DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 09 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1866

Richmond Tavern

18 Sept 2014

1 Margaret Street

Folkestone

Richmond Tavern 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Richmond Tavern watercolour 2007

Above watercolour 2007 by Stuart Gresswell, once licensee of "Guildhall" and "Raglan" kindly sent by Jan Pedersen.

Richmond Tavern, Folkestone

Picture taken from Folkestone CAMRA website and hopefully to be updated. http://www.camra-afrm.org.uk

Riochmond Tavern sign

Richmond Tavern sign date 1992.

Above with thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com

Richmond 2012

Above photo kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

 

Address was originally 1 Richmond Street but by 1938 it was named as being at 1 Margaret Street.

 

Photo below kindly sent to me by Jan Pedersen showing Derek Martin, the longest serving tenant of the pub. Derek unfortunately died in 2001.

Derek Martin

From an email received 11 October 2012.

Hi ya,

My name is Anna Martin. I am Derek Martin's daugther and I'm extremely proud to see his picture on your web site. We lived there for 20 years I was only just 3 years old when we moved in there on 23rd November 1981. They were the best years, and mum and dad made lots of friends that they considered as family.

I have heard from lots of people that the pub is haunted, it never was when we lived there, but people that didn't know my dad have described seeing someone sitting at the end of the bar near the hatch that is an image of my dad, and other people had said that some strange things go on in the cellar (which was my dads pride and joy and he never let anyone touch it lol).

I hope you find my info interesting.

Yours sincerely.

Anna Martin.

Richmond Tavern 2014
Richmond Tavern 2014

Above photos by Jan Pedersen September 2014.

 

From the Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 24 March 1934.

Edward Jordan 1934

Mr. J. T. Jordan, licensee of the "Richmond Tavern, receives for the second year in succession, the silver cup for the licensed house collecting the greatest amount for the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Fund. Mr. Jordan collecting 16 15s., during the year.

 

Folkestone Observer 24 August 1867.

Licensing Day.

Wednesday, August 21st: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

This being the day for granting certificates of publicans for renewal of licenses, or for new licenses, there was a large attendance of the “victualling” craft.

Mr. Minter supported an application for a license to Mr. Burgess, for the Richmond Tavern, Prospect Place, the ground for which had been purchased last year by Mr. Cobb, and the house had been built purposely for a public house.

The Bench consulted together, and then the Mayor announced that the application was adjourned for a fuller Bench of magistrates to deal with.

Mr. Minter enquired if they were to go into fresh evidence at the next hearing. The evidence had been heard on both sides by the present Bench. A hint had been dropped about a fuller Bench of magistrates. He apprehended that other magistrates would not have heard the evidence.

The Mayor said the question was whether they should have free trade in licenses or not.

The Court was then cleared, and the magistrates deliberated in private. When the public were again admitted, the Mayor announced that the license was refused, so that gentlemen would understand that it was not exactly free trade.

 

Folkestone Observer 29 August 1868.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott, and Alderman Tolputt.

This was a special session for granting alehouse licenses, and the various licensed victuallers attended for the renewal of their licenses, the whole of which were granted, with one exception which was suspended for a fortnight, until the adjourned licensing day.

George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern public house appeared for a license, and Mr. Minter supported the application, and put in a memorial signed by a number of the inhabitants of the neighbourhood.

After hearing the evidence for and against the application the court was cleared, and on the re-admission of the public the Mayor said the Magistrates were unanimous in refusing the the application, inasmuch as there was no necessity for it. They did not wish to make free trade of this matter, and he thought the Bench would carry out this course in future, and not grant any licenses unless the houses were actually required.

 

Folkestone Express 29 August 1868.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott, and Alderman Tolputt.

The licensing day was held at the Town Hall on Wednesday.

Fresh Application:

George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, Harvey Square, applied for a license. Mr. Minter, who supported the application, said that a number of new houses had been built in this neighbourhood, and, the house being of a very respectable character, he did not see what interest they could have in objecting to grant one. Houses are more likely to keep respectable when they have a license, which places them under the surveillance of the police.

Mr. Minter called the attention of the Bench to the fact that at Liverpool the magistrates granted licenses to every respectable applicant, and the houses there were of a good class and character. He did not think this ought to be a question of necessity, but one of respectability.

After a short consultation, the Mayor stated that the magistrates were unanimous in refusing the application. They did not see any necessity in the application, and they wished it to be understood that they will not grant licenses without the necessity is shown.

 

Southeastern Gazette 31 August 1868.

Local News.

The annual licensing day was held on Wednesday. There were two new applications for licenses, George Burgess, Richmond Tavern, Harvey Square, and R. P. Smith, Marquis of Granby, High Street, but they were refused.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869.

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Spirit License (Fresh Application)

George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, applied. Mr. Minter supported the application, and put in a memorial.

The Court was then cleared. When re-opened the Chairman said that the Magistrates had come to the unanimous decision that no more licenses should be granted, but in exceptional cases, as they were of opinion that too many licensed houses already exist. The application would be refused.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 August 1869.

Annual Licensing Day.—A full bench of magistrates attended on Wednesday to grant renewals and hear fresh applications.

Mr. Arthur Andrews, of the Guildhall Hotel; Mr. Burgess, Richmond Tavern; Mr.Thomas Wilson, of the Prince of Wales; and Mr. Chittenden, of the Star and Garter, made fresh applications but were refused; the magistrates stating that no more licenses would be granted except under exceptional circumstances.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 November 1869.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1861.

George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, Harvey Square, Folkestone, in the County of Kent, beer retailer, having been adjudged bankrupt on the 16th day of November, 1869, is hereby required to surrender himself to Ralph Thomas Brockman, the Registrar of the County Court of Kent, holden at Folkestone, at the first meeting of creditors, to be held on the sixth day of December, 1869, at three o'clock in the afternoon precisely, at the County Court Office, Folkestone.

John Minter, of Folkestone, is the Solicitor acting in the Bankruptcy.

At the meeting the Registrar will receive the proofs of the debts of the creditors, and the creditors may choose an assignee or assignees of the bankrupt's estate and effects.

All persons having in their possession any of the effects of the said bankrupt must deliver them to the Registrar, and all debts due to the bankrupt must be paid to the Registrar.

Ralph Thomas Brockman

Registrar and High Bailiff

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 November 1869.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1861.

In the County Court of Kent, holden at Folkestone, George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, Harvey Square, Folkestone, in the county of Kent, beer retailer, having been adjudged Bankrupt on the sixteenth day of November, 1869, a public sitting for the said bankrupt to pass his last examination, and make an application for his discharge, will be held at the said Court, at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on the sixteenth day of January, 1870, at ten o'clock in the forenoon precisely, the day last aforesaid being the day limited for the said bankrupt to surrender.

The Registrar of the Court is the Official Assignee, and John Minter, of Folkestone, is the solicitor acting in the bankruptcy.

Ralph Thomas Brockman.

Registrar and High Bailiff.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 January 1870.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1861.

In the County Court of Kent, holden at Folkestone. In the matter of George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, Harvey Square, Folkestone, in the county of Kent, beer retailer, adjudged bankrupt on the sixteenth day of November, 1869.

An order of discharge will be delivered to the bankrupt after the expiration of thirty days from this date, unless an appeal be duly entered against the Judgement of this Court, and notice thereof be given to the Court.

Ralph Thomas Brockman.

Registrar and High Bailiff.

County Court.
 

Monday, January 17th: Before W.C. Scott Esq.

Bankrupts.

George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, passed his last examination, without opposition.

 

Folkestone Express 22 January 1870.

County Court.

Monday, January 17th: Before W.C. Scott Esq.

George Burgess came up for his last examination. Mr. Minter supported the application for discharge. As there was no opposition, the application was granted.

 

Folkestone Observer 25 August 1870.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Kennicott R.N., R. Boarer, J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith and C.H. Dashwood Esqs.

Spirit License.

George Burgess applied for a spirit license for his house in Harvey Square. Mr. Minter supported, producing a memorial from several householders near that it would be an accommodation. There was no opposition, but a license was refused.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1870.

Wednesday August 24th: Before the Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N., J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith and C.E. Dashwood Esqs.

This was the annual licensing day.

Application for spirit license:

Mr. George Burgess, of the Richmond Inn, applied for a license to sell spirits. Mr. Minter, in supporting the application, said the house had been conducted in a most respectable manner, there was no licensed house near, and a memorial signed by nearly all the inhabitants, had been drawn up. He could not say that there were many “mansions” in the neighbourhood, but a license would be looked upon by the neighbours as a convenience.

This application was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 27 August 1870.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Kennicott, J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith and C.H. Dashwood Esqs.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

The Richmond Tavern: Mr. George Burgess applied for a spirit license. Mr. Munter appeared on behalf of the applicant, who, he said, had conducted this house as a beerhouse for the last four years without any complaint. He had a memorial signed by nearly all the inhabitants of the neighbourhood, which was a largely increasing one, and Mr. Minter hoped they would accede to his request, the number of houses that had been erected there rendering some accommodation really necessary, as it would be very convenient to the inhabitants.

The Bench decided on not granting the above application.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 August 1872.

Annual Licensing Day.

The Annual Brewster Licensing Day was held on Wednesday last at the Town Hall. The magistrates present were The Mayor, T. Caister, J. Tolputt, and J. Clarke Esqs.

The magistrates held a conference before the court was opened, when the new Licensing Bill was discussed. It was decided that the Act should be enforced, and each publican was informed by Superintendent Martin when he came up for his license, that henceforth he would be expected to close at 11 o'clock on weekdays, and 10 o'clock on Sundays.

Mr. Minter applied on behalf of Mr. Burgess, landlord of the Richmond Inn, for a license for that house, and produced a memorial asking for the license, signed by most of the respectable inhabitants in the neighbourhood of this house. He said that Mr. Burgess had now made the sixth application, he was personally known as a most respectable man, he had lived in the town for many years, and during that time had kept the house in a most orderly and proper manner. In that neighbourhood there was no house nearer than the North Foreland, and the inhabitants required accommodation. No complaint had ever been made against this house, and he hoped on this occasion patience would be rewarded, and the Bench would grant the application.

Mr. Burgess wished the Superintendent of Police called to speak to the character of the house.

The Mayor said it was because the magistrates thought that another house was not required in that neighbourhood that the license had hitherto not been granted.

Mr. Clarke said that there was the Harvey Inn not far from it.

Superintendent Martin, being sworn, said the house, as far as he knew, had always been conducted in a most respectable manner. No complaint had been made against it by the police.

The Magistrates' Clerk said that according to the Act the rental of the house must be 30 a year, and two rooms set aside for the public use before the license could be granted. It would be necessary to swear the applicant to ascertain these facts.

Mr. Burgess, having been sworn, said that his brother was landlord of the house, for which he (witness) paid 35 a year rent. It contained 8 rooms. There were two public rooms, besides the bar, which were used by his family during the day time. They were always, however, open to the public, and anyone could enter them, and find accommodation there, when the house was open.

The Court having been cleared, at the expiration of a quarter of an hour, the Bench gave their decision, refusing to grant the license on the ground that the accommodation in the house for the public was not sufficient, and that the license was not required in that neighbourhood.

 

Folkestone Express 31 August 1872.

Wednesday, August 28th: Before The Mayor, T. Caister, J. Tolputt and J. Clarke Esqs.

Brewster Sessions.

The proceedings were of a routine nature and, contrary to expectations, no allusion was made by the Bench to the new Licensing Act. There was not a single complaint against any licensed victualler or beerhouse keeper. The applicants had merely to pay their eight-and-sixpence each and, under the provisions of the new Act, give the names and owners of their respective houses, and receive their licenses. Each holder of a license was informed by Mr. Martin, Superintendent of Police, that he must close his house at eleven o'clock on working days and ten o'clock on Sunday nights, an announcement which did not cause any manifestation of feeling on the part of those whom it concerned.

It was incidentally stated that the North Foreland public house had been bought by Mr. Hodge for the purpose of preventing it being used as a public house.

The only application for a new wine and spirit license was made by Mr. George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, Harvey Road.

Mr. Minter, in supporting the application presented a numerously signed memorial from inhabitants of the neighbourhood, and stated that the tavern had been in the occupation of applicant several years and no complaint had been made against the house. There was a large and increasing neighbourhood, and the house stood at a corner, surrounded by other houses. There was a necessity for a spirit license, which the memorialists strongly recommended the Bench to grant, and all the signatures were genuine, and were those of persons living in the neighbourhood. Mr. Minter called the attention to the fact that the license of the North Foreland would be stopped, so that if the granted the new application, which was the only one made, there would be the same number of public houses in Folkestone as at present. The granting of the license would be a great convenience to the neighbourhood.

Mr. Martin, at the request of the applicant, was asked as to the conduct of the house, when he gave the negative testimony that he had had no complaints from the police. He had known the house several years.

Applicant was sworn and stated that the rent of the house was 35. There were eight rooms in it, two of which besides the bar would be for the use of the public. The house belonged to his brother.

The Court was cleared for a short time and on the re-admission of the public the Mayor said the Bench were of opinion that applicant had not made out his case, and that they did not intend to grant any more licenses for that neighbourhood at present. The application was therefore refused.

This was Mr. Burgess's sixth application for the spirit license, and on this occasion there was no opposition.

 

Southeastern Gazette 3 September 1872.

Annual Brewster Sessions.

These sessions were held at the Town Hall on Wednesday last. The magistrates present were the Mayor, Alderman Tolputt, J. Clarke, Esq., and Alderman Caister.

The Bench intimated to the publicans that in future they would have to close at eleven o’clock on week days and on Sundays at ten o’clock.

Mr. Burgess, landlord of the Richmond Inn made the seventh application for a spirit license, but the Bench decided not to grant the license on account of the house not being large enough, and there being accommodation in the neighbourhood.

 

Folkestone Express 30 August 1873.

Wednesday, August 27th: Before The Mayor, J. Gambrill, J. Tolputt, and J. Clarke Esq.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

The licensing committee met at ten o'clock for the purpose of taking into consideration the question of making any alteration in the hours for opening and closing public houses. Shortly after eleven o'clock the licensed victuallers present were called into Court, where the Clerk said the Bench would hear anything with reference to the alteration of the hours for the opening and closing.

Mr. Till appeared in support of an application by Mr. George Burgess for a spirit license to the Richmond Arms (sic) beerhouse, Harvey Street, and said that Mr. Burgess had occupied the house thirteen years, and the present was the sixth application he had made for a spirit license, and on no occasion had there been any opposition to his applications, and he had never had the slightest complaint against his house. The neighbourhood was increasing in population and there was no house with a spirit license very near. Applicant had spent a considerable amount of money in improving his premises. Mr. Till having presented a memorial from inhabitants of the neighbourhood said he must leave the matter in the hands of their Worships as he had an engagement which necessitated his going away at twelve o'clock.

The Bench took time to consider the application, and at a later hour informed Mr. Burgess that they saw no reason to alter the decision they arrived at on former occasions and refused to grant the license.

Note: This was the SEVENTH application.

 

Southeastern Gazette 2 September 1873.

Local News.

The annual licensing meeting was held on Wednesday, when the magistrates present were J. Hoad, Esq. (Mayor), J. Gambrill, J. Tolputt, and J. Clark, Esqrs.

Mr. Till made an application on behalf of Mr. George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, for a spirit license. He said there was no house in the neighbourhood, which was an increasing one, for the sale of spirits, and the applicant bore a good character. The magistrates ultimately decided not to grant the application.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 August 1874.

Licensing Day.

The annual brewsters' licensing day was held on Wednesday last. The magistrates on the Bench were The Mayor, J. Tolputt, and W. Bateman Esqs. A license was granted to the Richmond Tavern.

 

Folkestone Express 29 August 1874.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before The Mayor, W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The seventy four licensed victuallers, twelve beershop keepers and twenty three grocers and wine merchants had their licenses renewed, with the exception of those named.

New Licenses.

Richmond Tavern: Mr. George Burgess applied for the eighth time for a spirit license for the Richmond Tavern.

Mr. Minter appeared in support of the application, and having shown that the house was well conducted as a beershop, and that it was a suitable place for a license, the application was granted.

 

Southeastern Gazette 29 August 1874.

Annual Licensing Day.

At the annual licensing, on Wednesday, most of the licences were renewed.

Mr. G. Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern beerhouse, applied for the eighth time for a spirit licence, which was granted.

 

Southeastern Gazette 6 September 1875.

Local News.

At the Police Court, on Wednesday, before W. Bateman, J. Tolputt, and T. Caister, Esqs., George Burgess, landlord of the Richmond Tavern, Harvey Street, was charged with trespassing in search of conies on land in the Warren, in the possession of Lord Elibank and other gentlemen, on the 24th ult. Mr. Till appeared for the prosecutors; Mr. W. R. Mowll, of Dover, for the defence.

Mr. Till opened the case, saying that the shooting in the Warren was hired by Lord Elibank, Colonel Lenon, and one or two other gentlemen. They had been much annoyed by the depredations of trespassers, and had indeed been obliged to keep a looker” for the express purpose of watching the estate. It would, he thought, be clearly proved in evidence that the defendant was found trespassing in search of rabbits with a gun on land in the Warren rented by Lord Elibank, and the other gentlemen who owned the right of shooting.

For the defence it was shown that Burgess had a perfect right to be where he was found, and the case was dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 16 June 1877.

Tuesday, June 12th: Before W.J. Jeffreason and R.W. Boarer Esqs., and Alderman Caister.

Catherine Harrington once more made her appearance in the dock, charged as of yore with being drunk and disorderly.

The scene of her exploit on this occasion was the Richmond Tavern, from whence P.C. Sharpe was called about ten o'clock on the previous evening to remove her owing to her violent conduct and abusive language. He used all his persuasive powers to make her go away, but she resisted his kindly endeavours and deposited her gentle frame in the muddy road and blasphemed to her heart's content. So contrary was the fair and gentle creature that P.C. Sharpe was reluctantly obliged to convey her to the place where she had often been before, viz., the police station.

Prisoner in accordance with her usual custom promised the Magistrates to repent and reform from her evil ways, and to leave the town directly she quitted their august presence. She pathetically informed the Justices that she only came out of the Union on Monday morning, and not a mouthful of victuals passed her lips from half past six o'clock, when she left that noble institution, till she arrived in Folkestone in the afternoon, when she met a female who treated her to a single glass of beer, which took seven hours to drink, and at the expiration of that time “got into her head”, owing to her not having anything to eat “the whole day long”.

The Bench disbelieved her promises of amendment, and being afraid that she would not leave the town if they let her go, sent her over to Dover gaol for three weeks, and ordered her to be set to hard labour during that period.

 

Folkestone Express 16 August 1884.

Saturday, August 9th: Before General Armstrong, Captain Crowe, Aldermen Hoad and Banks, and F. Boykett Esq.

Robert Hawkins pleaded Guilty to refusing to quit the Richmond Tavern. Mr. Minter appeared for the prosecutor, and stated that the defendant had promised not to go into the house again. Therefore he would be satisfied with a nominal fine.

The Bench inflicted a fine of 2s. 6d. and 8s. costs.

 

Folkestone News 16 August 1884.

Saturday, August 9th: Before General Armstrong C.B., Aldermen Hoad and Banks, and F. Boykett Esq.

Robert Hawkins was charged with being drunk on licensed premises at the Richmond Tavern.

Mr. Minter, on behalf of the prosecution, said that the landlord had no wish to press the charge against the defendant, but he wished to prevent any complaint being made as to his management of the house.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 8s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 25 October 1884.

Saturday, October 18th: Before Captain Carter, Colonel De Crespigny, J. Fitness, J. Sherwood and J. Holden Esqs., and Alderman Caister.

Temporary authority was granted to George Burgess, of the Richmond Tavern, to carry on business at the Rendezvous.

 

Folkestone Express 1 November 1884.

Wednesday, October 29th: Before Captain Crowe, F. Boykett and A.M. Watkin Esqs.

Transfer Of Licence.

The licence of the Richmond Tavern was transferred to Cornelius John Burgess.

 

Folkestone Express 21 March 1885.

Wednesday, March 18th: Before The Mayor, Captain Fletcher, Captain Crowe, and Alderman Hoad.

John Lewis was charged with being disorderly and refusing to quit the Richmond Tavern.

Mr. Burgess, the landlord, said the defendant went to his house about four o'clock on Saturday afternoon. He was “as near sober as possible”, and he let him have two half pints of beer. He then became excited, and remained nearly two hours. His wife was there, and they began quarrelling. Witness ordered defendant to leave the premises, and he refused. Witness then sent for the police, who removed him. About half an hour after the defendant returned, and demanded some more beer, and again refused to leave the house, saying he would lay wait for witness, and in five or six days he would “pay him for it”.

P.C. Lilley said he was called to the Richmond Tavern about eight o'clock to put the defendant out.

Defendant was fined 10s. and 10s. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 June 1887.

Wednesday, June 15th: Before Capt. Crowe, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and H.W. Poole Esqs.

Mr. Minter applied on behalf of Mr. G. Burgess for the transfer of the licence of the Richmond Tavern. He said that Mr. Burgess was joint owner with his brother of the furniture, fixtures, &c., and that his deceased brother, the late landlord, had died intestate, leaving no property, and that the furniture &c. had been lent to him. The application was made with the concurrence of his brother, who was living at Weston-Super-Mare. Mr. Burgess was sworn and detailed the circumstances as stated by Mr. Minter and the application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 18 June 1887.

Wednesday, June 15th: Before Capt. Crowe, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, and J.H. Brooke Esqs.

There were several applications for transfer of licenses. Mr. Burgess, of the Rendezvous Tavern, applied for the transfer of the licence of the Richmond Tavern, which was held by his late brother, who died leaving no estate for which letters of administration could be taken out. The Magistrates granted the application.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 January 1889.

Bankruptcy.

A sitting of the Canterbury Bankruptcy Court was held at the Guildhall on Friday, before the Refistrar (Mr. Walter Furley). The Official Receiver (Mr. Worsfold Mowll) was in attendance.

Re. George Burgess, former license victualler, Folkestone: Mr. Lewis (Dover) appeared for Messrs. Binfield, wine and spirit merchants, Dover; and Mr. Ward (Folkestone) for the debtor.

The Official Receiver said there was a deficiency of 707 11s. 2d. Debtor was a guarantor to the Folkestone Exhibition for 100. He had been bankrupt on a previous occasion.

Under examination, the bankrupt stated that in 1867 he took the Richmond Tavern, which he had carried on ever since. In 1881 he took a market garden and laid out a large amount on the construction of forcing pits, greenhouses, piggeries, stables, a well, &c. He subsequently bought the Dover Castle coffee house; in 1884 he took the Rendezvous Hotel; and he also purchased a house in Richmond Street and a cottage at Capel. Messrs. Flint and Sons, brewers, in July, 1888, proceeded against him for 900 which he owed them, and he had to leave the Rendezvous Hotel. He was next compelled to pay off a load he had obtained from the National Provincial Bank. His market crops had failed; he found in July that his potato crop was a total failure. In November or the beginning of December he made over his possessions to Messrs. Flint, in satisfaction of their Rendezvous Hotel account. Mr. Flint knew that he owed other people money at the time. He was left with 200, out of which he subsequently paid 167 more to Messrs. Flint. When he signed the deed making over the property to Mr. Flint he received 70 odd. Subsequently he went to the White Hart with Mr. Flint. They stayed about an hour, and witness got intoxicated. He then gave Mr. Flint the 70, as he was not in a condition to take care of it, and told him he might deduct 50 owing on the Richmond Tavern account. 15 of the remaining money was paid to Mr. Ward (solicitor, Folkestone) for the filing of witness's petition. The money was forwarded by cheque, on witness's order, by Messrs. Flint. Lord Radnor was the owner of witness's garden. He owed His lordship 182 rental. He received nothing on account of the money he had laid out on the property.

The Official Receiver said the sum of 117 appeared to have been allowed for the improvements he had made.

The debtor said he considered that about 450 short. Mr. Banks (Lord Radnor's agent) called in Mr. Pilcher, sen., to value the work done in the garden. Mr. Pilcher's son had since taken possession of the garden on the payment of the valuation.

Witness only kept books in reference to the market garden business.

The examination was adjourned until the 8th February.

 

Folkestone Express 26 January 1889.

Re Burgess Bankruptcy:

The report is identical and verbatim as was in the Folkestone Chronicle of this date, but with the following footnote:

Mr. James Flint states that the evidence given by the debtor with reference to his having been with him at the White Hart for an hour is entirely incorrect. They were not in the house for more than five minutes, and subsequently took the bus from Hythe to Folkestone, where the bankrupt cashed his cheque, and certainly was not intoxicated when Mr. Flint left him.

 

Folkestone Express 2 February 1889.

Wednesday, January 30th: Before F. Boykett Esq., Surgeon General Gilbourne, and J. Brooke Esq.

The licence of the Richmond Tavern was transferred to Mr. Burgess, brother of the late landlord, and owner of the premises.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 February 1889.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

A sitting of this Court was held at the Guildhall, Canterbury, on Friday, before Mr. Registrar Furley.

Re. George William Burgess, Folkestone: Mr. Ward represented the debtor, and the examination was adjourned for a week as a private examination was going to be held.

 

Folkestone Express 16 February 1889.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

Before the Registrar (Mr. W. Furley), on Friday, at the Guildhall.

Re. George William Burgess, Folkestone: Mr. Ward represented the debtor, and the examination was adjourned for a week.

 

Folkestone Express 23 February 1889.

Local News.

Re. George Burgess. At the Canterbury Bankruptcy Court on Friday, the Official receiver (Mr. Worsfold Mowll), said the case was adjourned to enable certain parties to be examined privately. That had been done, and as a result of that private examination there would no doubt have to be motions before the court. As far as the bankrupt was concerned he had no further questions to ask him. The bankrupt was then allowed to pass the public examination.

 

Folkestone Express 9 March 1889.

Wednesday, March 6th: Before F. Boykett and H.W. Poole Esqs.

The licence of the Richmond Tavern was transferred to Frederick Burgess.

 

Folkestone Express 17 August 1889.

Canterbury Bankruptcy Court.

His Honour Judge Selfe held a sitting of this Court on Monday at the Guildhall.

Re. George Burgess.

The petition was filed in December, 1888. This was an application for discharge. The total debts amounted to 650 14s. 1d., and the assets realised 142 8s. 5d. A dividend of 3s. 3d. had been paid.

The Official Receiver (Mr. Mowll) alleged that the debtor had not kept proper books of account, and that he had traded after knowledge of insolvency. The debtor had been bankrupt about 24 years previously. He also said that the bankrupt had put one of his creditors, viz., the Committee of the National Art Treasures Exhibition, to unnecessary expense by a frivolous defence to an action brought against him.

Mr. Ward said the debtor had intended to appeal against the decision given in the case of the Art Treasures Exhibition, but he had thought better of it. The defence was that the guarantee was obtained by fraud and that Lord Radnor had promised to contribute 3,000. The Official receiver drew the attention of the Court to the transaction with Messrs. Flint. The bankrupt, on the eve of his bankruptcy, and when he admitted he knew he was insolvent, gave a security to Messrs. Flint. This security was carefully considered by the Official Receiver and Messrs. Flint paid 100 to the trustee of the estate and were allowed to prove for 113, the balance of the account. A sum of 5 was also paid to a man named Barrow by the bankrupt after he knew he was insolvent.

The Judge: What are your prospects now?

Debtor: Haven't any.

By the Official Receiver: The distress by Lord Radnor for rent was put in at the end of December. The valuation of the bankrupt's garden was completed a day or two before the distress was put in.

The Official Receiver said the debtor ought to have filed his petition directly after the valuation was made.

In reply to His Honour, Mr. Mowll said that his own personal opinion was that the mere suspension of the discharge was no punishment at all. What he would ask was that where a man might be in a position to earn money, and where the liabilities were not large, that the man should be ordered to pay an increased dividend. He did not think it would be too hard to make up the dividend to 5s. in the .

His Honour said that the question was what was a practical and proper order to make upon the facts made known. In one case the Court of Appeal strongly condemned the clogging of a case with conditions of payment. How could an order be made upon the debtor? It was useless to make an order when there was no probability of the money being paid. Under the Act of Parliament the report of the Official Receiver was made prima facie evidence of the facts of the case. It was for hism to consider how far the charges were sustained. Having entered into the facts of the case, His Honour said with regard to the allegation of trading with knowledge of insolvency, there was no doubt that the debtor traded on in the hope that a good season would, as he said, “bring him back to his bearings”. It was not a thing which should be dealt with very seriously. Loss had occurred to the creditors from the debtor not having called independent advice upon his position. With respect to the Folkestone Art Exhibition, he thought if the promised guarantee was not obtained by fraud, as asserted in the defence of the debtor and others, it was at least obtained in such a way as to render the fact of the debtor's objection to pay a very light matter indeed. In one case he knew, a railway guard, earning about two guineas a week, was induced to guarantee 25 towards the Exhibition upon the representation that he would only be liable for a small portion. He did not feel disposed to order a larger dividend to be paid. If no dividend had been paid it would have been a proper course to make such an order. The discharge would be suspended for 12 months.

 

Folkestone Express 14 December 1889.

Wednesday, December 11th: Before Alderman Banks, Surgeon General Gilbourne, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, F. Boykett and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Transfer.

Mr. Ward applied for a transfer of the licence of the Richmond Tavern from George Burgess to A. Farr and the transfer was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 May 1892.

Wednesday, May 18th: before J. Fitness & E.T. Ward Esqs.

Richard Major, landlord of the Richmond Tavern, was summoned for having his premises open during prohibited hours on Sunday week. Mr. Minter defended.

Sergeant Harman said he went with P.C. Dunster to the Richmond Tavern on Sunday morning, the 8th inst., at two a.m. They went into the house and found five men there, and glasses and pots which had contained drink. The defendant said “They have all engaged beds, Sergeant, so what can I do?” He took their names and addresses, and at five minutes past two saw a man named Mercer leave with another man. He found one man in bed. There were only three bedrooms in the house.

Mr. Minter, for the defence, stated that the landlord of the house was away at Chatham, and had left a properly qualified manager in charge. A lodger named Aird, who had lived there for the past three months, gave a supper party, and those men were his guests.

The Bench imposed a fine of 50s. and 13s. costs.

Note: More Bastions lists John Major.

 

Folkestone Express 21 May 1892.

Wednesday, May 18th: Before J. Fitness and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Richard Major, landlord of the Richmond Tavern, was summoned for having his premises open during prohibited hours on Sunday week.

Mr. Minter, instructed by the Licensed Victuallers Protection Society, defended.

Sergeant Harman said he went with P.C. Dunster to the Richmond Tavern on Sunday morning, the 8th inst., at two a.m. They went into the house and found five men there, and glasses and pots which had contained drink. The defendant said “They have all engaged beds, Sergeant, so what can I do?” He took their names and addresses, and at five minutes past two saw a man named Mercer leave with another man. He found one man in bed. There were only three bedrooms in the house.

Mr. Minter, for the defence, stated that the landlord of the house was away at Chatham, and had left a properly qualified manager in charge. He did not dispute the facts as stated, but said that the cause of these men being there was that a lodger named Aird, who had lived there for the past three months, gave a supper party, and those men were his guests. He quoted a case which had been tried in the Queen's Bench, in which Baron Pollock quashed a conviction of the justices.

Mrs. Alice Saunders, employed at the Richmond Tavern, said that on Saturday at midday she received an order to prepare a supper for Mr. Aird and his friends for 9.30 the same night. The order was for four persons, but six sat down. The house was closed at ten o'clock.

By the Bench: She had been there about three months. She went there the latter end of March.

Hamilton Aird, a butcher, said he had been living at the Richmond Tavern about three months. He occupied a bedroom, and had his meals in any room that was convenient. When he went to dinner on Saturday he ordered the supper to be prepared for that night between nine and ten o'clock. There were three guests invited to the supper, and everything was paid for by him.

Henry Arthur Parr, manager ast the Richmond Tavern, said Mr. Aird had been lodging there for about three months, and he had his bills to prove it. He asked for supper to be provided on Saturday night for two or three or perhaps five or six. Supper was laid in his private room. His house was closed at eleven o'clock, not ten as stated by Mrs. Saunders. The man in bed had been there two hours before the sergeant came.

The Bench retired, and on their return announced that they had decided to convict, the defence set up not being made out. The licence would not be endorsed, but defendant would be fined 50s. and 18s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 May 1892.

Police Court Jottings.

Another public house prosecution occupied the attention of their Worships on Wednesday last, when, however, only two magistrates were in attendance – Messrs. Fitness and Ward.

The defendant in this case was Richard Major, landlord of the Richmond, who was summoned for having his house open for the sale of intoxicating liquors on the Sunday week previous. The Folkestone Licensed Victuallers' Association engaged Mr. Minter to defend him, which he did in a vigorous and able manner, but without avail.

On Sunday, the 8th inst., at 2 a.m., Sergeant Harman, in company with P.C. Dunster, went to the defendant's house, and there found five men with glasses and pots before them, which had contained drink. Spoken to by the officers, the defendant said they had all engaged beds there, “so what was he to do?”, but about five minutes after that two of the men were seen to leave the house. The defence was that it was a private party given by a lodger in the house, and Hamilton Aird, a butcher, the said lodger, was called, and declared that the men present were his guests, and that everything that was consumed was paid for by himself. The landlord also swore that he received from Aird an order for a supper for five or six persons to be served in his own private room, which was executed on the evening in question, and was the occasion of the men being found upon his premises.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return intimated they were unable to accept the defendant's version of the affair, and fined him 50s. and 13s. costs; his licence, however, not to be endorsed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 May 1892.

Wednesday, May 25th: Before The Mayor, W.G. Herbert and W. Wightwick Esqs.

George Lepper, Richard Penny, Edward Down, Thomas Mercer, and David Larkin were summoned for being found on licensed premises during prohibited hours on the 8th May. Lepper and Larkin pleaded Not Guilty.

Sergeant Harman said on Sunday morning, May 8th, he visited the Richmond Tavern. He found six men there. Down tried to escape by a side door, Mercer tried to conceal himself in the kitchen, and Penny and Lepper were in the smoking room. He went upstairs and found the defendant Larkin in bed, and as far as he could see, he was undressed.

Lepper said he was employed by the landlord of the house as potman.

Henry Arthur Farr was called and said Lepper was employed by him as barman and potman.

By Mr. Minter: He was not acquainted with Larkin before this evening. About a quarter past 12 he went to the house and asked witness if he would oblige him with a bed, as he had lost his key. He showed him upstairs at once. He paid eighteen pence for the bed. He went to bed and did not leave till eight o'clock in the morning, when he made him a cup of tea. Larkin had nothing to do with the other defendants. He was a perfect stranger to him. He asked Sergeant Harman to go upstairs and see there was nobody concealed.

P.C. Dunster was called, and in answer to Mr. Minter he stated that he saw Larkin go to No. 4, Richmond Street. He saw him come out the Richmond Tavern at 1.20. About three he saw Larkin leave. He did not go to 4, Richmond Street.

Mr. Minter said he was very sorry to say it came to a case of perjury one way or another. Larkin happened to be down here as the holder of a special mission. He was a member of the detective force of Scotland Yard, and was not a person who was in the habit of running about to public houses. On the occasion n question, he was in bed when the police went into the house, and thought he had his latch key with him, but he had not. He denied utterly what Dunster had said.

Edward Down said he did not know Larkin at all. He was not drinking with them that evening. He was not in the room at all.

Thomas Mercer also said he did not know Larkin. He was not with them, nor was he in the room.

Defendant was called, and said he was a detective officer on special duty attached to Scotland Yard. He had been here for five months. The statement of Dunster that he saw him leave the Richmond Tavern at a quarter past three was not true. He passed the Town Hall about five minutes to 12. He lodged in Richmond Street with a widow. When he got there he found he had not got his key, and instead of knocking the landlady up, seeing a light in the Richmond Tavern he went there for a bed. He did not know any of the defendants except Lepper, nor had he ever spoken to either of them. Farr let him in to the Richmond Tavern at the side door, and he went to bed. He had nothing to drink. From the time he went in until past eight in the morning he did not leave the room.

The Magistrates fined Down and Mercer 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs, Lepper and Penny 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs. Larkin was dismissed.

Note: According to More Bastions Farr had left in 1890!

 

Folkestone Express 28 May 1892.

Wednesday, May 25th: Before The Mayor, W.G. Herbert and W. Wightwick Esqs.

George Lepper, Richard Penny, Edward Down, Thomas Mercer, and David Larkin were summoned for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours on the 8th May. Lepper and Larkin pleaded Not Guilty.

Sergeant Harman said on Sunday morning, May 8th, he visited the Richmond Tavern. He found six men there. Down tried to escape by a side door, Mercer tried to conceal himself in the kitchen, and Penny and Lepper were in the smoking room. He told them he should report them. Down said he should not have been there had it not been for Aird. The others made no reply. He went upstairs and found Larkin in bed, and as far as he couls see he was undressed. He told him he should report him for being there during prohibited hours, and he made no reply. He saw Mercer leave about ten minutes past two. He left P.C. Dunster with instructions to watch. He saw on the smoking room table five glasses and a pewter pot.

Mr. Minter appeared for Larkin, and cross-examined the witness, who said he did not ask the landlord if there was anyone upstairs. The landlord asked him to go upstairs. He saw Larkin's clothes on a chair. He had some difficulty in waking Larkin. He did not go upstairs a second time, but went into the bedroom a second time. Larkin was still lying in bed. He did not ask “What is the matter?”

P.C. Dunster said he saw Larkin leave the Richmond Tavern at twenty minutes past one, go into No. 4, Richmond Street, and close the door. He did not know who lived there. About ten minutes to two he visited the Richmond Tavern in company with Sergeant Harman, and there found Larkin in bed. The other defendants were in a room below. About ten minutes past two he saw two men leave the house – Mercer was one. About half past two another man left; he could not say who that was. About three two others came out and one of them was Larkin.

By Mr. Minter: I don't know that Larkin lodges at 4, Richmond Street. I did not see him leave to go back to the Richmond. I was not then watching the house.

Lepper said he was employed by the landlord of the house as potman.

Henry Arthur Farr was called, and said Lepper was employed by him as barman and potman. His wages were 12s. a week. He had no stated hours.

By Mr. Minter: He was not acquainted with Larkin before this evening. About a quarter past twelve he went to the house and asked witness if he would oblige him with a bed, as he had lost his key. He showed him upstairs at once. He paid eighteen pence for the bed. He went to bed and did not leave till eight o'clock in the morning, when he made him a cup of tea. Larkin had nothing to do with the other defendants. He was a perfect stranger to him. He asked Sergeant Harman to go upstairs and see there was nobody concealed.

Dunster was re-called, and in answer to Mr. Minter, he repeated that he saw Larkin go to No. 4, Richmond Street. He saw him come out of the Richmond Tavern at 1.20. About three he saw Larkin leave. He did not go to 4, Richmond Street.

Mr. Minter said he was sorry to say it came to a case of perjury one way or the other. He could not help it. They must accept the responsibility. But he should like to make an observation or two on Larkin's case, because it had assumed an aspect of a very serious nature. If Dunster had told an untruth, which he suggested he had, the question came, had he deliberately told an untruth, or was he mistaken? He was under the impression that he was mistaken. It was terrible to suggest that a police constable was deliberately telling an untruth without some real motive, and he did not wish to suggest it. But what he wished to suggest was, that he was utterly mistaken with regard to Larkin. He had very likely mistaken him for the man next to him, who was very much like him. The defence he was instructed to make was clear and distinct, and when he told them who Larkin was, he thought the Bench would agree that he was a man as much entitled to credence as the police constable, who was evidently mistaken. Larkin happened to be down here as the holder of a special mission. He was a member of the detective force from Scotland Yard, and was not a person who was in the habit of running about to public houses at night, or of stopping out at night. On the occasion in question, he was in bed when the police went into the house. He had been to Hythe, and if it was necessary to trace his movements on that evening he should apply for an adjournment. He lodged in Richmond Terrace, close to the Richmond Tavern. A widow occupied the house, and he himself was in the habit of getting in early. But, as he said, he had been to Hythe, and he thought he had his latch key with him, but he had not. He would not quibble about the hour, although the policeman was mistaken as to that also. He said he saw Larkin come out of the house at a certain time after one o'clock, and go down towards Richmond Terrace to his own lodgings. Then again he said he saw Larkin come out of the Richmond Tavern at half past three, and go he did not know where. Now, that was rather important, for this reason. He was still standing close to the Richmond Tavern (within 20 yards), and where could Larkin go at that time, supposing it was he, except to his own house? Dunster said he did not know where he went to, and for a very good reason, because he never saw him. Larkin went in between twelve and one o'clock. He went to his own door, thinking he had got his latch key, but he had not got it, and seeing a light in the Richmond Tavern went there and asked for a bed. He was told to go round to the side door; he went there and went straight upstairs exactly as the landlord had described, and went to bed. On the former occasion the two defendants who had pleaded Guilty said they had been to supper with a man named Aird, who was not summoned there that day. But the magistrates did not swallow that supper. (Laughter) They did not believe in the tale that it was a bona fide supper, and they convicted the landlord for having them there. On that occasion it was distinctly proved that Larkin was in bed. Unfortunately for him the supper party caused the landlord to be summoned and fined. Then the Superintendent, acting no doubt on the information of Dunster, who said he saw Larkin come out of the house at half past one and again at half past three, felt bound to summon Larkin as well as the others. The Superintendent knew Larkin, and he should appeal to the Superintendent as to Larkin's conduct, to show that he was not in the habit of drinking, or of breaking the law. On the contrary, he occupied a position which would prevent his doing that. He was an utter stranger to the other defendants, and also to the manager of the house. It was very hard that Larkin, who had committed no offence at all, and who had a perfect right to go to a public house for a bed – it was very hard on him because a dunder-headed policeman, which he said he was, had made a mistake in regard to him – that he should be brought there. The Superintendent ought to have exercised a little judgement in cross-examining Dunster before putting Larkin to the indignity of coming there to defend himself. It was intolerable that a man should be put to the trouble of coming there to defend himself and to give this explanation because a dunder-headed policeman had mistaken one man for another. If they were satisfied with the explanation he had given, they would dismiss the summons. He denied utterly what Dunster had said. But Sergeant Harman, with the lively imagination which all those policemen had, when they got into the box and wanted to get a conviction, was not satisfied with saying he had trouble to wake the man, but wanted to suggest that he was only shamming. The policemen should be taught to give evidence in a proper way. He could understand that the Superintendent desired to avoid any imputation of partiality, and therefore, on the information before him, decided to summon the detective as well as the other men, lest it should be said that he favoured a member of the police force. After a few further remarks he called the following witnesses:

Edward Down said he did not know Larkin at all. He was not drinking with them that evening. He was not in the room at all.

Thomas Mercer also said he did not know Larkin at all. He was not with them, nor was he in the room.

David Larkin himself was called, and said he was a detective officer on special duty attached to Scotland Yard. He had been here for five months. The statement of Dunster that he saw him leave the Richmond Tavern at a quarter past three was not true. He passed the Town Hall about five minutes to 12. He lodged in Richmond Street with a widow. When he got there he found he had not got his key, and instead of knocking the landlady up, seeing a light in the Richmond Tavern, he went there for a bed. He did not know any of the defendants except Lepper, nor had he ever spoken to either of them. Mr. Farr, the landlord, let him in at the side door, and he went upstairs to the bedroom and went to bed. He had nothing to drink. He got up next morning about a quarter past eight. From the time he went in until past eight in the morning he did not leave the room. He had a cup of tea with the landlord in the morning. When Sergeant Harman entered the bedroom he was asleep. When he entered the second time he asked what was the matter. Harman saw his clothes on the chair. On Sunday he saw the Superintendent and explained the matter to him. It was about a quarter past twelve in the morning when he went to the Richmond Tavern.

The Magistrates fined Down and Mercer 2. 6d. and 9s. costs, Lepper and Penny 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs,. With regard to Larkin, there was great discrepancy in the evidence, but they were inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt. The summons against him would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 May 1892.

Police Court Jottings.

At the Court five men were summoned for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours on the 8th of May. They respectively answered to the names of Geo. Lepper, Richard Penny, Edward Down, Thos. Mercer, and David Larkin. The first and last pleaded Not Guilty.

These summonses arose out of a case heard about a week previously, when the landlord of the Richmond Tavern was fined for keeping his house open during prohibited hours.

Sergeant Harman, who was concerned in the first case, proved the present, and as regarded all the defendants, except Larkin, there was no doubt they were there for the purpose of breaking the law.

Larkin, who is said to be a Scotland Yard detective, and has been here for the last five months, for what business it was not stated, was found by the police in bed, and presumably asleep. His excuse was that on the evening in question, finding himself without the latch key to his lodgings, he most considerately refrained from waking up his landlady, a widow living in Richmond Street, and instead went to the Richmond Tavern. Mr. Minter, who appeared for him, made a vigorous defence, and the Magistrates, allowing for the “discrepancy in the evidence”, gave him the benefit of the doubt.

The other defendants were fined half a crown and costs each.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 June 1892.

Saturday, June 18th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Dunk, and Mr. J. Holden.

The licence of the Richmond Tavern was temporarily transferred to Wm. Sandilands.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 August 1892.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before Mr. J. Holden and Mr. Fitness.

The licence of the Richmond Tavern was transferred from Mr. J.R. Major to Mr. Sandilands.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 July 1896.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before Messrs. J. Holden, J. Fitness, J. Pledge, J. Sherwood, and T.J. Vaughan.

Mrs. Hogben, the wife of Mr. Walter Hogben, was granted temporary permission to sell at the Richmond Tavern until next transfer day.

 

Folkestone Express 11 July 1896.

Wednesday, July 8th: Before J. Holden, J. Pledge, T.J. Vaughan and J. Fitness Esqs.

Mr. F. Hall applied on behalf of Mrs. Harriet Hogben for temporary authority to sell at the Richmond Tavern until the next transfer day. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 August 1896.

Wednesday, July 29th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and General Gwyn.

Mrs. Walter Hogben was granted the transfer of the licence of the Richmond Tavern.

 

Folkestone Express 1 August 1896.

Wednesday, July 29th: Before W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs., and General Gwyn.

Several transfers of licence were granted, including the Richmond Tavern to Mrs. Hogben.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 December 1896.

Wednesday, December 9th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. J. Fitness, and General Gwyn.

Mr. Charles Richards was allowed further temporary authority to sell at the Richmond Tavern, some misunderstanding having arisen.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 August 1898.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before Messrs. J. Pledge, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey.

Mr. Charles Ovenden, of the Richmond Tavern, was granted temporary authority to sell.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 August 1898.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday licence was granted to Mr. Charles Ovenden, Richmond Tavern.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 6 August 1898.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before J. Pledge, W.C. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey esqs.

Transfer was sanctioned to Mr. Charles Ovenden, Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street.

Hythe Reporter 13 August 1898.

 

Folkestone Police Court.

At the sitting of the Bench of Magistrates last Wednesday, the following licence was transferred:

Mr. C.P. Ovenden was granted temporary authority to sell at the Richmond Tavern.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 September 1898.

Wednesday, September 14th: Before Messrs. J. Banks, J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey.

Mr. Charles Ovenden was granted the transfer of the Richmond.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 September 1898.

Police Court Record.

On Wednesday transfer was granted to Mr. Ovenden, Richmond Tavern.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 17 September 1898.

Wednesday, September 14th: Before Ald. Banks, J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

Transfer was made to Charles Ovenden, Richmond Tavern.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1903.

Thursday, February 12th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Colonel Hamilton, Alderman Salter, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Two little lads, Frederick Thomas Clark (10), and John Keeling (9) were charged with stealing a contribution box from the Richmond Tavern.

Florence Ovenden, wife of Charles Ovenden, landlord of the Richmond Tavern, said she recognised the defendants. They come into the bar of their house on Tuesday afternoon about four o'clock. She asked them who they were looking for. Clark replied “My father”, and said his father's name was Green. She said she had not seen him and did not know him. One stood on the step, and the other just inside on the mat. She had a contribution box on the bar counter, which anyone could reach standing on the mat. When they left she went into her sitting room, and while there she thought she heard the sound of a footstep. She went into the bar. She could not see anyone, but missed the box at once. She went into the street, but only saw a number of little children. The value of the box was one shilling. There was money in it, but she did not know how much.

The box (in pieces) was produced for inspection by the Bench.

Detective Burnsiton said on Wednesday morning he called on the last witness at the Richmond Tavern, and acting on the description given to him he went to 7, Norris Place, Mill Bay, where he saw the boy Clark. He said to him “You answer to the description of a boy in the Richmond Tavern yesterday afternoon, and shortly after you left the bar Mrs. Ovenden missed a contribution box. I am going to take you there for the purpose of identification”. He replied “John Keeling took the box. There was only 2d. in it. I buried the box in the garden”. He was taken to the Richmond Tavern, where he was identified as one of the lads. In the garden of Brook Cottage he found the box buried. Later on he saw Keeling in the Fishmarket and charged him with being concerned in the theft of the box. He replied “Clark took the box. There was only 2d. in it. He gave me a farthing”.

He Chief Constable said three weeks ago Clark received twelve strokes with the birch rod and Keeling eight strokes for a similar offence.

Two little urchins only seven years of age and brothers of the boys before the Bench were brought forward, and the Chief Constable explained that these children had been taken to the police station on several occasions for being concerned in several petty thefts, but on account of their tender years they could not bring any charge against them. It seemed to him that the parents were more to blame than the children, and he was only sorry that the Bench had not the power to send the parents to a prison or a reformatory for not doing their duty to the children.

The boys pleaded Guilty and elected to be tried summarily.

The boy Clark apparently has a tender regard for bad characters, for on Tuesday night, thinking no doubt to meet a kindred spirit, he went to the theatre to see “The Worst Woman In London”, and arrived home at the respectable hour of one a.m.

The Bench said it was very difficult to decide what to do, and adjourned the case for a week, the defendants to remain in the custody of their parents.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 February 1903.

Thursday, February 12th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. W. Herbert, Alderman Salter, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Frederick Thomas Clark (10), and John Keeling (9) were charged with the theft of a contribution box from the bar of the Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street. Both lads pleaded Guilty.

Florence Ovenden, wife of Charles Ovenden, landlord of the Richmond Tavern, said that the two boys came into the bar on Tuesday afternoon about four o'clock. She asked them what they were looking for, and Clark replied his father, whose name, he said, was Green. Mrs. Ovenden told the lad that she did not know such a person. The lads then went into the roadway. Immediately afterwards, whilst in the sitting room, she thought she heard the sound of a footstep in the bar. When she got there she could not see anyone, but missed the contribution box at once. She looked out into the street, but there was nobody about except a number of little children. The value of the box was 1s., and it contained some money, but she did not know the amount. On Wednesday afternoon, about half past one, Detective Sergt. Burniston brought the boy Clark to her, and she recognised him as being one of the boys who had been in the bar the previous afternoon. Neither of the lads desired to ask witness any questions.

Detective Sergt. Burniston proved arresting the lads. When charged, Clark said “John Keeling took the box. There was only 2d. in it, and I buried the box in a garden”. On the way to the police station Clark pointed out the place where he had hid the box, and the detective found the box (produced) as indicated. Subsequently, Detective Sergt. Burniston saw Keeling in the fish market, apprehended him, and charged him with being concerned in the theft of the contribution box. He replied “Clark took the box. There was only 2d. in it, and he gave me a farthing”.

Prisoners had nothing to say, and their fathers, who were also in Court, did not desire to make any statement on their behalf.

The Chief Constable informed the Bench that this was not the only occasion on which they had had trouble with the lads. On the 4th of October Keeling was charged with stealing some money from a little girl in the street, but as the girl's mother declined to take proceedings he was let off with a caution. On the 14th of January Keeling was again before the Court for larceny, but on this occasion also the charge was withdrawn. Next, both prisoners were before the Court on the 23rd of January, on a similar charge to the present one, and also for stealing a set of chessmen from the Masonic Hall. Clark received 12 strokes and Keeling eight strokes with the birch rod. It seemed to him, added the Chief Constable, that the parents were more to blame than the lads themselves, as owing to their neglect, the lads had caused a great amount of trouble. He only wished the Bench had the power of sending the parents to prison or the reformatory instead of the boys.

After a long consultation with his colleagues, the Chairman said the Bench would adjourn their decision for a week.

 

Folkestone Express 21 February 1903.

Thursday, February 19th: Before W. Wightwick, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs., Aldermen Salter and Penfold, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

The two boys, Clark and Keeling, who were remanded a week ago on a charge of stealing a contribution box from the Richmond Tavern, were again brought before the Bench.

They were ordered to receive six strokes each with a birch, the Chairman expressing a regret that they could not send them to a Reformatory because they were too young. If they came before the Bench again, the parents would be bound over to be responsible for their behaviour.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1903.

Thursday, February 19th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Aldermen Penfold and Salter, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert, G.I. Swoffer, and W.C. Carpenter.

Frederick Thomas Clarke (10), and John Keeling (9), who were last week charged with stealing a contribution box from the bar of the Richmond Tavern, and remanded in order to give the Bench time to consider their decision, were brought up for sentence. Clarke was accompanied by his mother, and the other lad by his father.

The Chairman said that, unfortunately, they could not send the lads to a Reformatory because they were too young. Both were bad boys, and the Bench thought that the parents encouraged them. If ever the lads were again brought before them on a similar charge they would bind the parents over in a large sum to keep the peace. In the present case, however, they ordered each defendant to receive six strokes with the birch rod, administered in the presence of the parents. If they came again, the parents, whom the Bench thought were in a great measure responsible, as they did not look after the children as they ought to, would have to suffer as well as the lads.

Keeling's father told the Bench that he could not deal with his lad, as when he was at home he was always in mischief.

The Chairman: You will have to look after your own children. If he does not behave himself you must flog him a bit, if you don't we shall bind you over.

Keeling: If I use extreme measures, then I am taken for ill-treatment.

The Chairman: It is absurd a man like you saying you can't manage a child like that. You will have to manage the child.

Mrs. Clarke said that she took her lad to school twice every day, but the Chairman said she would have to look after him better.

The lads were then taken below to receive their punishment.

 

Folkestone Express 12 September 1903.

Local News.

The death is announced of Mr. George Burgess, formerly of the Richmond Tavern, who latterly carried on a fruitrere's business in Cheriton Road. The funeral took place on Tuesday.

 

Folkestone Express 5 October 1912.

Local News.

At the police court on Wednesday the following transfer of licences was sanctioned by the Magistrates: Richmond Tavern, Harvey Street, from Mr. C.P. Ovenden to Mr. Edmund Finn.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 October 1912.

Wednesday, October 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The Bench granted the temporary transfer of licence as follows: Richmond Tavern, from Mr. Chas. Ovenden to Mr. Edmund Finn.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 October 1912.

Wednesday, October 2nd: Before Messrs. Ward, Herbert, Swoffer, and Linton.

The following licence was transferred upon change of tenants: The Richmond, Harvey Street, from Charles Parkes Ovenden to Edward Finn.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 10 April 1920.

Local News.

His many friends will regret to hear of the death of Mr. Edmund Finn, of the Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, after a few days' illness. He was well known in the town, and for 12 years was manager of the Royal Pavilion Hotel laundry, in which he was employed for 24 years altogether. During the war he lost his two eldest sons at the front, and that was a great blow to him, from which he never seemed to recover. He was 65 years of age, and leaves a widow and one son.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 April 1920.

Obituary.

The funeral of the late Mr. Edmund Finn, who died at the Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, on the 17th instant, at the age of 65, took place at the Cemetery on Monday.

Felix.

The late Mr. Edward Finn. This respected resident, who passed away last week at the Richmond Tavern, was one of the old school – a real type of the independent gentleman. The war hit him hard with the loss of his two sons, and time failed to heal the wound. Like Rachel of old “he refused to be comforted”. Years ago he was engineer at the Pavilion Hotel Laundry and served under successive managers. At this moment, when “draws” and “sweeps” are all the rage, I recall an incident in his career, and what may be termed a “slice of luck”. He was induced to purchase a ticket in a lottery in Ireland. Similarly to many other, he thought but little of the matter after he had purchased the slip of paper representing his chance. One fine morning he was staggered to receive an intimation that he was a winner in the draw. The prize was not a silver teapot, a box of cigars, or poultry, but four live bullocks! How was he to get the bullock across the stormy Irish Sea? No, the wise man would have the cash, and this amounted to a nice round sum. The late Mr. Finn was more than ordinarily respected by a large circle of friends, and I am proud to include myself amongst them. With his widow and relatives sincere sympathy is felt.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 August 1921.

Local News.

At the Petty Sessions yesterday a temporary licence was granted to Mr. Adam Ingleton, who had recently taken over the Richmond Tavern, Charlotte Street (sic).

 

Folkestone Herald 27 August 1921.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Sir Stephen Penfold, Councillor E.T. Morrison, Councillor A. Stace, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Alderman C. Jenner, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Councillor W. Hollands, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Councillor Miss E.I. Weston.

The licence of the Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street was transferred to Mr. Ingleton.

 

Folkestone Express 9 February 1924.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Miss Weston, Miss Hunt, the Rev. Epworth Thompson, Alderman Pepper, Col. Owen, Col. Broome-Giles, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, A. Stace, W. Hollands, E.T. Morrison, J.H. Blamey, and W.R. Boughton.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) presented his report as follows: I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 114 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor, and taking the population of the Borough according to the last Census this gives an average of one licensed house to every 329 persons. The following are particulars of the licensed premises: Full licences 71; beer on 7; beer off 6; beer and spirit dealers 13; grocers, etc., off 6; confectioners wine on 3; chemists wine off 4; cider and sweets off 1; Total 114 (81 on and 33 off). Fifteen of the licences have been transferred during the year. Four occasional licences have been granted to licence holders to sell drink on special occasions elsewhere than on their licensed premises, and 60 extensions of hours have been granted to licence holders when dinners, etc., were being held on their licensed premises. In no case has any abuse of the privilege been reported. Six hotels and one restaurant have authority under Section 3 of the Licensing Act, 1921, to supply intoxicating liquor with meals for one hour after 10 p.m. on weekdays, viz.: Metropole Hotel, Grand Hotel, Majestic Hotel, Regina Hotel, Esplanade Hotel, Royal Pavilion Hotel, and Central Cafe. During the year ended 31st December, 1923, 26 persons (21 males and 5 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 16 were convicted and 10 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. Of those proceeded against, 8 were residents of the Borough, 5 were soldiers, 10 were of no fixed abode, and 3 were non-residents. This is an increase of one as compared with the number proceeded against last year, when 25 persons (16 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 16 were convicted and 9 discharged. The permitted hours, as allowed by the Licensing Act, 1921, have been fixed by the Licensing Justices for the Borough of Folkestone as under: On weekdays from 10.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Sundays from 12 noon to 2 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. All the licensed premises have been periodically visited at irregular intervals by my officers during the year to see that the same are being conducted in a satisfactory manner, and I am pleased to report that with few exceptions no adverse reports have been submitted to me. There are 28 premises licensed for music and dancing and one for public billiard playing. During the year two licensees have been proceeded against for breaches of the Intoxicating Liquor Laws, viz.: (1) 15 June 23 Henry William Cork, George the Third, Fenchurch Street, permitting intoxicating liquor to be consumed on his licensed premises during non-permitted hours; the case was withdrawn upon my application to the Bench. (2) 7 September 23 Alfred John Cope, Rose Hotel, Rendezvous Street, failing to have his name and expression of business for which the licence was granted affixed to the premises; fined 10s. On 20th October, 1923, Michael Ivory, of the Bouverie Hotel, Bouverie Road, was convicted and fined 1 at Newport, Isle of Wight, for consuming intoxicating liquor on licensed premises during restricted hours. I beg to report that in my opinion there is still a redundancy of licensed premises on the older portion of the Borough. Observation has been kept, and it would appear that very unequal trade is done between house and house in the same neighbourhood. Three houses, viz.: The Oddfellows, Dover Street, The Belle Vue, St. John's Street, The Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, according to reports received, are doing the least trade in the area referred to, and I have no hesitation in saying that they are redundant to the needs of the public, and I accordingly recommend that the licence of each house be referred back for your consideration at the adjourned meeting. I have to express my appreciation of the fairness and courtesy extended to me by the Bench during my first year of office, and also for the able assistance I have received from your Clerk, Mr. John Andrew.

The Chairman said they were especially pleased, it being the Chief Constable's first year there, that he was in a position to present such a good report. The members of the Licensing Authority were very gratified that the report was so good. They were of opinion that such a good report must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law had been carried out and adhered to on every possible occasion. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded that in one instance the Chief constable withdrew the summonses, and in the other case the offence was of a technical nature. Then with regard to the cases of drunkenness, out of the 16 convictions only eight of them were residents of the Borough. When they considered the population of Folkestone and that Folkestone was a port, with a fishing quarter, and with a military district adjoining, the Magistrates thought it spoke well for the community. They knew the community of Folkestone was very sober, but it only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record. They were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past year, and they hoped the number would not be increased during the present year. On behalf of the Bench he offered his congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had enabled the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report. The Justices had given full consideration to the question of the renewal of those houses specifically mentioned with regard to redundancy, and they had decided to put back the renewal of those licences for consideration at the adjourned meeting, and they directed the Chief Constable to cause opposition to their renewal. As proceedings were also pending against the Prince of Wales Inn for alleged breaches of the Licensing Act that licence would not be renewed, but would be put back to the adjourned meeting also. The question of the renewal of the licences of the Rose Hotel and the George the Third had also been considered, and they would be renewed that day. All the other licences would also be renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1924.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman A.E. Pepper, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Councillor W. Hollands, Colonel P. Broome-Giles, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Miss E.I. Weston.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) read his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said they had heard the report of the Chief Constable, and they were especially glad, it being his first year, for him to be in a position for him to present such a good report at this annual licensing meeting. He did not think it required many words from him, beyond saying that the members of the licensing authority were very grateful that the report was so good, and they were all of opinion that having such a good result must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law was carried out and adhered to on all possible occasions. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded in one case that the Chief constable withdrew the summons, and the other case was of a technical nature. He thought they would agree with him that neither of these charges could have been of a serious nature. With regard to the convictions for drunkenness, they had heard that out of sixteen offenders only eight were residents of the borough. When they considered the population of Folkestone and further that the town was a port, with a fishing quarter, and had a military camp close at hand, to know that only eight of the offenders were residents spoke very well, he thought, for the community. (Hear, hear) The community as a whole was a very sober one in Folkestone. It only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record, and they were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past twelve months, and they hoped that the number of offenders would not be increased during the coming year. They offered their congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had undoubtedly assisted the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report as they had had that morning. The Bench felt that the question of the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows Inn, the Belle Vue, and the Richmond Tavern should have further consideration on the grounds of redundancy, and therefore they would put back the licensing of these houses to the adjourned sessions. They also directed the Chief Constable to give opposition to the renewals on the ground stated. The licence of the Prince of Wales, against which proceedings were pending, would also be put back. The Rose Hotel and the George the Third Inn had also been considered, and in these cases the licences would be renewed that day. Therefore, with the exception of the three houses mentioned on the grounds of redundancy, and the one against which proceedings were pending, all the other licences would be renewed that day.

 

Folkestone Express 1 March 1924.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson and other Magistrates.

The Magistrates considered the opposition of Mr. Beesley to the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street, the Richmond Tavern, and the Belle Vue on the ground of redundancy.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared in the cases of the Oddfellows Inn and the Richmond Tavern, both of which are owned by Messrs. Leney and Co., of Dover, and the respective licensees, Mr. G.A. Woodley and Mr. A. Ingleton, and Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for Messrs. Mackeson and Co., the owners, and Mr. F.J. Taylor, the licensee, of the Belle Vue Inn.

Evidence was given by Mr. Beesley and Inspector Pittock to the effect that the houses were unnecessary for the needs of the district, and the latter gave evidence as to the result of his observations regarding the trade done at the three houses compared with the other houses in the district.

The Magistrates decided to renew the licence of the Richmond Tavern, but referred the other two houses to the Compensation Authority at Canterbury.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Mr. J. Blamey, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) opposed the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street, the Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, and the Bellevue Hotel, St. John's Street on the ground of redundancy.

The Richmond Tavern.

In the case of the Richmond Tavern Mr. Mowll also appeared for the licensee.

The Chief Constable said the Richmond Tavern was an old fully licensed house. The licensee, Adam Ingleton, obtained the transfer on August 24th, 1921. Two previous transfers had been made in the years 1912 and 1920. The owners were A. Leney and Co. There were other houses in the immediate neighbourhood. In Harvey Street there was the Harvey Hotel, with a rateable value of 84. A superior trade was done by these neighbouring houses to that done at the Richmond Tavern.

In reply to Mr. Mowll, witness said the licensee was satisfactory and the house was kept very clean.

Inspector Pittock stated that between January 21st and February 23rd observation was kept, and the number of customers at the Richmond Tavern was 101; at the George III 375; at the Star and Garter 121; and at the Harvey Hotel 265. The averages were: Richmond Tavern 6; George III 28.8; Star and Garter 7.5; and the Harvey Hotel 24. Trade at this house had decreased considerably during the past two years to his knowledge.

Mr. G.P. Wood, of the firm of Messrs. A. Leney and Company, put in particulars as to the trade of the house from 1912 until 1923. His firm regarded the house as a valuable one, and trade had been increasing lately. The number of barrels of beer (36 gallons each) supplied in 1912 was 265, whilst the number in 1923 was 166.

The Bench retired, and upon their return the Chairman said they had decided that the licence of the Richmond Tavern should be renewed, but with regard to the Bellevue Hotel and the Oddfellows Inn, they would be referred to the compensation authorities.

The licences of the Oddfellows Inn and the Bellevue Hotel were provisionally renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 3 October 1931.

Local News.

On Tuesday at the Folkestone Police Court the licence of the Richmond Arms, Harvey Street, was temporarily transferred from Mr. A. Ingleton to Mr. E.J. Jordan, who for some years had been employed on Folkestone Harbour.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 October 1931.

Local News.

The licence of the Richmond Arms, Harvey Street, was transferred from Mr. J. Ingleton to Mr. E.J. Jordan.

 

Folkestone Express 31 October 1931.

Obituary.

It is with very deep regret that we have to announce the death of Mr. Charles Parks Ovenden, who until a month ago was a well-known licensed victualler. He had been in failing health for some time, and retiring from his business he went to reside at 29, Joyes Road, Folkestone, where he died on Wednesday.

Mr. Ovenden, who was 59 years of age, was the third son of the late Mr. Stephen Parks Ovenden, a highly respected Folkestone resident. He was for a number of years a solicitor's clerk in the office of the late Mr. Harrison, the Town Clerk of Folkestone. For 20 years he was a member of the Parish Church Choir. In his younger days he was a keen football player, and for some years he was the goalkeeper of the Folkestone Football Club when they were an amateur side and played on the Park Farm ground, other members of the team including Messrs. Sidey, Billy Harris, and J.S. Clark.

The deceased leaves a widow and two sons, and with them and his brother and sisters the deepest sympathy will be felt in their sad bereavement.

The Funeral will take place on Monday at the Folkestone Cemetery at Hawkinge at 2.20 in the afternoon.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 October 1931.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death of Mr. Charles Parks Ovenden on Wednesday at his residence, 29, Joyes Road.

The deceased, who was until quite recently the licensee of the Foresters Arms, was 59 years of age and had been in poor health for some time.

He was the third son of the late Mr. Stephen Parks Ovenden and for a number of years was an assistant in the Town Clerk's Office. For twenty years he was a member of the choir at the Parish Church, and in his youth played for the Folkestone Football Club as goalkeeper.

The deceased leaves a widow and two sons.

The funeral will take place on Monday afternoon at the Folkestone Cemetery at Hawkinge.

 

Folkestone Express 24 March 1934.

Local News.

Four silver cups, awarded by the United Friendly Societies (Folkestone) Royal Victoria Hospital Saturday and Sunday Fund to the licensed houses collecting the highest amount of money in the town during the year, were presented on Monday evening.

The principal award went to Mr. T.I. Jordan, of the Richmond Tavern, who collected 16 15s. towards the fund. The second prize was gained by Mrs. E.A. Summerfield, of the Royal Standard, collecting 8 6s. 8d.; third place by Mr. S. Herbert, of the Swan, with 4 7s. 6d.; and finally Mr. H.W. Cork, of the Red Cow, who collected 3 12s. 8d. Messrs. B. Todd, S. Burvill, G. Spicer, and Mr. G. Dunkling, who superintended the collecting at the respective houses, were the recipients of presents of cigarettes.

 

Folkestone Express 22 September 1934.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday had before them applications in connection with the temporary transfer of licences until the next Transfer Sessions. On the Bench were Mr. J.H. Blamey, Dr. F. Wolverson, Alderman J.W. Stainer, and Judge H. Terrell.

The first application referred to the Richmond Tavern, where the transfer was taking place from Mr. T.J. Jordan, the present licensee, to Mr. T.D. Goldsmith, who was stated to have lived in Folkestone nearly all his life, having been employed for the past twelve years by the East Kent Road Car Company as a bus conductor.

The Bench granted the protection order in each case.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 September 1934.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the Richmond Tavern from Mr. T.J. Jordan to Mr. Thomas D. Goldsmith, a former employee of the East Kent Road Car Company.

 

Folkestone Express 13 October 1934. Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates had before them on Wednesday an application for the transfer of licences. This was in respect of the Richmond Tavern, 1, Richmond Street, from Mr. E.J. Jordan to Mr. T.D. Goldsmith, a bus conductor who has resided in the town for some years. The Magistrates granted the application.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 November 1948.

Obituary.

The death occurred on Wednesday of Mr. Thomas William Goldsmith, licensee of the Richmond Tavern, Margaret Street, Folkestone. He was 63.

Son of the late Mr. T.D. Goldsmith, he was well-known in the district as Captain of one of the old sailing colliers; he had held the licence of the Richmond for 14 years Mr. Goldsmith was an employee of the old Folkestone Motor Company, and for 12 years was in the service of the East Kent Road Car Company. He was known to many by his jovial manner and witty answers.

Although he had been unwell for over two years, he had been up and about until a fortnight ago. He leaves a widow.

The funeral will take place at Hawkinge on Monday (3.30).

 

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1948.

Local News.

Mrs. Amy Goldsmith was granted the licence of the Richmond Tavern, Margaret Street, Folkestone, at Folkestone Transfer Sessions on Wednesday. The licence was formerly held by her husband, the late Mr. T.D. Goldsmith.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 January 1972.

Local News.

Four public houses in the Folkestone and Hythe areas are among 32 being taken over by Shepherd Neame Ltd., Kent’s only remaining independent brewery.

All 32 belonged to Whitbread-Premlin Ltd. A Whitbread’s spokesman on Wednesday named local pubs in the takeover as The Earl Grey, Old High Street, Folkestone; Richmond Tavern, Margaret Street, Folkestone; Globe Inn, High Street, Hythe; Woolpack Inn, Brookland.

The deal - the price involved was kept secret this week - brings Shepherd Neame's total of houses to 215.

Mr. G.R. Jarvis, licensee of the Black Bull Hotel, Folkestone, and chairman of Folkestone and district Licensed Victuallers’ Association said “I do not think the changeover will make much difference to the public houses concerned”.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 December 1976.

Local News.

A charity collection box for the blind and a woman’s coat went missing from a Folkestone pub when two men with “drinks problems" left, town Magistrates were told on Tuesday. The men, who had visited the Richmond Tavern in Margaret Street, were stopped by police in Dover Road shortly afterwards, and the coat was found behind a nearby wall. The collection box was not discovered until one of the men, William Bolland, fell against a cell door in Folkestone police station and the box dropped from beneath his jacket, the court was told.

Bolland, aged 37, an unemployed. labourer of Augusta Gardens, Folkestone, admitted stealing the box.

His companion, Peter Richard Todd, a self-confessed alcoholic and lapsed member of Alcoholics Anonymous, admitted three offences of theft while on bail for shoplifting. Todd, aged 33, also of Augusta Gardens, was bailed after stealing a 2.99 cassette case from Boots in Sandgate Road, Folkestone, in October, when he had 8p in his pocket. Later that month he stole a 4.20 bottle of perfume from Debenhams, but was stopped outside the store.

In November he visited the Richmond Tavern, said Mr. Brian Deaville, defending. Todd went into the saloon bar while Bolland was playing darts. He came out with a 25 coat, belonging to Brenda Lilian Ravenscroft, and met Bolland, who had taken the charity box from near the dartboard. Two weeks after this offence, he went into Sainsbury's and stole a bottle of whisky. Todd told police “I am a straightforward geezer. I had a good try. I am an alcoholic and I didn’t know what I was doing. I was on drugs”. Mr. Deaville told the court that Todd was taking tranquillisers as well as being an alcoholic, and the combination of drink and dings led to his mind becoming confused.

The cases were adjourned for social reports. Todd was remanded in custody and Bolland was remanded on bail.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 January 1977.

Local News.

Charity collection box thief William Bolland was remanded in custody for social reports by Folkestone Magistrates last Friday.

Bolland, of Augusta Gardens, Folkestone, had been bailed after being found Guilty of stealing an Association of the Blind collecting box from the Richmond Tavern, in Margaret Street. He could not be contacted at his home for social reports to be made, the court heard.

“You did not make a great deal of effort to get these reports done”, said the presiding Magistrate, Mr. Bedo Hobbs, remanding Bolland for three weeks.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 January 1977.

Local News.

Charity box thief William Bolland, heard his crime described as a “mean and despicable act” by a Folkestone Magistrate last Friday.

Bolland, aged 37, appeared at the court to be sentenced for stealing an Association of the Blind collection box from a Folkestone pub. He was found guilty in December.

“To steal a box containing money for the blind was a mean and despicable act”, said presiding Magistrate, Mr. Bedo Hobbs. “This is the result of your drinking. I think it is time that you made a vow never to touch another drop”.

Bolland, of Augusta Gardens. Folkestone, was given a six month prison sentence suspended for two years and ordered to pay 10 towards his legal aid costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 April 1983.

Canterbury Crown Court.

An attacker who threatened to kill a 62-year-old barmaid when he robbed a Folkestone pub was jailed for two years on Friday. At Canterbury Crown Court, William Charles Worster, of St. Michael's Street, Folkestone, admitted robbing Mrs. Winifred Tutt, at the Richmond Tavern, Margaret Street, on January 6.

Mr Brian Pearson, prosecuting, said Worster, who was deported from South Africa last year, said he had a drink problem which started when he was in the Rhodesian Army. He drank several pints of strong lager in the pub that morning and just before closing time he saw the landlord and his wife leave. Mrs. Tutt was left in charge and she noticed that Worster had disappeared and left his drink half finished. She checked he was not in the pub before locking up but found him when she went to the upstairs toilet. “She screamed and went back to the bar area. Worster followed her, grabbed her by the arms and told her that he wanted the money from the till”, said Mr. Pearson. “He insisted that she got the cash - 140 in all - and said before he left that he would kill her if she told the police”. Worster was arrested later that day drinking in another pub. After denying the offence, he then said “I couldn't do anything else. I was boozed. I have a drink problem and was short of cash”.

Defending, Mr. Peter Birts said Worster intended to sneak down when everyone had left and empty the till. Mrs. Tutt had her arms bruised in the assault, but Mr. Birts said “He didn't mean to hurt the woman in any way, but when she screamed he just got hold of her”.

Sentencing Worster, Judge John Streeter said “You cannot frighten people into submission by the use of force just to solve your drink problem”.

After the trial Mrs. Tutt said a stiffer sentence might deter other would-be robbers. “I don't think some of these people get enough”, she added. The burly attacker was not armed but, said Mrs. Tutt, he did not need to be.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 January 1985.

Local News.

Everybody has heard of Male Chauvinist Pigs — but Shepway has its sheep. Members of the SAS (Silly As Sheep) club meet at the Richmond Tavern in Folkestone’s Harvey Street and dedicate themselves to such worthwhile activities as not wearing pinafores or carrying shopping bags and never holding an empty beer glass. The bar club was founded when Stevie, wife of leading fireman and sheep Denis Langford stopped him as he went out one evening with “I suppose you are off down the pub with the rest of the sheep?” Fines are imposed for all kinds of silly offences, including not carrying the green card of the club with the motto “Who cares who wins?” Chauvinism is taking a holiday break in September when the dozen members are off to Ibiza with their families. “We have got to take the wives with us because they are paying for the holiday by working in the evenings while we are down the pub”, arch sheep Denis told the Herald.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 May 1985.

Local News.

Ian Sell, of Black Bull Road, Folkestone, had his 100 Raleigh Marina cycle stolen from outside the Richmond Tavern on Thursday.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 March 1987.

Local News.

Top dog fundraisers at the Richmond Tavern have done it again. Last week the Margaret Street tavern handed over another hefty cheque to Folkestone Guide Dogs For The Blind. The cheque for 1,000 is the amount it takes to train a guide dog from a puppy to adulthood. The Margaret Street pub have been raising money for the guide dogs charity for some time and have paid for the training of three guide dogs so far. They already have nearly half the amount needed saved up for the next dog!

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1988.

Local News.

They're a generous bunch down at the Richmond Tavern in Margaret Street, Folkestone, - and they intend to stay that way! A bumper 2,000 cheque was handed over to Folkestone's Mayor, Kelland Bowden, by landlady Betty Martin, the sum of one year's fundraising for the pub's adopted charity, Guide Dogs.

“We have raised 5,000 in the last 3 years and we're nearly half way to our next target”, said Betty.

Much of the good work is down to regular, Vic Price, who has run money-spinning raffles.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 July 1989.

Local News.

Regulars at Folkestone's Richmond Tavern in Margaret Street have bought their ninth guide dog for the blind in five and a half years. Landlord Derek Martin handed over a cheque for 2,000 to the charity, raised by a sponsored walk and a weekly meat draw – joints are bought on Saturday and raffled in the pub on Sunday. The guide dog has been named Richmond.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 February 1991.

Local News.

Regulars at the Richmond Tavern have just helped to buy their 14th guide dog – a record for Shepway. Landlord Derek Martin started fundraising for the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association seven years ago and his customers have helped raise an incredible 14,000. Each guide dog costs 2,000, but when 1,000 has been raised the Association pays the rest.

Mr. Martin said “Before we started I asked regulars which charity they wanted to collect for and we decided we wanted something to show for the money we raised”.

Every year the pub holds a sponsored walk at Easter, which raises about 500, and they have raffles every Sunday lunchtime. A gallon-sized bottle also sits on the bar for coins.

Mr. Martin said “When we hand over the money we get a framed picture of a guide dog so that the regulars can see what they've bought”. He will be giving the money raised at the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association's diamond jubilee concert on February 9 at the United Reformed Church hall in Castle Hill Avenue.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 June 1991.

Local News.

Folkestone drinkers are calling themselves the cleverest in Kent – and they have a title to prove it. Regulars at the Richmond Tavern in Harvey Street have won the Guinness/Shepherd Neame pub quiz challenge.

Landlord Derek Martin said “It was all in good spirits – but the lads are proud of being the cleverest in Kent”.

The five man team came first out of 137 Shepherd Neame pubs all over the county to win the first prize. The finals were held at the Gentyl Knight pub in Canterbury this week when the Richmond beat a team from the Albion in Maidstone.

Derek said “They had to answer a whole load of questions to win it but they kept their cool right to the end”.

The team were presented with a selection of Guinness and Shepherd Neame goodies and have won a day out at Brands Hatch with free access to the hospitality tent.

“They deserved to win, of course, but the liquid inspiration helped them to become pure geniuses”.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 September 1995.

Local News.

One of Folkestone's smallest pubs is celebrating having raised enough money to buy a guide dog – its 20th in just 12 years. Regulars at the Richmond Tavern in Margaret Street, Folkestone, join in weekly raffles and sponsored events to raise the cash for the Folkestone branch of Guide Dogs for The Blind. Over the years the pub has collected 20,000 to buy and train the dogs which help blind people become more independent.

Landlord Derek Martin said “We always have meat raffles on Sundays and various sponsored events throughout the year. There's also a big bottle on the bar where people put their change. Nowadays we collect about 1,000 a year, which is enough to pay for one guide dog. A few years ago, when there was more money around, we used to raise enough for two or three each year”.

The 1,000 cheque was presented to blind Folkestone man Christo Thiardt by Miss Folkestone, 16-year-old Sam Beazley. Folkestone Mayor Roz Everett was also there. Dave Bentley, Treasurer of the Folkestone branch, said “We never know which dog our money buys because it all goes into a central fund but every penny helps. We are very grateful to everyone at the Richmond Tavern because they have raised so much money for us. It's one of the smallest pubs in the town, but it's a little pub with a big heart”.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 May 1998.

Toby Jugs.

Jugs hears congratulations are in order for the landlord of the Richmond Tavern, Folkestone. Derek Martin, of the Margaret Street pub, has apparently raise enough money over the years to buy 20 guide dogs for blind people. As well as his excellent work for the community, Mr. Martin is also the second-longest-serving landlord in Folkestone. Anyone know who the first is?

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

BURGESS George 1866-84 Next pub licensee had Post Office Directory 1882

BURGESS Cornelius 1884-87

BURGESS George 1887-89 (Also "Rendezvous")

Last pub licensee had FARR/PARR Herbert 1889-90 Post Office Directory 1891

MAJOR John 1890-92

FARR Henry Arthur 1892

SANDILANDS George 1892-96

HOGBEN Harriet 1896

RICHARDS Charles 1896-98

OVENDEN Charles Parkes 1898-1912 Next pub licensee had Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

FINN Edmund 1913 Post Office Directory 1913

FINN Mrs Alice Rachael 1920-21 Post Office Directory 1922

INGLETON Adam 1921-31

JORDAN Edward J 1931-34+ Kelly's 1934

GOLDSMITH Thos D 1934-48 Post Office Directory 1938

GOLDSMITH Amy 1948-49

SAUNDERS Edward 1949-55

SUMMERS Frederick 1955-64

OULDS Peter 1964-69

NIXON Ronald 1969-73

PALMER John 1973-77

ROWLING Malcolm 1977-81 Next pub licensee had

MARTIN Derek 1981-2001

PEDERSEN Jan & MATTHEWS David (also "Earl Grey") 2001-Feb/2002

PEDERSEN Jan 14/Feb/2002+

PEDERSEN Jan & SALSBURY Yvonne 2002-Feb/04

CLARKE Patricia & KIRBY Alison Feb/2004+

KING Mrs L 2010+

 

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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