DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, May, 2019.

Page Updated:- Sunday, 26 May, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1839

Swan

Latest 1940

176 Dover Road

Folkestone

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 15 February, 1862. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

CAUTION TO DRIVERS OF PUBLIC CARRIAGES

Friday February 14th:- Before Gilbert Kennicott and James Tolputt, Esqs.

William Philpot, a licensed driver, No. 6, was summoned for a like offence.

Ingram Swain P.C. deposed on Saturday evening last about 10 o'clock he saw two carriages standing at the door of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, about 6 or 8 feet from the door; defendant, the driver of one of them stood by the door; the other carriage was not attended by anyone. About 11 o'clock witness returned to the "Swan" and found that one of the carriages were gone; defendant still stood at the door; the other was inside the tap room. Witness asked defendant if that was his carriage outside and he said yes. The place where the carriage stood was alongside the high road.

Edmund Kingsford proved the defendant as a licensed driver, No. 6, the licence having been granted on the 1st June, 1857.

Defendant in answer to the charge attempted to prove the plea where his carriage stood was private property, and called the landlord of the "Swan," Mr. Robinson, to corroborate him.

The magistrates however considered the case proved and fined defendant 1s. and costs 11s. 6d. The fine and costs were paid at once.

 

Walter Woolgar, licensed fly driver No. 8, was summoned for a similar offence, at the same time and place. It appeared he was the driver of the other carriage, referred to in the previous case, belonging to Mr. Henry Laker.

Police Constable Swain deposed the horse and carriage was seen going down Mill Lane, without any driver with it. Swain proceeded to the "Swan," and found defendant sitting in the tap room. He told him the fly had gone away, when defendant said “Oh, I dare say the old mare has gone home all right”; he didn't think she'd run away. (A laugh)

Mr. Kingsford proved the defendant was a licensed driver.

Defendant, who had pleaded not guilty, justified himself on the plea that Mr. Laker had discharged him on a minute's notice, and was not therefore the driver of the carriage.

The magistrates, however, considered it a bad case, and fined him 5s. and 10s. costs, if brought up again the full penalty to be inflicted.

Defendant said he had neither money nor goods, so they must take his body.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 6 September, 1862. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

BREAKING AND ENTERING

Wednesday September 3rd:- Before Captain Gilbert Kennicott R.N., W.F. Browell, James Tolputt, A.M. Leith and W. Wightwick, Esqs.

Thomas Joy, 28, described as a baker, James Burns, 25, engine driver, Sarah Walker, 23, and Jane Jemima Castle, 20, were placed at the bar, charged with feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Hall Robinson, and stealing £3 0s 6d in gold and silver, 7s or 8s in coppers, two boxes of cigars, 1 silk handkerchief, 1 concertina, 2 coats, 1 monkey jacket, 4 clocks, 1 letter, 1 public house licence, pair sugar tongs, 1 gold pin, 1 frock, 1 child's coat.

William Hall Robinson, sworn, deposed he was landlord of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road. On Tuesday morning last, witness was awoke by his servant, about 20 minutes to 7, who told him the house had been broken into. On going downstairs, witness found that a pane of glass had been removed in the back parlour, and the fastenings undone – the window was a small distance open. Witness had fastened the window the last thing on the previous night, and was the last person to go to bed; the things in the parlour were all in a state of confusion. A writing desk had been broken open, and a small gold pin abstracted from it; the cupboard had been opened and the things in it turned topsy turvy. Witness missed the clock from the top of the cupboard, the right hand one as the room was entered. Witness then went to the bar, and found the bar window over the counter had been forced open, and two boxes of cigars taken, £3 0s 6d in gold and silver from the till, 7 or 8 shillings worth of coppers from the same till, a pint of pale brandy, a letter directed to witness, and the magistrates certificate of the licence, all from the same bar. Witness then went to the police station and informed the police. Witness had securely closed the bar window on the previous night by a flush bolt on the inside; the £3 0s 6d was club money, which had been collected the night before, and was in a large cup; saw the two male prisoners between the hours of 9 and 11 o'clock at his house, on Monday night; they had refreshments there; had not seen them before, nor the women prisoners at all. The gold pin now produced by Police constable Smith, witness identified; it had a red stone in it; witness also missed three coats, now produced by Police constable Smith.

Mary Jane Stace, being sworn, deposed she was servant at the "Swan Inn;" came downstairs on Tuesday morning about a quarter to 7, and saw the door of the back parlour was open, also saw two empty cigar boxes lying in the passage; also saw a pint pot half full of beer, and a glass standing on the floor in the front parlour; in the back parlour witness saw that five little clocks were gone from a sideboard in the room. Witness went out of the back door, and found a ladder standing against the gate, and that the window of the back parlour was opened a little way. Witness then called her master. Previous to this witness found the bar window was open, and also the till drawer. Witness was the first one down in the house that morning.

William Taylor, being sworn, deposed he was landlord of the "General Havelock" public house, at Canterbury. Between 1 and 2 yesterday afternoon James Burns and Sarah Walker came into witness's house and called for some refreshment. They had not been more than 10 minutes in the house when the bundle now produced by Sergeant Newman was given into witness's charge. The prisoners left the house, the male prisoner saying “Take charge of this. I shall be back directly”. Witness had not seen them until now. Witness did not examine the bundle. Inspector Dodd, of the Canterbury police, came to witness's house about 4 minutes afterwards with the witness Robinson, and witness gave the bundle to the Inspector.

By the prisoner Sarah Walker:- You asked if you might have a bed, to which I said yes.

Police sergeant Thomas Newman, sworn, deposed he was sergeant of police. From information received, witness proceeded to Dover yesterday morning in company with police constable Smith and Mr. Robinson. They traced the prisoners from Dover to Canterbury by the London and Chatham Railway. Witness followed, went into the "Wellington" public house, Broad Street, Canterbury, and found the prisoner Thomas Joy and the female prisoner Jane Jemima Castle. Police constable Smith took Joy, and witness assisted him in securing Joy, as he was rather violent; prisoner was taken to the Canterbury police station and witness told the prisoner he should search him. The prisoner pulled from his coat pocket 53 cigars, and 2 knives, one in a case, the other clasp, two boxes of matches, a letter addressed to Mr. W Robinson, The "Swan Inn," Folkestone, a magistrates certificate of licence to W. Robinson, dated 22nd August, 1862. When the prisoner took out the paper he said “Those are not my property”; also 4s 11 1/2d – 3s 6d in silver, and the rest in coppers; prisoner gave his name as John Asson. The other prisoners Burns and Walker were then brought in, and also Castle, and they were all brought to Folkestone. Witness received the bundle produced, identified by Taylor, from Inspector Dodd, in the presence of the witness Robinson, which contained a quantity of wearing apparel, not identified, four clocks, and a pair of scissors; the second bundle now produced, witness obtained from Inspector Dodd, in the presence of witness Robinson, and contained a quantity of children's wearing apparel and a quantity of baby linen, A good deal of amusement was caused by the Clerk asking the witness if he could describe the baby linen, in which the prisoners joined heartily.

Questioned by James Burns – Did not see you come into the police station at Canterbury.

Police constable Edwin Smith, sworn, deposed that on Tuesday morning, in company with police sergeant Newman and the prosecutor, Robinson, he went to Dover and from thence to Canterbury; Robinson went with witness to the "Wellington Inn," at Canterbury, and there saw the prisoner Joy and Castle; the prisoner Joy had a concertina, tied up in a silk handkerchief; witness enquired where he got it from, and he answered it was his own property; the witness Robinson immediately identified the concertina and handkerchief as his property; Joy said nothing. The three coats now produced were lying on a table, which Robinson also identified; previously witness asked prisoner where he got them from, and he said they were his property, he had bought them. Witness, who was in plain clothes, told him he was a police constable, and he should apprehend him on a charge of burglary at Folkestone. Prisoner said “You -----, you take me”, and put himself in a fighting attitude; with assistance the prisoner was secured and taken to the Canterbury police station, and also the prisoner Castle, who was also taken to the station. The prisoners Castle and Joy were sitting close together; she was the worse for liquor, and had a bundle of clothes with her, which she claimed as her property. Whilst in the station at Canterbury, witness saw the prisoners Burns and Walker brought into the station by superintendent Davis, of the Canterbury police; as soon as the prisoners were brought in, Robinson identified the prisoner Burns as the one who was in company with at his house the night previous. Witness commenced to search the prisoner Burns, who put his hand in his pocket and pulled out two pence. Witness then found in Burns' left hand pocket of his coat 4 clock weights and an alarm weight, in his waistcoat pocket two ear drops and a small gold earring, a gold pin with part of a red stone in it, and five cigars. All these articles witness produced. Witness then assisted in bringing the prisoners to Folkestone.

Examined and questioned by James Burns – You did not come into police station voluntarily, you were brought in by the collar by Davies. You did not say to me “The man who stole the weights is on the way”.

Mr. Robinson re-called – Identify the gold pin, the 4 clocks, 1 child's frock, a child's jacket, a letter, a magistrate's certificate, three coats, a silk handkerchief, sugar tongs, pair of scissors, 5 pieces of baby linen, clock weights and an alarm, and concertina as being his property, produced by police sergeant Newman and police constable Smith. The property taken exceeds £5 in value. Witness also identified the bundles produced as those which he saw delivered to the police at Canterbury, and saw them hand the bundles to police sergeant Newman.

Capt. Kennicott said the magistrates had decided on discharging the female prisoners, as they had not found any of the property on them, but cautioned them as to their future conduct; they having had a very narrow escape.

Both the male prisoners, having been cautioned made long, rambling statements in defence.

The depositions were then formally completed, and the prisoners were committed to take their trials at the next Quarter Sessions for the borough, the witnesses being bound over to appear and give evidence at the trial.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 6 September, 1862. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

BURGLARY

Wednesday September 3rd:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, A.M. Leith and W.F. Browell, Esqs.

Thomas Joy, 28, baker, James Burns, 25, engine driver, Sarah Walker, 23, prostitute, and Jane Jemima Castle, prostitute, were charged with burglariously entering the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, and stealing various articles.

William Paul Robinson, landlord of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, said that his servant came to him about 20 minutes to 7 on Tuesday morning and told him that the house had been robbed. He got up and went downstairs, when he found that a pane of glass in the back parlour had been broken, and the window itself was raised about 2 inches. He had himself fastened the window last thing on Monday night. All the things in the parlour were in confusion. A writing desk had been forced open, and a small gold pin with a real stone was abstracted from it. The cupboards had also been opened, and things turned out. A clock had stood on the cupboard, which he missed. At the time he did not notice the absence of anything else, but afterwards he missed a child's frock coat, and some babies' clothing. Going into the parlour, he missed two boxes of cigars, £3 0s 6d in gold and silver money from the till, 7s or 8s in copper money, a bottle of pale brandy (a pint), a letter, a magistrates' certificate of licence, and 3 coats. Witness then came to the police station to give evidence. The bar window, which was fastened by a small inside bolt the night before, had been forced open. There was no mark on the window, or on the writing desk, to show how either of them was forced open. The gold and silver was club money that he had incautiously left in a large packet in the till the night before. The two male prisoners came into his house between 9 and 10 on Monday evening, and went away between 10 and 11. The men came in for refreshment. The women were not with them. Witness then identified the gold pin (which P.C. Smith produced) but the red stone was missing.

Mary Jane Stace, servant at the "Swan Inn," came downstairs on Tuesday morning at a quarter to 7, and found the side door of the back parlour open. An empty wine glass was on the floor on each side of the passage; the cupboard doors were open. Five little clocks were gone from a box that stood on the sideboard. Going to the back door, she saw a ladder standing against the gate. The back parlour window was up a little way, and the bar window and till drawer were open.

William Taylor, landlord of the "General Havelock," Canterbury, said that between 1 and 2 yesterday afternoon, the prisoners Burns and Sarah Walker came into his house and ordered some refreshment. They had not been there more than 10 minutes when the bundle on the table (produced by Sergeant Newman), was given into his charge by the prisoner Burns, and both prisoners then left the house. Burns said “Take charge of this. I shall be back directly”. Witness had not seen the prisoners since until this morning. Inspector Dodd, of the Canterbury police, came to witness in company with Mr. Robinson four minutes after prisoners had left, and claimed the parcel. Walker, when she came in, asked if he had a bed to let.

P.S. Newman, having received information from Mr. Robinson, proceeded with him and P.C. Smith to Dover, and then to Canterbury, to the "Wellington" public house, where he found the prisoners Joy and Castle. He apprehended Joy, and took him to the Canterbury police station, where he told him he must search him. Joy then pulled from his pocket 53 cigars, a case knife and clasp knife, two boxes of matches, a letter addressed “Mr. W.H. Robinson, "Swan Inn," Folkestone”, and a magistrates' certificate of excise licence, dated 22nd August, 1862. When he pulled out the letter and licence he said “These are not my property”. He also produced 4s 11 1/2d. He then, at witness's request, wrote his name as John Asan. The other prisoners, Castle, Burns, and Walker were brought into the station while witness was there, and he assisted in bringing all of them to Folkestone. The bundle identified by Taylor witness received from Inspector Dodd in presence of Mr. Robinson. (The bundle was then opened, and was found to contain a quantity of wearing apparel not identified, 4 clocks, pair of German sugar tongs and a pair of scissors. Witness also produced a second bundle, that he had received in the same way, which contained several articles of children's clothes, baby linen &c.)

P.C. Smith said he went to Dover with Mr. Robinson and Sergeant Newman, and found the prisoners Joy and Castle at the "Wellington" public house. The prisoner Joy had a concertina tied up in a handkerchief, and said it was his own property, and also three coats that witness found on the table on the room in which the prisoners were. Witness asked him where he got the coats from, and he said he bought them. Witness then took Joy and Castle to the Canterbury station. Castle was rather the worse for drink. The bundle which she had she said was her own property, and she knew of nothing else. On examining her bundle nothing was found in it but her own wearing apparel. Prisoner and Castle were sitting near each other, but other persons were in the same room. While in the Canterbury station, the Superintendent brought in Burns and Walker, having found them outside the station. Robinson immediately identified Burns as the man who had been in company with Joy. Searching Burns, 2d in coppers, 5 clock weights, 2 ear drops, small gold earring, gold pin, with part of a red stone in it, and 5 cigars were found upon him.

In cross-examination by the prisoner Burns, witness said he (Burns) did not come voluntarily into the Canterbury station to enquire for a person, but was brought in by the Superintendent by the collar. Burns did not say that a man had sold him two of the things on the road. He said that he had sold the clocks to a man on the road.

Mr. Robinson, being again called, identified the gold pin, four clocks, child's jacket, letter, magistrates' certificate, three coats, concertina, silk handkerchief, sugar tongs, scissors, five pieces of baby linen and five clock weights as his property, and exceeding £5 in value.

This being the case against the prisoners, Captain Kennicott stated that the Bench had decided to dismiss the women, no property having been found on them, but he cautioned them as to their choice of companions in the future.

The prisoners then being called on for their defence, Joy said that on Monday morning he met Burns in Dover, on the road to Folkestone, and in reply to Burns he said he was going to Folkestone to look for work. He said he was also going to Folkestone. They stayed in Folkestone until about 9 o'clock, and then seeing that there was no work in the town they returned to Dover. They got up early on Tuesday and were going to Canterbury, and when they came to the station it was too early. There was a man there with two large bundles in his hand. He asked if anyone wanted to buy anything, as he was out of employment and without any money. They told him they could not do so, as they were short of money themselves. He then said he would sell them things very cheap, as he was in want of money. Burns asked him how much he wanted for the lot. At first he asked 35s. He (Joy) told him they could not give him so much, as they had only £2 between them. He then wanted 30s., but he (Joy) told him he would give him £1 8s., and he went and changed a sovereign and came back and paid him the money. Then the man offered them a lot of cigars for 2s., and so the man received 30s. for the whole, and left them, and they started for Canterbury.

Burns said the man who offered the things said they need not be afraid to buy the goods. He brought them from London. They were his own property. He had carried them a long way, and he was hard up for money. He said he would not carry them any further, for they were no use to him as he intended to go to sea. When he was leaving them, “this gentleman here” (the prisoner Joy), went to get two tickets, and the man put his two fingers in his white waistcoat pocket, and asked him (Burns) if he was married. He said he was not, but he intended to be; and the man then gave him two large ear drops and a small pin, and said “I'll bid you goodbye. Keep them in remembrance of me” (laughter). He then went away, and they went to Canterbury, where he went to the "General Havelock." Sarah Walker went out to get something to eat, but she came running back, and said the young man and woman who came with them from Canterbury were locked up. Giving the two bundles to the landlord at the bar, and asking them to keep them for a few minutes, he went to the police station, where there was a great crowd. Pressing through the crowd, he asked the Inspector if So-and-So (giving description of Joy and Castle) were locked up. He said “Yes. Come along with me”, and he (Burns) went. After he got inside the Inspector caught him by the collar of his coat, and searched him.

Both prisoners were then committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions to be held in the borough.

One of the male prisoners (Joy) is believed to be an old convict who has served a four year sentence; and the other (Burns) is a notorious character in the neighbourhood of Chatham. He was formerly in the 17th Lancers, and subsequently worked in the Chatham dockyard. The two female prisoners, who are well known on the Camp, were arrested by Sergeant Smith of the County Police immediately on their quitting the Court, their bundles containing various articles stolen, with others, from the premises of R. Oakenfold, of Ashford, on Tuesday se'ennight. They will be brought before the magistrates at Ashford this morning.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 4 October, 1862. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

QUARTER SESSIONS

Tuesday September 30th: - Before J.J. Lonsdale, Recorder.

Thomas Joy, 28, baker, and James Burns, 25, engine driver, were charged with stealing 1 gold pin, 4 clocks, £3 7s 6d in money, and other articles, the property of William Hall Robinson, in his dwelling house, at Folkestone, on the 2nd September, 1862.

After a short absence the grand jury brought in a true bill against both the prisoners, who pleaded not guilty.

The petty jury were then sworn, and a long enquiry into the facts of the case was gone into, the result being that they were both found guilty. Former convictions were proved against the prisoner Thomas Joy, who had a ticket of leave unexpired, and the learned Recorder said he felt bound to inflict a severe sentence on him: the sentence would be one of penal servitude for 15 years; the other prisoner not having any previous convictions, he would not punish so much; he should therefore sentence him to 5 years' penal servitude.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 4 August, 1862. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

QUARTER SESSIONS

Tuesday 30th September:- Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq., Recorder.

The Grand Jury retired and in a short time returned with true bills against Thomas Joy and James Burns for housebreaking.

Anson Polaski, otherwise Thomas Joy, 28, baker, was charged for that at the general sessions for the county of Kent, held at Maidstone, on 9th of March, 1857, he was convicted of felony; at the quarter sessions held at Sandwich, on the 7th April, 1859, he was convicted of felony; an that having been so convicted of felony, he, on the 2nd September of the present year, broke and entered the dwelling house of William Hall Robinson, situate in Dover Road (the "Swan Inn"), and feloniously stole and carried away £3 0s 6d in gold and silver money, a gold pin, four clocks, a child's frock, a child's cloak, five pieces of baby linen, two boxes of cigars, a bottle of pale brandy, a letter, a magistrates' victuallers' licence, three coats, a concertina, a silk handkerchief, a pair of sugar tongs, a pair of scissors, two ear drops and a gold earring, altogether to the value of £5 and upwards. There was also a count for stealing from a dwelling house to the value of £5, and a count for larceny.

The prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Minter, who appeared for the prosecution, briefly stated the case to the jury, and then called William Hall Robinson.

Examined by Mr. Minter, he deposed that he was the landlord of the "Swan Inn," and that he closed his house at half past twelve on the night of 1st of September, and went to bed about 1 o'clock. In consequence of what had been told him he came downstairs about a quarter to seven the next morning, and found the pane of glass close to the sash fastening of the back parlour window broken, and the window a little way up. The writing desk had been broken open and a pin with a red stone, four clocks, and some children's wearing apparel were missing. The clocks were in a box. He then unlocked the door leading into the bar and went into it, and observed that the window looking into the passage was open. It fastened on the inside by a thumb bolt, but by shaking the sash the bolt would loosen. It was witness's habit to fasten the bar window every night. He missed three pounds and sixpence from the till, and about seven or eight shillings in copper. He also missed three coats, a concertina, a letter, and a magistrates' certificate from the bar. He saw the prisoner on the previous evening in his house. He came in for refreshment. On Tuesday morning he gave information to the police, and went with them to Dover and Canterbury. He got to the "Wellington Inn" at Canterbury, with P.C. Smith, about half past 12. The prisoner Joy was there, and they found a concertina and three coats there in his possession. Joy said the concertina and the coats were his property, and he had bought them. He was then taken to the station and searched, and a letter, a magistrates' certificate and five cigars were found on him. The concertina and coats produced were his property. He saw police sergeant Newman searching Joy at the station house, and find the letter and magistrates' certificate produced, which were safe in his house on the Monday night.

By the Recorder – The desk had not been opened for 12 months before. All the money was taken from the till.

Mary Jane Stace, a servant of Mr. Robinson, came downstairs at a quarter to seven on Tuesday morning, 2nd September, and saw that the five little clocks that the night before were in a box on the sideboard were gone. The back parlour window was open a little way. The bar window and the till were also open. Going into the back yard she saw her master's ladder leaning against the gate. The was was rather high.

Police sergeant Newman said that he went to Canterbury on Tuesday, 2nd September, with Mr. Robinson and P.C. Smith. At the "Wellington Inn" they saw the prisoner Joy, and took him to the Canterbury police station. When witness said he should search him, prisoner said he would produce all he had, which was his own property. He then produced from his pocket 53 cigars, clasp knife, a magistrates' certificate, and a letter addressed to Mr. Robinson. When he took the latter articles out he said they were not his property. When asked his name, he said he would write it. He wrote “James Asan”.

P.C. Smith gave evidence in confirmation of Sergeant Newman.

The statement made by Joy before the magistrates was then read.

The prisoner being called on for defence said he could not make any further statement than he had already made.

The learned Recorder then summed up the case to the jury, remarking that when a person is found in possession recently stolen and failed properly to account for it, the law allowed the jury to presume his guilty possession.

The jury immediately found the prisoner Guilty on the first indictment – housebreaking.

Inspector Spratt of the Canterbury police was then called to prove a former conviction, and not presenting himself, the learned Recorder then said a most serious complaint should be made.

The prisoner was, however, called on to plead to the indictment for former convictions already given, and he pleaded guilty to both.

A further indictment was then proceeded with for feloniously stealing five shillings, a watch, and a walking stick, from the premises of the "Duke of York," Sandgate, on the 31st August, to which the prisoner pleaded Not Guilty, saying that he was not in England at that time. He came from Calais on the 1st of September.

This case had not been previously before the magistrates, and as no legal gentleman represented the prosecution, the examination of witnesses was conducted by the Recorder.

William Wood said he was a builder, but had control over the till at the "Duke of York." On the 31st of August he missed all the money out of his till, a walking stick, and a bundle of cigars. He had seen the watch on the 30th of August hanging over the mantel piece. Had not seen the watch since until today. Could not say that the prisoner was at his house on the Saturday or Sunday, but he had seen him at his house several times. (This witness gave his evidence in a manner that called from the Recorder several reproofs. At last the Recorder said it was disgraceful to see a man behaving himself in the Court as he was doing that day. It was shameful. He had a great mind to commit him for contempt of Court. It was shameful the state in which he was.)

---- Wood, the son of the preceding witness said he got up on the 31st of August and came downstairs and found the front bar sash thrown open. Going down the passage, he saw the back door was open.

James Long, shopman to Thomas Long, pawnbroker, Dover, had a notion that he had seen the prisoner before, but he could not identify him as having pledged the watch, which he had taken in.

The Recorder here stopped the case, no person being able to identify the person who pledged, and then he proceeded to sentence the prisoner on the indictments on which he had been found or pleaded guilty, remarking that he had very little moral doubt himself that in the last case he stole the watch and stick, although, as the case had been got up under rather peculiar circumstances, the evidence was not satisfactory. It was quite clear that he was a professional housebreaker. He was such a person that the law must protect persons against when they went to bed at night to take their rest. He was one of those persons, evidently, who if interfered with in the carrying out of their purposes would not hesitate to use violence. He meant therefore to do what would perhaps send him out of the country for a time – though it did not necessarily follow that a sentence of penal servitude removed a criminal from this country. The sentence he meant to pass on him was that he be kept in penal servitude for fifteen years (sensation).

James Burns, 25, engine driver, was then indicted for breaking into the "Swan Inn," and stealing articles as enumerated in the indictment against Joy. The prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Minter, for the prosecution, recapitulated the evidence, and called various witnesses, whose evidence was the same, with unimportant variations as to possession of goods &c., as in the last case, and the prisoner's statement before the magistrates as to his being accosted by a person on Tuesday morning at the Dover railway station, from whom he bought the articles found upon him, was read. To this statement the prisoner would now add nothing.

The Recorder then summed up the case to the jury, who immediately returned a verdict of Guilty, and he was thereupon sentenced to five years penal servitude.

This closed the business of the sessions.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 May 1911.

Saturday, April 29th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

Robert Death was summoned for assaulting Charles Andrews. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty.

Charles Andrews, of 16, Athelstan Road, said that on April 2nd at about 10 p.m. he was in Dover Road, near the Skew Arches. He was coming out of the Swan public house with a friend, when he saw defendant talking with a man named Gillam, and bade Gillam goodnight. Shortly afterwards, witness left his friend to go across the road, when he received a blow which caused him to become unconscious. He did not see who struck him, nor did he hear defendant come up to him. He was confined to bed for 17 days as a result of the blow, and had been under the doctor's hands for that period. Witness had never spoken to defendant in his life.

Frederick Tutt, of 19, Canterbury Road, a carter, stated that he left the "Swan Inn" with the last witness on the evening of April 2nd at about 10 o'clock, and proceeded in the direction of the Arches. Gillam and Andrews walked on ahead of him for a moment or two, but afterwards witness joined complainant again. As they got near the Arches, Andrews left witness and went across the road. Thereupon defendant came across the road and struck the complainant in the face with his fist, causing him to fall heavily on his back and head. Witness picked him up and took him home. Witness was about seven or eight yards from complainant when the blow was struck, and did not hear any word spoken.

Defendant: Did you see anybody pick me up?

Witness: No.

The Chairman: Was there any fighting going on of any description?

Witness: Not that I know of.

The Magistrates' Clerk: As far as you know then, it was an unprovoked assault?

Witness: Yes.

Mrs. Charlotte Andrews, wife of complainant, said she was at home when her husband was brought in. He was unconscious, and was suffering from a cut on the eye and a bad cut on the back of the head. So bad did he become that during the week she called in the doctor, and he had been under his hands ever since. Defendant called to see her on Friday, and said he was the man who had struck her husband, and that he had had words with him.

Defendant then said he had been threatened by complainant in the public house. He had no witnesses.

The Chairman said defendant was liable to be fined £5 or imprisonment without the option of a fine for two months. The Bench were of the opinion that he was guilty of a brutal and unprovoked assault, and he would be fined 40s. and 11s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 6 May 1911.

Saturday, April 29th: Before W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs.

Robert Death was summoned for assaulting Charles Andrews. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Charles Andrews, 16, Athelstan Road, a lime-burner, said on Sunday, 2nd April, about ten o'clock in the evening, he was in Dover Road, near the Skew Arches. He had come out of the "Swan" public house with a man named Tutt. He said “Goodnight” to a man named Gillam, and was going over to the urinal, near the arches, when he received a blow in the left eye and fell down and became insensible. He underwent medical treatment as a result of the blow. He did not know the defendant.

Frederick Tutt, 19, Canterbury Road, a carter, said he remembered Sunday night, the 2nd of April. He left the "Swan" with the last witness at ten o'clock. Gillam and Andrews were walking together, and witness was just behind. Andrews said “Goodnight” to Gillam and told witness to wait. Witness then saw defendant come up and strike Andrews in the face with his fist. Andrews fell on his back, and witness picked him up and helped him home. He was insensible, and bled at the nose and mouth. Witness saw defendant in the public house. There was no quarrel.

Charlotte Andrews, wife of the complainant, said she was at home when her husband was brought home. He was insensible, and it was five o'clock the next morning before he knew anything. There was a cut at the back of his head, and he had a black eye. Witness called in a doctor on the following Friday, and complainant did not get up until Thursday in last week. Defendant called on witness on the Friday following the occurrence. He said he was the man who struck her husband. He had had words with him before he struck him. Andrews said that if he (defendant) had said as much to him as he (defendant) said to Gillam he would have floored him.

Death said it was because Andrews threatened him that he did what he did.

The Chief Constable said there was one conviction for gambling six years ago against defendant. He was in the employ of the railway company.

The Chairman said defendant was liable to a fine of £5, or two months' hard labour without the option of a fine. It was a most unprovoked and brutal assault, and he would be fined 40s. and 11s. costs, or one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 13 August 1912.

Tuesday, August 10th: Before Messrs. Stainer, Swoffer, Harrison, Morrison, Boyd, and Stace.

Mr. Phillips was present to ask for the transfer of the licence of the "Swan," Dover Road.

It was explained, however, that a difficulty arose through the absence of the landlord, who could not be traced.

The application was therefore adjourned.

 

Folkestone Express 17 August 1912.

Tuesday, August 13th: Before J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, W.J. Harrison, E.T. Morrison, and A. Stace Esqs.

The Clerk said there was notice of an application that morning for a protection order in respect of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, but Mr. Phillips, on behalf of the owners, informed him that there was some hitch, and the application would not be made.

The Chief Constable said he had inquired into the character of the proposed incoming tenant. He understood the hitch had arisen out of the outgoing tenant not being there.

Mr. Phillips said that was so.

The Clerk (to Mr. Phillips): Then you do not make any application. You must come again in due course.

 

Folkestone Daily News 20 August 1912.

Local News.

Mr. Clarke, proprietor of the "Swan Hotel," Dover Road, mysteriously disappeared some few days since. Such disappearance has caused a good deal of speculation as to his whereabouts and the reason as to his absence. Some thought he might have gone for a holiday, and others that he had gone abroad.

All doubts were settled on Monday morning by the news reaching Folkestone that he had been found shot in a lane near West Hythe, leading to the canal. He was in a very decomposed condition and presented a fearful sight.

Clarke was a native of Hythe, but had resided in Folkestone for many years. He was a man greatly respected and is reported to have been very successful in the licensing victuallers' trade.

The County Coroner will hold an inquest on Tuesday at the "County Members Hotel," Lympne.

 

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette 21 August 1912.

Mr. Alfred Robert Clarke, landlord of the "Swan Hotel," Dover-road, Folkestone, was found dead under a hedge at Lympe, near Hythe. Mr. Clarke disappeared on August 6th.

 

Folkestone Express 24 August 1912.

Inquest.

Mr. A. Clarke, the licensee of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, who had been missing from Folkestone for about three weeks, was found dead on Sunday evening in a secluded spot about four miles west of Hythe. His body was discovered by a man named Percy Cheeseman, who at once gave information to the police. Close to the dead man's head was a revolver, by which it is almost certain that the unfortunate man shot himself. The body was in an advanced state of decomposition, and it was impossible to identify the man by his face, as it was practically eaten away. However, several articles found in the pockets of the clothing proved who the man was. With assistance the police had the body removed to the "County Members Inn," at Lympne, where an inquest was held last Tuesday.

It appeared that Clarke, after leaving Folkestone, went to West Hythe, where he took lodgings and remained until the day after Bank Holiday, since when all trace was lost of him until his dead body was discovered. It is therefore probable that he met his death about that time. When the clothing was searched a considerable sum of money was found on him. On Tuesday week an application was made to the Borough Magistrates to transfer the licence of the "Swan Inn," but it could not be proceeded with owing to the fact that the present licensee (Clarke) was not present. The deceased man had not lived with his wife for a considerable time, and on Monday the County Police were making enquiries as to her whereabouts.

The inquest was held at the "County Members Inn," Lympne, on Tuesday afternoon, when the inquiry was conducted by Mr. A. K. Mowll, the Deputy Coroner for East Kent.

Alonzo William Alexander Clarke, a baker, of 10, Russell Street, Dover, said he was the brother of the deceased. He identified the clothes on the body viewed by the jury as those belonging to his brother, Alfred Robert. He had seen him wear them at Folkestone. His brother was a publican, and was the landlord of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, Folkestone. He recognised the gold watch and Albert, gold seal, gold pin, and two rings (produced) as his brother's property. His brother was fifty years old last September. He was married, but had no children. His wife was not living with him, but left him about two years and a half ago. He was then holding the licence of the "Swan Inn." He last saw his brother alive on August 2nd, a day before he was missing. It was between five and six in the afternoon he met the deceased in Biggin Street, Dover. He asked him (the deceased) how he was, and he replied that he was not at all well, and was taking steps to get rid of his business and to be out within a fortnight. Previous to that he saw him some weeks ago. His brother complained to him on the last occasion he saw him that he was not up to the mark, his teeth troubling him a great deal. He knew there were things on his brother's mind in relation to his family life. He was upset at the time his wife left him, and he never seemed to recover properly from it. He heard by telegram that his brother was missing on the following Tuesday.

John Hadfield, of the "Swan Inn," Folkestone, said he was employed by the deceased as barman at the house. Mr. Clarke had been tenant at the "Swan Inn" for nine years. He left because he saw how things were going between the deceased's wife and another man. He told Mr. Clarke what was happening, and he left six months before Mrs, Clarke eloped with the man. He last saw his employer at 11 a.m. on August 3rd, when he told him he was going to the bank to get change, and he would not be long. He never came back. On the following Tuesday he informed the deceased's brother and sister, and the brewers that he was missing. On the 13th August he told the police that Mr. Clarke was missing, that being the day when the licence was to have been transferred. The deceased had got mixed up with a woman who lived in one of his cottages, and she had given birth to a child four months ago. The woman said he was the father of the child, and the deceased said he was not. He used to sleep off the premises about fifteen months ago. He had informed witness that she was trying to get some money out of him. The deceased's house was doing a good trade, and the accounts were all in good order. Mr. Clarke had threatened to take his wife's life, but had never threatened to take his own life. He never said he was worrying over anything, and he never gave him the idea that he was going to put an end to his existence. He never seemed at all strange in his manner. He, however, complained of pains in his head the Friday previous to his going away, and he said he had dropped his false teeth and had broken them. When he came back from Dover on the Friday he told deceased that he was thinking of going in for the "Richmond" house, and the deceased said that he had practically got rid of the house, and if he (witness) stopped with him until he went he would give him a cheque.

Peter John Uden, of the "Carpenters Arms," West Hythe, said a man, who was a stranger to him, came to his house at six o'clock on the evening of the 3rd August. He asked for tea, and he was served with it. He asked for a bed, and he (witness) got him one at Nightingale Cottage, close by. He left the house about eight o'clock and went to bed. He came on the following morning about ten o'clock and had breakfast. He stayed about the place all day on Sunday, and on Monday morning he came to the house again. After breakfast he came to the bar and asked if he could put him half a quarter of whisky in a bottle for him to take away. As the weather was bad, he asked him (witness) to lend him a Mackintosh, as he was going for a stroll. He said he would be back for dinner, but he did not return until evening. On the Tuesday morning he came in to breakfast about 9.30, and afterwards he had another half quartern of whisky to take away. He then paid up his account for the time he was staying there, it including his night's lodgings and amounting to 15s. He said he might not be back until evening, and asked him to lend him his Mackintosh again. He went on the canal bank, and proceeded in the direction of Hythe. That was the last he saw of him. The body viewed by the jury had his Mackintosh on it. The man did not appear to be strange in his manner, but was very quiet. On the Sunday he was in the smoke room all day, and smoked several cigars. He was very pleasant when spoken to. He (witness) had other people staying in the house, or they would have put him up. His (witness's) wife asked him for his name, and he replied “Oh, it's all right”. He had no luggage with him. The man only had one pint of beer in his house, and that was the only intoxicant, besides the whisky, he had in his house.

John Hadfield, re-called, said the deceased was practically a teetotaller.

Walter Cheeseman, a farmer, of Court-at-Street, Lympne, said he had been to look at some sheep near Aldergate Bridge at a quarter to seven on Sunday evening, the 18th, when he smelled something very offensive. He thought it must be the body of a dead sheep, so he looked into the bracken. He then noticed the body of a man in the bracken, on a bank in a meadow, five or six rods away from the road leading to Aldington. It was impossible to see the body from the road. The deceased was lying on his back, with his arms on his chest. It was getting dusk, and he immediately sent for P.C. Kingsbury at Sellinge, but could not find him until one o'clock in the morning, as he was on duty. As soon as it was light the constable came to his house, and they went to the spot, where they saw the body lying in the same position. He then saw a revolver in the man's right hand. He saw the constable take the two envelopes (produced) from the pockets of the clothing.

The Coroner was then handed the two envelopes, the writing on which was not easily distinguishable. He said the first one had on one side of it “Mr. Clarke, "Swan Hotel," Folkestone”. On the other side was “Mrs. Looker. I am sorry for what I have done to you. Get the deeds of Ivy Cottage at Lloyds Bank. The house you can have, also the furniture. Ever, A. R. Clarke”. The second ran as follows: “I find those papers I signed were false, not what you told me they were. They told me they were for £600 valuation, to be paid in bills”. Mr. Mowll thereupon asked if anyone could explain either of the letters. The witness Hadfield said Mrs. Looker was the woman to whom he had referred; and Mr. Battiscombe, of Messrs. Flint and Co., said he could explain the other letter.

Witness, continuing, said he was present when the constable searched the body, and took from the clothing a gun licence, which was taken out on August 3rd, the five chambered revolver (produced) with one discharged cartridge and four loaded cartridges in it, an account from Messrs. Upton Bros., another account from Messrs. Lee and Son for £1 12s. 6d., the jewellery previously identified, a note with £700 and £16 upon it, a box containing 42 loaded cartridges, and £14 16s. 7d. in money.

P.C. Kingsbury, stationed at Sellindge, said he searched the body and found the articles previously described. He conveyed the body later to the "County Members."

Mr. C. W. Battiscombe, Managing Secretary for Messrs. Flint and Co., said he could throw a little light on the second paper read by the Coroner. On Aug. 1st Mr. Clarke came to his office in the afternoon to see him in regard to a contract he had seen in respect to the change at the house he was giving up. The contract was between him and the prospective tenant. Deceased said he did not think the contract was quite in order and he asked him if he would read it through. He (witness) did so, and then pointed out that it was all in order. So far as he could see, it was perfectly in order, and Clarke was quite satisfied when he left the office that it was so. The contract was drawn up by Messrs. Phillips and Son, valuers, of Dover, who were acting on behalf of the prospective tenant. Deceased's accounts were up to date, and there were no debts owing to them. He was in a most happy position, so far as their accounts were concerned – in fact, they could not be better. Deceased would have come out of the house with over £700. He was a first class tenant, and so far as he (witness) knew there was nothing for him to worry about.

Dr. Clifford Hackney said he examined the body at seven o'clock on Monday evening in the coach house of the "County Members Inn." The features were unrecognisable, as they were in a state of advanced decomposition. An examination of the body revealed no injury of any kind until he came to the head, when he found a hole in the right upper jawbone, and a fracture of the bone, which was splintered from the hole. The hole suggested to him gun trouble. The point of entry was all eaten away, but the hole went in the direction of the base of the skull. The right hand was clenched in the typical position for gripping a revolver, the position of the trigger finger being projected. The man must have been dead for fourteen days. The cause of death was the injury to the upper jawbone, probably from the revolver. The size of one of the undischarged cartridges was about the size of the hole in the jaw.

The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought the jury must come to the conclusion that the body was that of Alfred Robert Clarke. He also thought it was quite clear from the evidence that the deceased must have taken his own life. It was for the jury to say whether at the time the deceased was temporarily insane.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide whilst temporarily insane”.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 August 1912.

Inquest.

A sensation was caused on Monday by the news that the body of Mr. Alfred Robert Clarke, the landlord of the "Swan Hotel," Dover Road, Folkestone, had been found a few miles west of Hythe. It was discovered near a hedge not far from Aldergate Bridge, in the parish of Lympne, by a man whose attention was drawn to it on account of a strong odour.

There was a bullet wound in the head, and in one hand was clasped a five-chambered revolver containing four full cartridges and one empty one. On the body were about forty other cartridges. The corpse was decomposing.

Mr. Clarke left the "Swan Hotel" on the 3rd August. He stayed at West Hythe until August 6th, when he disappeared. Formerly the deceased held the licence of the "Eagle," Guildhall Street, and was likewise known as the owner of bath-chairs.

An inquest on the body was held at the "County Members Inn," Lympne, on Tuesday afternoon by Mr. A.K. Mowll, Deputy Coroner. Mr. G. W. Haines, solicitor, of Folkestone, was present.

Previously to the jury going to view the body, the Deputy Coroner asked each to put in his mouth a medical lozenge, a quantity of which he had brought with him.

Mr. Alonzo William Alexander Clarke, a master baker, identified the clothes of the deceased as those belonging to his brother. (The Deputy Coroner had previously remarked that it was impossible to recognise the features of the deceased.) Witness had seen his brother wearing those clothes when he had been over to Folkestone. His brother was a publican, and kept the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, Folkestone. Witness identified the gold watch, chain, rings, and other articles now produced, as having belonged to his brother. The age of the deceased was fifty last December; he was married, but there were no children. His wife was not living with him, she having left him about 2½ years ago. Witness last saw his brother on Friday, August 2nd, between the hours of five and six in the afternoon. The deceased was then on his holidays in Dover, and they met in Biggin Street. They stopped and had a talk. Deceased said he was not very well, that he was taking steps to get rid of his business, and was hoping to leave it in a fortnight's time. Witness had not seen him for some time previously, though Alfred had called at his house a fortnight before his death, when he (witness) was out. His brother had complained about his teeth, and witness told him that he wanted a change. Deceased had a season ticket on the railway, and witness had suggested to him that he should travel up and down a bit. Witness knew that there were things on his brother's mind which he would not reveal to him. Deceased did not seem to have properly recovered from his wife leaving him. Witness was informed by telegram of his brother being missing.

Mr. John Hadfield stated that he was now manager at the "Swan Inn," but had been in the employ of deceased as barman. Witness was with him some time before Mrs. Clarke eloped with another man; he could see that there was something coming off, and so he (witness) left the Swan Inn in order that he would not be placed in any difficulties. He came back in the employ of Mr. Clarke afterwards. Witness last saw the deceased on August 3rd, at about 11 a.m., when the latter said that he was going to the bank to get some change, and that he would not be long. However, he never came back. Witness informed the brewery, and also the brother of the deceased on Tuesday, August 13th; that was the day of the transfer. He told the police the same day. He knew the deceased had been accused by a woman of being the father of her child, but he had denied it. He also knew that Mr. Clarke had slept away from the house for the past fifteen months. Deceased had told him that the woman had been trying to get some money out of him. Witness knew that there was no worry in connection with the house; there was a good trade, and all the accounts were in order.

The Deputy Coroner: Did he ever threaten to take his life?

Witness: No, but he threatened once to take the life of his wife if ever she came to Folkestone.

I didn't ask you that. Did he ever threaten himself?

No, I never heard him.

Did he ever complain?

Only about his head and his teeth.

Continuing, witness said that, in the course of a conversation he had with the deceased, the latter talked about going to Richmond, and said that he had practically got rid of the "Swan." He also told witness that if he stayed with him he would write him a cheque. Witness understood by this that if he stayed with Mr. Clarke until he left the Swan he would receive the cheque as a little present.

Mr. Peter Uden, licensee of the "Carpenters Arms," West Hythe, said that on August 3rd, at about six in the evening, a stranger came to him and asked for tea, and afterwards for a bed. Witness got the latter for him at Nightingale Cottage, which was close by. Deceased came to the "Carpenters Arms" for breakfast the next morning (Sunday), and stayed about the place all day. He came in again for breakfast on the Monday, and he afterwards came to the bar and asked witness if he would put a half quarter of whisky up in a bottle for him to take away. He also asked if, as the weather was bad, witness could lend him a Mackintosh, as he was going for a stroll, and said that he would be back for dinner. However, he did not come back that day until supper time. Deceased had breakfast on Tuesday morning at about 9.30, and after that he had another half quarter of whisky in a bottle. He paid up all his accounts that morning, including that for the night at Nightingale Cottage, the total being 15s. He then said that he might not be back before the evening, and asked witness if he would lend him the Mackintosh again, which he did. Deceased then went up on the Canal bank, and proceeded in the direction of Hythe. That was the last which witness saw of him. Witness identified the Mackintosh as the one which he had lent to the deceased, and he also recognised the clothes as having been worn by the deceased.

The Deputy Coroner: How did he behave while he was with you?

Witness: He was a very quiet man; he did not speak unless he was spoken to. There seemed nothing strange about him, however.

You say that he stayed about your place all day on Sunday. What was he doing with himself?

He was smoking sometimes, and sometimes he was reading.

What was he reading? Do you know?

He was reading the Folkestone Herald; he seemed rather anxious to have the Folkestone Herald.

In reply to further questions, witness said he could not provide a bed for the deceased at the "Carpenters Arms," because he already had ten people sleeping there. Witness's wife did ask him his name, but he said “Oh, it doesn't matter”. They (witness and his wife) had wondered who he was and where he had come from. The deceased had no luggage with him. While he was at the "Carpenters Arms" his drinks consisted of stone ginger beer chiefly, but he had a pint of beer on the Sunday. He had never asked witness as to where he could get a revolver or anything else of that sort.

Mr. John Hadfield was re-called at this point, and, in reply to a question put by Mr. Mowll, said the deceased was practically a teetotaller, drinking ginger beer during the day, though he usually had some port wine during the evening.

Mr. Walter Cheeseman, a farmer, of Court-at-Street, Lympne, described how he found the body. He said it was at about 6.45 on Sunday evening, August 18th. He had been round to have a look at some sheep which he had near Aldergate Bridge (about two miles west of the "County Members Inn") when, smelling something offensive, he looked amongst some bracken, thinking that the cause of the smell was a dead sheep. He found it to be the body of a man. The spot was near a by road, though it could not have been seen from the thoroughfare. The corpse was in a meadow which belonged to Mr. Frederick Uden, of Hythe. The deceased was lying on his back with his arms across his chest. Witness noticed no revolver then; it was getting dusk. He went to the police at Sellinge, but could not find P.C. Kingsbury there, as he was on duty elsewhere. It was after midnight before he found him and told him of his discovery. When witness again saw the body in the morning he noticed that a revolver was in the right hand.

The police then produced various documents which had been found upon the body. One was a note written on the back of an old envelope addressed to the decease at the "Swan Inn;" the note was partially indecipherable, but the Deputy Coroner read it as best he could. It was addressed to Mrs. Looker, of Ivy Cottage, and apparently ran as follows:- I am sorry for what I have done to you. Hope you will forgive me. Get the deeds of Ivy Cottage at the bank; the house you can have. Ever (?) A .R. Clarke.

Then followed a postscript in which some mention was made of £709, and also the passage “I have found that the papers I signed were false”.

The police also produced a gun licence taken out on August 3rd, and other documents relating to the business of the deceased. The contents of these, however, were not made public. The revolver was also produced, and it was mentioned that when found it contained four loaded cartridges and a blank one. There was also a box of 42 cartridges, while the sum of £14 in gold and 16s. 7d. in other coin were likewise found upon the deceased. The false teeth were broken.

P.C. Kingsbury deposed to having his attention called to the body, and to searching the clothes, etc., on Monday, August 19th. He found the articles and documents produced that afternoon.

Mr. Christopher William Battiscombe, Secretary to Flint's Brewery, Canterbury, was called with the object of throwing, if possible, some light upon the passage written by the deceased “I have found that the papers I signed were false”. Witness stated that Mr. Clarke once called to see him in regard to a contract he had signed about giving up the "Swan Inn." Deceased then seemed to think that the thing was not in order, but after hearing the document read through with some explanations he went away quite satisfied. Witness added that the accounts of the deceased were absolutely up to date.

The Deputy Coroner suggested that the £709 mentioned in the note might have been the amount Mr. Clarke was going to receive at the termination of his tenancy of the "Swan Inn."

Witness: I can throw no light upon that. He would get a few hundred pounds; it would be more, I think.

Dr. Clifford Hackney, of Hythe, gave evidence as to his examination of the body on Monday evening in a shed attached to the "County Members Inn." The features were unrecognisable, owing to decomposition. There was no injury to the body, but in the head was what appeared to be a shot hole, the direction of which was towards the base of the skull. The right hand was clenched; this would be a typical position for gripping a revolver, the position of the trigger finger being particularly well marked. The deceased must have been dead not less than fourteen days. The cause of death was the injury to the jawbone; this injury could have been caused by a shot from the revolver produced.

The Deputy Coroner reviewed the evidence taken, and said that to his mind there was only one question for the jury to decide – that of sanity. There was no doubt that the body was that of Mr. Clarke, and, to his mind, he had come to that part of the district with the idea of taking his life. He was a man who was practically a teetotaller, and he had got the whisky perhaps to get his heart high enough to commit the deed. They also had that letter to Mrs. Looker written on the back of the envelope, which also showed that the idea was in his mind.

The jury, with but little discussion, returned a verdict of “Suicide whilst temporarily insane”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 27 August 1912.

Local News.

The Deputy Coroner for East Kent (Mr. A. K. Mowll) held an inquest at Lympne, on Monday on the body of Alfred Robert Clarke, aged fifty.

Alonzo William Alexander Clarke, of 10, Russell Street, Dover, a master baker, identified the body as that of his brother who was the licensee of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, Folkestone. The deceased was married but had no children. His wife left him some two and a half years ago. Witness saw his brother alive last on Friday, August 2nd, but he then said he did not feel at all well.

John Hadfield, barman at the "Swan Hotel," Folkestone, said the deceased was the tenant of the house for eight or nine years. Witness left his employ about three years ago, but came back again after Mrs. Clarke had eloped with another man. Witness left because of the unpleasantness. Witness saw deceased alive at 11 a.m. on August 3rd. He said he was going to the bank to get change and that he would not be long, but he never came back. Some four months ago a, woman who lived in one of the deceased's cottages gave birth to a child, and deceased told witness that she said it was his and had been trying to get some money out of him.

Peter John Uden, of the "Carpenters' Arms," West Hythe, stated that the deceased came to his house at 6 p.m. on Saturday, August 3rd. He. asked for tea, and subsequently witness got him a bed at Nightingale Cottage close by. The deceased remained about until Tuesday, the 6th August, when he paid his account. He borrowed witness's mackintosh and said he would be back in the evening, but he never returned.

Walter Cheeseman, grazier and farmer, of Court-at-Street, Lympne, stated that at 6.45 on the evening of Sunday. August 18th, he was looking at some sheep of his near Aldergate Bridge when he smelt something which might be a sheep. He went into a meadow in the occupation of a Mr. Uden and saw on the top of a bank hidden by bracken the body of a man. He was lying on his back with his arms on his chest. Witness did not notice whether there was a revolver as it was getting dusk. He communicated with the police. The next day on going to the spot with a police constable he saw the revolver in the deceased's right hand lying across his chest.

P.O. Kingsbury gave a list of the articles he found on the body, including £14 16s. 7d. in cash.

Mr. C. W. Battiscombe, manager and secretary of Messrs. Flint and Co., Ltd., stated that the deceased owed nothing to his firm except on the. current account. As far as witness knew there was nothing for the deceased to have worried about.

Dr. Hacknev, who examined the body, stated that the deceased's features were unrecognisable, being in an advanced state of decomposition. There was a hole in the right upper jawbone and a splinter of the jawbone from the hole. The hole suggested to him a gunshot wound. The man must have been dead for about fourteen days.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide during Temporary Insanity”.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 September 1912.

Friday, September 20th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman C. Jenner, Col. Owen, Capt. Chamier, and Mr. J. J. Giles.

Mr. G. W. Haines applied on behalf of Mrs. Clarke, of the "Swan Hotel," Dover Road, the landlord of which, Mr. Clarke, was recently found dead near Hythe, for the transfer of the licence to Mr. Norman. Letters of administration had been granted to Mrs. Clarke. Mr. Norman was well-known in the town, and had formerly been landlord of the "Gun Tavern" for 12 years.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 21 September 1912.

Friday, September 20th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Giles, Fynmore, Jenner and Chamier.

The licence of the "Swan," Dover Road, was transferred to Mr. Norman, who some years since held the licence of the "Gun," Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Express 28 September 1912.

Friday, September 20th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Alderman Jenner, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Captain Chamier, J.J. Giles Esq., and Captain Owen.

Mr. G. W. Haines applied for the temporary transfer of the "Swan Inn" to Mr. Norman. He said they would remember the landlord recently died, and his widow, to whom letters of administration had been granted, applied for the temporary transfer to Mr. Norman, who was well-known in the town, having some time ago kept the "Gun Tavern" for twelve years.

The Bench granted the temporary authority asked for.

 

Folkestone Express 5 October 1912.

Local News.

At the police court on Wednesday the following transfer of licence was sanctioned by the Magistrates: "Swan Hotel," Dover Road, from the late Mr. A. R. Clarke to Mr. Norman.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 October 1912.

Wednesday, October 2nd: Before Mr. E. T. Ward, Mr. W. G. Herbert, Mr. G. I. Swoffer, and Mr. R. J. Linton.

Mr. G. W. Haines appeared on behalf of Mrs. Robert Clarke, whose husband died recently. The licence was transferred to the applicant, who now wished to transfer it to Mr. Norman. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 12 October 1912.

Notice Alfred Robert Clarke, Deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against the estate of Alfred Robert Clarke, late a licensed victualler, of the "Swan Inn," 176, Dover Road, Folkestone, Kent, who died on the 6th day of August, 1912, intestate, are herby required to send particulars of such claims to me the undersigned on behalf of the Administratrix on or before the 30th day of November next, after which date the Administratrix will distribute the assets having regard only to claims then notified.

Dated this 3rd day of October, 1912.

Geo. W. Haines, 18 & 20, Church Street, Folkestone, Solicitor for the Administratrix.

 

Folkestone Express 29 August 1914.

Saturday, August 22nd: Before Mr. E. T. Ward and Col. Owen.

Lucy Foreman was charged with stealing a ring, the property of a fellow servant at the "Royal Pavilion Hotel."

Maud Ellen Lambert, a chambermaid employed at the "Royal Pavilion Hotel," said the prisoner had also been employed there as staff maid from July 28th until August 14th, when she left without notice. The ring (produced) was her property. On Thursday week she placed the ring in a hatpin box in her bedroom, and she saw it safe on the following morning at ten o'clock. The same evening she went to the box, but the ring was missing. She made a search for it, but could not find it, and on Saturday she gave information to the police. On Friday she was shown the ring with two others, and identified it as her property. She valued the ring at 32/6. On Thursday before the prisoner left she was sweeping he (prosecutrix's) room at four o'clock. She did not give the prisoner permission to take the ring; in fact, she had not even shown it to her.

Harrison Prescott, manager to Mr. S. W. Joseph, pawnbroker, of High Street, said the previous day, at half past eleven, the prisoner came to the shop and offered the ring produced in pledge, and asked a loan of 5/- or 6/-. She said it was her property, and had been in her possession five or six years, it having been given to her by a young man. He ultimately advanced 5/- on it. Prisoner gave the name of Lily Gilham, 85a, Marshall Street. Later in the day he handed it over to Det. Sergt. Johnson.

Det. Sergt. Johnson said from information received he made inquiries. The previous evening at 9.45, he, in company with P. C. Butcher, saw the prisoner in the public bar of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road. He called her outside, and told her they were two police officers, and asked her her name. She replied “Lucy Foreman”. He then cautioned her, and showed the ring (produced), which had been given to him by the last witness, and told her she answered the description of a woman who had pledged the ring, which had been stolen, at Mr. Joseph's, and had been identified by Maud Lambert as her property. He informed her she would be charged with stealing it from a bedroom at the "Royal Pavilion Hotel" on the 14th. She replied “My young man, named Carter, gave it to me two years ago”. He saw Carter in the prisoner's presence, and showed him the ring produced, and told him that the prisoner said he gave her the ring two years ago, He replied “I did not. She asked me to pledge it for her. I took it down to the pawnshop, and they refused to take it in”. Prisoner then said “I may as well tell you the truth. My husband gave it to me as an engagement ring ten years ago, but he is now in Canada”. He brought her to the police station and formally charged her, and she again said her husband gave it to her ten years ago. Prisoner had not a wedding ring on.

Prisoner asked the Magistrates to decide the case, and pleaded Not Guilty. She said her husband gave her the ring ten years ago when she was in the Victoria Hospital.

The Clerk pointed out that she told Det. Sergt. Johnson that her young man gave it to her two years ago.

Prisoner said what she told the Magistrates was the truth.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said they knew nothing about the prisoner there. She had, however, been drifting about a good deal. Mr. Easton, the Police Court Missioner, told him that she was eight or nine years ago in service in the town, and bore a very good character then. She was married, but her husband had deserted her, and she had one or two children in the Cottage Homes at Chatham. He was afraid she had not been leading a very good life since she had been down there.

The Clerk said Mr. Easton informed him that the prisoner had been in a Salvation Army Home from January to July, when she was found that situation down there.

Prisoner agreed to go into a home.

The Chairman said they did not wish to send her to prison. They wished to give her another chance. They had decided to bind her over for twelve months, the condition being that she was to go into a home for that period, during which time she would be under the supervision of the Probation Officer.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 August 1914.

Saturday, August 22nd: Before Mr. E. T. Ward and Col. G. P. Owen.

Lucy Foreman was charged with stealing a ring, the property of Maud Ellen Lambert. She pleaded Not Guilty.

Miss Maud Ellen Lambert said she was employed at the "Royal Pavilion Hotel," and prisoner was employed there as staff maid from July 24th till August 10th. On the 14th inst. accused left without giving notice. The ring produced was identified by the witness as her property. On Thursday, August 13th, witness placed the ring in a hairpin box. At 10 o'clock on Friday morning it was safe there, but on the same evening when witness went to the box it was gone. She made a search, but was unable to find it. On Saturday afternoon witness gave information to the police, and on Friday afternoon, the 21st inst., she was shown the ring with two others. She identified hers. She valued it at 32s. 6d. On the day it disappeared prisoner swept out her room. Accused left about seven in the evening. Witness had not given or lent the ring to prisoner.

Mr. H. Prescott, employed by Mr. S. W. Joseph, pawnbroker, deposed that on Friday, 21st inst., at 11.30, prisoner came into the shop and asked for a loan of 5s. or 6s. on the ring. Witness asked her if it was her property, and she said it had been in her possession for about two years, it having been given to her by her young man. Witness advanced her 7s. in the name of Lillie Gibbons, 85a, Marshall Street. Later in the day witness handed over the ring to Detective Sergt. Johnson.

Detective Sergt. Johnson deposed that on Friday night, at 9.45, he saw prisoner at the "Swan Hotel," in Dover Road. In the company of P.C. Butcher he called her outside and told her they were two police officers. Witness asked her for her name and she replied “Lucy Foreman”. He then cautioned her and showed her the ring, telling her that it had been stolen and that Miss Lambert identified it as her property. Witness added that she would be charged with stealing it from a bedroom at the "Royal Pavilion Hotel" on the 14th inst. She said “My young man, Carter, gave it to me two years ago”. Witness then saw Carter in prisoner's presence and showed him the ring, but he said he did not give it to her. Carter said she had asked him to pledge it, but they refused to do so at the pawnshop. Accused then said “I may as well tell you the truth. My husband gave it to me ten years ago, but he is now in Canada”. Witness brought her to the police station and there formally charged her. Prisoner again said her husband, who was in Canada, gave it to her ten years ago.

Prisoner, in defence, said her husband had given it to her ten years ago when she was in the Royal Victoria Hospital.

The Chairman asked her if she would go in a home. At first she refused, but on second thought she said she would. She was then bound over for 12 months, and to go into a home selected by Mr. Easton, the Police Court Missioner, for that period.

 

Folkestone Express 24 October 1914.

Local News.

On Tuesday, an application was made at the Police Court with regard to the transfer of the licence of the "Swan Inn" from Mr. Norman to Mr. E. Miles.

The Chief Constable said it was a similar application to that of the previous day, and was done for safety. Mr. Miles was a very respectable man, and he had had a licence at Canterbury.

Mr. Norman said he was a naturalised Englishman, and had lived here for forty years. He had a public house for twenty two years at Postling, and had been two years at the "Swan." He had no objection to the transfer,

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 28 November 1914.

Wednesday, November 25th: Before E. T. Ward, G. I. Swoffer, R. J. Linton, G. Boyd, and E. T. Morrison esqs.

Mr. Phillips, on behalf of Messrs. Nalder and Collyer, said he wished the Bench to give Mr. E. Miles, now in possession, temporary permission to sell at the "Swan Inn." They would shortly ask for the transfer of the licence to Mr. Clarke, of Watford.

The request was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 November 1914.

Wednesday, November 25th: Before Mr. E. T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Mr. G. I. Swoffer, Mr. R. J. Linton, Councillor G. Boyd, Alderman C. Jenner, Mr. E. T. Morrison, and Mr. J. J. Giles.

A temporary transfer of the licence of the "Swan Inn" from Mr. Ernest Miles to Mr. Butler, of Ramsgate, was applied for.

The Bench decided that Mr. Butler was not a suitable person, and the application was withdrawn until December 9th, when Mr. Clark, of Watford, would be proposed, Mr. Miles remaining in control until that time.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald 22 July 1933.

"A PERFECT NUISANCE." PRISON FOR MAN WHO SMASHED GLASS PANE.

There was a sequel at the Folkestone Police Court on Monday to a scene at a Folkestone licensed victualler's house on Saturday, when William D. Thomas was charged with committing wilful damage at the "Swan Hotel," Dover Road, Thomas was found guilty and sentenced about Sidney Charles W. Herbert, landlord of the "Swan Inn," Dover Road, said at about 8.10 on Saturday night the prisoner came into his house begging. Witness was attending to his customers at the time, but told Thomas that he did not allow begging on his premises and he asked him to leave. He then becalm rather abusive and witness told him to go. When he refused to do so witness opened the door wide and stepped back into the bar, agate requiring Thomas to go. Prisoner then took his hat on and said "Ladies and gentlemen." Witness then put him out and shut the door. As he turned to go back he put his foot against the door. Thomas then raised his right hand, struck the glass panel in the door and shattered it.

It was a deliberate action on prisoner's part. Thomas then ran away into Folly Road. Witness chased him and he went into Rossendale Road. The next he saw of prisoner was that he was in charge of P.S. Southey. The damage amounted £4 2s. 6d.

P.S. Southey said at 6.10 p.m. on. Saturday he was in Warren Road when he saw Thomas being chased by the last witness. He followed and caught prisoner in Rossendale Road. He said to him "What have you been doing?" but Thomas made no reply. He then took prisoner back to the last witness, who said, "That man has broken a panel in the saloon bar door or my house. I wish to charge him with it."

When charged at the Police Station Thomas said " I plead guilty." The first third and fourth fingers of prisoner' right hand were cut across the knuckles They were bleeding freely and had to be dressed.

Defendant said he was very sorry that it had happened. He had been out all the previous night. He had no intention of breaking the glass panel.

Mr. Herbert, recalled, said Thomas appeared to be sober at the time. Chief Inspector H. G. Pittock said Thomas had only arrived in the town on the previous day. There was no doubt that he was getting his living by begging. At Uxbridge on June 10th, 1930 he was sentenced to 14 days' imprisonment for stealing a cycle. There were other convictions for drunkenness. He had been in the Army, prisoner told them.

The Chairman (Mr. W. R. Boughton) said prisoner made himself a perfect nuisance. He would go to prison for two months with hard labour.

 

LICENSEE LIST

ROBINSON James G 1847+ Bagshaw's Directory 1847

Last pub licensee had FRANKS John (rendered by sickness incapable of keeping the house) to June/1857 Folkestone Chronicle

ROBINSON William Hall June/1857-99+ Folkestone ChronicleMelville's 1858Post Office Directory 1862Post Office Directory 1874Post Office Directory 1882Post Office Directory 1891Kelly's 1899

BRETT William Perren 1903 Post Office Directory 1903

Last pub licensee had CLARKE Alfred Robert to Aug/1912 dec'd

Last pub licensee had NORMAN Christian 1913 Post Office Directory 1913

MILES Ernest Mr Oct-Dec/1914

CLARKE William P 1922 Post Office Directory 1922

HERBERT Sidney Charles W 1933-38 Kelly's 1934Post Office Directory 1938

 

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Post Office Directory 1930From the Post Office Directory 1930

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML

 

LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room