he had conducted his house extraordinarily well. He had been asked whether the Bench would care to give any expression of opinion as to whether the case should not act adversely to the renewal of the defendant's licence.

Mr. Bonniface said he was authorised by the Chief Constable to say so far as the prosecution was concerned, if it was the opinion of their Worships, that the police were perfectly in agreement with what Mr. Mowll had said.

The Magistrates' Clerk said he did not think the Bench could say any more.

The Chief Constable said he was not intending to oppose the licence.

The magistrates then heard six summonses against James Betts for selling tickets in a lottery and using the premises for the purposes of lottery on December 10th, 12th and 17th.

Mr. Wheeler said having regard to the findings of the Bench on the summonses relating to December 19th, he had been instructed to plead Guilty to the remainder of the summonses.

Mr. Bormiface said on December 10th the case was more flagrant. Raffles were held for a piece of pork, a crate of beer, two or three lots of chocolate, a case of cider and cigarettes. Just before “time” two half bottles of whisky were put up and raffled to anybody who was in the bar. He could produce a number of prizes which were won by the police officer. One was a casket of cigarettes and he also won chocolates. Continuing, Mr. Bonniface said exactly the same kind of thing happened on December 17th. On that occasion there was a joint of pork, cigarettes, chocolates, sherry, twelve cigarette cases and biscuits. In fact, a ham which was purchased was never raffled because they did not get enough to pay for the ham. On one night alone, he said, a police officer spent 8/- in twopenny tickets in raffles which were held in the public house. A rabbit in a hutch was raffled also, but by a woman who was not before the Court.

The Chairman of the Bench said the summonses against James Betts would be dismissed on payment of costs, 2 13/-.

Two summonses against Charles Knight, of 30, Broomfield Road, Folkestone, for selling tickets in the lottery were withdrawn.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 January 1939.

Local News.

Raffles promoted by the Secretary of a darts club at the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, were the subject of a number of summonses for alleged breaches of the Betting and Lotteries Act, 1934, at the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday.

A police officer described how he visited the public bar find while keeping observation took part in a number of raffles. It was stated by the prosecuting solicitor that the officer wan a number of prices.

For the landlord of the White Lion Hotel, Herbert Joseph Samway, who was summoned for permitting his premises to be used for the purpose of a lottery on the night of December 19th, it was submitted that he had no knowledge of what was taking place. He was found Guilty, but the summons was dismissed on payment of costs amounting to 5 7s.

James Betts, of 3, Cobden Road, Cheriton, Secretary of the White Lion Darts Club, was summoned for selling lottery tickets on December 10th, 12th, 17th, and 19th, and there were four similar summonses in respect of the same dates for using the hotel for the sale of tickets. He was found Guilty, but the summonses were dismissed under the Probation of Offenders Act on payment of 2 13s. costs. A summons against Albert Edward Betts, of 7, Cobden Road, Cheriton, a brother of the other Betts, was dismissed, and a summons against Charles Knight of Bloomfield Road, Cheriton, was withdrawn.

The summonses were heard by Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Engineer Real Admiral L.J. Stephens and Alderman J.W. Stainer. Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for Mr. Samway, and the Betts brothers were represented by Mr. H.G. Wheeler. Mr. B.H. Bonniface prosecuted for the police.

Mr. Mowll submitted that the case against his client (Mr. Samway) should be heard first, and after consideration, the Chairman announced that they would first hear all summonses relating to December 19th.

Two summonses against James Betts, of 3, Cobden Road, Cheriton, in respect of December 19th were then heard. He pleaded Not Guilty to selling lottery tickets, and also to a further summons for using the White Lion Hotel in connection with a lottery.

Opening the case, Mr. Bonniface said Betts was charged under the Betting and Lotteries Act, 1934, with selling chances in a lottery, and also with using the White Lion Hotel for the purposes of the lottery. Under Section 21 all lotteries for the provisions of the Act were unlawful, and offences included selling tickets and having tickets in one's possession. Sections 22 to 24, however, dealt with certain private lotteries, lotteries which were run in connection with a particular society or a club, like a darts club for instance, which could be held under certain conditions.

P.C. Walsh said on December 19th he entered the White Lion Hotel about 7.30 p.m. He was in plain clothes, and in the public bar he saw about 25 men present. A man he knew as “Jim” (the defendant) was in the bar. Witness saw him take a book of cloakroom tickets from his pocket, and after tearing out several tickets, he spread them on the table. He than said “Twopence a ticket, two prizes”. He held up two boxes of 25 cigarettes each. Witness bought a ticket from defendant for the draw. After the tickets had been sold the counterfoils were crumpled up and put in a cap, from which they were drawn. The first two tickets taken from the cap were the winners and persons holding the corresponding numbers were handed cigarettes bv defendant. Witness left the premises and telephoned to the police station, afterwards returning to the hotel. On his return he saw several people round a table and a number of tickets. The same procedure was followed by defendant, and witness bought another ticket. When Inspector Hollands arrived a draw for a small carton of cigars, for which witness had a ticket, was proceeding.

Questioned by Mr. Wheeler, witness said he believed there was a Darts Club at the White Lion. He did not know whether the lottery in which he took part was in connection with the Darts Club. He threw his money down on the table and took a ticket.

Mr Wheeler: Do you know whether those present were members of the Darts Club?

Witness: No.

Did anyone invite you to purchase a ticket? - No.

Did you know you were contributing for the benefit of the Darts Club? - No.

Mr. Bonniface (to witness): Were you a member of the Darts Club? - No.

Inspector Heastie said he accompanied Inspector Hollands to the White Lion Hotel on the night of December 19th and when they arrived there were about 35 persons in the public bar. Witness went to a table on which were a number of cloakroom tickets, and he took possession of them. In a cap on the corner of the table were a number of screwed up tickets; he also took possession of them. The cap was claimed by defendant Betts. There was nothing on the tickets to show they were being used for a Darts Club draw.

Chief Inspector W. Hollands said he entered the premises on the night of December 19th with a warrant. He saw a crowd of men standing round a table; four were playing cards. There were two men behind the bar. Standing close to the table were Betts and P.C. Walsh, who pointed defendant out to him. Witness said to him “Are you the man called 'Jim'?” and he replied “Yes". He obtained defendant's name and address and told him he would report him for selling tickets and using the premises. He replied “Only for the Darts Club”, adding “Here's my book. I am Secretary of the Darts Club. There are the names of the members who have had tickets”.

Defendant, giving evidence, said the Darts Club started on August 27th. There were 150 members, including 70 women. The subscription was twopence a week, which he collected. He handed the subscriptions to the Club’s Treasurer, Mrs. Samway. Defendant explained that they tried to get the best team possible for away matches, but some of the best players were out of work. They could get dart players who had money, but they “could not play for toffee”. A team consisted of 14 players with four reserves. Their expenses were paid, and supporters of the team going away with the players received half their expenses. The raffles were to help pay the expenses. He occasionally ran raffles for the Darts Club. Only members were invited to purchase tickets, and he took every precaution to see that only members had ticket. On this evening there were 30 to 40 in the bar and nearly all who were round him were members of the Darts Club. He saw P.C. Walsh and took him to be a working man. He did not invite the officer to buy a ticket and he did not see him take a ticket. He said on several occasions “Only tickets for members of the Darts Club". He had no opportunity of stopping P.C. Walsh buying a ticket.

Mr. Bonniface: How many in the bar were not members of the Darts Club?

Defendant: The majority were.

How many were not? - I cannot say.

When did you say “Only members”? – On two or three occasions.

Mr. Bonniface: You had had an official Darts Club draw over there?

Betts: Yes.

Mr. Wheeler submitted that the raffle which was held on this occasion was what was referred to in the Act as a private lottery, and the persons taking part in it or taking tickets were members of the Club. As far as was humanly possible defendant took steps to see that only members of the Club took part. The police officer had told them that he was not invited to buy a ticket.

The Magistrates decided that an offence had been committed.

The next, case was one in which Albert Edward Betts was summoned for having in his possession certain tickets for the purpose of sale in a lottery. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Inspector Heastie said when he entered the public bar of the White Lion Hotel on December 19th he saw defendant seated at a table. In His hind he had part of a book of tickets. He asked defendant if he had any more tickets on him and from his pocket he pulled out eight tickets.

Witness told him that he would be reported for having in his possession lottery tickets and for selling them. He made no reply.

P.C. Walsh said defendant was in the company of the other Belts while witness was in the bar, and he had tickets similar to these produced.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not see defendant offer any tickets for sale.

Mr. Wheeler: What was he doing with the tickets?

Witness: Tearing them out of the book and putting them on the table.

Defendant told the Magistrates, in evidence, that he was rolling up the tickets for the draw. He offered no tickets for sale.

James Betts said he asked his brother to roll up the counterfoils. He had no authority to sell any tickets.

The Magistrates dismissed the case against this defendant.

Herbert Joseph Samway, the landlord, was then summoned for, on December 19th, knowingly permitting his premises to be used in connection with the promotion of a lottery. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Bonniface said the whole of the bar could be seen from the server. Not only was Mr. Samway there on a number of occasions, but on one occasion he was asked by James Betts if he would like a ticket in the draw. Mr. Samway put his hand to his pocket, but before he could get his money out someone else took the ticket.

P.C. Walsh said the public bar was a fairly large room. From behind the counter one could see the whole of the public bar. Before he left to telephone to the Police Station he had not seen Mr. Samway. When he came back he saw defendant standing behind the counter of the public bar. He was looking towards the table where James Betts was standing. The tickets were spread cut on the table and a lottery for cigarettes was taking place. Betts said to the landlord "Do you want the last one?" Defendant put his hand in his pocket, but just then a man standing near the table put twopence on the table and picked up the ticket. Shortly after Inspector Hollands arrived.

Replying to Mr. Mowll, witness said there was a slight bend in the counter and in front of that was the table referred to. People interested in the lottery were standing between the table and the counter.

Chief Inspector Hollands said after he had entered the premises on this night he saw defendant and told him that he had a warrant to search the premises in connection with a lottery. Defendant replied “The only tickets we have here are those we had printed for the Darts Club draw. A book of tickets was given to each member and so far as I know no-one else has had them”.

Witness pointed out that it was stated that Betts had been running a lottery in the bar, and defendant said "I know nothing about that”.

Told that he would be reported defendant said “This is all unbeknown to me. The Darts Club had some tickets printed which I was told were in order. I told the Club it must be for members only. With regard to the other draw, I have no knowledge”.

Witness said there were notices in the bar prohibiting lotteries.

Mr. Mowll: It is a very busy house? - Yes.

Probably the busiest in Folkestone? - I don’t know about that.

Addressing the Magistrates, Mr. Mowll said it was a very flimsy case against the licensee. There was only one little incident mentioned to show wha was going on. That was when James Betts asked the landlord, according to the evidence, if he would “have one”. He (Mr. Mowll) had heard that term used in another way than in connection with the buying of lottery tickets. The most that was suggested against Mr. Samway was that he put his hand in his pocket and that was not very conclusive evidence. At that moment someone else took the ticket.

It was a very curious anomaly of the law relating to lotteries. It was admitted so far as the Darts Club was concerned that a lottery confined to members of the Club was in order. What these people were doing on this evening might have been in connection with the Darts Club or it might not. It was suggested that the landlord knew what was going on, but there was a crowd of people in the premises, and there was a crowd of people interested in what was going on at this table. Those people had their backs to the servery and it did not make it very likely that the landlord, even if he were in the bar, could have seen what was going on. He submitted the evidence did not justify them recording a conviction against the defendant, who had been a licensed victualler for a large number of years.

The Chairman announced that the Magistrates found defendant Guilty but they would not register a conviction. He would have to pay the casts of the prosecution, three guineas advocates fee, 2 police costs and 4s. court fee, a total of 5 7s.

Mr. Mowll said he was asked by the brewers to enquire whether the Bench would consider whether their decision meant that defendant should be asked to leave the house. The brewers had a very high opinion of Mr. Samway and they thought he had conducted his house extraordinarily well. He was asked as to whether that case would act adversely against defendant in regard to the renewal of the licence.

Mr. Bonniface said he was authorised to say by the Chief Constable that subject to the opinion of the Bench he would not oppose the renewal.

The Bench felt it could not express any opinion, but the Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) said he understood that the Chief Constable had no intention of opposing the renewal.

Further summonses against James Betts were then considered.

There were six summonses against him alleging that on December 10th, 12th and 17th he had sold certain lottery tickets, and that he had used the White Lion Hotel for the promotion of lotteries.

A summons against Charles Knight, of 30, Broomfield Road, for selling certain tickets in a lottery on December 12th was withdrawn.

Mr. Wheeler, for Betts, said having regard to the findings of the Bench in regard to December 19th he was instructed to plead guilty to these six summonses.

Mr. Bonniface said the summons in respect of December 10th showed a rather flagrant and wholesale case. Not only were packets of cigarettes raffled but also a rabbit and hutch, a crate of beer, two or three prizes of chocolate, a case of cider and just before time two half-bottles of whisky were raffled to anyone present in the bar. “I can produce a number of prizes won by the policy officer”, added Mr. Bonniface, “including a casket of cigarettes and chocolates". In regard to December 17th articles raffled, continued Mr. Bonniface, included a joint of pork, cigarettes, chocolates, sherry, cigarette cases and biscuits. A ham was not raffled because they could not sell enough tickets. On one night alone the police officer spent 8s. in twopenny tickets.

Mr. Bonniface said he was informed that the rabbit and hutch were raffled by a woman who was not before the court.

Mr. Wheeler again pointed out that these raffles were run entirely for the benefit of the Dart Club.

The Magistrates dismissed the summonses against James Betts under the Probation of Offenders Act on payment of costs amounting to 2 13s.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 April 1941

Local News.

A Sergt. Major who has been recommended for a commission appeared before the Folkestone Magistrates on Friday last week to answer a charge of stealing a mirror.

His battery commander described the taking of the mirror as “an irresponsible prank”, and the case was dismissed under the First Offenders’ Act, defendant being ordered to pay 15s. costs. The accused was T. Sergt. Major Edward C. Cave.

Herbert J. Samways, licensee of the White Lion, Cheriton, gave evidence that there was a mirror, valued about 1, on the wall of the hotel lounge. He saw it there last Saturday night, but he could not say whether defendant was in the lounge that evening.

P.C. Barrett said at 8 p.m. on March 31st he received information that a mirror was missing from the White Lion Hotel, and following enquiries he saw Cave in the presence of his commanding officer. Defendant said “We took the mirror but not in the light of theft. There were three other men with me”. Witness said the mirror was lying on the floor by the side of defendant’s bed.

Defendant’s Battery Commander asked the Magistrates to allow the case to be dealt with by the military, but the Bench would not acquiesce.

His Battery Commander, a solicitor, said although in law it was a case of theft, the motive was not theft in the ordinary sense of the word. It might be more properly described as an irresponsible prank.

Defendant told the Magistrates that he went to the public house with several of his friends. He had just been granted leave and they went there to celebrate. They had several drinks and were rather merry and he removed the mirror from the wall. On the night the police officer called they were considering how they could restore the mirror to its owner, realising that it was not “playing the game,” but they were rather “stuck” as to know how to take it back.

The Battery Commander said defendant enlisted in May, 1939. In four months he was promoted from lance-bombardier to troop sergt-major. He had done extremely well and had been recommended for a commission in either the R.A.O.C. or the R.A.S.C. because of his knowledge as a mechanical motor engineer.

The Chairman (Alderman R.G. Wood) said the Magistrates had decided to dismiss the case under the First Offenders’ Act on payment of 15s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 July 1950.

Local News.

Mr. and Mrs. H. Samway retired on Tuesday after 21 years in the licensing trade.

They spent nine years at the Fleur de Lis, Sandgate, and have just completed 12 years, to the day, at the White Lion, Cheriton. Mrs. Samway said that she and her husband had spent only one week and five days together on holiday in 27 years. “We shall be sorry to leave our customers, as we have been very happy here, but we feel we need and nave earned a rest”.

They have received presents from customers and from clubs which hold their meetings at the hotel.

Mr. and Mrs. Samway reside in Tedders Leas Road, Etchinghill.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 March 1957.

Local News.

Three days before he was due to sail for the Far East, Pte. James William Grier, R.A.M.C., Royal Military Hospital, Shorncliffe, pleaded Guilty at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday to stealing a tankard from the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton.

“I was foolish”, he said. “I had too much to drink, and I do not know what made me take it”.

An R.A.M.C. officer said Grier took the tankard after attending a farewell party.

Chief Inspector L.A. Hadlow told the magistrates that on February 23rd Mr. William Floydd Care went to the hotel, where he was a regular customer and had his own tankard. He left at 10.20 p.m. and when the barmaid collected the dirty glasses the tankard was missing.

Giving Grier a conditional discharge on payment of 15/- costs, the Chairman (Ald. W. Hollands) told him “Don’t do such a silly thing again”.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 November 1957.

Local News.

Plans of proposed alterations at the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, were approved by the Justices at Folkestone Licensing Sessions on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 May 1958.

Local News.

The licence of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, was transferred at Folkestone Transfer Sessions on Wednesday, from Mr. T.E. Moore to Mr. R.B. Peters, former electrician, of Rochester.

Note: No record of Moore in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Gazette 14 March 1962.

Townsman's Diary.

Mrs. Faith Goldsack, of 21, Chilham Road, Cheriton, writes to tell me that before the existing White Lion building at Cheriton there was another. “It was owned by my late husband's grandfather, Henry Baldock”, writes Mrs. Goldsack, who states that there was a statue of a white lion in front of the inn. “I believe the statue is still in the possession of one of the family”, she continues. For many years Mrs. Goldsack had a photograph of the old inn, but it was loaned to someone and not returned. “My late husband asked for it several times, and just before he died in August, 1957, he said he would have liked to have had the picture back. I would also like to have it for my son and his family”, adds Mrs. Goldsack.

Should the person who has the picture see this note perhaps they will be good enough to return it to Mrs. Goldsack.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 November 1962.

Local News.

An intruder, who smashed a window at the back of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, on Wednesday afternoon, stole 13 from the till in the private bar.

 

Folkestone Gazette 21 November 1962.

Local News.

Said to have broken into a Cheriton public house and stolen 11 12/6, Michael Lynch, of Milton Barracks, Gravesend, was sent for trial by Folkestone Magistrates on Friday to Folkestone Quarter Sessions in January.

Lynch, who was remanded in custody, told the Court “If I was given the opportunity I would like to pay all this money back. I an very sorry all this has happened”.

Mr. Norman Franks, prosecuting, said that on the afternoon of October 31st the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, was locked, but left unoccupied. At 6.05 p.m. Mrs. Irene Poole, who was looking after the hotel while the licensee, Mr. Reginald Peters, her brother, was away, returned and found that a window at the back of the bar had been smashed and glass scattered all over the floor. It was later found that money totalling 11 12/6 was missing. Lynch was interviewed subsequently by D.C. Brian Fowler. At first he denied knowing anything about the offence, but later admitted that he did. D.C. Fowler said that Lynch made a statement to him, saying that he broke a window at the White Lion Hotel at about 2.45 p.m. on October 31st. Inside he took money from the till and also 5/- in halfpennies from a shelf. When he got outside he threw the halfpennies away. He gave 9 to his wife for housekeeping and spent the rest himself.

 

Folkestone Gazette 12 February 1964.

Local News.

First attempt to build up a pile of pennies at the White Lion, Cheriton, resulted in 11 5/- being obtained for the British Empire Cancer Campaign. The pile was knocked over by Ald. Wilfred Harris on Friday evening.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 April 1965.

Local News.

Mr. William (Billy) Banks retired as barman at the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, on Wednesday. He had been there for the past nine years.

The customers contributed to a parting gift and presented him with an electric razor on his last night at the bar. The landlord, Mr. A. Wells, gave him 10, and his wife presented him with 5.

Mr. Banks, who is 68, has been a barman for 45 years. Before going to the London and Paris he worked at the White Lion, Cheriton, and the Swan Hotel, Hythe. Mr. Banks lives with his sister in Radnor Park Crescent, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Gazette 1 February 1967.

Local News.

Mrs. A. Peters, wife of the landlord of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, pushed over 12 5s. in pennies last Tuesday. The money went to the British Empire Cancer Campaign for Research.

At the Victoria Hotel, in Risborough Lane, Folkestone, a pile of pennies totalling 6 9s. was pushed over recently.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 September 1968.

Obituary.

Mr. Herbert Joseph Samway, former landlord of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, for 22 years, died recently after a long illness. Bert Samway, as he was known by his wide circle of friends and acquaintances, had lived with his wife at Dunromin, Teddars Leas, Etchinghill, since his retirement 18 years ago. He was 76.

Mr. Samway was born in Maidstone, and began his career there as a watchmaker and jeweller. He transferred to the licensed trade in 1928, when he took his first public house, the Fleur-de-Lis, in Sandgate. After 10 years there, during which time he became a founder member of the Sandgate Branch of the British Legion, and was a member of the Castle Lodge of Freemasons, Mr. Samway moved to the White Lion, where he and his wife stayed until 1950, when Mr. Samway retired. Mr. Samway was a Knight of the Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes.

Three years after joining the Royal Naval Air Service in 1916 he was married at Maidstone. Representatives of the British Legion and many other friends and villagers attended the funeral at Lympne Parish Church on Monday.

 

Folkestone Gazette 26 November 1969.

Local News.

Thieves knocked a hole through a brick wall at the White Lion at Cheriton in the early hours of yesterday morning – while the licensee, Mr. R.B. Peters, slept soundly upstairs. They stole cash, cigarettes and spirits worth up to 200. They broke in through a window at the rear of the premises and then knocked a hole through an inside wall to get to the bars. Said Mr. Peters “I didn't hear a thing. I keep a dog, which must have barked, but even that did not wake me”.

 

Folkestone Gazette 5 September 1973.

Local News.

After more than 40 years as a publican, Reginald Peters sent his last pile of pennies crashing into a blanket on Thursday. With 16 years as landlord of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton High Street, and 43 years in pubs throughout Kent behind him, it was one of the many things he was doing for the last time. For, on Monday, Mr. Peters hung up his tankard, emptied his last optic, swapped beer handle for garden hoe and settled down to retirement in the country. As he spoke on Thursday of his life behind bars (the kind you don't try to escape from), business went on as usual. The only difference being the aforementioned pile of pennies which, incidentally, raised 36.50 for the Folkestone committee of the Campaign for Cancer Research.

Retirement, I suggested, would perhaps prove more of a wrench for the 63-year-old landlord than it would for most. Pubs have been his life. His parents kept one for more than 50 years and he was born within singing distance of a glass of bitter. He reckons he has seen the best era in the history of the English pub. “It’s become so different", he said, nodding in the directions of a fruit machine and juke box. “There’s not as much fun as there used to be”.

Admittedly wages were much lower, but some of the prices he quoted for 40 years ago were still enough to bring tears to the eyes of all but the strongest men. Fourpence for a pint of bitter, sixpence for a tot of whisky, the same for a large (very large) port, 11d . for 20 Players - the list goes on and on. But perhaps even worse than rising prices is the drop In quality. ‘‘Beer today is not nearly as strong as it used to be”, said Mr. Peters. After so many years working long hours, seven days a week, wasn’t he going to find time hanging heavily on his hands? “The prospects of all that leisure time doesn’t really worry me”, he replied. “I like messing around with tape recorders and things, and I will have a chance to do some gardening”.

 

South Kent Gazette 28 March 1979.

Local News.

Police are hunting several men who attacked a barman in Cheriton on Saturday night. But fears that workmen from the M20 motorway construction site could be responsible have been scotched by both police and local landlords. The incident happened at 11.10 p.m. in the Victoria public house, Risborough Lane, when barman Brian Brown told customers it was time to leave.

A police spokesman said that Mr. Brown, who lives in Christchurch Road, Folkestone, received a bleeding nose, cut gums and facial bruising. “Navvies” from the Danton Lane, Cheriton, motorway site were blamed for the assault because the assailants had not been identified and one spoke with an Irish accent.

However, Police Inspector Peter Ford told the Gazette “We’ve had no trouble at all from the site. If the situation with site workers continues as it is then we shall be perfectly happy”.

Mr. Brown was unavailable for comment at the time of going to press but the Victoria’s landlord said “This is the first time we’ve had trouble in the pub since I came here three years ago”.

Speculation that motorway workers could be a possible source of violence was scotched by landlords at: The White Lion in Cheriton High Street - “So far they’ve been perfectly well behaved in here”.; The Morehall, Cheriton Road “Nice lads ... no trouble whatsoever”.; The Nailbox, Shorncliffe Road – “A bit noisy, that's all”.; The Cherry Pickers, Ashley Avenue, Cheriton – “We've had a few in, but they've been perfectly O.K.”.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 May 1979.

Local News.

Renovation plans at a Folkestone pub could turn it into one of the town's major entertainment centres. Nearly 10,000 is being spent on the pub, The White Lion, at Cheriton.

And now new landlord Bryan Adams hopes he will be able to give the town a top rock and cabaret venue. Already Mr. Adams, who only took over the pub six weeks ago, has set about cleaning up its image. Last week he banned motorway construction workers after a fight outside the premises led to a 400 bill for a smashed window. He explained “This place has had a rough image in the past, but I am determined to change all that”.

Plans for the pub include re-decoration and carpeting throughout and regular evenings of live entertainment. It is hoped that these will include two rock nights a week, featuring both established and local bands, and cabaret and club-type entertainment at the weekends.

Mr. Adams said that he hoped entertainment at the pub would start in June. “We will try to get first-class acts down here. With the right acts I am convinced we could become one of the leading entertainment centres in the town”, he said.

Note: Adams not listed in More Bastions.

 

South Kent Gazette 30 May 1979.

Local News.

Thieves broke into the White Lion pub in Cheriton High Street on Thursday and stole bottles of whisky and rum, and 140 in cash.

On Friday morning, as he checked his stock, landlord Bryan Adams told the Gazette “It's lucky they didn't take quite a lot more”. Mr. Adams thinks the thieves, who broke in through the rear of the building, were amateurs. “They seem to have tried a lot of windows before actually getting in”, he said. “I am sure if they had been really serious they would have taken more of my stock”. The intruders grabbed the cash, a handful of spirit bottles and fled. Mr. Adams thinks they may have been frightened off by his dog. “I keep him in the office and he obviously must have barked when these people got in”, he said. “I didn’t hear anything but there are scratch marks on the door where the dog had tried to get out”.

Note: Adams does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 June 1979.

Local News.

Trouble and violence are things of the past for the White Lion pub, Cheriton. At least, that is the hope of landlord, Bryan Adams, as he prepares to open the pub as a new entertainment centre this weekend. In the past the pub has gained a rough reputation. But, since Mr. Adams arrived as new landlord three months ago, he has been determined to clean up the bad image. He has re-decorated and refurnished the premises and last month he banned motorway construction workers from the bar after a navvy was hurled through a window during a closing-time fight on the pavement outside. Now the 10,000 face-lift has been completed and tonight a special evening is being arranged to mark the start of regular entertainment spots at the pub. Featured act tonight will be the local group, Denigh, but Mr. Adams says that shows ranging from cabaret to country and western will be presented. “I know the place has had a bad image in the past”, he said, “but I am determined to make this a really good entertainments centre and make sure there is no more trouble”.

Ironically the special celebrations tonight nearly could not go ahead as planned. Police objected to an application placed before Folkestone Magistrates for an extension of hours. They claimed that it wasn’t a special occasion. But the Magistrates decided to approve an extension until 11.45 p.m.

 

South Kent Gazette 3 October 1979.

Local News.

There was a barmaid with a big difference pulling pints at the White Lion pub in Cheriton. London drag queen Tony La Tour went behind the bar after his performance in the pub on Thursday night.

A crowded pub had been waiting expectantly for him when he walked in wearing a long fur coat and carrying his props at 10 p.m.

Most of the women crowded into the open back room as the men made a dive for the now empty bar. A pool table was hastily moved aside and the men wandered in clutching their pints and stood in the shadows at the back. One old regular in a raincoat and cloth cap walked to the front thinking he was the star of the show. “Get ’em off”, cried the hopeful locals as the old man unbuttoned his coat. In a blaze of music in walked Terry with a large wobbling bulge under his long white dress. To the music of “Yummy, Yummy, Yummy, I've Got Love In My Tummy” he did strange things with the bulge. The old boy in the raincoat still tried to get in on the act but he gave up when he got a kiss.

Then off came the dress to reveal a mini skirt and a pair of rubber mounds. A “volunteer” was dragged from the audience as his cheering mates pushed him forward. Layer after layer of his clothes were stripped off as the crowd roared. The act ended with a bang and the man was left in an embarrassing position. He crawled away, picking his clothes off the floor. Everyone returned to the bar, waiting for the repeat performance at midnight.

The volunteer, Sammy Collins, of Cheriton, said he has got used to this sort of treatment. “I used to work with strippers in London. You just have to let them get on with their act and you get a good laugh.

Landlord Bryan Adams said “Folkestone is dead at the moment, so I am trying to bring some life to it. I will try to get a different artiste down once a month. I wasn't too sure, but after Thursday night I know it is right”.

But not all the regulars were too pleased. “To tell the truth I prefer to sit here with my pint”, one said. Some members of a local church, All Souls, in Cheriton, are also unsure about it. Reader and editor of the parish magazine, Mr. K.B. Edwards, said “I am not particularly prudish, but I am not sure a public house is the proper place for that sort of thing. We ought to be a little wary about what we call entertainment and where we hold it”. In the latest parish magazine he said, about drag and striptease “Is this what is really needed today to provide “entertainment”, because if it is, then our society is sicker than it realises? Moral standards have declined. Is this another nail in the coffin?”

 

South Kent Gazette 10 September 1980.

Local News.

Tempers frayed at a meeting of pub landlords. Two members stormed out at the end of the Licensed Victuallers- Association meeting at the Swan Inn, Sellindge, on Wednesday afternoon amid scenes described as “chaotic” and “farcical”.

Host Mr. Bill Corne, landlord of the Swan, told the Herald and Gazette “I had to shout at one member to shut him up. He was drunk when he arrived at the meeting. I threatened to cancel the meeting and sling them all out”.

And Mr. Chas Croft, landlord of the Gate Inn, Hythe, said “As the most junior person present, I was rather embarrassed to see my elders and betters behave in the way they did”. He said the two men wanted the L.V.A. to do things which are impossibilities. “They were unfortunately very inebriated and shouting at the same time. The members didn’t discuss anything relevant and made a load of fools of themselves. It was a typical farce”.

After the meeting Mr Brian Adams, landlord of the White Lion in Cheriton, resigned from the L.V.A. committee for what he later described as “purely personal reasons which I don’t really want to discuss”.

However, L.V.A. chairman Mr John Mees, of Botolph’s Bridge, Hythe, denied there had been a row.

Several other landlords declined to comment and Mr John Barrington, landlord of the Castle Inn, Folkestone, who also is believed to have resigned from the L.V.A. after the meeting, was unavailable for comment.

 

South Kent Gazette 18 November 1981.

Local News.

A pub in Cheriton has been branded as “pretty scruffy” and advised not to open until the place is cleaned up. The White Lion pub, in Cheriton High Street, was inspected by a Shepway District Council health officer on Friday. The following day the pub was shut for business and a sign stating “Closed until further notice” had been placed in a front window. “It was a general inspection and the officer found the place pretty scruffy”, said Mr. John Button, Shepway's Environmental Health Manager. It was suggested that until equipment and fittings could be thoroughly cleansed the pub should not open for business, Mr. Button added.

Pub landlord, Mr. Bryan Adams, is believed to be away on holiday at the moment and a relief publican is looking after the place.

In a letter to the occupier of the pub it was “intimated” that if the place was not cleaned legal action would be taken under the public health act, Mr Button said. It is basically food and hygiene facilities relating to the kitchen and bars which are causing concern. The health officer will visit the pub again today to see what progress has been made. He gave the pub two working days to clean up.

The Gazette was unable to get hold of the relief landlord for comments before going to press and on Monday a spokesman for Whitbread Fremlins Ltd said the company knew nothing about the matter.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1981.

Local News.

A pub shut because it was a potential health hazard reopened on Wednesday after the landlord cut short his holiday in Spain. Mr. Bryan Adams returned to the White Lion, Cheriton High Street, after Shepway District Council health officials advised the relief publican to close last Friday until the premises were cleaned up.

A council spokesman told the Herald and Gazette that following discussions with Mr Adams on Wednesday morning, no objections were raised to the pub reopening to customers. Officials recommended several improvements which could be made to the White Lion’s general basic cleanliness and will re-inspect the premises in about a fortnight.

Mr Adams said later there is nothing to worry about regarding conditions at the pub. “My local customers will agree that I have always kept up high standards. The pub was not in a state, officials just raised a few points regarding part of the premises which were not being used. These things do happen and the relief landlord knew nothing about it. I was the only one who was able to sort this problem out. The are quite happy now”.

Mr. Adams flew back from Torremolinos on the first available flight after hearing about the situation, cutting short his holiday after only four days.

 

South Kent Gazette 3 February 1982.

Local News.

The landlord at the centre of a dirty kitchen row is almost certain to quit. But rumours that Brian Adams, of the White Lion, Cheriton, is being thrown out by the brewery, Whitbread Fremlin Ltd., were strongly denied on Monday. A spokesman said he understands Mr. Adams has asked to leave and has apparently got another business in Spain.

The pub was shut for a few days last November after being inspected by one of Shepway District Council's health officers. The place was cleaned up and as far as the Council is concerned the incident is now closed. When the Herald and Gazette telephoned the pub on Monday, two men, who both refused to give their names, said Mr. Adams is away on holiday in Spain. They are running the pub while Mr. Adams is away. “It is doing marvellously well”, said one of the men.

Shepway's Environmental Health manager, Mr. John Button, said his department was satisfied, after work carried out in November, that the premises were up to “a reasonable standard”.

When Mr. Adams moved into the pub in 1979 he said he was determined to get rid of its bad image and make it a really good entertainment centre.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 July 1987.

Local News.

Barry Chamberlain, popular guv'nor at Cheriton's White Lion pub, did not need asking twice when invited to take part in a charity banger race at Coombe Valley Circuit, Dover. The White Lion has sponsored local driver Dermot Walsh for several years, and on Sunday Barry lined up with more than twenty other licensees from all over Kent and London, helping to raise over 2,000 for bone marrow research at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

“It was good fun”, said Barry on Monday. “I came nowhere, of course, but the place was crowded and everyone had a good day. I promise I'll do better next year!”

The annual event was started in memory of Ian Saunders, a junior banger racing champion from Canterbury, who died of leukaemia at the age of 16.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 July 1988.

Local News.

Twenty-first birthday celebrations for Patrick Dunn ended in bloodshed when he was savagely attacked with a pool cue in a pub. Patrick, from Cheriton High Street, was playing pool with three men he met last Saturday night in the White Lion in Cheriton. He was suddenly set upon by one of the players and beaten repeatedly over the head with a cue. The trio then picked up their coats and walked out, leaving Mr. Dunn covered in blood on the pub floor.

A barmaid at the White Lion said “It all happened so quickly. We'd never seen the three men before and they ran out after the attack. The one who had been hit was very badly hurt”.

Patrick was drinking from a pint glass when he was attacked and this was smashed into his face by the cue. He was rushed to the William Harvey Hospital with serious head and facial injuries.

“It was a violent and unprovoked attack”, said Folkestone C.I.D. “He could have been killed. We'd like to hear from anyone who witnessed it”.

One of the men was described as about 35, 5ft 7ins and stockily built. He was unshaven and had short black hair. He was wearing a blue and white striped shirt. Another was 5ft 8ins of medium build. He had fair collar length hair and a white shirt with a collar.

Anyone with information should contact Detective Trevor Smith of Folkestone C.I.D.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 July 1988.

Local News.

Thirsty summer drinkers in Shepway will have to wait for all-day pub openings because of a Whitehall glitch. The Government has been forced to delay the controversial new licensing laws until September 1. This has been caused by a technical problem at the Home Office which means present “last orders” for another two months. Then pubs will be able to serve alcohol from 11a.m. to 11p.m. all week. But not all Shepway landlords reckon it will be worth the bother.

Horace Brickell from the East Cliff Tavern said “It’s a great idea for some pubs, but for the ones in restricted areas, like us, it’s not much good.

Where we are placed, it won’t make any difference and it will be a waste of time staying open”.

William Taylor, landlord of the Pullman Wine Bar and chairman of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers Association, said "There is some confusion, but no-one is forced to stay open. They will be able to choose the hours that suit them.” Mr. Taylor said there were mixed feelings about the changes. “Pubs in busy areas are welcoming them but small, rural or out-of-the-way places are indifferent. Personally, I’m in favour. I think it will give flexibility to the licensee and the public. I don’t think it will cause more drunkenness because people only have a certain amount of money to spend each week. And I don’t mind the extra hours involved because we will get extra staff which will help the dole queue”.

Barry Chamberlain from the White Lion in Cheriton agrees. He said “I think it’s about time change was made. Pubs will become much more suitable for families, and will be more like restaurants. We will try to stay open all day. We are just about to redecorate the pub with the new freedom in mind”.

Michael Norris from the East Kent Arms told us “I’ve accepted that the new laws are coming, although I have mixed feelings about them. I think it’s a shame we are not being allowed to stay open later at night rather than all afternoon. Of course we will be making full use of the new hours and will try to serve food all day. It’s all right for us because we are so centrally placed”.

Eileen Lewis from The Guildhall in The Bayle summed up the feelings of most landlords when she said “If I’m making money, I’ll stay open”. She added “It’s all right for more central pubs, but I can’t see us staying open in winter. The brewery has asked us to give it a three-month trial period. Like other pubs, we’ll just have to feel our way when the change comes”.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 August 1988.

Local News.

Pubs in Folkestone, Hythe and Romney Marsh will continue with the time-honoured cry “Time, please” despite the big shake-up in pub hours this week.

Some will “test the beer” with all-day opening, but most landlords contacted by the Herald felt there wasn’t the demand, and that they would be out-of-pocket if they had to pay staff to man empty bars.

Martin Foulkes, landlord of the Clarendon, Tontine Street, Folkestone, said “I run a night pub really. I do not have enough customers during the day to keep it open. It just would not make sense. On Fridays and Saturdays I might stay open in the afternoon; it depends on how many people we have in”.

At the Guildhall, The Bayle, Folkestone, landlady Eileen Lewis said “I am waiting to see how it goes. I might stay open on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, but only if we are busy”.

The White Lion, Cheriton, is going to be open all day, every day except Tuesdays and Sundays. “There are plenty of workers who finish their shifts in the afternoon who will come here for a drink”, said the landlord.

Kent’s biggest brewery, Shepherd Neame, welcomed tie change. Chairman Robert Neame said “It is a victory for common sense. The new laws provide licensees with an opportunity to improve their trading”.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 March 1989.

Advertising Feature.

The old White Lion pub in Cheriton has opened with a new name and a new look. It is now called Banjo's and puts much more prominence on food. There are regular bands and plenty of good beer.

Landlord Barry Chamberlain said “We have been closed for six weeks. Basically there's been a complete change at the pub. There is a restaurant at the back of the pub now and one double-size bar”. He says he hopes to push the food more as an attraction. “We serve traditional English food and can boast a wide range on offer. It's quality food at reasonable prices. Sunday night will be band night, when we will be having the best bands you can find in the area”, said Mr. Chamberlain.

The pub is open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. with the restaurant cooking good food practically all the time. Barry and wife Lyn always extend a warm welcome to their customers, and the White Lion has been a popular place for many years. Now under it's new name it is set to stay just as successful – if not much better. So why not pop along to the end of Cheriton high Street if you fancy some decent food and drink?

 

Folkestone Herald 25 August 1994.

Local News.

Live music will go on being played at a pub despite complaints from neighbours. Four of them told Shepway District Council they were fed up with the noise from bands playing at the White Lion pub, Cheriton.

Licensing officers, who visited the inn several times, said noise was very loud inside the building and on nearby streets. But landlord Tony Leeves appealed for permission to keep live bands at the pub, saying it was historically known for such entertainment. Bands were vital for attracting customers, he added.

Entertainments licensing committee members asked how Mr. Leeves could reduce noise escaping from the pub. Shifting the performance stage, building a small entrance foyer and secondary glazing were among possibilities. Mr. Leeves explained. He had asked environmental health officers for help.

Peter Wells, Assistant Director of Health, recognised steps the landlord had taken to find out how he could improve things and said if he carried out alterations and closely monitored noise neighbours should not suffer unreasonable disturbance. The committee renewed the licence for six months instead of the usual year.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 December 1994.

Local News.

A youth who persistently committed offences while on bail has been given nine months in a young offenders' institution. Scott Keeler, 18, was finally kept in custody after he and an accomplice were trapped in a pub cellar they intended to steal from.

Keeler, of Wood Avenue, Folkestone, admitted theft, aggravated vehicle taking, burglary and driving without insurance. He asked for five other offences to be taken into consideration.

Maureen O'Connor, prosecuting, said a number of vehicles were broken into in Deal on March 14 and items were stolen. Property worth 300 was also stolen from a shed. Keeler was later arrested with two other youths and then granted bail. In June he took a car from Linden Crescent, Folkestone. Police followed at speeds up to 60 m.p.h., and eventually caught him in Green Lane, where he had crashed into a wall and written the car off. Again he was bailed and more offences were committed. On September 4 he and three others stole five bottles of alcohol from a supermarket. When interviewed, Keeler said “We just thought we would have a laugh and a couple of bottles”. When released on bail for the final time he and another youth broke into the White Lion pub at Cheriton. The landlord was woken by the burglar alarm and on seeing that the cellar hatch was open closed it and put beer kegs on top, trapping the thieves inside. They were then arrested.

Johnathan Higgs, defending, said it must have been a surprise to Keeler when he was finally refused bail. He had been in custody for three months and no longer felt he was leading a clever way of life.

Noting that Keeler committed the offences to impress his friends, Judge Michael Nelligan said they were so serious that only a custodial sentence could be passed.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 February 1995.

Local News.

Plans to extend pub opening hours on Sundays have failed to cheer local landlords. “No thanks” was the reply from most Shepway publicans asked about the controversial move.

Prime Minister John Major wants to scrap the law that forces pubs to close between 3 and 7 p.m., leaving them free to open from noon until 10.30 p.m.

But many hard-working pub owners are already calling time on the idea, saying their extra time off on Sundays was “sacrosanct”.

Tony Leeves, owner of the White Lion, in Cheriton High Street, said “With most publicans Sunday afternoons are the only time they get to sit down and have a normal lunch, with an extra hour to relax. My Sunday afternoons are sacrosanct and I like being able to relax for an extra hour and enjoy my Sunday roast and Yorkshire pudding”. Mr. Leeves already works from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. every day except Sundays, and he says he will probably not open for the extra hours. “If the business is to be had I'm all for going out and getting it, but people only have so much money to spend”, he added. “If you divide that amount by hours, it just means less money is spent per hour”.

Landlord James Hawkings said his regulars at The Happy Frenchman, in Christ Church Road, Folkestone, thought little of the proposal. “Most men come out for a drink at Sunday lunchtime, but have to get back to their wives for their lunch afterwards”. He intends to stay shut between 3 and 7 p.m. and does not believe trade will suffer as a result. Pubs benefitting from the longer hours would be those in the countryside selling meals, and those on the seafront, he said.

A Home Office official said the Government hoped to change the law by the end of the year. The proposals include letting off-licences sell alcohol from 10 a.m. to 10.30 p.m.. And supermarkets could do the same for six continuous hours on Sundays.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 February 1995.

Local News.

A pub landlord has promised to cut down the noise from his live music nights. Neighbours of the White Lion in Cheriton High Street complained last year about the noise coming from the building when bands played there. Shepway Council renewed landlord Tony Leeves' indoor entertainment licence for six months and have monitored the situation since. Now they have said he can go on holding the Thursday and Friday night events for another six months at least. But members of the licensing sub-committee said he must try to have a porch built in front of the pub – work Mr. Leeves said the owner of the building was prepared to undertake. But he added “I do feel this has been blown out of all proportion by one complainant whose complaint has not been justified”.

The main protestor is a woman living in Risborough Lane but Mr. Leeves said she exaggerated how badly the noise penetrated her home. “In her first letter she said she could hear the music above the sound of the TV, but I've spoken to several noise consultants and they say that's impossible”.

Senior licensing officer, John McEwan, visited the woman in her home and said the music could be heard indoors with a window open, but not with the window shut. No meter readings of noise levels in the house were taken, and Mr. Leeves said he believed these were necessary if the complaint were to be justified. Since the last licence renewal he has secured windows so they cannot be opened on music nights and has carried out sound insulation of the stage area. But the licensing sub-committee was most concerned about noise escaping when customers opened doors on entering and leaving. This would be reduced if a porch was built. Police told the Council before the latest meeting it had received several complaints about noise from the White Lion, but later said this was an error on their part and there had actually been no such complaints.

The sub-committee said if more neighbours complained an officer would take readings of noise levels as evidence.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 October 1996.

Local News.

Some God-fearing folk have found a new venue in which to celebrate their faith. Last week the Herald reported that a branch of the Christian Community Church had started to meet every week – in a pub. And, on Sunday, more than 30 of the Church members met before opening time at the White Lion, Cheriton. However, the worshippers stress that although they are turning an ale house into a house of God, they have not swapped bread and wine for snacks and beer.

Ally Kay, 35, who runs the Church with his wife, Nicky, also 35, said “All Churches have a responsibility to reach out to the community. People who wouldn't normally go to Church feel comfortable in a pub. We felt it was the right way to worship. It's a nice pub and we are welcomed by the staff”.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 August 1997.

Advertising Feature.

All kinds of changes have been underway at the White Lion.

Landlady Ruth Smith has undertaken an extensive refurbishment to create the perfect setting for special occasions and a warm welcome whether you pop in for a drink, enjoy a meal or stay the night. There are four double bedrooms available. Ruth, who has owned the White Lion for the last three months, has worked in the trade for 40 years, owning or managing various pubs, night clubs and restaurants, including The Hotel Tresillian in Margate, Sam's Nightclub in Portsmouth, and The Station Bar in Helensburgh, Scotland.

The White Lion was originally a hotel, and is remembered for a visit by King George V, who stayed there for a night on his way back to London after First World War victory.

Ruth Smith is known for producing cakes for special occasions, especially for the beautiful wedding cakes which are made to order. To complement this, the White Lion offers a function room for up to 100 people to cater for events such as parties, weddings and christenings. Bookings are already being taken for Christmas outings and parties.

The White Lion has a restaurant, seating up to 36 people, which features Sunday Lunch for just 3.95. Needless to say, you should book in advance, as it is extremely popular. On a livelier note, there is karaoke every Tuesday night, and happy hours every Tuesday evening between 6 and 8 p.m.

An extra feature is tucked away at the rear of the pub, where there is a very popular cafe with easy parking facilities. It serves a full English breakfast from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at just 2.40, or a Jumbo Breakfast for 3. There is a full menu available, which is added to by daily specials.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 June 1998.

Maidstone Crown Court.

A man who had gone along to a pub karaoke evening was kicked unconscious by wedding party thugs who had spilled out of a private function room into the bar.

Alastair Walker, prosecuting, told how, from being irritating, their behaviour developed into something far worse as everyone gathered outside at closing time waiting for lifts. It was then, he said, that John Newland, who had gone along for an evening out at the White Lion, Cheriton High Street, Folkestone, was asked by the groom “Did you call my missus a w****r?” “This was a question which was unfounded and designed to provoke trouble”, said Mr. Walker. A bottle was smashed over his head and he was surrounded by wedding party guests, who set about punching and kicking him. An attempt to make a break for it was thwarted when he was tripped up and again kicked as he fell to the ground.

Richard Norris, 20, of Joyes Road, Folkestone, Roy Jackson, 20, of Manorfield, Singleton, Ashford, and his brother, John Jackson, 23, of Cambridge Gardens, Folkestone all pleaded Not Guilty to malicious wounding on November 6, 1996, when they appeared at Maidstone Crown Court.

Mr. Walker said the attack only ended when someone called out that the police were coming, but, despite this, Roy Jackson, who had left with the others, returned to carry out what he called “an act of gratuitous violence”, jumping on Mr. Newland, who at that stage was down and almost out. He regained consciousness hours later after being taken to the William Harvey Hospital, where he had to have six stitches for a cut above his right eye, and was found to be badly bruised.

Mr. Newland told the Court that the attack had been completely unprovoked and how, after the bottle was smashed over his head, he was punched and kicked. He remembered being pushed against the pub wall, when his only recollection was of a flurry of boots and shoes kicking out at him.

Mr. Walker said it was the Crown's claim that the three defendants were among those to surround and kick Mr. Newland, although conceded it was probably not one of them who smashed the bottle over his head.

The trial continues.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 June 1998.

Maidstone Crown Court.

Three thugs who attacked and beat a man in a pub where they were attending a wedding reception have been jailed.

John Newland was beaten senseless while attending a karaoke evening at the White Lion, in Cheriton high Street, in November, 1996.

A trial heard how Mr. Newland was surrounded by drunken guests from a wedding party being held on the premises. A bottle was smashed over his head, he was punched and kicked and when he tried to make a break for it he was tripped and again kicked as he fell to the ground. He woke up in hospital after being knocked unconscious.

Appearing at Maidstone Crown Court, John Jackson, 23, of Cambridge Gardens, Folkestone, admitted affray and assault causing actual bodily harm, and was jailed for a total of six months.

His younger brother, Roy Jackson, 20, of Manorfield, Singleton, Ashford, was sentenced to a total of 12 months in a young offender institution for malicious wounding and a public order offence.

Richard Norris, 20, of Joyes Road, Folkestone, was convicted of wounding Mr. Newland and was sent to a young offender institution for six months.

Mr. Newland told the Court the attack had been completely unprovoked. He remembered being pushed against the pub wall and then his only recollection was a flurry of boots and shoes kicking out at him. He needed six stitches to a cut over his right eye.

Alistair Walker, prosecuting, told the jury that the three defendants were among those to surround and kick Mr. Newland, although it was probably not one of them who smashed the bottle over his head.

Counsel for all three defendants, who had denied the offences, said they agreed that their behaviour had been unacceptable and inappropriate. All of them had undergone a complete change in lifestyle since the offence and all were now in stable relationships.

But Assistant Recorder Peter Wallis said the offences were so serious that only custody was appropriate.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 July 1998.

Toby Jugs.

Has anyone been to the White Lion, Cheriton, recently? Does it exist? The number in the Yellow Pages doesn't work and it is not listed in directory inquiries. Instead Jugs got through to a middle-aged lady. “Is that the pub?”, Jugs asked. “Wish it was!”, came the reply. Please call us, landlord, wherever you are!

 

From the BBC News Website 14 May 2006

INQUIRY AFTER MAN IS SHOT IN LEG

Police were talking to witnesses at the pub on Saturday.

Police have been given more time to question a man over a shooting at a pub in a Kent town on Friday evening.

An 18-year-old man is still being treated in hospital for a leg injury after being shot at the White Lion pub, Cheriton High Street, Folkestone.

Armed police were called to the scene and the pub was cordoned off for forensic inquiries on Saturday.

A 35-year-old local man was arrested and is being held on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm.

He can be questioned for another 36 hours until Monday night.

 

From a Twitter comment, 21 February, 2008, by BOB

Well I live opposite saw the whole damn thing pretty sick stuff.

But then the gang got really out of hand hells-angels I think crazy mothers.

There was guns, knifes, baseball bats, one guy even had a molotov cocktail which he failed to light but great effort.

At this stage I ran for my cam-corder. Returned with all my haste to find the police had turned up to break up the party.

So I began to record when a police officer saw me at the window and began walking towards my front door. OOps! I opened the front door and he requested I hand over my cam for evidence. Which upon this request I refused and hence got tazered.

Unfortunately for the police officer he managed to destroy all recordings on the cam.

What a Cock .... Thanks Yours Faithfully BOB.

 

Twitter reply 22 February 2008 by Harbourmaster.

That was 2 years ago. I don't think you got tazered. I smell BULLSHIT BOB.

 

From the Liberal Democrats website, 10 October 2007

WHITE LION REDEVELOPMENT REJECTED BY SHEPWAY COUNCIL.

Local residents were delighted last night. Plans for the redevelopment of the White Lion site on the junction of Cheriton High Street and Chilham Road, Folkestone, was rejected by Shepway Development Control due to concerns on the impact on parking locally. The plans were for a block for accommodation for 16 students plus 4 terraced houses on Chilham Road.

Cheriton Councillor Tim Prater spoke on behalf of Folkestone Town Council. The Town Council supported the basic application, but had strong concerns about the impact of parking on local residents. Local residents were also represented by local resident Michelle Baines who spoke against the development due to the increased pressure in would put on parking locally.

Michelle outlined the horrendous difficulties of parking in Chilham Road now, with many local residents forced to park streets away.

The developer had made a number of changes to the scheme from the initial application including inclusion of CCTV and a 24 hour on site concierge in the student accommodation which were welcomed, but the issue of the impact on parking was not felt to have been sufficiently addressed.

Councillor Prater said: "Folkestone Town Council has considered this application, and wants to be clear that it has difficulties with this development only regarding the implications for parking for local residents.

"Chilham Road has 24 houses, none of which have off-road parking or garages.

"Although this new development contains 11 parking paces, these will be behind security controlled gates and access strictly controlled. It is likely therefore that the four houses in the development that face Chilham Road will only be permitted access for one car most of the time, and any additional cars for those houses will be parked on the street.

"Equally, the development requires the creation of a 3.4 m wide access road to the rear parking area which does not currently exist off Chilham Road, which will in itself reduce the amount of parking available in Chilham Road.

"The development already passed by this Committee in 2005 on the other side of the road already introduces 19 new flats and houses into the area, with 21 new parking spaces.

"Crucially however, in that development, 6 houses are built in a run on Chilham Road, each of which have their parking spaces at the front of the houses, therefore reducing significantly one area of existing on street parking, as it would otherwise block access to those houses parking.

"Chilham Road already has significant parking issues, and the effect of these developments taken together will hugely worsen the situation.

"The Town Council's view is not that the total number of spaces are too low for the development itself, but that the development will cause still more pressure on the current difficult parking for other local residents. With some creative thinking, this development could help improve the situation, not worsen it."

 

From an email received 18 April, 2011

My Grandfather Reginald Peters operated The White Lion, 70 Cheriton High Street, Cheriton, Folkestone, Kent for many years.

I remember this pub vividly as a boy. It is where I grew up.

My brother was born up-stairs on the 2nd floor.

My Great grand mother also died on the same floor. I think she was 97!

It used to be a beautiful building and most fascinating to a young boy although the cellars were a bit scary.

We have family photos of The White Lion and Reg Peters (grandad). Its very sad to see it bricked up.

It once had lovely etched windows and beautiful fittings in the bars. Also my Great Grand father, Reg's dad, ran the pub Morning Star, 48 Boxley Rd, Maidstone but I have no information about him other than that.

Below are two photos, one of me as a tot with Reg's dog.

Will Peters and dog

and one of Reg and Tess (nana and grandad). Both photos are in the back garden of the white lion around 1966.

Reginald Peters and wife

Regards Will Peters,

Queensland,

Australia.

 

From an email received 20 January, 2013

Reg and Tess Peters were my grandparents too. They ran a “respectable establishment” – no drunkenness or swearing allowed!

It's so nice to see a picture of their dog, Bruce again, too. Bruce is my first memory of a beloved pet.

My dad and mum (Reg's daughter) were married at the pub in 1962, and I have memories of being allowed “Babycham” at the counter (and crisps).

As my coz, Will, said, it's so sad to see the place bricked up.

Does anyone have information on the British law that has resulted in the premises being closed?

Apparently if there is a crime committed, a premises is shut down? I would appreciate any further information for research purposes.

Kel.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

COLLINS Benjamin c1855-59 Next pub licensee had Melville's 1858Bastions Later Victoria (2)

GILBERT William 1859-1862 Bastions

MITCHELL James 1861-66 Bastions

CHAPLIN Edward 1866-67 Bastions

LOVELAND Charles Edward 1867-70 Bastions

HAMMON(D) Thomas Edward 1870-76 dec'd Post Office Directory 1874Bastions

HAMMON(D) Mary 1876-81 Bastions

BALDOCK Henry 1881-99 (also farmer age 40 in 1891Census) Bastions

New pub built

SAUNDERS Joseph Sidney July/1898-1902 (age 44 in 1901Census) Bastions

SMILES Joseph George 1902-18 (age 52 in 1911Census) Kelly's 1903Post Office Directory 1913Bastions

SMILES Roy 1918-19 Bastions

SMILES Joseph 1919-26 Bastions

SMILES Roy 1926-29 Bastions

MOSS Percy 1929-38 Bastions

SAMWAY Bert & Lydia 1938-50 Bastions

PETERS Reginald 1958-Sept/73 Bastions

ROGERS John & Dena 1976+ Bastions

CHAMBERLAIN Barry 1982-92 Bastions Renamed "Banjos" 1989-92

LEEVES Anthony & Hilary 1992-97 Bastions

BILBERRY-SMITH Ruth 1997-98 Bastions

OLIVER Linda 1998-99 Bastions

DOYLE Derek 1999 Bastions

DOYLE Derek and BYATT Paul 1999-2000 Bastions

WILSON Patricia 2000 Bastions

Last pub licensee had LONG Thomas 2000-01 Bastions

LILEY Deborah and ORMISTON Robert 2001 Bastions

BOYLE Shane 2001-02 Bastions

CONSIDINE Rachel & POPHAM Beryl 2002-04 Bastions

HAGGER Deborah and HAMMANT Robert 2004+ Bastions

https://pubwiki.co.uk/WhiteLion.shtml

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/whitelion.html

 

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyMore Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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