DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 11 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1885-

(Name from)

East Kent Arms

Open 2019+

19-21 Sandgate Road

Folkestone

(01303) 254095

East Kent Arms 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

East Kent Arms, Folkestone 1996

Above photo kindly supplied by Patricia Streater, April 1996.

East Kent Arms, Folkestone

Picture taken from Folkestone CAMRA website and hopefully to be updated. http://www.camra-afrm.org.uk

East Kent Arms sign 1991

East Kent Arms sign October 1991.

Above with thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com

 

Folkestone News 9 January 1886.

Quarter Sessions.

Thursday, January 9th: Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq.

William Armit (59) was charged with stealing a pony and cart and other articles, value 50, the property of John Paul Scott, of the East Kent Arms, Folkestone. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Croft prosecuted, instructed by Mr. J. Minter.

Mr. Croft opened the case, and briefly outlined the evidence he intended to call.

John Paul Scott, the prosecutor, said: I am the proprietor of the East Kent Yard and Stables in Sandgate Road. I saw the prisoner at the bar on the morning of November 13th last. I had not known him previously. He was dressed very respectably. I thought he was a customer of the former proprietor. My man said the prisoner wanted a trap to Dover and back. I let him have one for 10s. 6d. on the understanding that he was not gone more than three hours. He took the trap. I subsequently received a telegram, in consequence of which I went to Canterbury, where I found my pony and trap. The value was 50.

Cross-examined: I did not lose anything, excepting that the pony was laid up five weeks with a cold, and I had to pay the expenses of the stabling.

Henry Hogben said he remembered the prisoner coming to his master's stables on the morning of November 13th. He said he had come for the pony and trap which he had hired. He asked for a rug, and witness told him there was one in the cart. He said he was going to bring a lady back with him.

---- Bennett, a stableman, living at Canterbury, said on Friday, November 13th, he saw the prisoner there about two o'clock at the Flying Horse Yard. He was in conversation with three or four men about selling a cart, rug and whip, which were in a lodge near. He believed the pony was in the stable. He knew the pony belonged to Mr. Scott. He saw the prisoner again about three o'clock with a man named Hill driving the cart. He got out at the Flying Horse, and offered to sell the cart, rug and whip for 7. He did not say anything about the pony. Witness telegraphed immediately to Mr. Scott and received a reply. He showed it to prisoner, who read it. Witness said he should detain the pony and cart. He next saw the prisoner at the police station. The prisoner was not drunk, although he had had a glass or two of beer.

The Recorder said the witness had behaved most creditably.

Prisoner asked no questions.

Police Sergeant Harman said he happened to be in Canterbury on that day on special duty. He went to the Beehive Stables and found the pony and cart there. Prisoner was not there. He searched for him, and afterwards found him in custody. He told him the charge, and he said “I suppose you have got it or know where it is. They wanted me to sell it for 6, but I wanted a saddle”. Mr. Scott came from Folkestone afterwards. Witness brought the prisoner to Folkestone next day, and when charged he made no reply.

Cross-examined: He was under the influence of drink at eight o'clock in the evening. He appeared to be stupid.

Elizabeth Johnson was called, but the Recorder asked if it was necessary.

Mr. Croft thought not.

The Recorder said it was an undefended case.

Prisoner said he was under the influence of drink at the time or it would not have happened. He had been an officer in the Army, and was ruined.

Mr. Scott, re-called, said the prisoner was quite sober when he hired the cart.

The Recorder summed up the evidence, and said if the prisoner hired the trap bona fide, and it afterwards came upon him to sell it, that would not be theft.

The jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of Guilty, and the Recorder passed a sentence of six months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 September 1887.

Local News.

The police are making investigations into a case of robbery which was perpetrated in the Sandgate Road on Monday night at the East Kent Arms public house. At present the affair remains a mystery, but it appears that the entrance was effected through the fanlights. Money amounting to upwards of 7 was stolen from a cupboard. No clue has yet been obtained of the burglar or burglars. Amongst the stolen money there was 25s. in bronze.

 

Folkestone Express 3 September 1887.

Local News.

There have been several robberies committed in Folkestone during the past two or three weeks, public houses being apparently the favourite places for the raids of the thieves. On Monday night an entrance was effected at the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, by way of the fanlights, and about 7 abstracted from a cupboard. The money included 25s. worth of new bronze coins. Mr. Scott is, not unnaturally, astonished that is house, almost under the shadow of the police station, should be visited by burglars.

 

Southeastern Gazette 5 September 1887.

Local News.

The East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, in the occupation of Mr. J. P. Scott, was broken into on Monday night, and about 7 stolen, including 25s. worth of new bronze coins. Entrance to the house was made by way of the fanlights.

 

Southeastern Gazette 28 January 1890.

Local News.

Mr. Thomas B. Hammond, who was well known as having been associated with Mr. J.P. Scott in the running of the Folkestone and Canterbury coach for two seasons, died at the East Kent Arms on Monday evening. The deceased appears to have been for some time past suffering from a complication of disorders, but his death was accelerated by an attack of “the prevailing epidemic,” as it is termed. He was a lieutenant in Her Majesty’s Navy, but retired about 10 years ago, after having taken part in the Chinese War, for which he received a medal and two clasps. He was a member of the Temple Lodge of Freemasons, and among a large circle of friends and acquaintances he was very highly esteemed for his general good nature and many sterling qualities. The funeral took place on Friday at the cemetery.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 April 1890.

Local News.

Great sensation was caused in Sandgate Road yesterday morning upon a man named Charles Jordan being found amongst some straw in the loft of the East Kent Arms. Dr. Thomas Eastes was immediately summoned, and the injuries of the unfortunate man were attended to. He was removed to the Dispensary as speedily as possible, where he was placed under the care of Dr. F. Eastes and Dr. Bateman. The wound is a very severe one, the windpipe being badly cut. He lies in a very precarious condition and appears to be gradually sinking. No hopes are held of his recovery. Jordan, who lived in Bradstone Road, is only 23 years of age, and had been in the employ of Mr. Scott at the East Kent Arms about two months. He has been noticed to be in very distressed spirits lately, but at the present time we are unable to assign any reason for the unfortunate man's act.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 June 1890.

Wednesday, June 11th: Before J. Clarke Esq., Alderman Dunk, E.T. Ward, F. Boykett and J. Hoad Esqs.

A respectably dressed young woman named Kate Caine was charged with obtaining a quantity of underclothing, valued at 16s. 3d., from Mr. Stephen John Petts, of Rendezvous Street, by false pretences on the evening of the 7th instant; with obtaining a mantle from Mr. Shaw on the same date by false pretences, and two woollen skirts, valued at 4s. 11d., by false pretences, from Mr. Longley, draper.

Stephen John Petts, draper, of 34, Rendezvous Street, said the prisoner came to his shop on Saturday evening between eight and nine o'clock. He had seen her before. The prisoner said “I want to see some underclothing”. Witness showed her some and she asked that she might take them to Miss Scott, at the East Kent Arms, on book. She said she had been sent there by her. She went towards the door, but came back again and said if the goods did not suit Miss Scott she would bring them back again directly. Witness believed the statements which she made, and upon the faith of them allowed her to take them away. She did not return with the goods, and he saw no more of her until he saw her at the police station on Tuesday. He identified the things produced as his property. The selling price would be 16s. 3d.

Miss Ada Scott, residing at the East Kent Arms, said she knew the prisoner, who lived in her father's service at the East Kent Arms about two years ago. Witness did not send her to Mr. Petts' shop, or to any other shop, to purchase underclothing.

Elizabeth Wakefield, assistant to Mr. Shaw, draper, said the prisoner went to her shop about quarter past eight on Saturday evening. She asked for a dusk cloak, and not having one to show her, gave her a mantle, which she tried on. She said “I will take this to show Mrs. Scott. She has made me a present of it”. She said Mrs. Scott lived at the East Kent Arms, and asked witness's permission to take it there, promising to return by quarter to nine. Witness believed her statements and allowed her to take the mantle away. She did not return. On Tuesday she accompanied Sergeant Butcher to a house in Theatre Street, Hythe, where she saw the prisoner, whom witness identified as the woman who came to the shop on Saturday. Witness went into the prisoner's bedroom, and she produced a mantle from the cupboard. Witness identified it as Mr. Shaw's property. The value of it was 14s.

Mrs. Amy Scott, wife of Mr. Scott, proprietor of the East Kent Arms, stated that the prisoner was formerly in her service as cook. She did not send her to Mr. Shaw's on Saturday night to purchase a mantle or a dusk cloak, nor did the prisoner bring her one. She had never sent her there on any other occasion.

Miss Emily Ward, assistant to Mr. T.W. Langley, draper, said the prisoner came into the shop on Saturday evening to see some flannel skirts. They had none in stock, and she showed her some woollen ones. She said she was kitchen maid at Mrs. Hart's, Bates Hotel, and wanted them for the chambermaid. She asked to take them away, and witness allowed her to do so. She said she would come back in a quarter of an hour, but she did not return. She identified the things produced. The selling price was 4s. 11d.

Esther Hambrook said she was chambermaid at Bates Hotel, and had been there four years. The prisoner had been employed there as kitchen maid, but that was some two years ago. She had not seen her since, and had never sent her to purchase any skirts, or any other goods.

Sergt. Butcher said he went to Hythe on Tuesday in company with Miss Wakefield, and went to a house occupied by Mr. Johnson, in Theatre Street, at half past two. He asked to see the prisoner, and Miss Wakefield identified her. Witness read the warrant to her. She replied “Any question you ask me I shall answer truthfully”. Witness told her he had no questions to ask her. He would have to take her to Folkestone. She went upstairs and called witness up. She said “You'll find the things there”, pointing to a cupboard. Witness called Miss Wakefield up, and they found the mantle hanging up. Witness then found, wrapped in a brown paper parcel, two bodices and some other underclothing, and in another parcel he found one skirt. Witness brought her to Folkestone, and at the police station the warrant was again read over to her. She said “I did have the things”.

Louis Sharpe, a female searcher, said she searched the prisoner at the police station at four o'clock on Tuesday. She was wearing some of the clothing, but made no statement.

Prisoner stated that she did not know what caused her to do it. She did not wish to soil any of the goods, and those which she had worn she would pay for. When she got the things home she was sorry for what she had done.

The Bench committed the prisoner for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 14 June 1890.

Wednesday, June 11th: before J. Clark, J. Hoad, J. Dunk, F. Boykett and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Kate Caine was charged with obtaining by false pretences from Mr. S.J. Petts a quantity of drapery articles; from Mr. R.J. Shaw, a mantle; and from Mr. Thomas White Longley two woollen shirts.

Stephen John File Petts, draper, of 34, Rendezvous Street, said on Saturday evening, between eight and nine o'clock, prisoner went to his shop. He knew her by sight. She asked to see some underclothing. He showed her some chemises, drawers and bodices. She asked to be allowed to take the articles to Miss Scott, of the East Kent Arms, on approval. She went towards the door, returned, and said if the goods did not suit Miss Scott she would bring them back directly. Believing her statements, he allowed her to take away the goods. She did not return, and he saw no more of her until he saw her at the police station on Tuesday. He identified the three bodices, three chemises, and three pairs of drawers produced as his property. The total value of them was 16s. 3d.

Ada Scott, daughter of Mr. J.P. Scott, of the East Kent Arms, said she knew the prisoner, who lived in her father's service about two years ago. She had not sent her on Saturday to Mr. Petts's shop to purchase underclothing, nor did she see prisoner at all on Saturday last.

Elizabeth Wakefield, assistant to Mr. R.J. Shaw, draper, Dover Road, said on Saturday evening about a quarter past eight prisoner went to the shop and asked for a dust cloak. Not having one to show her, witness showed her a mantle instead. She tried the mantle on and said “I'll take this to show Mrs. Scott, as she is making me a present of it”. Witness allowed her to take the mantle away, and prisoner promised to return by a quarter to nine. She did not return. On Tuesday witness went with Sergt. Butcher to a house in Theatre Street, Hythe, and there saw the prisoner. From a cupboard in a bedroom prisoner produced the mantle. The selling value of it was 14s.

Amy Scott, wife of Mr. J.P. Scott, said the prisoner was formerly in her service as cook. She did not send her on Saturday to Mr. Shaw's for a dust cloak or a mantle.

Emily Lord, assistant to Mr. T.W. Longley, of 69, High Street, draper, said prisoner went to the shop about nine o'clock on Saturday evening, and asked for some flannel skirts. They had no flannel, so she showed her some woollen skirts. She said she wanted them for the chambermaid at Mrs. Hart's, Bates Hotel, where she was kitchen maid. She selected the skirts, and asked to be allowed to take them away to show the chambermaid. She was allowed to do so, but did not return. Witness identified the skirts produced as Mr. Longley's property; the selling price was 4s. 11d.

Esther Hambrook, chambermaid at Bates Hotel, said the prisoner had lived at the hotel for several months as kitchen maid. She left quite two years ago, and witness had seen her but once since.

Sergeant Butcher said he went on Tuesday to Hythe with Miss Wakefield, to a house in Theatre Street, occupied by a Mrs. Johnson. He found prisoner was lodging there and asked to see her. Miss Wakefield identified her. He read the warrant to her and she replied “Any question you ask me I shall answer truthfully”. He told her he should ask her no questions, but she must put on her things and go to Folkestone. She went upstairs, and then called him, and, pointing to a cupboard, said “You will find the things in there”. He called Miss Wakefield up, and showed her the mantle produced, and she identified it. In a brown paper parcel he found the articles identified by Mr. Petts, and a skirt identified as Mr. Longley's property.

Rachel Sharp, wife of Richard Sharp, said she searched the prisoner. She was wearing a bodice, chemise, a pair of drawers, and a skirt, which formed part of the property she was charged with obtaining.

Prisoner said she did not know what to do. She had no money to take her boxes further than Sandgate Station, and rather than trouble anybody with them she left them there, and was paying a penny a day for them until she knew what she was going to do. She did not mean to soil any of the goods except those she put on, which she meant to pay for. She had no clean changes to put on, and she wanted to go and see a young man in London.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 9 July 1890.

Quarter Sessions.

At the Quarter Sessions held at the Town Hall on Monday, there were only two prisoners for trial, but there were two indictments in one case and three in the other. The Recorder was unable to be present, and Mr. Abel John Rann acted as his deputy. It is an open secret that the Recorder is engaged in a case at present pending in the High Courts, in which the Victoria Pier shareholders are deeply interested.

Kate Caine was then charged on three counts with obtaining goods by false pretences from Mr. S.J. Petts, Mr. R.J. Shaw, and Mr. M.W. Longley.

Mr. Watts, barrister, appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. G. Thorne Drury (instructed by Mr. Neve), for the defence.

Prisoner, who was allowed to be seated, pleaded Guilty to all the charges, and Mr. Watts stated that he believed his learned friend had certain facts to lay before the Court, and in view of these he was instructed not to press charges.

Mr. Drury then told a sad story of prisoner's life, saying that she was utterly destitute when she committed the crimes. He would respectfully urge upon the Court that she was shortly to become a mother, that she had been in prison a month, that all the goods had been restored, and a charitable lady was willing to take her into a home until her trouble was over and she could obtain a situation.

Mr. Wray, the police court missionary of the CETS, was called and bore out these statements. The lady had the highest regard for prisoner on account of kindness which had been shown by prisoner during the lady's illness.

In reply to the Deputy Recorder, prisoner expressed her willingness to go into the home offered her by Mrs. Francis. The Recorder said he had listened to a sad story, and he hoped that these crimes were the only ones of which prisoner had been gulty. He was happy to hear that a lady, actuated by Christian kindness, had offered to take care of her. It was not because the offences were light, for they were very serious, but in consequence of her condition and of certain mitigating circumstances, that he was only going to impose a very light sentence. He hoped it would not induce others to think that they would meet with a light punishment for similar offences, because that would not be so. He would only sentence her to one day's imprisonment, which meant that she was free to leave the Court then and go to the home which the kind lady he had mentioned had offered to receive her into.

Prisoner was then released, and the business of the day ended.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 July 1890.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, July 7th: Before Abel John Ram Esq.

Kate Caine was then placed in the dock charged with obtaining a quantity of underlinen by false pretences from Stephen John File Petts, of Rendezvous Street, and also from Robert John Shaw and Mr. W. Longley, on the 7th June. Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Watts prosecuted and Mr. G. Thorpe Drury defended.

Mr. Drury, in addressing The Recorder, said the prisoner admitted the offence and was truly sorry that she had been tempted to commit it. All he could do for her was to plead for mercy. Her career had been one of misfortune, and some two years ago she was delivered for a child, which she had worked hard to maintain. When in service she only earned 7s. per week, and as long as she could she contributed 1 per month towards it's keep. Her parents had both died, and a short time ago she fell victim to another man who had promised to marry her, but he had gone away and broken his promise. At the time she committed the offence the prisoner was in great distress, and it was with the idea of obtaining enough money to go to the man who had promised to marry her that she did it. She had been in prison since the 7th June, and during that time Mr. Wray, the Church of England Temperance Missionary at Folkestone, had been in communication with her friends. A lady – Mrs. Francis – in whose service the prisoner had been, took a great interest in her, and she had promised to take her into her house until after her accouchement, and then, if necessary, to obtain a situation for her, or send her to her relatives in Ireland. If the Court were disposed to take such a merciful view of the case as to allow her another chance she would do her best to amend and was quite willing to go back to Mrs. Francis.

Mr. Wray was called, and stated that he had seen Mrs. Francis on the subject, and she would be pleased to do all she could for the prisoner. He had written to the man who had promised her marriage, but had not had any reply to his letter.

In answer to The Recorder, the prisoner said she was quite willing to go with Mrs. Francis and to remain with her.

The Recorder said the offence which the prisoner had committed was a very serious one, and one which was perpetrated with a great deal of determination. The prisoner's story was truly a sad one, and he was willing to believe that she was led away by her misfortunes. He was glad to learn that there was a lady who, on account of the prisoner's previous good conduct, was willing to take her back into her house. Under the circumstances he would deal leniently with her, but he hoped it would not be thought that the sentence was in consequence of the lightness of the offence. It was not. The offence was a very bad one, and had there not been mitigating circumstances he would have been obliged to sentence her to a long term of imprisonment. He particularly hoped it would not cause others to think that they would receive the same amount of mercy. He would sentence the prisoner to one day's imprisonment, which meant that she would be able to go to Mrs. Francis that day.

The sentence was received in Court with loud applause, which was instantly suppressed.

 

Folkestone Express 12 July 1890.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, July 7th: Before Abel John Ram Esq.

Kate Caine was indicted for obtaining goods by false pretences from Stephen John File Petts on the 7th June. There were two other charges against her of obtaining goods, the property of Robert John Shaw, and J.W. Longley.

Mr. Watts prosecuted. Mr. Drury addressed the Recorder on prisoner's behalf. He said her career had been one of misfortune. She was two years ago seduced by a soldier, she had lost her parents, and since then she had got into trouble and was again enceinte. He said she obtained the goods to get money to go to the man who had promised to marry her. Mr. Wray, agent of the Church of England Temperance Society, was present, and he was instructed to say that a lady was prepared to receive her into a home, and then either to get her a situation or send her to her relatives in Ireland.

Prisoner, in reply to the Deputy Recorder, said she was willing to go and remain in the home proposed by Mrs. Francis.

The Deputy Recorder addressed the prisoner on the enormity of the offence, and said had there not been mitigating circumstances in the case, and had not the lady promised to look after her, a very much heavier sentence would be passed. He would sentence her to one day's imprisonment, the meaning of which was that she would be discharged then, on her promise to go to the home.

 

Folkestone News 12 July 1890.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, July 7th: Before Abel John Ram Esq.

Kate Caine was charged with obtaining goods under false pretences from Stephen John File Petts on 17th June. There were two other charges of a similar nature, the victims being R.G. Shaw and J.W. Longley.

Mr. Watts (barrister) prosecuted, and Mr. G. Thorne Drury (instructed by Mr. Neve) defended. The prisoner pleaded Guilty to all the charges, and Mr. Watts said he need not detain the Court as he understood his learned friend had certain facts to communicate, in face of which he had no desire to press the charges.

Mr. Thorne Drury asked the Court to take the most merciful view possible. Two years ago the prisoner had been seduced by a soldier, and she was again enceinte. She was utterly destitute when she obtained these goods, and she did so in order to go to the man who had promised to marry her. She had been in prison for a month, and all the goods had been restored as they had been taken, with the exception of two garments which she had worn. A lady was willing to take her into a home until her trouble was over and she was able to get a situation.

Mr. Wray, the Police Court Missionary of the C.E.T.S., said the lady (Mrs. Francis) had the highest regard for prisoner in consequence of kindness shown by the latter during the illness of the former. If the prisoner would go into the home she would be well cared for, and either a situation would be found for her, or she would be sent to her friends in Ireland when her trouble was over.

The Deputy Recorder admonished the prisoner as to the serious nature of her offence, and hoped that no-one else would imagine that a similarly light sentence to that which he was about to impose would be dealt out to them for a similar offence. He would sentence her to one day's imprisonment, which meant that she could leave the dock at once, on her promise to go to the home which Mrs. Francis, actuated by Christian kindness, had offered her.

Prisoner was then discharged.

 

Folkestone News 26 July 1890.

Monday, July 21st: Before Major Poole and W.G. Herbert Esq.

Emily Koe, 20, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Sandgate Road on the previous evening.

P.C. Swift said he saw the prisoner outside the East Kent Arms, shouting and using filthy language. He advised her to “move on”, but as she would not, he was compelled to take her into custody.

Supt. Taylor said that nothing was known against the girl, who had been for a fortnight in the employ of Mr. Scott at the East Kent Arms as a domestic servant, and previously at the South Foreland. She had stayed out after ten o'clock, when the house was closed, and had imbibed too freely.

Emily admitted the drunkenness, but denied that she was disorderly or used bad language.

Fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, with the alternative of seven days' hard labour. Prisoner said she could get the money during the day, and she was allowed 24 hours for payment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 August 1891.

Wednesday, July 29th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, Major H.W. Poole, W.G. Herbert Esq., and Alderman Banks.

John Paul Scott, proprietor of the East Kent Arms, was fined 5s. and 9s. costs for allowing his dog to be at large in Guildhall Street, without a licence, on the 18th of July.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 August 1892.

Monday, August 8th: Before Mr. J. Fitness, Aldermen Pledge and Dunk.

Three privates in the West Surrey Regiment, named Edward Anwyl, William Davis, and William Bruce, were charged, with others not in custody, of assaulting and robbing Charles Guilliams and John Winfelder.

Guilliams said he was a Dutch waiter, and on Saturday evening from 10 o'clock till 10.45 he was in the Guildhall Vaults with John Winfelder and others. There were some soldiers there, and witness “stood treat” and remained with them in the bar about ten minutes. They left together and went to the East Kent Arms just before closing time, and he and his his friends treated the soldiers again. They left there at closing time and went up Sandgate Road as far as Christ Church Road, where they stood talking for a time. He and Winfelder accompanied them along Shorncliffe Road. He walked arm-in-arm with one of the soldiers, and after he had gone some distance he missed his friend and looked back to see what had become of him, but could not see him. About six or seven soldiers were with him then. Just at that moment one of the soldiers got hold of his watch chain. He was wearing a gold double-cased keyless watch and a gold Albert chain with twisted links. He requested him to let go, but he would not. The soldier called “Help” to the other soldiers. They were close behind and came running up. The Scotch soldier put his hand inside of his waistcoat, and must have stolen his silk handkerchief and pocket book. He also said “You had better walk on. Your friend will be with you in a minute”. They had a struggle for a minute, the soldiers got hold of his arms, he got free, and ran away towards the town. He missed his watch and chain, pocket book, letter case, a silk handkerchief, his stick and hat. He shouted to his friend, and after a time saw him coming out of a field. He was very excited, had his tie unfastened, no collar on, and his clothes were dirty. He told witness what had happened and they went together to the police station. On Sunday morning they went with Sergeant Swift to Shorncliffe Camp. He saw the stick produced at the Camp – it was the one he had on Saturday night. He saw no more of his property. The value of the watch and chain was 13. He could not identify any of the prisoners as those who assaulted him.

John Winfelder, also a foreign waiter, said that when he was in Shorncliffe Road one of the soldiers he was with tried to get his hand into his trousers pocket. Four or five others came up and knocked him down in the cornfield. They held him down by the arms and legs and took everything he had about him – about 15s. or 20s. in money, a silver watch and chain, a cigarette case, a pipe, and a stick. He was not sure as to the men. The man Anwyl was one of the two who walked with him arm-in-arm. On Sunday they went to the Camp, and witness identified the stick produced as his property. The watch and chain were worth about 1. In reply to the Court he said he first saw Anwyl in Christ Church Road.

Anwyl said it was correct that he was one of the soldiers who walked with witness up Shorncliffe Road.

William Stanley, caretaker of the Recreation Room, Provisional Battalion, said he lent Davis and Bruce 1s. 6d. on the two sticks, and subsequently handed them to the colour sergeant.

Sergeant Swift said the robbery was reported to him at 1.30 on Sunday morning. The men had been drinking and were not sober. Neither of them had a hat on, and they were excited. He went to a field in Shorncliffe Road, near Leigh House. He found a Glengarry cap of the West Surrey Regiment and a linen cuff. When the men were arrested, Bruce said “I have got myself into this through selling that stick”. Davis had on him 6s. 10., and the others about 18d. each.

Supt Taylor asked for a remand until Saturday, and it was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 13 August 1892.

Monday, August 8th: Before Aldermen Pledge and Dunk, and J. Fitness Esq.

Edward Anwyl, William Davis, and William Bruce, privates in the West Surrey Regiment, three smart looking soldiers, were charged with being concerned with others, not in custody, with assaulting and robbing Charles Guilliam and another.

Charles Guilliam said he was a Dutch waiter. On Saturday evening from ten o'clock till a quarter to eleven he was in the Guildhall Vaults with John Winfelder and others, drinking together. They were in a bar at the back of the house. They left and returned to the house, entering another bar. There were some soldiers there, and witness “stood treat” and remained with them in the bar about ten minutes. They left together and went to the East Kent Arms just before closing time, and he and his friend treated the soldiers again. There were four or five of them. They left at closing time and went up Sandgate Road as far as Christ Church Road, where they stood talking for a time. Some of his friends left him there and he remained with Winfelder and some soldiers – altogether there were 14 or 15 soldiers – and they wanted some more to drink. He thought they said they could get it at the canteen. He and Winfelder accompanied them along Shorncliffe Road. He could not say he was quite sober – he was a little the worse for drink, but remembered clearly what took place. He walked down arm-in-arm with one of the soldiers, and after he had gone some distance he missed his friend and looked back to see what had become of him, but could not see him. About six or seven soldiers were with him then. A soldier in Scotch uniform came running up to him. Just at that moment one of the other soldiers got hold of his watch chain. He was wearing a gold double-cased keyless watch and a gold Albert chain with twisted links. He requested the soldier to let go, but he would not. He said he had better give it to him till he went back – it was not safe to wear it in the company he was in. He requested the soldier again to leave off, and pushed him away. He called “Help” to the other soldiers. They were close behind, and came running up. The Scotch soldier put his hand inside of his waistcoat, and must have stolen his silk handkerchief and pocket book. He also said “You had better walk on. Your friend will be with you in a minute”. They had a struggle for a minute, the soldiers got hold of his arms, he got free, and ran away towards the town. He missed his watch and chain, pocket book, letter case, a silk handkerchief, his stick and hat. He shouted to his friend, and after a time saw him coming out of a field. He was very excited, had his tie unfastened, no collar on, and his clothes were dirty. He told witness what had happened, and they went together to the police station. On Sunday morning they went with Sergeant Swift to Shorncliffe Camp. A number of men were paraded before them, but they could not identify the men who had assaulted him. He saw the stick produced at the Camp – it was the one he had on Saturday night. He saw no more of his property. The value of the watch and chain was 13. He could not identify any of the prisoners as those who assaulted him.

John Winfelder, also a foreign waiter, said when he was in Shroncliffe Road one of the soldiers he was with tried to get his hand into his trousers pocket. Four or five others came up and knocked him down in a cornfield They held him down by the arms and legs, and took everything he had about him – about 15s. or 20s. in money, a silver watch and chain, a cigarette case, a pipe and a stick. He cried out for help, and they threatened to kill him. He was not sure as to the men. He also lost a cuff. The man Anwyl was one of the two who walked with him arm-in-arm. He was not sure whether he was one of the men who pushed him in the field, but he supposed he was there. They left him after they had taken everything. He called for Guilliam, who came along a few minutes after, and they went together to the police station. On Sunday they went to the Camp, and witness picked Anwyl out. He identified the stick produced as his property. His watch and chain were worth about 1. He was not quite sober.

By Anwyl: You were not one of the men I saw in the East Kent Arms.

In reply to the Court, he said he first saw Anwyl in Christ Church Road.

Anwyl said it was correct that he was one of the soldiers who walked with witness up Shorncliffe Road.

William Child, a private in the West Surrey Regiment, said he saw the two stick produced, one in the possession of Davis, at 6.30 on Sunday morning. He asked witness the value of the Malacca cane. He said he exchanged his regimental cane for them. Bruce brought the acacia stick and asked what it was worth. He took it from behind his cot.

William Stanley, caretaker of the Recreation Room, Provisional Battalion, said he lent Davis and Bruce 1s. 6d. on the two sticks, and subsequently handed them to the colour sergeant.

Thomas Roblon, colour sergeant in the West Surrey Regiment, said he heard of the robbery about 10.30 on Sunday morning, and received the stick from the last witness. The three prisoners slept in the same barrack room.

Sergeant Swift said the robbery was reported to him at 1.30 on Sunday morning. The men had been drinking and were not sober. Neither of them had a hat on, and they were excited. He went to a field in Shorncliffe Road, near Leigh House. He found a Glengarry cap of the West Surrey Regiment, and a linen cuff. When the men were arrested Bruce said “I have got myself into this through selling that stick”. Davis had on him 6s. 10d., and the others about 18d. each.

Supt Taylor asked for a remand till Saturday, and it was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 August 1892.

Police Court Jottings.

Three smart young fellows of the West Surrey Regiment, whose collars were adorned with a little brass representation of the Sphinx with the word “Egypt” underneath, were brought up in custody on Monday, before Mr. Fitness and Alds. Pledge and Dunk, charged with an offence which, if proved against them, and should they have to take their trial before a judge of the same disposition of either Sir H. Hawkins or Sir C. Stephen will probably result in their acquaintance with the lash – highway robbery with violence. They were named respectively Wm. Bruce, Edwd. Anwyl, and Wm. Davis.

It appeared, according to the voluminous evidence which was most painstakingly recorded by the Deputy Magistrates' Clerk. On Saturday evening, about half past ten, a couple of Dutch waiters at an hotel in Folkestone, who gave the names of Chas. Guilliams and John Jas. Winfelder, met a number of soldiers in a public house, whence they adjourned to another, at each of which they treated them. On their leaving the second at “closing time” they walked up the Sandgate Road, and from thence towards the Cheriton Road; the soldiers, who were afterwards joined by some seven or eight others, accompanying them arm-in-arm, for, as they admitted in the course of their examination, they were the worse for drink. After they had gone some way on the road, some of the soldiers asked them to come further on, as they knew where they could get more drink. This invitation they ill-advisedly accepted, but after proceeding but a short way, Guilliams and his brother waiter found themselves hustled into a bean field, where they were knocked down and robbed of their watches and chains, and what money they had about them, together with their walking sticks, their pocket handkerchiefs, and their hats. The former managed to get away from his assailants and ran off, afterwards meeting his companion. They then went together to the police station and gave information of the outrage, and the case was put into the hands of P.S. Swift, who accompanied them to the scene of the tussle, where the Sergeant found, about ten yards from the highway, in the field, a Glengarry cap belonging to a private of the West Surrey Regiment. This was about two on Sunday morning. At nine the same morning the Sergeant accompanied the prosecutors to the Shorncliffe Camp, when some thirty men were paraded before them, and Winfelder identified Anwyl as one of the soldiers who had taken part in the robbery, but Guilliams was unable to pick out either of his assailants.

It was, however, proved by Wm. Stanley, a caretaker at the recreation room of the Provisional Battalion at the Camp, that Davis and Bruce each pledged with him a stick for 1s. 6d., which the two prosecutors now identified as their property which had been taken from them.

When apprehended by Sergt. Swift, the only one of the three who made any reply to the charge was Bruce, who said “I have got myself into this by selling that stick”. When searched Bruce had on him 1s. 7d., Anwyl 1s. 6d,. and Davis 6s. 10d.

Guilliams put the value of his watch and chain at 13 – they were of gold. Winfelder estimated his watch and chain at about a sovereign, while he had also been robbed of between 15s. and 20s. in money.

The three prisoners, who had conducted themselves very coolly throughout the Magisterial proceeding, said they were not guilty, Anwyl remarking “I most emphatically say that I am not guilty”.

At the conclusion of the case Mr. Supt. Taylor said he should ask for a remand in order to trace the stolen property, and this was granted until Saturday.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 13 August 1892.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Monday three privates in the West Surrey Regiment, named Edward Anwyl, William Davis, and William Bruce, were remanded on a charge of being concerned with others not in custody, with assaulting and robbing Charles Guilliams and another on the previous Saturday evening. The prosecutor, who is a Dutch waiter, and another foreigner, named John Winfelder, met several soldiers in the Guildhall Vaults, Folkestone, and treated them. They left the house together and went into the East Kent Arms, just before closing time, where they again stood treat. They afterwards proceeded with the soldiers up Sandgate Road towards the Camp, and accompanied them along the Shorncliffe Road. Both were a little the worse for drink. They were afterwards assaulted by the soldiers, and robbed of their watches and money. The soldiers made off, and the prosecutor and his companion went to the police station and informed the police. P.S. Swift went to the spot, near Leigh House, where the assault was committed, and found a Glengarry cap of the West Surrey Regiment. Prisoners were arrested at the Camp on Sunday. Only Anwyl was recognised, but the sticks of prosecutor and his companion were found in the possession of the other two prisoners.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 August 1892.

Saturday, August 13th: Before Aldermen Sherwood, Dunk, and Pledge, Councillor Holden and Mr. J. Fitness.

William Bruce, William Davis, and Edward Anwyl, three well-built soldiers, belonging to the West Surrey Regiment, were brought up on remand, and further charged with assaulting and robbing two Dutch waiters, named Charles Guilliams and John Winfelder on the night of the 6th inst.

It will be remembered that the case came before the Bench on the 8th inst., when the prosecutors deposed that they had been robbed of a gold double-cased keyless watch, gold Albert chain, pocket book, letter case, silk handkerchief, sticks, hats, 15s. in money, silver watch and chain, cigarette case, and pipe.

Frederick Harris, a lance corporal in the same regiment, now deposed that the defendants passed the quarter guard together at three minutes past twelve on the Saturday night, and went into quarters. He knew the men personally.

Bruce stated that he came into Folkestone on the evening of the 6th inst. with his comrades in the dock, and after drinking with them at the George Hotel, he left them and went to the Alhambra, Sandgate, where he stayed till closing time; after that he returned to barracks. He was not accompanied by the other defendants. With regard to the stick, he found that outside hut number 23 early on Sunday morning, and he carried it away and hid it behind his own cot.

Anwyl stated that he was in Folkestone until closing time. As he was returning to the Camp he overtook a group of soldiers with whom were the two prosecutors. He addressed the latter in Dutch and they replied. Shortly after he bid them “good night” and went into the Camp. He had neither handled nor seen the missing property.

Davis also averred that he had had nothing to do with the robbery.

The Bench stated that they had decided that the case should go before a jury for trial, and the prisoners would therefore be committed for trial.

The men were removed in custody.

 

Folkestone Express 20 August 1892.

Saturday, August 13th: Before Aldermen Sherwood, Dunk and Pledge, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

William Brice, Edward Anwyl, and William Davis were charged on remand with assaulting and robbing two waiters.

Frederick Harris, a lance corporal in the West Surrey Regiment, was called, and said he was on duty with the quarter guard on Saturday night and saw the three prisoners go into Camp together at three minutes past twelve. They went up to the guard. No other soldiers were with them. They passed the guard and went into quarters.

All three prisoners made long statements of their proceedings on the night in question. Brice denied all connection with the matter or that he was in the company of the other prisoners, and appealed to the Bench to ask them the question.

Anwyl said he left the hut early in the morning of Sunday and found the walking stick.

Davis said he exchanged his regimental cane with a Scotch soldier for the stick in order that the latter might pass the guard, and next morning pawned it for 1s. 6d.

The prisoners were committed for trial at the Sessions.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 20 August 1892.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Saturday three privates in the West Surrey Regiment, named Edward Anwyl, William Bruce, and William Davis were committed for trial on the charge of assaulting and robbing two waiters in the Shorncliffe Road on the night of the 6th inst.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 October 1892.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday 17th October: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

William Bruce, Edward Anwyl, and William Davis, all privates in the West Kent Regiment, were charged with stealing from the person of John Winfelder one watch and chain, one cigarette case, one pipe, one stick, and the sum of 15s. in money on the 8th August.

Each of the prisoners pleaded Not Guilty to the charge.

Mr. Matthews appeared for the prosecution, Mr. Tassell appeared for the defendant Anwyl, and Mr. Bowles defended the remaining two men at the request of the Learned Recorder.

The evidence, as given at the two hearings before the Bench, was repeated.

John Winfelder, prosecutor, said on the night in question he was drinking until closing time at the East Kent Arms, with Guilliam and some soldiers. All left together, and went in the direction of Shorncliffe Road. As they were walking together, a Scotch soldier tried to thrust his hand into witness's pocket, but he prevented him from doing so. The Scotch soldier then left witness and joined the other party, walking in front with Guilliam. Subsequently a gang of the soldiers got witness into a field alongside the Shorncliffe Road, knocked him down, and robbed him of everything he possessed. The next day he went to the Camp with a police sergeant, and identified Anwyl as one of the party by whom he was attacked.

In the course of cross-examination by Mr. Tassell, he said he did not say, before the Bench, that “he saw Anwyl in the field”, although the remark was on the depositions. He said “he supposed he was with him”. He could not swear to any of the prisoners.

By the Recorder: He told them he identified Anwyl as walking with him, and the Scotch soldier.

Was Anwyl with him when he tried to put his hand into his (witness's) pocket? – Yes.

What did Anwyl do? – He did not do anything.

Charles Guilliam, another waiter, deposed to accompanying the previous witness in his drinking campaign that evening. He did not witness the assault and robbery, but he saw Winfelder coming out of a field looking very much disturbed and excited.

Private Childs, of the West Kent Regiment, said on the Sunday morning he was shown a Malacca stick (produced) by Davis, who asked him the value of it. He told witness he had taken the stick in exchange for his regimental stick.

William Stanley, the Caretaker of the Recreation Room of the Provisional Battalion deposed to lending prisoner Davis 1s. 6d. on the stick until the following day.

Sergeant Swift said the prosecutors came to him at the Police Station on the night of the assault, and told him what had happened; they were somewhat excited, and under the influence of drink. With the men he went to the scene of the struggle, and there found a Glengarry cap belonging to the West Kent Regiment. During the Sunday morning they went to the Camp, and Winfelder identified Anwyl as one of those who had taken part in the assault.

The jury wished to know if the three prisoners were wearing their caps when they returned to the Camp.

An answer was returned, by Lance Corporal Harris, in the affirmative.

Mr. Tassell made an able speech on behalf on Anwyl, and in the course of his summing up, the Learned Recorder said Mr. Tassel had put forward his case in a clear manner. He had made a very able defence that was worthy of the best traditions of the bar.

The Recorder also admitted that there was hardly any evidence against Bruce, but the facts against Davis were of a very important description. He then pointed out that the latter had not shown how he came by the possession of the stick, and in affairs of this nature it was held that the recent possession of stolen property was evidence that either the person stole it, or he knew who did commit the theft.

Lieut. Geo. Williams gave the defendant Bruce an excellent character.

The issue was then left in the hands of the Petty Jury, and after deliberating together for a short time they found a verdict of Not Guilty against each of the prisoners.

The Court then adjourned for a short interval.

On re-assembling the three prisoners were again placed in the dock, and this time charged withsteal;ing from the person of Charles Guilliams one watch and chain, one letter case, one pocket handkerchief, one stick, and one hat, on 8th August, 1892.

Mr. Mavrojain appeared to prosecute. Mr. Tassell defended Anwyl, and Mr. Bowles the others.

In the second case Charles Guilliams said he was now living in London, at No. 12, Stamford Street. He detailed what took place on the 8th August, as already described in the previous case, to which he added that his watch and chain, and pocket book, silk handkerchief, stick and hat were taken away from him in the course of a wrestle with five or six soldiers.

John Winfelder and William Childs gave evidence. The latter stated that Bruce produced a Malacca stick on the Sunday morning in his barrack hut. He drew it from behind his cot, and asked witness the value of it. He replied “One and sixpence”.

In summing up, the Learned Recorder said he thought it was right that the jury should acquit Anwyl, and also Davis, but he again commented very strongly on the fact that Bruce was found in the possession of a part of the stolen property, and he had failed to give any reasonable explanation as to how he had come by the same.

The Recorder having summed up, the jury expressed a desire to retire to consider their verdict.

Mr. Harrison (to the Recorder): There is no room, sir, for the jury to go to.

The Recorder (to the jury): I can't help it, gentlemen. It is the fault of the Borough. I consider it is a perfect scandal and a disgrace to a town like Folkestone. I have raised my voice over and over again, and I can't help it, gentlemen. If you don't take the matter in your own hands, I can't do anything.

Mr. Major (a juror): Put us in the cells! (Laughter)

It was eventually decided to lock the jury in the Reception Room at the Police Station.

After an absence of ten minutes the jury returned, and found a verdict of Not Guilty against all the prisoners.

 

Folkestone Express 22 October 1892.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 17th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Edward Anwyl, William Bruce, and William Davis were indicted for stealing from the person of John Winfelder a watch and chain, a cigarette case, a pipe, a stick, and 15s. in money.

There was another charge of stealing from the person of Charles Guilliams, but this was dealt with separately.

Mr. Matthews prosecuted. Mr. Tassel defended Anwyl, and Mr. Bowles, by direction of the Recorder, defended Bruce and Davis.

John Winfelder, one of the prosecutors, said he was a waiter. On the 6th August (Saturday night) he was with Guilliams in the East Kent Arms. There were some soldiers there, and they left at closing time and walked up the Shorncliffe Road. When they left they had some conversation with the soldiers. They were talking “some nonsense”, and asked witness to have another drink. He said he did not mind, and they went off to get another drink. Guilliams was in front. Witness was behind with two soldiers. One was a Scotch Guard, and the other a “red”. The Scotch soldier tried to get his hand in witness's pocket, and afterwards ran to Guilliams, and some other soldiers came up from behind, knocked him down, and robbed him of his watch, stick, money, cigarette case and handkerchief. He called out twice to Guilliams for help. He identified Anwyl as the man who was walking with him with one of the Scotch soldiers, but was not sure he was in the field. None of the soldiers stayed in the road. When he met Guilliams they both went to the police station together. Next day they went together to the Camp, and he identified Anwyl, picking him out from about 30 men. He was not drunk when the offence was committed, but he had been drinking.

By Mr. Tassell: I was not drunk and not sober. I know quite well what I did. We left the West Cliff about ten o'clock. We went first to the Guildhall and had a drink, and stayed there some time. At a quarter to eleven I and Guilliams went out and went in again. We did not then stand drinks to the soldiers. Then we went to the East Kent Arms. I can swear I was not drunk, but not just as sober as I am now. The place where the robbery took place was about ten minutes' walk from the West Cliff Hotel. I did not say before the Magistrates that I saw Anwyl in the field. I said I supposed so. (The evidence was read, in which he said “I saw him in the field when I was down”.) I did not say that. The nonsense we were talking was about soldiers. I cannot remember anything Anwyl did. I could not identify any of the Scotch soldiers. Anwyl was not in the Guildhall Vaults with us.

By Mr. Bowles: Neither Bruce nor Davis were in the Guildhall with us. We stood drinks to several soldiers in the East Kent Arms. I did not see Bruce or Davis there. I identified Anwyl as being with me when walking down Shorncliffe Road, but did not see him in the field, nor do I identify Bruce or Davis as having been in the field.

By The Recorder: Anwyl was with me when the Scotch soldier tried to put his hand in my pocket. I only said to him “Leave off!”. Anwyl did not do anything.

Charles Guilliams was called, and Mr. Matthews asked the Recorder whether he should examine him.

The Recorder did not see anything material in his evidence affecting the case of Winfelder, except that he bore out a part of the statements.

Witness was then sworn, and corroborated up to a certain point Winfelder's evidence. Winfelder, he said, was very excited and very dirty after he came out of the field.

By Mr. Tassell: I went with Winfelder in his “little round”. I was not quite sober. I have not been able to identify any single soldier.

Wm. Childs, private in the West Surrey Regiment, said he went on the 8th August to a room, when Davis was in the barracks. Davis showed him the stick produced and asked him the value of it, and he told him it was worth 18d. or 2s. He said he exchanged his regimental stick for it.

By Mr. Bowles: After he asked him the value of the stick he laid it down by the side of his bed.

Wm. Stanley, caretaker of the recreation room of the Provisional Battalion, said on the 8th August he saw Davis at eight o'clock in the morning. He asked him to lend him 18d. on the stick till next day. He said it was his own stick that he had given him in exchange.

By Mr. Bowles: It is not an uncommon thing to lend money just before pay day.

Sergeant Swift said the prosecutors were very excited, and under the influence of drink, when they went to the police station on the 8th of August. He went with them to a field in Shorncliffe Road, and there found a Glengarry cap, a cuff, and some links. The same morning they all went to the Camp together, and Winfelder picked out Anwyl, who was charged with robbing Winfelder. He replied “I never laid a finger on him”. When Davis was charged with being concerned in the assault and robbery he made no reply. Bruce and Anwyl were searched. They only had 1s. 6d. and 1s. 8d. on them.

By Mr. Bowles: Bruce and Davis were not identified. Sergeant Roblow told me they were in the guardroom.

Frederick Harris, lance corporal in the West Surrey Regiment, said the three prisoners entered the Camp together at three minutes past twelve on the 8th August.

By Mr. Tassell: They all arrived about the same time. They were due in at twelve.

By Mr. Bowles: There may have been 20 others come in at the same time.

Prisoners' statements were put in and read.

Mr. Matthews contended that the jury would consider that the men were guilty at any rate of taking part in the robbery.

The Recorder asked what the evidence against Bruce was.

Mr. Matthews said they were out together.

Mr. Bowles emphasised the Recorder's view.

Mr. Price, a juryman, asked if the cap found in the field could be identified as belonging to either of the prisoners.

The Colour Sergeant was re-called, and said he did not know who the cap belonged to. A man might have two or three. There was no number on the cap, which had been cut down. They had tried to find out who it belonged to, and could not. No Glengarry caps were missing among the men in the guardroom.

Mr. Price: Did the three men return with their caps on?

Harris was re-called, and said they did.

Mr. Tassell said he was extremely obliged to the jury for the manner in which they had brought out the facts of the cap. He then addressed the jury on behalf of Anwyl, and said if it had not been for the fact that he was picked out by Winfelder there would not have been a scrap of evidence against him, and he urged that it was a mistake altogether, and there was no value whatever in the identification. He also referred to the fact that Winfelder, two hours and a half after the public houses were shut up was still, according to Sergeant Swift's evidence, under the influence of drink. He remembered very little, except the identification, which was quite valueless. Even if he did see him, his evidence did not connect Anwyl in any way into the robbery, and from the very first moment he had told one consistent story.

Mr. Bowles addressed the jury on behalf of Bruce, first contending there was no evidence against him. In dealing with the charge against Davis and his dealing with the stick, he urged that his explanation was a very reasonable one, namely that he exchanged his regimental cane for it.

The Recorder said of course one was not inclined to have very much sympathy with people like the prosecutors, going about on a Saturday night spending their wages in public houses. But still the jury had a duty to perform. He scanned the evidence, and said in regard to Anwyl he had lost nothing at the hands of his counsel, and that he had been defended in a manner worthy of the best traditions of the bar, and he congratulated him on the able defence he had made. The evidence against Bruce, he said, was very slight indeed, but in the case of Davis, he said there was evidence of a very important nature. The possession of articles recently stolen had been held to be strong evidence of a guilty knowledge, and Davis was found within a few hours of the stick being stolen trying to dispose of it, and when charged by Swift with stealing a watch and chain, and a walking stick, he made no reply. It was undoubtedly a deplorable state of things that two men in a state of semi-drunkenness should be set upon by soldiers in such a manner, but it was for the jury to say whether either of the men were guilty of stealing or receiving the property stolen.

George Willes, Lieutenant of the 3rd Royal Berkshire Regiment, said Bruce bore a good character in the regiment.

The jury asked to be allowed to retire, and the Recorder was about to adjourn the Court for half an hour, when the jury consulted in the box for a moment, and gave a verdict of Not Guilty.

The Recorder thought the other indictment ought to be proceeded with.

After the adjournment the prisoners were indicted for assaulting and robbing Charles Guilliams. Mr. Mavro-Jain prosecuted, and Mr. Tassell and Mr. Bowles defended the prisoners as in the first case.

Charles Guilliams gave evidence. He said he was out of employment, and lived at 112, Stanford Street, London.

The evidence was practically the same as in the first case.

At the close of the case, the prosecuting counsel said the evidence against Anwyl was very slight. Against Bruce it was stronger, because he was found dealing with a stolen stick, and it was held that that constituted at any rate a knowledge that it was stolen property.

Mr. Tassell submitted that there was no evidence against Anwyl at all, but the Recorder declined to withdraw the case from the jury. Mr. Tassell then said it was especially hard that Anwyl should have to undergo a second trial, when there was absolutely no evidence against him whatever. He had told a simple, straightforward tale, which one jury believed, and acquitted him, and he asked that jury to do the same.

Mr. Bowles contended there was not a single bit of evidence against Davis, and, as regarded Bruce and the stick, the story he told as to finding it was perfectly probable. It might be a foolish thing to do, but it was not an act that ought to convict him of being connected with the robbery.

The Recorder then summed up. He said the evidence as to Anwyl and Davis was of a flimsy character, and he thought that those two should be acquitted. But because one jury acquitted Bruce, it was not to say that another should do so. There was evidence against him of a very cogent nature. Judges had said, and he had said over and over again that when people were found in possession of goods recently stolen, it was stong evidence that they either stole them, or knew them to be stolen, and in such a case the onus was shifted – it was for him to show that he came by them honestly. He summed up strongly against Bruce, chiefly on the ground of the inconsistency of the statements he made. He added further, that if people picked up property and dealt with it it was as much larceny as anything else.

The jury retired, and on their return into Court gave a verdict of acquittal in the case of all three prisoners.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 October 1892.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 17th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

William Bruce, 26, Edward Anwyl, 25, and William Davis, 25, three soldiers of the West Surrey Battalion, were charged with stealing from the person of John Winfelder a watch and chain, a cigarette case, a pipe and stick, and 15s.; also wit stealing from Charles Guilliams a watch and chain, a letter case, a pocket handkerchief, a stick and hat, on the same date, each robbery being accompanied with violence.

Mr. Matthew prosecuted in the first case, and Mr. Mavrojani in the second. Mr. A.J. Tassell (instructed by Mr. R.M. Mercer, of Canterbury) defended Anwyl, and Mr. Bowles, at the request of the Recorder, defended the other two.

On the 8th of August the prosecutors had been drinking at various public houses standing treat to soldiers. On leaving they were accompanied by the prisoners and others. They were then in a condition which Mr. Tassell described as “squiffy”, but upon the Recorder expressing his ignorance of the word, he substituted the expression “muddled”. After going some distance on the Shorncliffe Road they were knocked down and robbed by the soldiers. The evidence as to the prisoners having taken part in the robbery was not very clear, but they were afterwards found dealing with the sticks.

In summing up, alluding to Anwyl's case, the Recorder said he had lost nothing by the way in which he had been defended. His Counsel (Mr. Tassell) had put forward the defence in an able and clear manner, worthy of the best traditions of the Bar, and he congratulated him upon it.

Lieut. Willes, 3d Royal Berkshire, gave Bruce a good character.

The jury found the prisoners Not Guilty in the first case.

The second charge was heard before a fresh jury. The Recorder, in summing up, said he thought it right to advise them that they should acquit Anwyl and Davis. He dissented from the proposition that because one jury had acquitted a man a second should do the same, and in the case of Bruce he thought there were cogent circumstances in the case against him.

The jury, however, eventually followed the example of their predecessors in the box and acquitted all three prisoners.

 

Sandgate Weekly News 29 August 1896.

Local News.

As the “Sporting Times” was proceding through Lyminge on the road from Canterbury to Folkestone on Wednesday the horses, frightened at a traction engine, suddenly bolted. Mr. J.P. Scott, the owner and driver, was thrown into the road and slightly injured. Subsequently the coach collided with a carriage in which were two ladies. The occupants were thrown out, but met with little injury. The horses were eventually brought to a standstill by one of the passengers. It appears that the main billet broke, causing the leaders to bolt.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 September 1896.

Local News.

Of late there have been some unfortunate accidents to the well-known Sporting Times coach, which has been run for several seasons between Folkestone and Canterbury by our enterprising and respected townsman, Mr. J.P. Scott, of the East Kent Arms Hotel, 12, Sandgate Road.

On Wednesday an exciting event occurred at Barton Fields, near Canterbury, on the outward journey from Folkestone. The two leaders became frightened at something on the road, and swerving suddenly, they caused the coach to mount the raised footpath. The leaders managed to break away, and made off towards Canterbury, colliding with a horse and trap. The wheel horses of the coach were, however, held under control, and danger was thus averted.

Yesterday (Friday) evening alarming rumours reached Folkestone to the effect that the Sporting Times had met with a terrible accident that afternoon in the immediate vicinity of Barham. It was at first stated that the coach had been upset by an obstacle that was lying unperceived on the road, and that Mr. Scott had been very seriously injured. The apprehensions thus entertained were enhanced by the later intelligence that Mrs. Scott and daughter had set out for Barham in a special conveyance, taking with them a bed and other comforts for the husband. Under these alarming circumstances it was determined at the Herald office to despatch a reporter specially to Barham, and by the next available train on the Elham Valley Railway, a member of our permanent staff, on whose discretion the fullest reliance could be placed, proceeded to that village, taking his cycle with him so as to be enabled to place a full report of the facts before our readers in case of any failure to secure railway or telegraphic communication.

Interview with Passengers.

I arrived at Barham at 8.42 p.m. by train, and set to work to find out the real facts of the unfortunate occurrence. Needless to state I found the accident was the sole topic of conversation. Mr. Scott, I am sorry to hear, has sustained serious injuries, not only to the back of his head, but also to the side of his face. The unfortunate whip is well cared for at the Red House (now in the occupation of Mrs. Yorke) which is near the scene of the accident. The greatest sympathy is expressed for the unfortunate gentleman, who, it is no exaggeration to state, is beloved by all the countryside. I was fortunate enough, after a little trouble, to find an eye-witness of the accident. His name is Alfred Cox, by trade a bricklayer, and the substance of his statement is that as he was going to work he saw the Sporting Times descending the incline near the Woodman's Arms. It was going at a very steady pace, but on rounding the curve near the Parsonage Bridge, which crosses a dry watercourse, he saw the coach suddenly swerve towards the bank, and running against a stump of wood, it overturned in an instant. Continuing his clear statement, Mr. Cox said: I at once ran to Mr. Scott. His face was covered in blood, and the whole weight of the rear of the coach appeared to be weighing on his chest. I whistled to some men for assistance, and this being forthcoming we rescued Mr. Scott from his perilous position. My mate (a bricklayer), with great presence of mind, ran to the horses' heads, and probably thus prevented further disaster. The other passengers, Miss Mary Young, Mr. Treloar, and Mr. Arthur Katanakis, appeared to have fallen luckily, for they escaped unhurt. I must say the lady was full of nerve and pluck. She picked herself up at once and ran to Mr. Scott's assistance. We procured two hurdles and cushions, laid the whip upon them, and gently conveyed him to the Red House. In the meantime, Police Constable Skinner, acting upon his own initiative, sent off a telegram to a medical gentleman at Bridge. The doctor arrived on the scene promptly, and was joined by his resident colleague in the village. It was God's own mercy the whole of the passengers were not killed.

Before leaving Barham, I learned that Mr. Scott, although conscious, is very low, and as yet it has been found impossible to discover the full extent of his injuries, some of which it is feared are internal. Hearing that some of the passengers were at Elham, I mounted my cycle, and was soon trundling thither over the greasy roads and through the dark lanes. Here I was fortunate to find both Miss Mary Young, the well-known Kentish vocalist, and Mr. Treloar. The former readily gave me her experiences. She said “We were travelling so gently. I could not make it out. I was laughing and and joking one moment, and in another sitting in the road. Providentially, I escaped unhurt. The coach swerved, tumbled over, and that's all I can remember”. Hearing I had just come from Barham, Miss Young asked most earnestly if I could give her any tidings of Mr. Scott. I then found out Mr. Treloar. He certainly did not appear as though he had gone through such an exciting episode. Sitting in an armchair and puffing at his briar, he said “Yes, I'll tell you all I know about it. The coach was going remarkably steady at the time of the accident. It swerved and was over before “Jack Robinson” could be uttered. I was unhurt, and my friend, Mr. Katanakis, also escaped. To our horror, Mr. Scott was under the coach, covered in blood. It was a thrilling experience for us all. We are deeply grieved for our old friend”. Mr. Treloar also paid a high tribute to Miss Young for her plucky behaviour and cool-headedness. After exchanging a few compliments, and congratulating both the lady and gentleman on their providential escape, I soon covered the remaining nine miles, and wrote out in the Herald office the facts here recorded.

 

Folkestone Programme 21 September 1896.

We regret to announce this morning that the accident with which the Sporting Times met on Friday has resulted in the death of Mr. J.P. Scott, the proprietor.

The Sporting Times was the coach running between Folkestone and Canterbury and vice versa, and was the property of Mr. Scott, of the East Kent Arms, who for years has driven himself. Mr. Scott was one of the best whips in the country, and it may be said that until a few weeks ago he never met with a single accident, so careful a driver was he. The manipulation of his four-in-hand team was to him a matter quite as simple as the driving of an ordinary horse by one of the licensed hackney carriage drivers.

It may be mentioned that a few years ago Mr. Scott drove from Folkestone to London and back again in less than twelve hours, and this record has never been broken. Unfortunately the coach this season has met with two or three accidents. A few weeks ago the leaders shied at something in the road near Lyminge, but with this exception nothing else occurred. On Wednesday, when entering Canterbury the leaders swerved and broke away, but were soon secured.

On Friday, as the coach was going into Canterbury, another accident occurred. Miss Young, at present residing at Elham, Mr. Treloar, Mr. Katinakis, together with the Guard, were with Mr. Scott. The horses were going at a moderate pace, when near Barham, and suddenly the coach overturned, throwing the occupants over a fence to the ground. It was miraculous that none of the passengers received any injury, but Mr. Scott was found to be lying under the coach. Assistance was immediately secured, and the unfortunate gentleman was conceyed to the Rd House, Barham (in the occupation of Mrs. Yorke), medical aid being summoned from all parts, and Mrs. Scott fetched from Folkestone.

The extent of the injuries Mr. Scott received were not ascertained until the following day, and on Saturday afternoon a telegram was received intimating that two broken ribs had been bound up, and that the injuries to his head were very serious. The next information that reached Folkestone was the announcement that Mr. Scott died yesterday (Sunday) afternoon at 4.20. There can be no doubt but death was due to some internal injuries, but at the inquest these may be explained by the medical men.

In Folkestone and Canterbury the news of Mr. Scott's death was received with the deepest regret, for the deceased was a gentleman known to almost everyone, and enjoyed the friendship of a large circle of friends. It was his custom at the commencement of each coaching season to take the Mayor and members of the Town Council of Folkestone to Canterbury, and at his own expense he entertained those gentlemen to luncheon, together with the Mayor and Corporation of the cathedral city. Towards all charitable objects he was always the first to contribute. Though proprietor of the East Kent Arms Hotel, Mr. Scott was a lifelong abstainer, and some of his dearest friends have been members of the Temperance party. The body of the deceased gentleman will be removed to Folkestone this (Monday) evening.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 23 September 1896.

Local News.

Travellers by the Sporting Times coach on Wednesday had an exciting experience. The journey from Folkestone had been satisfactorily accomplished as far as the entrance to Canterbury, and the team were trotting down the New Road in capital form, when, and unexpectedly, the leaders, scenting something objectionable in the road, swerved sharply to the right and ran some of the wheels of the coach on to the pavement. The pathway at this point is about six inches higher than the level of the road, but, as it happened, the front wheels, or one of them, ran up an approach spanning the water table. The hind wheels, however, came sharply into collision with the edge of the pavement. In the plunging which ensued, Mr. Scott coolly held on, and the leaders broke away. The wheelers struggled on a few paces until a lamppost barred further progress, and, with the help of a Corporation roadman, they were then secured. Naturally the accident greatly alarmed the passengers, but they were induced to keep their seats until all danger was past, and the majority of them then proceeded on to the Rose Hotel with two horses. The leaders, still coupled together, had, meanwhile, proceeded down the main street of the city at a spanking pace. It is the opinion of some that had they been unchecked they would probably have found the way to their usual place of stay – the Rose Hotel stables. As a matter of fact, however, several unsuccessful attempts were made to intimidate them, with the result that they went as far as the cab stand outside St. Mary Bredman's Church, and there ran into a horse and cab belonging to a licensed hackney carriage driver named Harding. Harding saw the approaching danger, and as the horses showed a tendency to take to the pavement, attempted to draw out. The runaways, however, had two minds on the subject, and while one took the inside berth and toppled Harding over in an unpleasantly unceremonious manner, the other came into collision with his horse. The cab also sustained slight damage, but this contretemps witnessed the close of the incident, as P.C. Hawkes was able promptly to seize the runaways, and with assistance, to ensure their safekeeping.

On Friday again, it is our misfortune to have to record another accident to the coach, and as a result of this we deeply regret to announce the death of Mr. Scott, the proprietor. Mr. Scott was driving towards Canterbury, and was accompanied on the coach by Mr. A. Katinakis, his son-in-law, who occupied a box seat, and Miss Mary Young, Mr. R. Treloar, and the guard who always accompanies the coach. They were just leading into Barham and had passed the Woodman's Arms where there is a nasty curve in the roadway. At this curve it seems that the stump of an old tree projects about a foot from the hedge, and in turning the corner at a gentle pace the wheels of the coach caught the stump, and the vehicle overturned almost instantly. The whole of the occupants were thrown to the ground, and the first to recover from this sudden and unexpected position was Miss Young, who providentially escaped without any injury whatever. With womanly sympathy she approached Mr. Scott, who was underneath the coach, but, with that characteristic which always marked him as a driver, he advised the lady to be careful lest she should be in any way hurt. The other occupants escaped also with the exception of one or two scratches.

Mr. Scott presented a pitiable appearance, his face and head being covered with blood, and while he was being removed he said “My back is broken”. Medical assistance was at once summoned, and, in the meantime, the injured gentleman was removed to the Red House on a hurdle. He was bleeding profusely from a wound on the back of the head, but though so seriously injured he was quite conscious of all that was going on around him. He called Miss Young and asked her whether any of the passengers were hurt, whether the horses were hurt, or whether the coach was in any way damaged. Being assured that all these were uninjured he gave directions to his son-in-law as to how the horses were to be taken in turn to Folkestone, and other directions with regard to private matters.

In the meantime, Mrs. Scott and her daughter were summoned, and the medical gentlemen who had arrived dressed the wounds as far as possible, and did everything that skill could commend. On Saturday afternoon Mrs. Scott telegraphed to a lady friend in Folkestone intimating that two broken ribs had been bound up, but that the injuries to the head were very severe indeed. Some hopes were then entertained that the injuries were not so bad, but that recovery in time was possible, but Sunday proved otherwise, and poor Mr. Scott died about half past four in the afternoon. Mr. Scott was 54 years of age.

The news of his demise was received with the greatest regret, for Mr. Scott was a gentleman known to almost all in the town, and had many friends throughout the County of Kent and beyond it. As a whip he had no comparison, and some of his four-in-hand drives are still records that have not been beaten. He was careful at all times and won the admiration of hundreds of travellers he had at one time or another driven from Folkestone to Canterbury and vice versa. As host of the East Kent Arms he was an exemplary landlord, a total abstainer throughout his life, yet one of the cheeriest of men. None regretted more than he the tendency towards inebriety amongst certain classes he had met, and there are many today ready to acknowledge that his advice has been their means of salvation. Some of his dearest friends were members of the Temperance party, but with all classes of society he was a man highly respected. Though he took but little interest in public affairs, he was ever the first to take an active part in any charitable work, and if he could not do much he gave liberally of his substance. It was his custom at the commencement of the coaching season to take the Mayor of Folkestone and the members of the Corporation to Canterbury, and he always arranged that the Mayor of that city and the Corporation should meet their Folkestone friends. Mr. Scott entertained these gentlemen always right royally, and nothing gave him greater delight than to gather his friends together for the purpose of spending a recreative hour. Alas!, how suddenly a single turn of the wheel of life causes a blank in associations of a town or district.

On Monday, Mr. Mercer, the East Kent Coroner, held an inquest at Canterbury, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned by the jury, who desired also that their expressions of deep sympathy should be conveyed to the family of the deceased gentleman. The body of deceased was removed the same evening to Folkestone. The funeral will take place tomorrow at Folkestone Cemetery, and no doubt will be attended by a very large number of persons.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 September 1896.

Local News.

An accident, the third within a brief period, happened on Friday to the four-horse coach which plies daily between Folkestone and Canterbury. Up to last year the route was by way of Denton, but it has now been changed for the more picturesque but also more difficult country through Barham. Elham was on Friday reached without incident, and there the horses were changed. On emerging from Derringstone Street, the road turns sharply to the left for a short distance of 50 yards, and then again to the right. The first of these curves were safely passed, but, whether from the horses shying, or from some other cause, the near wheels almost immediately afterwards fouled the hedge, and, coming in contact with the stump of an alder tree, the coach was thrown over on it's side. Fortunately, the weather not being good, the passengers were few, there being only five persons on the coach in addition to Mr. Scott, the driver and proprietor. All the passengers escaped without injury, but Mr. Scott fell under the coach, and when extricated was found to have sustained serious injury to the back of the head and spine. He was removed upon a stretcher of hurdles to the Red House, Barham, and medical aid summoned. Mr. Scott, however, died on Sunday afternoon. The intelligence has been received with manifestations of deep regret, for the popular whip was known throughout the whole of East Kent, and his sterling qualities were generally appreciated. Mr. Scott was the son of Mr. Henry Scott, who formerly had the business in Ashford now in the hands of Mr. Henry Headley, and was afterwards a grocer at Hythe. For some time he carried on the business of a job master etc., leaving the Walnut Tree posting establishment, which was afterwards bought by the Hythe and Sandgate Omnibus Company. Mr. Scott was always wonderfully fond of horses, and he received a course of instruction in taming from the famous Rarey at the Agricultural Hall, London, some years ago. Since giving up the Hythe business, Mr. Scott devoted his attention to his Folkestone business, at the East Kent Arms, a well known house of resort, especially for the sporting fraternity. His death will be deplored by a very wide circle of friends.

The East Kent Coroner (Mr. R.M. Mercer) held an inquest on the body at the Red House, Barham, on Monday afternoon.

Arthur Katinakis, of 8, Kingsnorth Gardens, Folkestone, deposed that the deceased, John Paul Scott, who was his father-in-law, was aged 54. He was a job master, and owner and driver of the coach which ran between Folkestone and Canterbury. Deceased drove the coach on Friday morning, and witness sat on the box seat next to him. When at the bottom of the hill near the Red House, the leaders shied at some scrapings in the road, and the splinter bar cannoned against the stump of an alder tree in the hedge, which swung the coach. At the moment the coach was in its extreme swing the wheel ran up the base of the stump, and the coach went over on it's off side. Witness fell clear right of deceased, who was struck by the coach and dragged three yards. Witness got up at once and got deceased from under the coach, he being confined in the space between the front and next seat. He was perfectly conscious, and complained of pain in his back.

Mr. Charles Henry Schon, surgeon, of Bridge, deposed that deceased sustained serious injury to the spine, paralysis of the legs, and two fractured ribs on the left side. His injuries were very serious. He had a bad wound at the back of the scalp, and he was in a state of collapse, from which he never recovered. He died from shock through the severe injuries which he received.

The jury at once returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

A juror asked whether it would be possible to get the County Council to widen the road just there.

The Coroner feared not. It was not dangerous for ordinary carriages, though it was for great coaches. He was afraid the County Council would not make the road wider for them.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1896.

Local News.

We regret to have to record the death of Mr. John Paul Scott, of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, Folkestone, proprietor and whip of the Sporting Time coach, running between Folkestone and Canterbury. Within the past few weeks two slight accidents had happened, both owing to the nervousness of the leaders of the team, and there is no doubt that the third, which had such a sad termination, was due to the same cause. The story told at the inquest on Monday by Mr. Katanakis, deceased's son-in-law, who was on the box with him at time of the accident, was so straight that the Coroner did not deem it necessary to call any further witnesses as to the occurrence.

The scene of the accident is within a few hundred yards of Barham Station, and from the elevation on which the station stands it can be plainly seen. After passing through South Barham the road descends, and at the foot of the hill, just after passing the Red House, the residence of Mrs. Yorke, turns sharply to the left, curves slightly, and then turns sharply to the right and on to North Barham. On Friday night, just after passing the Red House, and while in the narrow neck slightly on the curve, the leaders shied, the splinter bar struck the stump of a little gnarled oak tree, not bigger than one's arm, which forms part of the hedge, twisted the wheel in slightly, and over went the vehicle, Mr. Scott, who was of course driving, being caught and dragged about three yards, the three passengers, Mr. Katinakis, another gentleman, and Miss Young, happily escaping unhurt. The guard also escaped. The horses, after the accident, remained perfectly quiet. Mr. Scott was carried to the Red House, and Dr. Schon was sent for and attended him, but his injuries were so severe that he died, as we have said, on Sunday afternoon about four.

The Inquest.

Mr. Coroner Mercer held an inquest at the Red House on Monday afternoon, when the following evidence was given:-

Arthur Katinakis, living at 8, Kingsnorth Gardens, Folkestone, said: I am son-in-law of the deceased. His name was John Paul Scott, and his age was 54. He was a job master, and owner and driver of the coach from Folkestone to Canterbury. I was on the coach with him on Friday. He was driving, and I was sitting on the box seat. He always drove this was. We arrived here about 12.30. At the bottom of this hill the road turns into a curve. We were in the curve, which is on the level, when the leaders shied at some scrapings in the road. Men had been cutting the bank. It being a narrow road, we had of course to keep very close to the near side. When the leaders shied, our splinter bar, or rather the roller bolt of the splinter bar, cannoned against the stump of a tree in the hedge, which swung the coach. At the same instant that the coach was at the extreme swing, our wheel ran up about three inches. The box of the axle just scraped, but that did not turn us over. It turned our wheel towards the stump and the coach went over into the road. There was just room for me on the road between the coach and the hedge. I was thrown further than Mr. Scott. He was holding the reins and did not have such an impetus as I did, and I fell clear. We can't say for certain where he fell exactly. All we know is that he was struck by the coach and dragged three yards. The horses only moved three yards in the interval while I was lying in the road. I was not insensible and got up at once. Scott was caught by the coach, but it was not on him. He was at the hind part of the coach when we took him up, between the seats on the top. No part of the coach rested on him then. He had one arm under the rail and was not crushed. He was perfectly conscious when we got him out, and complained of his back. He was brought to this house, and died at 4.20 on Sunday afternoon.

Dr. Charles Scon, of Bridge, said: I was called to attend the deceased, and saw him about three quarters of an hour after the accident. He was then in this house. He was suffering from serious injury to the spine, with paralysis of both legs, the fracture of two ribs on the left side, and a wound in the wall of the chest, caused by the fractured ribs. His injuries were very bad indeed. The arms were not injured, but he had a very bad scalp wound on the back of the head. His hat had not saved him at all apparently. He was in a state of collapse from which he really never recovered, and died from shock.

The Coroner: I suppose he was too much collapsed for you to do anything for him? – Yes. We could not examine him. The broken ribs were evident, and the wound on the head, but when we attempted to turn him over, his suffering was so great that we had to desist. He was brought to this house on a hurdle, I believe. He died from shock from his severe injuries.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

A juror asked whether it would be possible to get the County Council to widen the road just there.

The Coroner feared not. It was not dangerous for ordinary carriages, though it was for great coaches. He was afraid the County Council would not make the road wider for them.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 September 1896.

Editorial.

In our last issue we fully reported the terrible accident which occurred at Barham to the Sporting Times Coach, of which our townsman, Mr. J.P. Scott, was at once the driver and proprietor. He has succumbed to his injuries, and the announcement of his death has come as a shock to a large circle of his friends, admirers, and acquaintances. Elsewhere we devote a considerable portion of our space to a reviw of his many excellent qualities of head and heart. In this brief notice, however, we would emphasise the benefits he has conferred upon Folkestone by maintaining the Sporting Times and a large stud of horses at his own expense, and for the gratification of that instinct of sport which might be regarded as the dominant element in his character. Mr. Scott was, essentially, a sportsman of the genuine British type, and as such his loss is regretted by hosts of friends, not only in this neighbourhood but in remote parts, both at home and abroad. The Folkestone Coach, as it has been popularly termed, and as it has been known in the Elham Valley, has been instrumental in opening up the beauties of local scenery to a long succession of summer visitors. In keeping this coach upon the road, Mr. Scott was promoting not only his own interest but also the prosperity of the town with which his fortunes have been so long and so honourably identified. He was a believer in the development of Folkestone, and he did a great deal to attract here the best class of visitors. It is generally known that the passenger traffic by the coach was never remunerative, but this did not deter the proprietor from indulging in his sporting proclivities. In this respect alone, apart from his many excellent qualities, he deserved the esteem in which he was held, and there is not a lover of sport in this town or district who does not mourn the untimely death of one who was always consistent in its patronage and pursuit. Folkestone is very much the poorer for his loss, and it is a loss which it will be difficult to replace. We only hope that the sympathies of the whole community, which have gone out unstintedly to the widow and family of the deceased, may help to assuage in some measure the poignancy of the anguish into which they have been so cruelly and suddenly plunged.

Local News.

A feeling of gloom settled over Folkestone on Sunday evening when it became known that the famous Whip had breathed his last at the Red House, Barham. The story of the sad accident has already been told in these columns, and the evidence adduced at the inquest removes any doubt as to its cause. Thus at the comparatively early age of 54 there has passed away one whom we could ill afford to spare – an altogether interesting personality.

The Hythe correspondent of the Herald, in his appreciative notice of deceased's connection with the Cinque Ports town, has left little to be said in that respect, and I will therefore cursorily glance at deceased's Folkestone connection. It was after he had ceased to take any part in the Folkestone – Hythe omnibus service that Mr. Scott settled down and made his home at the East Kent. From the date of his retirement from this road, however, his passion for the noble equine race never forsook him. To handle the ribbons was his chief delight. For a time, perhaps, “Scottie” (as he was popularly called), would remain quiescent, but the old life was too much for him, and he would become restive and yearn for the companionship of his horses.

So it was that the Sporting Times became the outcome of all this. No need to write here of this institution, which now, alas, is a thing of the past. We shall ever remember the spanking teams of well-groomed animals, the appointments of the coach, and above all the manifest pride of the owner and Whip. The ancient saying that “A prophet hath no honour in his own country” did not apply here, for it was the almost universal opinion that a more skilful whip had never tooled a team. One of the greatest living equine artists – Mr. John Sturgess – whose beautiful delineations of horses have delighted us these many years in the Illustrated and Sporting and Dramatic News, has never wearied of paying the highest tribute to “Scottie's” skill and management of horses. And the thousands, comprising all classes of society, who have sat behind him, whether on the Hythe buses or the Canterbury coach, will have no difficulty in coming to the conclusion that a great whip has gone forever. The villagers in the peaceful Elham Valley; the schoolchildren who daily welcomed the coach with their flowers; the labourers in the fields – all these will miss our old friend, and the sound of the “yard of tin”.

“Scottie” combined in himself, too, distinguishing features. He was a true sportsman, a licensed victualler, and a rigid teetotaller of lifelong habit, and it is quite as well to emphasise this latter fact. His cheerful animal spirits on one occasion led him into trouble, but at the expense of those who sought to charge him with intemperance. It was even given in evidence that he with others was “elevated” with something stronger than water, but our friend was able to prove conclusively and successfully that such was not the case – that he had never tasted strong drink, and it is reported that, turning on the witness with dramatic effect, he said to the Magistrates, “This, gentlemen, is the kind of witness that would swear away a man's life”.

Year after year in his cosy smoking room, Scottie would sit in the armchair of an evening with his pint, book, and pint of cocoa, and his friends might do as they liked. That was his choice. Surrounded with the best of liquor, tempted by all his friends and acquaintances to join them in the sparkling cup, he stood his ground, and preferred to stick to his own principles.

Think of his dogged moral courage, and one cannot but admire the man. Scottie scorned all kinds of cant and humbug, and it can be truly said of him he never feared the face of man. He possessed one of the kindest hearts, and did a deal of good, not only openly but by stealth. Never did a deserving appeal come his way without his assistance being forthcoming. The latter years of his life were not unclouded. His hope and pride – his only son, Walter – died a year or two ago under very sad circumstances. Just as the youth was entering on manhood the seeds of that fell disease – consumption - manifested themselves, and the boy was sent for a tour of America in the hope that the sea voyage and the change might restore him. But the news was flashed across the Atlantic that the lad had died alone in a strange town in a strange land. This young fellow possessed one of the sweetest and gentlest of dispositions. I think one of the most touching letters I have ever read was received by Mr. Scott from a stranger out in America, who had felt it his duty to write to the lad's parents, describing the decease and burial of the boy, also enclosing flowers that were growing on the grave. It was such a letter that emphasised “That touch of nature that makes the whole world kin”. And then a bright little girl – a perfect ray of sunlight – was taken from him. These bereavements were as the iron entering his soul. He sought solace, and obtained it in the circle of his family, but there was the blank “the world could never fill”. If anything could lift the cloud from him it was coaching, and he has been heard to declare that he wished to die with the reins in his hand. His desire has almost been fulfilled to the letter, and it is a comfort and consolation to the bereaved ones that although his sufferings were great, they were not prolonged.

Scottie was essentially a man. “Rough Diamond” he might be called, yet in that ruggedness there glittered the precious article. We mourn his tragic death and revere his memory. As a tender husband, a good father, a true and constant friend, we all mourn the loss, and shall remember him, and keep his memory green with fond affection.

His employees, too, have lost a good master, and the guard Jones will no doubt re-echo the sentiments expressed by Walter Godden (to whom apologies), who acted in a similar capacity to the late celebrated James Selby:

“The last ride that our old friend had was on the (Barham) road,

Whilst he with favourite anecdote amused his sporting load;

But now he's left us all to mourn for him, so kind and true,

Respected both by rich and poor, in fact by all he knew.

 

Ne'er shall I ride another stage with him I loved so well,

Or tootle on his favourite horn the tunes to me he'd tell;

For now he's gone to realms above, all pleasure here is marred,

A good old master and a friend was he to me, his Guard.”

 

To the writer of this notice, Scottie for over a generation was more than an acquaintance. The drives I have enjoyed with him were amongst my pleasantest experiences. One by one the old friends fall as “the leaf in autumn weather”, and every year the world appears to be more and more “like some banquet hall deserted”. But memory is left to us, and in that stronghold we will fondly treasure our recollections.

A Tribute From Hythe.

The Herald's report to our former townsman, Mr. J.P. Scott, aroused much sympathetic feeling in the hearts of many old acquaintances, and this was much intensified when the news came on Sunday that he had passed away. It will be remembered that Hythe has an earlier claim to him as a townsman than Folkestone, for until he removed to the latter town he lived and worked amongst us and made many friends. “Rarey”, as his friends called him, was endowed with a wonderful degree of tact and skill in the management of horses, and his care for them approached that begotten by love. Indeed, it might rightly be said that he loved his cattle. Time and again I have seen him win over a restive animal by his gentle manner when nothing could be done with it by a circle of attendants. His voice and style seemed to bring the erratic one into subjection when no others could manage it. His feelings were so kindly developed towards his equine family that on more than one occasion on which he had the misfortune to lose an animal, I have seen the tears flow down his cheeks, so tender was his regard for his stud, and his grief at its circle being broken. Rarey was fond of humour, and frequently shared hilarity with those surrounding him, when the circumstances permitted the indulgence. I remember one occasion, years ago, when he was driving his 'bus between Hythe and Folkestone, on which his merriment was the means of his being libelled. A lady passenger, sensitive no doubt as to her safety, insisted upon getting out of his 'bus, and protested loudly that its driver was drunk and not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility. Those who knew the habits and behaviour of Mr. Scott, however, were amused, knowing as they did that “J.P.” was a lifelong total abstainer from intoxicating drinks, so that the charge of drunkenness was as amusing as it was unfounded.

“J.P.” had very strict ideas upon the subject of gallantry as it should be shown by gentlemen to the other sex. More than once I have heard him subject a male rider inside his bus to severe castigation for insisting on retaining an inside seat, whilst a lady had to go outside. This, by the way, was in the old days of the knife-board seats on the top of a bus, when having to mount there was almost an indignity to a lady. Such instances always riled the spirit of propriety possessed by “J.P.”, who in turn always expressed himself in very clear terms to the individual whose conduct prompted it. As a whip, there was hardly a finer living. This subject, however, I will leave to those who have a closer technical knowledge of his capabilities. Mr. Scott was one of a family of two sons, and until a short time back his aged parents lived amongst us. His brother, being in America, could not give personal attention to the old people, but “J.P.” appeared to do his best to do duty for both, for almost daily in the latter part of his mother's life he could be seen driving to Hythe to visit her at “The Whim”.

The Inquest.

Mr. R.M. Mercer (the East Kent Coroner) held an inquest on Monday afternoon at the Red House, Barham, on the unfortunate Whip.

Arthur Katinakis, of 8, Kingsnorth Gardens, Folkestone, deposed he was son-in-law to the deceased. Mr. Scott was 54 years of age, and was a jobmaster and driver of the Sporting Times, which ran between Folkestone and Canterbury. Witness was on the coach at the time of the accident on Friday morning, and was sitting in the box close to the deceased. Witness had frequently come that way before on the coach. At about 12.30 they reached the bottom of the hill on which the accident occurred. At this point the road turns a corner, and as they were rounding it the leaders shied at some scrapings in the road. Being narrow, of course they had to keep fairly close to the near side of the road. When the leaders shied, the roller bolt on the splinter bar cannoned against the stump of an old elder tree in the hedge, which swung the coach at the moment that it was at its extreme, some three inches into the hedge, causing the wheel to be raised that amount onto the stump. The coach was turned over on its offside into the road, only just leaving room for witness to get between the coach and the opposite hedge. Deceased was holding the reins and he did not fall clear of the coach as the others did, and was struck violently by the vehicle, and dragged along with it about three yards. They could not see where he was struck until they got him out. Witness got up at once and went to deceased's assistance. He was jammed up in the back seats, owing to the horses having moved forward whilst he was on the ground. No part of the coach rested upon him, but during the whole of the time one of his arms was under the rail of the back seats. Deceased was quite conscious when they got him out, but complained of his back being hurt. He was conveyed to the Red House, and died there on Sunday afternoon at 4.20.

Charles Henry Schon deposed that he was a surgeon residing at Bridge. He had been in attendance on deceased since the accident till his death. He first saw him about three quarters of an hour after the accident at that house. He was suffering from serious injuries to his spine, paralysis of both legs, and fractured ribs of the left side. He also suffered from a wound to the chest wall caused by the fractured ribs. His injuries were very bad indeed. His arms were not injured, but he had a very bad wound at the back of the skull. He was in a state of great collapse, from which he never really recovered, dying from the shock. He would not permit any accurate examination as he was in such pain. He was brought up to the house on a hurdle.

The jury, after consultation, returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Sandgate Weekly News 26 September 1896.

Local News.

Another accident, the third within a fortnight, occurred to the well-known “Sporting Times” coach on Friday, unfortunately resulting in the death of the well-known proprietor and whip of the coach, Mr. J.P. Scott. The coach was being driven from Folkestone to Canterbury, and when near Barham, in a narrow road, owing to one of the leading horses shying, ran into the bank and was overturned. There were only five persons on the coach at the time, and these all escaped uninjured except Mr. Scott, who was struck violently by the coach and was dragged along a few yards. He was conveyed on a stretcher to the Red House at Barham, and medical aid summoned. It was at once apparent that Mr. Scott was in great pain, but it was impossible to make a thorough examination of his injuries until Saturday, when it was found that his injuries were very bad indeed, his spine was injured and his ribs fractured; there was also a bad wound at the back of the skull, and another to the chest. The unfortunate man lingered to Sunday afternoon. At the inquest held on Monday a verdict of “Accidental Death” was returned.

The death of Mr. Scott is greatly regretted by a large circle of friends throughout the neighbourhood. The funeral took place at Folkestone Cemetery on Thursday.

 

Hythe Reporter 26 September 1896.

Local News.

On Wednesday afternoon week, an accident of an alarming character happened to the Folkestone four-horse coach just as it was entering Canterbury. It had just passed over the New Road railway bridge when the leaders shied at some water in the road, and plunging violently they ran the coach onto some asphalt by the side of Baron Court Park. The coach had a full complement of passengers, some of whom were naturally much alarmed, especially as it appeared for a moment that there must be a collision with a lamp post at the spot. However, the leaders, by their kicking and plunging, broke the splinter bar against the post, and this set them free, and the coach then came to a standstill. The released animals tore off down into St. George's, and were not stopped until they reached the High Street, where, opposite St. Mary Bredman's Church, a landau was drawn across the road, which checked their wild career. Meanwhile Mr. Scott, the proprietor and whip, had driven the coach to the usual halting point, the Rose Hotel, the two wheelers being perfectly in hand. Neither the horses nor the coach sustained any damage; in fact the accident did not cause anything more than a little excitement both in Barton Fields and St. George's, where it was feared the runaway horses would come into collision with the vehicles in the street, which, happily, was avoided. But for the skilful way in which Mr. Scott managed the reins at the critical moment, there is little doubt that serious consequences would have ensued, and it was fortunate that the restive leaders broke away as they did.

The above paragraph appeared in last week's Dover Standard. This week the local papers have to write the account of another accident to the coach which did not end so satisfactorily.

The Sporting Times coach is now in Worthington's Yard undergoing repairs, but the proprietor and driver will never again mount the box and spin along the country lanes to the sound of the merry horn. He has gone to his last rest, a victim of his love for horses. To have deprived him of horses would have been depriving him of life itself. Who does not remember J.P. seated on the Folkestone and Hythe 'bus behind two of the finest horses to be found on any 'bus in the kingdom?

The writer does not remember when Mr. Scott first took over the Folkestone 'bus, but it was some time in the sixties. It was only about three years ago that he disposed of his 'bus business to the Hythe Omnibus Company, so that for thirty years his vehicles were plying between here and Folkestone. When he first started he only did three journeys a day – Mr. Laker, afterwards Denne, doing the other three journeys alternately with him. That was in the good old time when the fare was a shilling each way. Nowadays sixpence is deemed sufficient. It was a lucrative business enough, and Mr. Scott throve well on it. It may not be generally known that Mr. Scott served under the famous French horse trainer Rairey, so that for years he was known as Rairey Scott.

Mr. Scott's father died about four years ago at a ripe old age – over eighty. Mrs. Scott followed her husband last year, both to be soon joined by their son. Mother and son were much attached. Before her death Mr. Scott used regularly to drive over from Folkestone to see his widowed mother. It is said that the latter always feared that her son would be killed by some horse accident, and her fears have been fully borne out, although, happily, not until she herself had passed away. Mr. Scott's father carried on a grocer's business for many years in the shop now occupied by Mr. R. Price, the Mayor of Hythe – a block of these premises may be seen in another column of this paper – but it was a long time ago, nearly half a century.

Local News.

We regret to have to record the death of Mr. John Paul Scott, of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, Folkestone, proprietor and whip of the Sporting Times coach, running between Folkestone and Canterbury. Within the past few weeks two slight accidents had happened, both owing to the nervousness of the leaders of the team, and there is no doubt that the third, which had so sad a termination, was due to the same cause. The story told at the inquest on Monday by Mr. Katanakis, deceased's son-in-law, who was on the box with him at the time of the accident, was so straight that the coroner did not deem it necessary to call any further witnesses as to the occurrence.

He scene of the accident is within a few hundred yards of Barham Station, and from the elevation on which the station stands it can be plainly seen. After passing through South Barham, the road descends, and at the foot of the hill, just after passing the Red House, the residence of Mrs. Yorke, turns sharply to the left, curves slightly, and then turns sharply to the right and on to North Barham. On Friday, just after passing the Red House, and while in the narrow neck slightly in the curve, the leaders shied, the splinter bar struck the stump of a little gnarled ok tree, not bigger than one's arm, which forms part of the hedge, twisted the wheel in slightly, and over went the vehicle, Mr. Scott, who was of course driving, being caught and dragged about three yards, the three passengers, Mr. Katinakis, another gentleman, and Miss Young, happily escaping unhurt. The guard also escaped. The horses, after the accident, remained perfectly quiet. Mr. Scott was carried to the Red House, and Dr. Schon was sent for and attended him, but his injuries were so severe that he died, as we have said, on Sunday afternoon about four.

 

Folkestone Programme 28 September 1896.

Inquest.

The inquest on the body of Mr. Scott was held at the Red House, Barham, on Monday afternoon by Mr. R.M. Mercer (Coroner for the district).

Arthur Katinakis deposed: I live at 3, Kingsnorth Gardens, Folkestone, and am son-in-law to the deceased, who was 54 years of age. He was the owner and driver of the Sporting Times coach from Folkestone to Canterbury. He drove the coach on Friday morning. I was on the box seat. At the bottom of this hill the road turns into a curve. At about 12.30, as we were on the curve – it is not hilly there – the leaders shied at some scrapings in the road, where the hedge had been cut. The road being narrow we had to keep fairly close to our near side. When the horse shied the roller bolt on the splinter bar cannoned against the stump of an elder tree in the hedge. This swung the coach, and at the same instant the wheel ran up the bank three or four inches. I think the wheel ran on to the base of the stump, and the coach then went over on its off side. There was just room for me between it and the hedge, and I was thrown clear of the coach, but Mr. Scott did not get so much impetus, having hold of the reins.

The Coroner: Where did he fall? – All we know is he was struck by the coach and dragged two or three yards; we cannot say where he was struck. I got up directly and we found he was confined by the coach, which, however, did not rest on him; he was right under the part of the coach between his seat and the first passenger's seat when we took him out, and we had to lift it to do so.

I understand no part of the coach rested on him? – No. Of course the make of the coach left room for his body, but one arm was underneath the rail. When we got him out he was perfectly conscious.

Did he complain of pain in any special part? – Yes, his back. He was brought to this house, where he died at 4.20 on Subday afternoon.

Dr. Chas. Henry Schon, practicing at Bridge, deposed: I saw the deceased about three quarters of an hour after the accident. He was suffering from serious injury to the spine, with paralysis of the legs and fracture of two ribs on the left side; the chest wall was wounded, caused by the fractured ribs.

His injuries were very excessive then? – They were very bad indeed.

Were the arms injured? – No, but he had a very bad wound on the scalp at the back of the head. He was in a state of great collapse, from which he never recovered, and he died from the shock.

I suppose he was too collapsed for you to do anything with him? – Yes.

Could you examine him at all? – Well, the ribs and scalp wound were very evident, but the injury to the back was not, and he would not permit any examination as the pain was so great.

What did he die of? – Shock from his severe injuries.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

A juror: There is one thing I should like to mention – the dangerous state of the road.

The Coroner: I am afraid they won't make the road any wider for us.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 December 1896.

Wednesday, December 9th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. J. Fitness, and General Gwyn.

The licence of the East Kent Arms was transferred to Mrs. Scott.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 September 1897.

Saturday, September 11th: Before The Mayor and Messrs. J. Pledge, J. Fitness, and J. Holden.

John Dryland, a fly driver, was summoned for leaving a horse and carriage unattended in Sandgate Road on August 27th.

P.C. Lawrence stated that he saw the carriage standing in front of the East Kent Arms unattended. The horse moved away, and witness stopped it.

Defendant said he left his horse to go in and get a drink.

He was fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 18 September 1897.

Saturday, September 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Pledge, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs.

A flyman, named Dryland, was charged with leaving a horse and fly unattended in Sandgate Road on August 27th.

P.C. Lawrence said at a quarter past five he saw a horse and fly standing in front of the East Kent Arms unattended. The horse moved away, and witness stopped it.

Defendant said he left his horse to go in to “get a drink”.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 September 1897.

Police Court Report.

On Saturday – the Mayor (Alderman Banks) presiding – Richard Bryan was summoned for leaving a horse and cart unattended in Sandgate Road on the 27th.

P.C. Frank Lawrence gave evidence that on the Friday in question at 10 past 12 he saw a horse and carriage standing in front of the East Kent Arms, and about two minutes later the horse started up the Sandgate Road to opposite Messrs. Brook's premises. Witness took charge, and about five minutes later defendant came up and said it was his.

Defendant said it was only four minutes from when he pulled up. He went in to get a drink. There was another trap and that moved off, and his horse followed it up. It only went twenty steps.

Fined 2s. 6d., 9s. costs, or seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 September 1898.

Tuesday, September 13th: before Messrs. J. Banks, J. Fitness, C.J. Pursey and W.G. Herbert.

Sherlock Wray was charged with stealing three chisels, one screwdriver, one bradawl, and a watch, the property of John Reader. He was also charged with stealing a plated tankard, the property of Amy Scott.

P.S. Swift said that about 3.30 the previous day he went to 29. Westbourne Gardens, and saw the prisoner, where he was at work. Witness cautioned him, and then told him he was making enquiries as to some chisels, etc., stolen from the Electric Light Works on Saturday. He replied “I know nothing about the watch, and the hammer Foad gave to me. The chisels I took back. I had a drop of drink, and I suppose that was the cause of it”. Witness said “Will you show me the tools you had in your possession in the football field on Saturday?” He replied “They are down home, in a box in the scullery”. Witness said he should take him to the police station, and detain him while making enquiries. On the way there they met the prisoner's wife. Prisoner said “Give the officers those chisels in the scullery down home”. Witness went to 39, Bradstone Road, and was shown a box in the scullery, in which he found three chisels, a screwdriver, and a bradawl. He also found a silver plated tankard with “The East Kent Arms” stamped on it. Prisoner was charged. As to the tools he made no reply, but as to the tankard he said “I didn't steal that”.

John Reader, 11, Invicta Road, a carpenter, said that on Saturday he left his tools in the manager's office, and on Monday at nine o'clock he missed them. He identified those produced as his property. He valued them at 4s. or 5s.

William John Foad, a wireman, in the employ of the same company, said that on Saturday, about half past three, he was in the engine house, and saw the prisoner at the door. He afterwards saw him in the manager's room, looking at witness's tools. Witness told him not to touch them. He had a small volt meter in his coat pocket. When spoken to he took it out and put it back on the mantelpiece. They then both left the works and went to the football field.

By the prisoner: He invited him to the works, and sent him into the manager's room for some tape. Prisoner was in the employ of the company.

Annie Ellse, barmaid at the East Kent Arms, said that about three weeks ago she missed the silver plated tankard produced from the bar. She valued it at 9s. She had seen prisoner in the house several times.

Prisoner said he was under the influence of drink, and did not know until Monday morning. He had sunstroke in India, and two or three glasses of spirits he had on Saturday upset him. He was very sorry he took the tools, as he had no use for them.

He was sent for trial at the next Quarter Sessions for the Borough. The Bench offered bail, himself in 20, and another surety in the same sum.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 September 1898.

Police Court Record.

On Tuesday – Alderman Banks presiding – Sherlock Ray was charged with stealing three chisels, a screwdriver, and a bradawl, value 4s., the property of John Reeder, and a tankard, value 9s., the property of Mrs. Scott.

P.S. Swift deposed that about 3.30 on the previous day, from information received, he went to 29, Westbourne Gardens, where the defendant was at work. He cautioned the defendant, and then said to him “I am making inquiries respecting a watch, hammer, and chisel, stolen from the Electric Works on Saturday last”. Defendant replied “I know nothing about the watch. The hammer Foad gave to me. The chisels I took back. I had a drop of drink. I suppose that was the cause”. Witness said “Will you show me the tools you had in your possession in the football field on Saturday last?” He replied “They are down home. The box in the scullery”. Witness said to him “I shall take you to the police station and detain you to make inquiries”. On the way to the police station they saw defendant's wife. Defendant said to her “Give the officer those chisels out of that box in the scullery”. Witness went to the defendant's lodgings in Bradstone Road, where he was shown the box in the scullery by the defendant's wife. In this he found the three chisels, the screwdriver, and the bradawl produced. He also found a silver plated tankard with “East Kent Arms” stamped upon it. Afterwards the defendant was charged in witness's presence. As to the tools, defendant made no reply. With regard to the tankard he said “I did not steal that”.

John Reeder, of Invicta Road, deposed that he was a carpenter in the employ of the Folkestone Electric Light Company. On Saturday, the 10th inst., about 1 o'clock, he left his tools in a basket in the manager's office at the Electric Works. On Monday, about 9 o'clock, he went to the basket for his tools, and they were missing, three chisels, a screwdriver, and a bradawl. He valued the articles at 4s. or 5s.

William John Foad, in the employ of the Electric Company, deposed that he was in the Company's works on the 10th inst., at about half past 3, in the engine room. Witness called defendant in, and afterwards saw him in the manager's room. He was looking at witness's tools. Witness said “Don't touch those. Those are my tools”. He also had a small volt-meter, which he took out and put back on the mantelpiece. They then left the room together, and went to the football ground. Witness lost the defendant just inside the ground. Defendant was in the employ of the Company.

By the defendant: Witness sent him to the manager's room for some tape.

Miss Annie Ellse, barmaid, of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, deposed that she missed from the bar a half pint tankard three weeks or a month ago. She identified the tankard produced as the missing one. She valued it at 9s. She had seen the defendant several times in the house. He was a customer.

Defendant said that he was under the influence of drink. He had sunstroke in India, and did not know what he was doing. He had been steady lately, but two or three glasses of spirits he had upset him. He was sorry he took the articles, as he had no use for them.

The Bench committed him to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions on both cases.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 October 1898.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 10th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Gillespie Sherlock Wray was charged with stealing a silver plated tankard, the property of Amy Scott, at Folkestone, on August 15th. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Matthew appeared for the prosecution.

P.S. Swift repeated his evidence given in the Police Court, and already fully reported. He found the tankard in a box in the prisoner's home. Prisoner denied that he stole it.

Miss Annie Ellse, barmaid at the East Kent Arms, recognised the tankard as the property of Mrs. Amy Scott. She identified it by the name on it – East Kent Arms – and by the fact that the handle had been recently mended. She missed it about three weeks before prisoner was before the justices. She knew the prisoner as a customer.

Prisoner's statement before the justices was read – “I was under the influence of drink” he said. “I had a sunstroke in India three years ago. I have been steady lately. I had two or three glasses on Saturday. I am sorry I did it”.

Prisoner now said: I had been up to the Pleasure Gardens Theatre two or three nights before, and found the tankard near Pearson's, the coal merchants, in the middle of the road. I took it home, and my wife told me to take it back to the East Kent Arms. I forgot to do it, and it was put into the box. I would have taken it back if I had thought of it. I forgot it was there until Sergt. Swift told me of it. I can only throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

The Recorder summed up briefly, pointing out the difference between the two statements.

The prisoner said the statement before the justices referred only to another charge, and had nothing to do with the tankard.

The jury found the prisoner Not Guilty.

Prisoner was then charged with stealing three chisels, one screwdriver, and one bradawl, value 4s., the property of John Rins, at Folkestone, on the 4th September. He pleaded Guilty to the charge, and also to a previous conviction.

Superintendent Taylor said the former conviction was for breaking into the Camera Obscura (the property of an invalid), and he received one month's hard labour. He was also convicted of stealing a glazier's diamond, and the police strongly suspected that he was concerned in petty robberies in the neighbourhood of the electric works.

John Rina said he had worked with the prisoner three months, and had missed a hammer and an axe.

Prisoner said he had never worked with the prosecutor.

The Recorder said prisoner had pleaded Guilty to the charge. As to the former case, the jury had taken a very merciful view. He (the Recorder) absolutely disagreed with that verdict. Prisoner was a bad man, and had committed a very mean offence, having stolen the tools of a fellow workman, and then obliterated his name from them in the hope that they would not be traced. He would go to prison for nine months with hard labour. Prisoner left the dock sobbing.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 October 1898.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 10th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Gillespie Sherlock Wray, aged 28, seaman, well educated, was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver plated tankard, value 9s., the property of Amy Scott, at Folkestone, on the 15th August. The defendant had been detained on the indictment of feloniously stealing three chisels, one screwdriver, and one bradawl, value 4s., the property of John Riva, of Folkestone, on the 10th September. He pleaded Not Guilty to stealing the tankard.

Mr. Matthew, who prosecuted, pointed out that it was for an accused person, who is found in the possession of stolen property, to say how he came to possess it.

P.S. Swift deposed that on the 12th the prisoner made certain statements to him, in consequence of which witness went with his wife to the prisoner's house. In a box there witness found the tankard produced. He was charged with stealing it, and replied “I did not steal that”. He gave no explanation as to how he got it.

Miss Annie Ellse, barmaid at the East Kent Arms, deposed that she recognised the tankard by the name, and the handle being mended. She missed it three weeks before the 12th September.

The prisoner's statement was read. It was as follows: I was under the influence of drink. I had sunstroke in India three years ago. I have been steady lately. Two or three glasses of spirits I had on Saturday upset me. I am sorry I did it, as I know no use for them”.

The prisoner now said he had been to the Pleasure Gardens about the 26th or 27th, and coming home, opposite Pearson's coalyard, about a quarter to 11, he found the tankard on the side of the road by the rails. He took it home. His wife told him to take it back again, but he forgot all about it. He threw himself at their mercy. If he thought of it he would have taken it back.

The Recorder said that when the prisoner was charged with stealing the tankard by Sergt. Swift he denied stealing it. When he was before the Justices he made the statement already read. He now made the statement they had heard.

The prisoner said that the statement he had made before the Justices was as to the tools. He did not make it on account of the tankard.

The Petty Jury, after consideration, found the prisoner not guilty of stealing the tankard.

The prisoner Wray pleaded Guilty to the further charge of stealing the tools. He also pleaded Guilty to a previous conviction at Folkestone.

Superintendent Taylor deposed that the former conviction was one month's hard labour for breaking into a camera obscure and attempting to steal. On the 27th May, 1897, he was fined 40s. for stealing a plumbers' diamond from Mr. Holden's, High Street. Defendant had been employed by the Electric Lighting Company. He was strongly suspected of being concerned in several petty robberies.

The prosecutor stated that he had been working on the same job as the prisoner.

Prisoner said he never worked with Riva.

The Recorder said the jury had taken a lenient view of the previous charge. Defendant had a very bad career. The crime was committed on a fellow workman. The tools were stolen, and the initials scraped off, in the hope that they would not be identified. He was sentenced to nine months' hard labour.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 October 1898.

Quarter Sessions.

The Michaelmas Quarter Sessions were held at the Town Hall on Monday, Oct. 10th, before the Recorder (Mr. J. C. Lewis Coward).

In the case of Gillespie Sherlock Wray, 28, described as a seaman, who was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 9s., the property of Mrs. Scott, of the East. Kent Arms, the petty jury returned a verdict of Not Guilty. Prisoner, who had been employed at the Electrical Supply Company’s Works, then pleaded guilty to stealing tools, the property of a fellow workman, and was sentenced to nine months’ hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 October 1900.

Inquest.

At the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Saturday afternoon, Mr. Coroner Minter and a jury opened an inquest on the body of Timothy John Harrison, a well-known inhabitant of the town, whose death took place under tragic circumstances on the previous evening. The Town Hall was besieged by friends and curious ones during the whole of the proceedings, which lasted well over two hours.

The first witness called was Theopholus Hogben, who said: I am a clerk to the late Mr. Harrison, and live at 18, Bouverie Square. He wasd an auctioneer and commission agent, and was 42 last November. He had a very extensive practice in commission agency. He also backed horses himself, and had lately sustained some very heavy losses, which he was unable to meet. He used to drink a good deal in the day, and has been greatly worried lately on account of his not being able to meet his engagements. During the last week he seemed very strange, always thinking and worrying. He had been threatened with proceedings, writs, etc. I know of one of his cheques being dishonoured, but it was met afterwards. His sister kept his house. I know that he had a room at the East Kent Arms. He had one or two brandies and sodas yesterday. I took them up to him in bed.

The Coroner: Where?

Witness: At 18, Bouverie Square. He got up about 4 p.m. He was sober when he went to bed. All the last week he got up about 4 in the afternoon. When he got up yesterday he had something to eat, and then went out. He told me he had made arrangements to go to London today. I made some accounts out for him to collect. He was going to take them to a solicitor, and intended to sue some of his clients. Some of the amounts were large ones. At 10 minutes to 10 I rang up on the telephone to the East Kent Arms to ask if he had gone to London. I spoke to the barmaid, who replied that he was there still. Then I went down to the East Kent to see him. I went upstairs and spoke to Mrs. Scott, who told me that Mr. Harrison was in his bedroom, on the first floor, with a revolver. Mrs. Scott, who was ill in her room, asked me to go and speak to him. I went and knocked at the door, and had just lifted the latch when he pushed the door to and locked it, saying “You can't come in”. I did not reply, but went back to Mrs. Scott's room and told her he would not let me come in. As I was talking to her I heard a report, as of a firearm. I said to Mrs. Scott “It will be best to break the door open”. She told me that previously she had heard one shot. I then went for Hooper, the coachman, who burst the door open, and I found deceased on the ground beside the bed. He only had his coat off. I took the pistol produced out of his right hand, and told Hooper to stop while I fetched the doctor. Deceased was making a slight noise through the nose. There was a quantity of blood on the floor. Putting the pistol in my pocket, I went to Dr. Perry directly, and returned with him within two or three minutes. Dr. Perry examined the deceased, said he was dead, and sent me for the police. I went for the police, who came.

The Coroner: You should not have taken the pistol out of his hand. Sometimes it is very important that a pistol should not be touched.

By the Chief Constable: Mrs. Scott did not tell me what time elapsed between the two reports. She said it was like a cap going off.

William Hooper, coachman at the East Kent Arms, said: I knew the deceased a great number of years. He had a horse standing at the East Kent Arms called Black Polly. When he stayed at the hotel he had a bedroom looking over the yard. I saw him last night at about 10 minutes to 8. He asked me how the horse was getting on. She had been lame. He had had a drop, but was not drunk. He spoke to me about cats annoying him of a night when he went to sleep, and said he would have a game in the night and shoot them all. There is a large roof covering the yard, and a great many cats frequent it. He asked me where my cat was, saying “Where is Old Joe?” He did not show me anything he was going to shoot the cats with. Later I washed, and went into the bar for a drink, when he called me out under the porch and said “Here is a sovereign. Go into Mr. Price's and buy me a small revolver”. I went and got a small gun. He said that would not do; it would kill people. I took the gun, and brought back three revolvers for him to choose from. He chose one at 15s. 6d; it was similar to that produced. He then told me to get 25 rounds of ammunition – “that would be enough to catch all the cats on the roof”, he said. I got the ammunition, and gave it to him in the porch of the East Kent Arms. He then went into the smoking room. About 10 to 10 I asked the barmaid for the letters to post. She told me I should have to wait, for Mr. Harrison was locked in his bedroom, and would not answer the door. Soon after 10 the nurse came down and said Mrs. Scott wanted to see me. Hogben said he wanted me to help burst the door open, as he had heard a report from a revolver. After a struggle I burst the door open. I found Mr. Harrison on his face on his left side in a pool of blood. There was a gaslight in the room. Hogben took something out of Mr. Harrison's hand, and away he went. Deceased made a noise like a drunken man in his sleep; He did not seem to be in any pain. I waited until the doctor came.

Harry William Price, jeweller, Sandgate Road, close to the East Kent Arms, said: The last witness came and purchased from me the revolver produced, together with fifty rounds of ammunition. It is a seven chambered American revolver. He said it was to kill the cats. The time of the purchase was about 8.15.

Dr. C. Perry deposed: I knew the deceased, who was a patient of mine. Off and on I have attended him for some years, though not just lately. He had been a great sufferer from rheumatic gout and large liver, and touch of heart failure at times. Frequently I have warned him of the critical state he was in. I should consider he was a free liver. I have not considered his life worth much for some time. He might die at any time from heart failure, from which he was suffering. When he had these attacks he used to be very oppressed. A few minutes after 10 yesterday the witness Hogben came and fetched me. On proceeding to the East Kent arms I went up to the bedroom on the first floor, and saw the deceased lying on his left side, with his head in a pool of blood. I found that he had been dead some few minutes. Hogben had shown me the revolver produced. In conjunction with Dr. Chambers, this afternoon I made a post mortem examination. We found much superficial haemorrhage, a large blood vessel having been opened, and after careful searching we discovered the bullet produced embedded in the left side of the base of the skull. It had evidently been fired through the mouth. The cause of death, in my opinion, was haemorrhage and shock. Death must have been instantaneous. It arose from a self-inflicted wound. I have no hesitation in saying so. At times the deceased had told me that he had difficulty in getting his money in. Mrs. Scott is also a patient of mine. For a fortnight she has not left her room. She has been suffering from bronchitis.

Dr. Chambers corroborated the evidence of Dr. Perry concerning the post mortem.

Stanley Hyham deposed: I am a gun maker, of 14, Harbour Street. Deceased came to my shop about 7.15 last night, and said he wanted a rifle or revolver to shoot cats. I told him a revolver was no use for the purpose he wanted it, and said a little rifle would be better. I put him off a revolver three times, recommending a rifle. At the finish he bought a rifle for 15s. 6d., and paid for it, with 6d. for 25 cartridges. He said “Don't trouble to send it tonight, but send it in the morning”.

Hogben, re-called, said “We have been annoyed with cats at Bouverie Square”.

The Coroner (to Dr. Perry): We have heard a lot about shooting cats. Could this have been an accident, or was it, in your opinion, a deliberate act?

Dr. Perry: It was a deliberate act, without a doubt.

Dr. Chambers, also questioned by the Coroner, gave the same reply.

Edwin J. Chadwick, the Coroner's Officer, said: Last night, at 10.45, I was sent for to the East Kent Arms. In a back bedroom on the first floor I saw the deceased in a pool of blood. I moved the body on to the bed. I examined the room, and found the mark of a bullet in the wall on the right hand side of the entrance to the room. The bullet produced was embedded in the wall. It is similar to that found in the deceased's skull. The revolver was then on the mantelpiece. I took possession of it and found two cartridges had been exploded; the remaining five chambers were empty. I also took possession of a box containing 48 cartridges. I searched deceased's clothing, and found the gold watch produced, one sovereign, seventeen shillings, and five pence, a bunch of keys, cigarette holder and case, and a quantity of letters.

The Coroner, after an exhaustive summing up, told the jury that if they would like the attendance of Mrs. Scott, there could be an adjournment for a fortnight.

The jury, without hesitation, returned a unanimous verdict of “Suicide whilst temporarily insane”.

 

Folkestone Express 27 October 1900.

Inquest.

On Friday night, about ten o'clock, Mr. Timothy Harrison, a widely known tradesman and commission agent, committed suicide by shooting himself with a revolver. An inquest was held on Saturday afternoon by the Borough Coroner, at the Town hall, when the following evidence was given:-

Theophilus Hogben, a clerk in the employ of the deceased, and residing at 18, Bouverie Square, said deceased was an auctioneer and a betting commission agent.

The body had been removed to 18, Bouverie Square, and the jury went there to view it.

Witness then identified the body, and on returning to the hall, continued his evidence. He said deceased was 42 years of age last November. Witness had been in his service four years. He had a very extensive business in commission agency. He had backed horses himself now and again, and had lately sustained some heavy losses, and in consequence had been unable to meet his engagements. He had not latterly drank more than he usually did – he drank a good deal every day. He had been greatly worried lately on account of his not being able to meet his engagements. During the last week he had been very quiet – always thinking and worrying.

The Coroner: Has he had any proceedings against him?

Witness: No.

The Coroner: I see by the letters which have been handed to me that there have been writs and summonses issued.

Witness said lately he had been pressed. He only knew of one cheque being returned dishonoured – that was for 19, and it was met afterwards. Deceased's sister kept his house. He had a room at the East Kent Arms. He slept at Bouverie Square on Thursday night and had one or two brandies and sodas in the morning. Witness took them up to him. He got up about four o'clock in the afternoon. When he went to bed the night before he was sober. For the past week he had laid in bed all the morning. He had something to eat and then went out about half past four. He told witness before he went out that he intended to go to London by the boat train at 9.30. Witness made out some accounts for him to take to a solicitor in London, who was to have instructions to sue the customers. There were some rather large amounts – about 150 in all. About 10 minutes to 10 witness rang up on the telephone to the East Kent Arms to know if deceased had gone to London. He spoke to one of the barmaids, who replied that deceased was there still, and had not gone to London. He went down to the East Kent afterwards to see him, and went upstairs and spoke to Mrs. Scott, who said deceased was in his bedroom with a revolver. The bedroom was on the first floor at the back. Mrs. Scott asked witness to go and speak to him. Witness went and knocked at the bedroom door and tried to open it. He lifted the latch and opened the door about an inch. Deceased pushed it to and locked it. Witness did not say anything, but went back to Mrs. Scott's room and told her deceased would not let him go in. As he was talking to her he heard a report of a firearm. He then said to Mrs. Scott “We had better break the door open”. He only heard one shot. Mrs. Scott told him she had heard one previously. He went for Hooper, the coachman, who went up and burst the door open. They saw deceased lying on the floor on his face by the side of the bed. He had only his coat off. Witness took the pistol (produced) out of his right hand, and told Hooper to stay there while he went to fetch a doctor. Deceased was making a slight noise through the nose, and there was a quantity of blood on his face. About ten o'clock he got to Dr. Perry's. He put the pistol in his pocket without examining it to see if it was loaded. He returned with Dr. Perry within two or three minutes. Dr. Perry examined the deceased, and said he was dead and sent witness for the police.

The Coroner told witness he ought not to have taken the pistol away. Sometimes it was a matter of the gravest importance as to how the pistol was lying. But it did not matter in that case.

Witness added that deceased had not said anything to him about destroying himself.

William Samuel Hooper, coachman at the East Kent Arms, said he had known the deceased for nine years or more. He had a horse standing at the stables, called Black Polly. He had a bedroom at the back on the first floor looking over the yard. He saw deceased about ten minutes to eight on Friday evening, and he asked him how his horse was getting on – she had been lame for four months, and turned out at Horn Street until a day or two ago. Deceased had had a little drop to drink, but was not drunk. He talked about cats annoying him when he went to sleep and said he was going to have a game that night and shoot them all. Cats and kittens ran wild over the room. Deceased did not show him a pistol, but asked where witness's own cat was. Witness afterwards saw deceased in the bar, something after eight. He called him into the porch, and said “Here's a sovereign. Go to Mr. Price's and buy me a small revolver”. He went and got one. The first one he took in was a long one, like a small gun. Deceased would not have that, as he said it would kill people at 200 yards. Witness took it back and fetched three more for him to choose from.

The Coroner: Why did you not tell me this this morning? Didn't you know who I was?

Witness said he did, but he did not think it right to tell it all then. He went on to say he brought back three revolvers. One was 15s. 6d. – very like the one produced. Deceased then told him to get 25 rounds of ammunition, saying he would be able to shoot all the cats on the roof. He got the ammunition and gave it to the deceased, with the revolver. Deceased then went into the smoking room at the East Kent Arms. The next he heard was about ten minutes to ten, when he asked the barmaid for letters for the post. Mrs. Scott had been ill for more than a fortnight. The barmaid told him he would have to wait as Mr. Harrison was locked in his bedroom and would not answer the door. The nurse just after called him and told him he was wanted upstairs. He went up and saw Hogben on the landing, who said he wanted him to help him burst the door open, as he thought there was something wrong, and they had heard the report of a revolver. They burst the door open and saw the deceased lying on his face on his left hand side in a pool of blood. There was a gaslight in the room – only one burner, he believed. He did not see the pistol. Hogben took something out of deceased's hand and said he was going for a doctor. Deceased made a noise like the snore of a drunken man, but did not seem to be in any pain. He waited till Dr. Perry arrived, and then left.

Henry William Price, a jeweller of Sandgate Road, gave evidence as to the sale of a revolver and 50 rounds of ammunition to the last witness. It was a seven-chambered American revolver, and the size was .22. Hooper said it was to kill or frighten cats.

Dr. Perry said he knew the deceased, who was a patient of his. He had attended him at various times for some years, but not just lately. He had suffered a great deal from rheumatic gout, enlarged liver, and heart failure at times. He had frequently warned the deceased of the critical state in which he was. Deceased was, he considered, a free liver, and witness did not consider his life worth much at any time. He had warned deceased that he might die at any moment from an attack of heart failure. He had been very depressed at times in consequence, but after a little treatment he threw it all off again. On Friday witness was fetched soon after ten by the witness Hogben. He went to a bedroom in the East Kent Arms on the first floor at the back, and saw deceased lying on his left side. His head was in a large pool of blood and he was dead. Hogben had showed him the pistol in his consulting room. Deceased had been dead only a few minutes. Witness had that afternoon made a post mortem examination in conjunction with Dr. Chambers. They opened the skull and removed the brain and found a great deal of superficial haemorrhage, and when they removed the brain there was a large quantity of haemorrhage at the base of the skull, a large blood vessel having been opened. After careful searching they found the bullet produced embedded in the base of the skull on the left hand side. On the previous nigt he saw the place where the bullet had entered – in the mouth – where there was some discolouration and depression of the roof. The cause of death was haemorrhage and shock. It must have been almost instantaneous. He had no hesitation in saying it was a self-inflicted wound, and the pistol, he thought, must have been held in the mouth. Witness knew nothing about his financial affairs except that he had remarked that there was difficulty in getting his money in. Mrs. Scott, who had also been a patient of his, was ill with bronchitis and quite unable to leave her room.

Dr. Chambers also gave evidence, corroborating that of Dr. Perry.

Stanley Higham, a gun maker, of 14, Harbour Street, said deceased went to him on Friday at a quarter past seven and said he wanted a rifle or revolver to shoot cats. He told him a revolver would be of no use, and a little rifle would be far better. He asked for revolvers three times over, but witness put him off. He said he wanted to shoot cats in his back garden in Bouverie Square. He bought a rifle and paid 15s. 6d. for it, and also 25 cartridges, 6d. He said it was to be sent up in the morning.

Hogben was recalled, and said they had been annoyed by cats in the front garden at Bouverie Square. Deceased had never to his knowledge shot cats there. His guns were kept at the East Kent Arms.

The Coroner asked Dr. Perry if it could have been an accident and not a deliberate act?

Dr. Perry replied that it was a deliberate act. He did not think there was a doubt about it.

Dr. Chambers gave a similar answer to the same question. It must, he said, have been deliberate. Had it been an accident there would certainly have been a wound on some part of his face.

Edwin John Chadwick, Coroner's Officer, said he saw the deceased as described. He placed the body on the bed and then examined the room. He found the mark of a bullet in the wall on the right hand side on entering the room, and embedded in the wall he found the bullet produced. It was the same size and sort as that found in deceased's head. The revolver was lying on the mantelpiece. (Hogben said he gave the pistol to Sergt. Osborne, who placed it on the mantelpiece.) There were two empty cartridges in the revolver, and the other five chambers were empty. There were forty eight cartridges in a box. In deceased's pockets were a gold watch, 1 17s. 5d. in money, a bunch of keys, and other articles, and also a quantity of letters.

The Coroner said there was nothing in them beyond applications for payment of debts, and that a writ had been issued and also summonses. He need not trouble them with all the particulars, but that was the effect of them.

In reply to a juror, Dr. Perry said there was no other mark on the body, except a slight abrasion caused by a fall.

The Foreman asked if anyone in the house beside Mrs. Scott heard the first report.

Witness said they fired an experimental shot, and it was scarcely hard outside the room. The first report was merely like the explosion of a cap.

The Coroner summed up at considerable length, pointing out that there was no doubt whatever that the deceased shot himself, and the only question was as to the state of his mind. They had heard the evidence as to the financial difficulties of the deceased.

While the Coroner was summing up the Town sergeant handed him a letter, and after reading it, he said it was simply an application from some person at Dover for the payment of wages.

The Coroner, resuming, said they had heard from the witness Hogben that the deceased was engaged in an extensive book-making business, and he had suffered severe losses and he had been worried because he was unable to meet his engagements. It was common knowledge that if a man engaged in that class of business was unable to meet his engagements it was utter ruin to him. There was nothing more tender than the credit of a man engaged in a business of that kind, and if he failed to meet his engagements he might as well give up business altogether. There was no doubt that the state of his health and his financial difficulties preyed upon his mind, and in a fit of temporary insanity he committed the act.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide during temporary insanity”.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 October 1900.

Inquest.

On Saturday morning the town was shocked on hearing that, on the previous night, Mr. T.J. Harrison, the well-known auctioneer and bookmaker, had committed suicide in the room which he occupied at the East Kent Arms Hotel. The details of this sad affair are fully set out in the evidence given at the inquest, which was held at the Town Hall on Saturday afternoon, before Mr. John Minter, Borough Coroner, and a jury. The deceased had long suffered from rheumatic gout and heart disease, but had always shown a passionate love for sport of every kind, while on the turf he carried on an extensive business as a betting agent. He took a prominent part in the public life of the town, having been for some years a member of the Town Council, and also a member of the Elham Board of Guardians. Latterly the deceased had sustained some heavy losses in his business as a commission agent, and creditors were pressing him for money, a circumstance which worried him considerably, and doubtless led him to make away with his life. At the inquest the courtroom was crowded with people, and the following witnesses were examined:-

Theophilus Hogben, clerk to the late Mr. Harrison, was the first witness called. He said deceased lived at 18, Bouverie Square, and was an auctioneer and commission agent.

The jury then proceeded to view the body, which witness identified as that of his late employer.

Witness, continuing, said deceased was 42 years of age last November, and that he had been in his service four years. Deceased had a very extensive business. He had always backed horses himself, now and again. Lately he had sustained some very heavy losses, and it was a fact that he had been unable to meet his engagements. He had not been drinking more than he usually did, but he had always drunk a good deal during the day. He had worried a good deal over the business. He had been strange during the past week; very quiet, and always appeared to be worrying. Lately he had been threatened with proceedings to recover money which he owed. Witness only knew of one cheque which had been returned dishonoured. That was for 19, a fortnight ago. Deceased's sister kept house for him, and witness knew that he had a room at the East Kent Arms. On Friday witness took up one or two brandies and sodas to deceased in bed at his house. He got up about four o'clock in the afternoon. When deceased went to bed the night before he was sober. For the past week he had laid in bed all the mornings. On arising on the previous day, deceased had something to eat, and went out about 4.30. He had told witness that he was going up to London by the 9.30 train on the Friday night, and witness made out some accounts, which he was going to take, to sue his customers. There were some large amounts, about 150 in all. At about 9.40 witness rang up on the telephone to the East Kent Hotel to ask if he had gone to London, and they replied that he had not. He then went down to the East Kent to see him, but could not do so. He went upstairs and spoke to Mrs. Scott, and she told him that he was in his bedroom with a revolver. The bedroom was on the first floor, at the back. Mrs. Scott asked witness to go and speak to him, as she was ill in bed. Witness went and knocked at his door. He had just lifted the latch and opened the door about an inch, when deceased from the inside pushed it to and locked it. Witness did not say anything to deceased, but went back and told Mrs. Scott that he would not let him in. Whilst he was talking to her he heard a report, as of a pistol being fired. Mrs. Scott told him that she had heard one shot before. Witness went for Hooper, the coachman, who came up and burst the door open. He went into the room and found deceased lying half on his face on the floor near the bed. He had only got his coat off. Witness took the pistol produced out of deceased's right hand, and told Hooper to stop there until he fetched a doctor. Deceased made a slight noise, evidently through his nose. There was blood on the floor. Witness put the pistol in his pocket, and went straight away to fetch Dr. Perry, arriving there about 10 o'clock. The doctor returned with him at once, and after making an examination said he was dead, and sent witness for the police. He had never said anything to witness about taking his life.

The Coroner told witness that he should not have taken the pistol out of his hand, as it might have been a matter of the greatest importance as to the position in which the pistol was found.

The Chief Constable: What time elapsed between the first and second shot?

Witness: I did not hear the first shot.

The Chief Constable: Did Mrs. Scott hear the first shot?

Witness: She said she heard a slight noise as of a cap going off.

Wm. Samuel Hooper, coachman at the East Kent Arms, said he had known the deceased about nine years. Deceased had got a horse called Black Polly standing at the East Kent Arms, and also had a bedroom at the back looking over the yard for when he stayed at the hotel. About 7.50 on the previous night (Friday) witness saw deceased, who asked him how the horse, which had been lame four months, was getting on. Deceased had had something to drink, but was not drunk. He also talked to witness about cats annoying him of a night when he went to sleep. He said he was going to stop there that night and would shoot them all. There was a large room covered with iron in the yard, and often a great many kittens got there at night. He (witness) volunteered the information that cats ought to be licensed like dogs.

In reply to the Coroner, he said that he had a cat, but did not have a licence, because they were not granted.

Continuing, he said deceased did not show him what he was going to shoot them with. Witness went into the bar, and about 8 o'clock deceased called him out and said “Here's a sovereign. Go into Mr. Price's and buy me a revolver”. He did so, and got a small gun, but deceased would not have it, as he said it would kill people over the building at 200 yards. Witness took it back, and brought back three revolvers for deceased to choose from. The prices were 11s. 6d., 15s. 6d., and 27s. 6d., and he chose the 15s. 6d. one. The revolver produced was like the one he chose, but he could not swear to it. He said “Bring me 25 round of ammunition to kill the cats on the roof”. Witness got it and handed it to him in the porch. Deceased then went into the smoking room, but witness did not know whether he put the revolver and ammunition in his pocket or not. About 9.50 witness asked the barmaid for the letters to post. Mrs. Scott had been ill over a fortnight. She said he would have to wait, as Mr. Harrison was locked in the bedroom, and would not answer the door. The nurse called him shortly afterwards, and said he was wanted upstairs. He went up on the landing and saw Hogben, who said he wanted him to help to burst the door open, as he thought there was something wrong, having heard a report from a revolver. After a hard struggle the door was burst open, and deceased found lying on his face on the left side in a pool of blood. The gas was lighted. He did not see the pistol, but saw Hogben take something out of deceased's hand and go away. Deceased made a noise like a drunken man snoring, but did not seem to be in any pain. Witness stayed until the doctor came and then went away.

Harold Wm. Price, jeweller, Sandgate Road, Folkestone, deposed that the last witness came to his shop on the previous night and purchased a revolver (produced) and a box of fifty round of ammunition. The revolver was a seven-chambered one; an American, and size .22. He said it was for Mr. Harrison to kill or frighten cats with.

Dr. Perry said he knew the deceased, and had been attending him off and on for some years. He had suffered a great deal at times from rheumatic gout, an enlarged liver, and attacks of heart failure at times. Witness had warned him as to the critical state in which he was frequently. He was a free liver, but he was aware that he might die at any moment from heart failure. He had been depressed in consequence of illness, and when he had the attacks was very much so. A few minutes after ten on the previous night witness was fetched by Hogben, and on going into the bedroom at the East Kent Arms he saw deceased lying on his left side. His head was in a pool of blood. He was dead. Hogben showed witness the pistol. He had only been dead a few minutes when witness arrived. He had made a post mortem that afternoon in conjunction with Dr. Chambers. Before removing the skull they found a good deal of haemorrhage, and after removing the skull found a large amount of haemorrhage at the base of the brain. After careful searching they found the bullet embedded in the base of the skull on the left side. On the previous night he examined the mouth and found a slight depression and discolouration, such as would have been caused by a bullet. Death must have been instantaneous. He had not the slightest hesitation in saying that the wound was a self-inflicted one. There was no discolouration on the outside of the mouth. Personally he knew nothing of deceased's money difficulties, except that he had at times told him he had difficulty in getting his money in. Mrs. Scott was ill, and had been so for a fortnight.

Dr. Chambers corroborated Dr. Perry's evidence in its entirety.

Stanley Higham, gun maker, said that on the previous night, about 7.15, deceased came into his shop and said he wanted a rifle or revolver to shoot cats. Witness told him that a revolver was no use for the purpose he wanted, and that a little rifle would be far better. He asked about revolvers three times, but witness put him off by telling him that it was a rifle he wanted. Deceased said he wanted to shoot cats in his back garden in Bouverie Square. At the finish he bought a rifle at 15s. 6d., and 25 cartridges at 6d. He said “Don't trouble to send it tonight, it will do in the morning”.

The witness Hogben was re-called, and said they had been annoyed in the front garden by cats, but witness did not shoot cats there. He had sporting rifles at the East Kent.

Dr. Perry was asked whether the shot could have been an accidental one, and in reply said that he had not the least doubt that it was a deliberate act.

Dr. Chambers was asked the same question, and said if it had been accidental there would have been some wound on the lip or other part of the face. It must have been deliberate.

Edwin John Chadwick, Coroner's Officer, said at 10.45 on the previous night he was sent for, and on going to the back bedroom of the East Kent Arms saw deceased in a pool of blood. He examined the wound in company with Dr. Perry, and also found a bullet embedded in the wall on the right hand side entering the room. It was the same size as the one found on the mantelpiece.

Hogben, re-called, said he gave the revolver to Sergeant Osborne.

Dr. Perry said he placed the revolver on the mantelpiece.

Witness, continuing, said he took charge of the pistol, and found two exploded cartridges. The other five chambers were empty. He found 48 cartridges in the box. He searched deceased and found a gold watch, one sovereign, 17s. 5d., bunch of keys, cigarette holder in case, and a number of letters, which he gave to the Coroner.

The Coroner said he had looked through the letters, and there was nothing in them except threats of writs and summonses for money owing.

A juror: Was there a second shot anywhere about the body?

Dr. Perry: None whatever. There was a slight abrasion over the left eyebrow, evidently caused by the fall.

Another juror: Did anyone hear the first report?

The Coroner: According to the evidence of Hogben, Mrs. Scott, who was ill in another room, heard a report. I have enquired of everyone in the house, but no-one seemed to have heard it. It would be a very small report.

The Coroner's Officer said they tried the shot on the previous night with the doors closed, and they could not hear it downstairs.

Dr. Perry, in reply to the Coroner, said Mrs. Scott could not attend for a few days.

The Coroner said if they liked they could adjourn the inquest for a week so that Mrs. Scott could attend. He then proceeded to sum up, and said they had to enquire and determine by what means that man came to his death. The medical evidence was quite clear, that he met his death from the effects of a pistol shot, the bullet entering through the roof of his mouth into the base of his brain, and severing a blood vessel. That caused considerable haemorrhage and shock, from which he died almost immediately. There was no question as to the cause of death, but then came the question “Was it accident or was it intentional?” They had the evidence of the witness Hooper to the effect that deceased sent him to buy a revolver with which to shoot cats, and also that of the gunsmith in Harbour Street that a gun to shoot cats was bought. In consequence of that he re-called the doctors, and both of them gave their unhesitating opinion that the pistol must have been placed in his mouth with the deliberate intention of killing himself. The only thing which remained for them to consider was the state of mind deceased was in at the time he committed the act, if they were satisfied he committed it, a point on which he should imagine they could have no doubt whatever. They had heard from the evidence of his clerk that he was engaged in a very extensive bookmaking business; that he had suffered some severe losses in that business; that he had been worried in many matters, and that he was unable to meet his engagements. They all knew that if a man engaged in a business of that kind failed to meet his engagements, it was utter ruin to him. If he once failed he might as well give his business up. Why did he discharge the first barrel? The only reason he could think of was that he fired an experimental shot to try the penetrating power of the pistol. They in the town well knew that he was subject to heart failure, and was likely to drop down dead at any time.

After a short consultation with his colleagues on the jury, the foreman said the jury had considered the evidence, and their verdict was that he committed suicide whilst temporarily insane.

 

Folkestone Express 9 February 1901.

Friday, February 1st: Before J. Hoad, J. Pledge, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Mr. Walter Checkley, of Canterbury, was granted a transfer of the licence of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 March 1901.

Wednesday, March 9th: Before Messrs. Wightwick, Pledge, Pursey, Stainer, and Salter.

The licence of the East Kent Arms was transferred to Mr. Walter Checkley.

 

Folkestone Express 9 March 1901.

Wednesday, March 6th: Before W. Wightwick, W. Salter, G.I. Swoffer, C.J. Pursey, and J. Pledge Esqs.

Licences.

Mr. Walter Checkley, of the East Kent Arms, was granted the transfer of the licence.

 

Folkestone Express 23 November 1901.

Friday, November 15th: Before W. Wightwick and G.I. Swoffer Esqs., Alderman Salter, and Colonel Hamilton.

The licence of the East Kent Arms was temporarily transferred to Mr. Chas. Major.

 

Folkestone Express 7 December 1901.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before J. Stainer, G. Peden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Col. W.K. Westropp.

A special licensing sessions was held, when Mr. Chas Major was granted transfer of the licence he East Kent Arms.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 March 1902.

Monday, March 10th: Before Mr. W. Herbert, Alderman Salter, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Edward William Flisher, a respectable-looking young man of about 20, who was employed as boot cleaner, etc., at Rochester House School, Folkestone, was charged with stealing from a bedroom at that house two marked two shilling pieces. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Miss F. Harston, one of the lady principals of Rochester House School, deposed as to the accused being employed by her to do certain work, which occupied two or three hours daily, and for which he was paid 1s. per day and his breakfast. She also spoke as to instructing Miss Hilda Kate Ivett to conceal herself in a bedroom and await events which concerned two marked two shilling pieces.

Miss Hilda Kate Ivett said that on Saturday evening she concealed herself behind the curtain in a bedroom on the first floor of No. 4, Earls Avenue (Rochester House School). After she had been there ten minutes, prisoner entered the room, opened the right hand drawer of a chest of drawers, counted the money in it, made a further search, shut the drawer, and peered all over the top of the dressing table. He then left the room. She remained long enough to let him get away, and then on her way downstairs saw him standing near the window of another bedroom. She went down and made a communication to Miss Harston, and they both came up from the basement in time to see prisoner shut the front door. Witness flung the door open, and saw prisoner hurrying away in the direction of Sandgate Road. When he saw Miss Harston behind him he began to run. Witness went to the prisoner's house, and subsequently to the police station, and saw the accused brought in by P.C. Sales. She had no doubt the prisoner was the man she saw in the bedroom.

P.C. Sales deposed to accosting the prisoner in the doorway of 114, Black Bull Road. In reply to questions he said “I have not been near the house this evening”. His mother, who was standing in the doorway at the time, said “What about those violets which you were going to take up there this evening?”, and prisoner said he had put them in the cellar. He added “You take me up to Miss Harston's, and I will prove that I have not been there this evening”. On the way up to Earls Avenue, however, he said to witness “I did go up there this evening. I took some violets for the cook. I did not see her, so put them in the coal cellar, but I did not go inside the house. The barmaid at the East Kent Arms can prove that I was in there shortly after eight o'clock”. Witness then took him to 4, Earls Avenue, where he was identified by Miss Ivett and formally charged. He replied “All right. You have got to prove that”. On being searched, there was found in his possession some penny packets of cigarettes, part of a 3d. packet, 1s. in silver, and 4d. in bronze.

Having been warned in the usual manner, accused elected to make a statement. He said: After I left home on Saturday evening, I went down to Mr. Pollard's, the Castle public house, and stopped there until nearly 7.30. I then went up to Earls Avenue, went into the coal cellar, and left the violets. After that I went to the top of Earls Avenue, and on to the Leas, going into the East Kent Arms just after eight o'clock. From there I went into the library. After that I went to Mr. Blank's shop, and stayed there about half an hour. I then went straight home, where I met P.C. Sales on the doorstep. When he told me that he should charge me with stealing money from Miss Harston, I told him I had not been in the house that evening. I said that I would go up and see Miss Harston with him. I did so, and saw her at No. 4, Earls Avenue. The constable asked her if she identified me, and she replied “No”. It was Miss Ivett who identified me. I told Miss Harston that it was not me, as I had not been in the house that evening. After that, P.C. Sales took me to the station and charged me. I again told him that I had not been in the house.

The Chief Constable asked that the prisoner be committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

The Bench committed the accused to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions, offering to accept the bail of two householders in 10 each, and himself in 20.

 

Folkestone Express 15 March 1902.

Monday, March 10th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Alderman W. Salter, and Col. C.J. Hamilton.

Edward Wm. Flisher, a youth, employed as a boot boy, was charged with stealing 4s. 3d. from a purse in a bedroom in Rochester House School, in Earls Avenue, which offence he denied.

Annie J. Harsant, mistress of Rochester House School, Earls Avenue, said the prisoner was in her employ as boot boy since November last year. On Saturday evening, having suspicions, she marked two two shilling pieces, which she put into a purse which contained two pennies and two halfpennies, and which she placed in a drawer of the chest of drawers in a back bedroom. The money was safe at eight o'clock that evening. Witness requested one of her governesses to conceal herself in the room. She subsequently saw the prisoner leave the premises, and on looking at the purse the money was gone. The prisoner had no business in the bedroom.

Hilda Kate Ivett, a school mistress at Rochester House School, said about eight o'clock, by instructions received from Miss Harsant, she concealed herself behind a curtain in a recess in the bedroom. About ten minutes afterwards the prisoner entered the room, opened the right hand drawer, searched it and took out the purse. He opened it and took the money. He put the purse back and again searched the drawer, and he then peered all over the dressing table. He left the room, and witness followed soon after. As she was passing through another bedroom, she saw prisoner near the curtain. She informed Miss Harsant what had happened. They went upstairs and she was in time to see the prisoner go out by the front door, He looked back, and seeing Miss Fanny Harsant, he ran towards Sandgate Road. She saw prisoner's parents, and then communicated with the police.

Mr. Herbert: What light was there in the room where you were concealed? – The gas was full on.

P.C. Thomas D. Sales said about ten o'clock on Saturday evening he saw prisoner just entering the door of his home, No. 114, Black Bull Road. Witness, who was in plain clothes, said he was a police constable, and he would take him to the police station on a charge of stealing some money from Rochester House. After being cautioned, he said “Me? I haven't been near the house this evening”. The prisoner's mother, who was standing in the doorway, said “What about those violets you were going to take up there this evening?” He told witness he would be able to prove he was innocent, and on the way to Rochester House he said “I went up to give some violets to the cook. I did not see her, so I put them in the cellar. I did not go into the house. The barmaid at the East Kent Arms can prove I was in the bar shortly after eight o'clock”. Miss Ivett identified the prisoner, who was taken to the police station, where he was charged with the offence. He replied “All right; you've got to prove that”. He searched him and found eight penny packets of cigarettes, part of a 3d. packet, one shilling in silver, and 4d. in copper.

The prisoner was formally cautioned by the Bench, after which he said: I left home on Saturday evening and went to the Castle public house, and stopped till nearly seven o'clock. I then went to Earls Avenue, went into the coal cellar, and left the violets there. Then I went on to the top of Earls Avenue, went on to the Leas, and just about eight o'clock I went into the East Kent Arms. I left there and went into the library. Then I went to Mr. Blank's shop and stayed half an hour, and then went home. I met P.C. Sales on the doorstep, and he told me he would charge me with stealing money from this house, and I told him I had not been there that evening. I told him I would go to Miss Harsant's. When the last witness (Miss Harsant) said I was the man, I told them it was not me, as I had not been near the house. P.C. Sales said he would take me to the police station, and I again told him I had not been near the house at all; I was in the East Kent Arms a little after eight o'clock. He then took me to the police station and charged me.

The Bench committed the prisoner to the Borough Quarter Sessions, and fixed bail in his own recognisance of 20, and two sureties of 10.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 5 April 1902.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Edward William Flisher, 20, described as a stoker, pleaded Not Guilty to a charged of stealing 4s. 3d., the money of Fanny Jenkins Harsant and others, on the 8th March, 1902, at Folkestone.

Mr. Matthew, for the Crown, explained that prisoner was employed by the prosecutrix, Miss Harsant, as a boot boy, and to do other labour, occupying about three hours a day. Miss Harsant's suspicions having been aroused, some money was marked, and a governess in her employ (Miss Ivett) was given certain instructions. These, on being carried out, led to prisoner's arrest and indictment.

Miss Fanny Harsant, principal of Rochester House School, Earls Avenue, said prisoner had been in her service about four months. She then detailed how, on her suspicions being aroused, she marked two two shilling pieces and placed them in a drawer, giving Miss Ivett instructions to watch the drawer from a concealed position in the bedroom.

Miss Hilda Kate Ivett, governess, described how she hid behind some curtains in a bedroom and observed prisoner come into the room. Open a drawer, take out a purse, and abstract money from it. Having given prisoner time to get away, she followed him, and noticed him in another bedroom. She then went down into the basement and explained to Miss Harsant what had happened. They went to the front door together and saw prisoner, who had just left, walk sharply along Earls Avenue. On witness following, he looked over his shoulder, and (she presumed seeing her) ran away.

By prisoner: As near as I can say, you entered the room at about ten minutes past eight.

P.C. Thomas Sales proved arresting the prisoner in the doorway of 114, Black Bull Road (his home). He said he had only been to Miss Harsant's with a bunch of violets for the cook, which he put in the cellar and did not go into the house.

Prisoner was then sworn, and said he would swear that he never entered Miss Harsan's house on Saturday evening, March 8th. What he had told P.C. Sales was the truth. At 8.15 he went into the East Kent Arms, and the barmaid could prove that he was in there at the time. From the East Kent Arms he went to the Free Library on Grace Hill, from there to Mr. Blank's, the greengrocer's on Grace Hill, and from there straight home, where he met P.C. Sales on the doorstep.

Cross-examined: With regard to Miss Harsant's and Miss Ivett's evidence, he suggested that they mistook someone else for him.

Miss Alice Ward, a barmaid at the East Kent Arms,, was called by the prisoner, and said that his face seemed familiar, but they had so many customers in the bar on Saturday evenings that she could not possibly remember whether he came into the bar on the evening in question.

The jury returned a verdict of Guilty, and prisoner admitted previous convictions at the Folkestone Quarter Sessions in 1896 and 1898.

Chief Constable Reeve said that prisoner had also been in custody at Hastings, and sentenced to two months imprisonment for failing to pay a fine of 5 for obtaining a situation by means of false characters.

Miss Harsant was re-called, and said she had missed various sums of money, the largest amounts being a sovereign and a Kruger half sovereign. She had no suspicions as to the thief, and consequently took the precaution of marking the money and arranging to have the bedrooms watched. She did not employ any other male servant.

The Recorder, in passing sentence, said the jury could have arrived at no other verdict. Prisoner had also gone into the witness box and committed perjury. Of that offence, however, he should not now take notice, but give the prisoner another chance. The sentence would be nine months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 5 April 1902.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 2nd: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

Edward Wm. Flisher was indicted for stealing 4s. 3d., the money of Fanny Jenkins Harsant and others, of Rochester House, on the 8th March. Mr. T. Matthew prosecuted.

The prisoner was emploted by Miss Harsant as a boot boy, etc. Miss Harsant suspected him of dishonesty, and placed some marked coins in a purse in a drawer in a bedroom. A person was instructed to watch, and she saw the prisoner enter the bedroom in the evening and take the money.

Prisoner desired to be sworn, and gave evidence and said that at the time of the alleged theft he was in the East Kent Arms.

Alice Ward, barmaid at the East Kent Arms, was called to support this theory, but she failed to recognise the prisoner as having been in the house at the time stated.

The Recorder, in commenting on the evidence, said if the jury believed the statement of the two ladies who had given evidence they would have no difficulty in arriving at a verdict. The prisoner was clearly seen by one of them in the bedroom, and other witnesses saw him leave the house, and no questions had been put by the prisoner to shake their evidence. Against that there was only his statement that he was not guilty.

The jury found the prisoner Guilty.

The prisoner pleaded Guilty to a conviction for felony at the Quarter Sessions in 1898, after a previous conviction in October, 1896.

Prisoner persisted that he was not guilty.

Supt. Reeve said the prisoner had been sentenced to two months' hard labour at Hastings for obtaining a situation by a false character. He would like the Recorder to hear Miss Harsant's statement as to the stolen money.

Miss Harsant said she had missed a sovereign and a shilling previously and also several smaller sums of money belonging to the scholars. No suspicion attached to anyone, but they decided to set a watch. A half sovereign was on one occasion stolen from her watch chain. Prisoner conducted himself very well in other respects and did his work well.

The Recorder said Miss Harsant acted quite rightly in the way she set to work to catch the thief. He sentenced the prisoner to nine calendar months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 April 1902.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 2nd: Before Mr. Lewis Coward.

Edward William Flisher, a stoker, was charged with feloniously stealing 4s. 3d., the monies of Fanny Jenkins Harsant and others, on March 8th. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Matthew said the case against prisoner was a simple and clear one. The prosecutrix kept a school in Earls Avenue and prisoner had been employed there night and morning as a boot boy. Having her suspicions aroused, Miss Harsant marked some money, and gave instructions for a watch to be kept. Accordingly a witness concealed herself and saw prisoner enter the room, and take the money out of a purse which had been placed in a drawer. No money, with the exception of 1s. 4d. and a few cigarettes was found on prisoner when arrested.

Miss Harsant said on March 10th she marked two two shilling pieces and placed them in a purse in a drawer on the first floor. Miss Ivett, who had been watching, subsequently made a statement to her, and going up to the room, witness found that the money had disappeared. Witness saw prisoner outside the house on the night in question. He ought to have come to his work, but did not put in an appearance. Prisoner had no business upstairs unless he was directed to go.

Miss Ivett detailed how she watched behind a curtain on the night in question. After witness had been there about ten minutes, prisoner came into the room and opened a drawer, which he searched. He shook the purse, and witness heard the money clink. She also saw him count it. Prisoner then put back the purse and peered very carefully over the dressing table. Witness waited a few minutes and saw prisoner standing in another bedroom. He then made off, and witness communicated with Miss Harsant. When in the hall, witness saw prisoner closing the door, and afterwards saw him at the bottom of the steps. He was moving fast, and turning his head round and catching sight of witness and Miss Harsant, prisoner commenced to run.

Prisoner (to witness): What time did I enter the room? – About 8.10.

P.C. Sales deposed to arresting prisoner at his home, 114, Black Bull Road. He said he had not been near the house on the night of the robbery, but afterwards prisoner corrected himself by saying he took a couple of bunches of violets up for the cook, and these he placed in the cellar.

Prisoner then went into the witness box, and denied he was near the house when the robbery was said to have been committed. He was at the East Kent Arms at the time.

Alice Ward, a barmaid at the above licensed house, was called to support this, but she failed to recognise the prisoner as the man she served that night.

The jury, without any hesitation, found the prisoner Guilty.

Prisoner, who admitted three previous convictions, was sentenced to nine months' hard labour.

Miss Harsant said for some time she had missed money belonging to the scholars. No suspicion was attached to anyone, and eventually they decided to watch.

The Recorder said Miss Harsant had acted in a very proper manner.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 September 1902.

Wednesday, September 24th: Before Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Harry Moon, a lance corporal in the Buffs, and wearing the South African medal, was charged with attempting to obtain the sum of 8 14s. 6d. by means of a worthless cheque from Councillor J. Jones.

Councillor J. Jones said: On Monday, the prisoner, accompanied by a woman, came to my shop. He selected various articles of furniture, and said he would call back and pay for them. He did not call any more that day, but came back between two and three yesterday afternoon. He told me that he had a cheque for 15. Would I take it and give him the change which was to come out of the account? I asked him if the cheque was from the Government for his pay. He said “Yes”, and I asked him to go and get the cheque. He went away and came back in about half an hour. He then produced a cheque for 25, dated Sept. 23rd. He selected some more goods, and wanted the difference, 8 14s. 6d., out of the cheque. I said to him “This is not the Government cheque for 15”. He replied “My money is in the National Provincial Bank, and this is my own cheque”. I said “Why did you not get it cashed at the bank this morning?” He said “I found it was too late; the bank closes at three”. I then said “Why not wait until tomorrow when the bank opens?” He answered “Because I want particularly to get away by the five train; my wife is ill, and I want the goods delivered to the station before five”. I said to the accused “I don't want any nonsense; is this money at the bank or not?” He said “Yes, and much more than that”. I said “I don't think that I have sufficient change”. My wife said “Oh, yes, you have”, and accused said “If you have not got quite enough – I am in a hurry, and will have some more goods; these pictures will do, and it will make the change 5 or 6”. I said “You sit down, and if your cheque is all right I'll change it in three minutes”. He replied “The bank is closed; it's no use going there”. I said “Sit down; while you are chatting, I'll get the change”. I then made enquiries, and went to the police station and gave particulars to Sergt. Dawson. On my return, prisoner said “Have you got the money?” He was then outside the shop talking to the woman. I told him to come into the shop, and P.C. Scott came down. I then invited him to come to the police station and explain matters. At first he demurred. I said “Where did you get this cheque from?” He replied “From Bill Weaver, at the Prince of Wales; he gave me the cheque”. I then accompanied prisoner to the station, and at six o'clock last night signed the charge prepared by the Chief Constable.

Mrs. Major, wife of Charles Major, of the East Kent Arms Hotel, said: The prisoner came into the bar yesterday afternoon, and brought a note from my sister. In consequence of the note I gave the prisoner a blank cheque.

Charles John Lee, accountant at the National Provincial Bank, said he did not know the prisoner, and had not seen him before. Accused had not an account at the bank, and to his (witness's) knowledge never had one.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty. He said that when in South Africa he had had some money transferred to his account at Cape Town. He came from the Sussex Regiment to the Buffs, and now the money could not be traced.

Councillor Jones appealed to the Bench to deal with the accused under the First Offenders Act. The man had only just married, and it would be a pity to blight two young lives. The case had been brought in the public interest. He had not lost any money, and no real harm had been done.

An officer present said the regimental record of the accused was clean. He was transferred to the Buffs in South Africa, and invalided home with enteric fever.

Moon, questioned, said he had two more years service with the colours to do.

Alderman Herbert: Moon, you have shown great ingenuity – misplaced ingenuity – in perpetrating this act. Fortunately for you your regimental sheet is clean, and the prosecutor has pleaded hard for the Bench to deal leniently with you. You will therefore be bound over under the First Offenders Act in the sum of 20 to be of good behaviour for six months.

Prisoner: Thank you, sir.

It should be explained that Mr. Weaver of the Prince of Wales is Mrs. Major's brother. Prisoner went to the Prince of Wales in the afternoon, and spoke freely about his money at the bank. He said he did not wish to buy a book of cheques when one would do, and upon this, Mr. Weaver being out, Mrs. Weaver obliged prisoner by sending a note to Mr. Major, knowing that he banked at the N.P.B.

 

Folkestone Express 27 September 1902.

Wednesday, September 24th: Before Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and G.I. Swoffer Esq.

Harry Moon, a lance corporal of the Buffs, was charged with attempting to obtain 8 14s. 6d. from John Jones by means of a worthless cheque.

Prosecutor said between eleven and twelve o' clock on Monday prisoner, accompanied by a woman, went to his shop and selected some furniture. Prisoner said he would come back between two and three p.m. He did not do so, however, and came on Tuesday afternoon. Prisoner stated he had a cheque for 15 and asked witness if he could give him the change. Witness enquired if it was a cheque from the Government, and he replied “Yes”. Witness asked him for the cheque and prisoner said he would go and get it. He returned about half an hour later and selected some more furniture and presented a cheque on the National Provincial Bank for 25 and wanted the difference, 8 14s. 6d. Witness said it was not the Government cheque for 15. Prisoner replied “No; my money is in the National Provincial Bank, and this is my cheque”. Witness said “Why did you not cash this at the bank?” Prisoner replied “I forgot it until it was too late. The Bank closes at three o'clock”. Witness proposed that he should wait until next day and then cash it, but prisoner wanted particularly to get away by the five o'clock train, as he said his wife was ill. He wanted the goods delivered at the station before five o'clock. Witness told prisoner he did not want any nonsense, and asked whether the money was at the bank or not. Prisoner replied “Yes, and a lot more than that”. Witness said he did not think he had the change, so prisoner selected more goods, which left him change of 5. Witness told prisoner to sit down, and if his cheque was all right he would change it in three minutes. Prisoner said “The Bank is closed; it is no good going there”. Witness went to the bank, and on making enquiries and finding prisoner had no account, he went to the police station and gave information. When witness returned, prisoner said “Have you got the money?” He was then standing on the pavement. Witness told him to come inside as he did not do business on the pavement.

Constable Scott then came inside and asked prisoner to go to the police station and explain the matter. When asked where he got the cheque, prisoner said “From Bill Weaver at the Prince of Wales”.

Mrs. Alice Major, of the East Kent Arms, said prisoner went to their house on Tuesday afternoon and took a note letter, and she then put a blank cheque in and handed it to prisoner.

It was a cheque obtained in this way that prisoner used.

Charles John Mason, accountant at the National Provincial Bank, said prisoner had no account then at the Bank, and so far as witness knew he never had.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty and said he had some money transferred from Cape Town, but could not trace it at all.

Mr. Jones asked the Bench to deal as leniently as possible with prisoner.

An officer gave prisoner a very good character so far as he knew, but the prisoner's company sheet was in South Africa, and the officer commanding the regiment was away. Prisoner was at present on sick furlough, having caught enteric fever while at the front.

The Bench bound the prisoner over in the sum of 20 to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 September 1902.

Wednesday, September 24th: Before Mr. Herbert, Mr. Swoffer, and Councillor Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Harry Moon, a soldier in the Buffs, was charged with endeavouring to obtain 8 14s. 6d. from Councillor Jones by means of a worthless cheque.

Councillor Jones said prisoner went to his shop on Grace Hill with a woman and selected some articles of furniture. He then said he would call the next day. Witness saw him when he called, and prisoner told him that he had got a cheque for 15, asking him to take it and give him the change. Witness asked him whether it was the cheque from the Government for prisoner's pay, and he said “Yes”. Witness then asked him for the cheque, and he said he would go and get it, and went away. Witness said he would be there when prisoner returned. Prisoner came back in about half an hour, and produced a cheque for 25. He wanted 8 14s. 6d. change out of the cheque. Witness said to him “This is not the Govenment cheque for 15”. Prisoner answered “No. My money is in the National Provincial Bank, and this is my cheque”. Witness said “Why did you not get the cash this morning from the bank?” Prisoner replied “I forgot it until it was too late. The bank closes at 3 o'clock”. Witness then said “Why not wait until tomorrow when the bank opens?” He said “I want particularly to get away by the 5 o'clock train. My wife is ill, and I want the goods delivered to the station before five”. Witness said “I don't want any nonsense. Is this money at the bank or not?” Prisoner answered “Yes, more than that – much more than that”. Witness said “I don't think I have got nearly 9 in change”. Prisoner then said “If you have not got it, I am in such a hurry that I will have some more goods so that I can have 5 or 6 in change. I will have those pictures”. Witness said “If your cheque is right, I will change it in three minutes”. Prisoner replied “The Bank is closed; it is no use going there”. Witness then told him to sit down, and while he was chattering he would go and get the change. Witness then went to the Bank, and on the way back, to the police station, and thence to his shop again. Prisoner said “Have you got the money?” Witness replied “come in my shop. I don't do business out here”. P.C. Scott came down, and witness said “Will you come to the police station and explain this matter?” Prisoner the said he had got the cheque from Bill Weaver at the Prince Of Wales. Witness accompanied him to the police station.

Charles John Wilson, accountant at the National Provincial Bank, said he had never seen the prisoner before. He had no account at the Bank, and had not to witness's knowledge had one.

Councillor Jones made an appeal for the prisoner, remarking that it was a hard case and he did not wish the man and his young wife to be blighted thus early in life. No-one had been harmed – he had not been defrauded, but he thought it right to bring the case before the Bench in the interests of the public. He would appeal for mercy and consideration.

An officer from the Camp said prisoner had a clean sheet, and was now on sick furlough.

Prisoner was dealt with under the First Offenders Act, and bound over in 20 to be of good behaviour.

Prisoner, who was deeply moved, said “Thank you very, very much, sir”.

 

Folkestone Express 31 January 1903.

Saturday, January 24th: Before Aldermen Penfold and Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, G. Peden and W.C. Carpenter Esqs.

Chas Major was summoned for having his chimney on fire.

Inspector Lilley said about 5.25 on the afternoon of the 14th inst. his attention was drawn to the East Kent Arms on account of volumes of flames and burning material coming from the chimney. He saw Mr. Major, who said he was drawing up the fire with a piece of paper, which set the chimney on fire.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 January 1903.

Saturday, January 24th: Before Alderman Penfold, Alderman Spurgen, Councillor Peden, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and Mr. Carpenter.

Charles Major was fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs for allowing his chimney to be on fire on January 14th.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 February 1903.

Saturday, February 21st: Before Lieut. Col. Penfold, Lieut. Col. Westopp, and Messrs. W.C. Carpenter, E.T. Ward, J. Stainer, and G. Peden.

Henry Andrews, an architect, etc., appeared to answer a summons charging him with assaulting Thomas English. Both complainant and defendant are well known locally, and, therefore, considerable interest was taken in the case.

The complainant said that about 10.20 p.m. on the 18th of February he went into the East Kent Arms and saw defendant sitting there. He sat down next to Andrews. Someone remarked that “Freddy” Mason was dead, and he (complainant) turned to defendant and said “He was a pal of yours, wasn't he, Harry?” With that defendant “started raving and making a blackguard of complainant”. The landlord told defendant to leave the house and never come in again. Defendant went out, and complainant left about 11 o'clock. As he was passing Upton's (the house next door), defendant stepped out, muttering something, and struck defendant a violent blow on the jaw with his clenched fist.

The defendant: When I was sitting in the room, didn't you say to me “You are a ---- lunatic, and ought to be buried with Freddy Mason”?

Complainant: No, I didn't.

You know you are committing perjury?

The Magistrates' Clerk: Complainant has sworn that he did not. That is his answer.

Frank Goodyear said he was losing the “Bodega” on the night in question when he saw the assault committed.

Defendant said that for a very long time complainant had grossly insulted him. On the night in question, English called him “a ---- lunatic”, and said that he ought to have been buried with Freddy Mason. At that he (defendant) grew indignant and felt perfectly justified in striking complainant as he did, after such great provocation had been given.

The Chairman said that whatever the provocation might have been, defendant had waited outside in cold blood and committed the assault. He must pay a fine of 20s. and 10s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour. The fine was paid.

 

Folkestone Express 28 February 1903.

Saturday, February 21st. Before Alderman Penfold, Lieut. Col. Westropp, W.C. Carpenter, E.T. Ward, G. Peden, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Henry Andrews was summoned for assaulting Thomas English.

Complainant stated that he went into the East Kent Arms about 10.20 p.m. on Monday night and sat down next to defendant. Some “chaffing” was going on, and defendant, taking it seriously, became excited and noisy, and was requested by the landlord to leave. He did so, and waited outside, and as complainant was passing stepped out of a doorway, muttered something, and struck him a severe blow on the jaw.

Frank Goodyear said on the night in question he was closing the Bodega, when he saw defendant standing in a doorway opposite. Complainant came by, and defendant stepped out and struck him. Complainant pushed him away, and defendant again attempted to strike him.

Defendant told the Bench he had been constantly insulted by complainant. He had been to an entertainment at the Town Hall, and then went to the East Kent Arms. Complainant came in and said some person was dead, and he (defendant) was a lunatic and ought to be buried with him. He then went outside, and just after complainant followed. He (defendant) said “What do you mean by insulting me?” Complainant then squared up at him, and he struck complainant on the jaw. Defendant also told the Bench that he considered to be called a lunatic was a gross insult, and he was perfectly justified in the step he took.

The Bench, however, took a different view of the matter and fined defendant 1 and 10s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 February 1903.

Saturday, February 21st: Before Alderman Penfold, Lieutenant Colonel Westropp, Councillor Peden, Messrs. Ward, Stainer, and Carpenter.

Henry Andrews, of Guildhall Street, was summoned by Thomas Henry English for assaulting him on the 16th February by striking him on the face.

Complainant said that last Monday evening, about 10.30 p.m., he went to the East Kent Arms and saw the defendant sitting there. Witness sat down next to him, and someone remarked that old Fred Mason was dead. He turned to defendant and said “He was a pal of yours, wasn't he, Harry?” With that Andrews started raving and calling witness a blackguard. The landlord ordered defendant out of the house, and told him not to come in again. Witness left the house at eleven o'clock, and as he was passing Upton's next door, the defendant stepped out of the doorway and muttered something, and struck him a violent blow on the jaw.

Mr. Bradley: Open or shut hand?

Witness: With his fist, sir. The jaw is still bruised.

Defendant: When I was sitting in the bar, didn't you come into that place and say “You are a ---- lunatic, and should have been buried with Frederick Mason, for then there would be two out of the way?”

Complainant: No.

Defendant: You are committing perjury by saying that.

Frank Goodyear said that when he was closing his premises on the Monday evening he saw Mr. English come out of the East Kent Arms. Defendant stepped out of the doorway, and struck Mr. English a blow on the face. The latter tried to push his assailant out of the way, when defendant again tried to strike him. He did not hear complainant say anything to defendant.

Defendant, addressing the Bench, said that for years he had been grossly insulted by “this individual”. It did not matter where he went, or where he saw him, he insulted him. On Monday night he had been to the Town Hall to an entertainment. He went across to the East Kent Arms afterwards, and while he sat there, he (complainant) came in and made a remark that Frederick Mason was dead, and that he (defendant) was a ---- lunatic and should have been buried at the same time, and that would have been two out of the way. Mr. Major said that he did not want any row, and witness went out. When “this man” came out, he asked him what he meant by insulting him, and complainant said “Insulting you”, and squared up. Defendant thought he was perfectly justified in doing what he did. To call a man a lunatic was one of the most violent things a man could call another.

The Chairman remarked that whatever provocation defendant had received, it appeared that he had been waiting outside in cold blood for Mr. English to come out. The Bench would fine defendant 20s. and 10s. costs, or fourteen days' imprisonment. Defendant paid the money.

 

Folkestone Express 10 June 1905.

Monday, June 5th: Before The Mayor and Alderman Vaughan.

George Read was charged with being drunk and incapable in Sandgate Road on Saturday. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Watson said at four o'clock on Saturday afternoon he was on duty in Sandgate Road, where he saw the prisoner very drunk. He fell down in the East Kent yard, and was ejected from there; witness, finding he was unable to walk, brought him to the police station.

The Superintendent said prisoner was a “regular client” of theirs.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 19 November 1907.

Inquest.

The Coroner (Mr. W.G. Haines) held an inquest this afternoon on the body of Thomas Nickalls.

Harry Nickalls, a postman, brother of the deceased, identified the body as that of Thomas Nickalls. He was 23 years of age, and was single. He had acted as potman at the East Kent Arms, and lived at 10, Spring Cottages. Witness last saw him alive on Sunday night at No. 9, The Plain. He had been in good health up to the last two months, and only said he was down on his luck. He was in constant work, and had been in his recent occupation about a week. He had formerly been barman at the Red Cow, Foord Road. As far as witness knew he had no troubles. There was something in his manner on Sunday night that witness could not understand. Deceased had been under the doctor, and had been treared for nervous breakdown, which witness thought was due to his not being able to get work. Witness parted with him on Sunday night at 9.10. Witness asked him several things, but could not get any satisfactory answer.

Alice Cladingbowl, wife of Charles Cladingbowl, a coachman, said she resided at No. 9, The Plain. The deceased was her brother, and often visited her. She noticed he was strange in his manner about a fortnight ago, and did not seem himself. She had questioned him about his breakdown, but he gave no particular reason, and certainly did not lead her to think he would take his life. He left the house on Monday morning, as if he was going to work, after having his breakfast.

George Flood, 6, Coastguard Cottages, said on Monday morning at 8.10 he got as far as the west end of the Switchback, when he saw a body floating about three or four fathoms from the shore. He got the body out of the sea and handed it over to Mr. Chadwick. Witness did what he could to bring the deceased round, but failed. He also sent to the police station.

Dr. Gilbert deposed that on Monday week he saw the deceased, and found he was suffering from a general breakdown and a love affair. He also seemed to have a difficulty in getting work. Witness saw him again on Thursday, and he seemed better, and his trouble seemed to be passing off. On Saturday deceased called at witness's house, and asked to be allowed to go off his Club. The marks on deceased were no doubt caused by the action of the beach. Death, in his opinion, was due to drowning.

The Town Sergeant gave evidence as to the body being handed over to him on Monday morning, and also to finding several letters on the deceased, none of which, however, had any reference to the matter.

The jury, without any hesitation, returned a verdict of “Suicide whilst of unsound mind”.

 

Folkestone Express 23 November 1907.

Inquest.

On Tuesday afternoon the Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines) investigated the circumstances attending the death of Thomas Nickalls, whose body the previous morning was found floating in the sea close to the sea wall near to the switchback. Unfortunately, Nickalls had for some time been unable to obtain regular employment and that probably preyed upon his mind, and he had a nervous breakdown, which proved too much for him.

Henry Gordon Nickalls, a postman, residing at 7, Geraldine Road, identified the body viewed by the jury as that of his brother, Thomas Nickalls, who was 23 years of age. He was a single man, and was last engaged as a potman at the East Kent Arms. He was living at 10, Spring Cottages. Witness last saw him alive on Sunday night at 9, The Plain, the residence of his sister. Up to the last two months the deceased had been very well. He had only seen him twice during the last two months. He had often complained to witness that he was down on his luck and could not get any work. He believed he had been in work for about a week. He had been barman at the Red Cow, Foord Road. He did not know that he had any troubles or any money troubles. On Sunday night the deceased seemed strange, and he could not make him out at all. His sister had told him that his brother had been under the doctor for nervous breakdown. He took it that the cause of the breakdown was worry because of no work. He did not know it was because he wanted to get married. On Sunday night the deceased stared so and seemed very distant. He left his brouther at the Plain Cottages about a quarter past nine.

Mrs. Alice Cladingbowl, the wife of Charles Cladingbowl, a coachman, residing at 9, The Plain, said the deceased was her brother. He had very often been in the habit of visiting her lately. He had been out of work a good deal. Previous to getting work at the Red Cow he worked for Mr. Lukey. During the past fortnight she noticed he was strange in his manner. He seemed to be very absent minded. After he was ill he stayed with her, so she sent for Dr. Gilbert, who attended him for nervous breakdown. She had often questioned him as to the strangeness, and he answered “Nothing in particular”. He had never said anything to lead her to think he would take his life. On Monday morning, between a quarter and twenty past seven, he left the house to go to work at the East Kent Arms. He had been away from work a week. Mr. Major was willing to take him on again. The deceased did not say anything to her. He appeared to be a little better. She, however, asked him to have another week from work, but he took himself off the club.

Thomas Flood, of 6, Coastguards' Cottages, a collector at the Metropole Lift, said on Monday morning, about ten minutes past eight, he was walking to his work along the Marine Walk and when just beyond the switchback he saw a body floating in the sea. He got it out, and with assistance carried it up the beach and handed the body over to Mr. Chadwick at ten minutes past nine. He turned the body over and got the water out of him. He appeared to be quite dead and cold. There was frothing at the mouth, the face was bruised and the eyes were blood red.

Dr. Thornton Gilbert said he first saw the deceased at 9, The Plain. He was suffering from nervous breakdown, and seemed to have some worry about a love affair and a difficulty of getting work. He suggested that he should take a little rest and not look at the black side of life. He saw him the following day and he appeared much better and more cheerful, and the other matter seemed to be passing off. A gentleman, who was acting for him, saw the deceased on Saturday and the latter suggested that he should be taken off the Friendly Society, as he wanted to get work. He had examined the body that day, but there were no marks of violence upon it. The marks on the face would be caused by the beach. In his opinion death was caused by drowning. The deceased's condition on the Monday did not lead him to suppose that there would be a more serious breakdown.

Edwin John Chadwick, the Coroner's Officer, said he took over the body from Mr. Flood about ten minutes past nine. He undressed the body and found a quantity of letter upon him in addition to other articles.

A verdict of “Suicide whilst temporarily insane” was returned.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 November 1907.

Inquest.

A very sad story was unfolded at the Town Hall on Tuesday afternoon, when the Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines) held an enquiry regarding the death of Thomas Nickalls, a young man, aged 23.

Henry Gordon Nickalls, of 7, Geraldine Road, a postman, identified the body as that of his brother Thomas. He was a single man, and had recently been employed as potman at the East Kent Arms. He lived at 10, Spring Cottages. On Sunday night witness last saw deceased at No. 9, The Plain Cottages, where his sister resided. Up till the last two months deceased had been very well in health. During that time witness had not seen much of him. He had complained that he was down on his luck, and could not get any work. He had been in his last situation about a week, and before that had been barman at the Red Cow, in Foord Road. Deceased had no money troubles. Witness could not understand his brother on Sunday night, for he seemed so strange. He had been under the doctor, owing to a nervous breakdown, as the result of his worrying through his inability to get work. Witness did not know that deceased wanted to get married. On the Sunday night, soon after nine o'clock, witness left deceased at The Plain Cottages.

Mrs. Alice Cladingbowl, wife of Mr. Chas. Cladingbowl, a coachman, living at No. 9, The Plain, said deceased was her brother. Very often he visited her. He had been out of work for a long time, and had not been in regular employment since he left Mr. Lukey's employ as a cellarman. A fortnight ago witness noticed deceased was strange in his manner. He seemed very absent in his manner, and was not himself. Witness asked Dr. Gilbert to attend him. She often asked deceased what had caused the breakdown, but her brother never gave any definite answer. On Monday morning, about 7.15, the deceased left her house with the intention of going to work at the East Kent arms. He had been away from there a week, owing to his illness. Mr. Major had expressed his willingness to take deceased back to work on the Monday morning, and was surprised that he did not reach there. On the Saturday he took himself off the club, though witness advised him to have another week at home.

George Flood, collector in the employ of the Metropole Lift Company, deposed that on Monday morning, about eight o'clock, he was going to work. He usually went to work along the Marine Walk. At the westward of the Shelter, about five fathoms out, he saw a body floating. Witness dragged it out of the water, and the Coroner's officer was sent for. To witness the man appeared to be dead. He was quite cold, and was frothing a very little at the mouth. His face was very bruised, and his eyes were bloodshot.

Dr. J.W. Thornton Gilbert proved having attended the deceased. He first saw him on Monday week, when he was suffering from nervous breakdown. He appeared to have a general upset about a love affair, and the difficulty of getting work. Witness suggested that he should take some rest, and not to look on the black side of life. Next day he was more cheerful, and his trouble seemed to be passing off. On Saturday he visited witness's house, and saw the gentleman who was acting for him in his absence. Deceased suggested that he should be removed from the sick books of his club, as he wanted to get work. Death had been caused by drowning. The abrasions on the face were probably due to contact with the shingle. Witness did not presuppose that deceased would take his life.

Edward John Chadwick, Coroner's Officer, proved receiving the body from George Flood. Witness undressed him, and found a quantity of letters, an Oddfellows Club card, a silver watch and chain, etc.

A verdict of “Suicide whilst temporarily insane” was returned.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 October 1908.

Felix.

My last week's yarns anent “Pompey” and the corpse, the wheelbarrow, and the church steeple, appear to have gone down very well. Here is another one that I and many others can vouch for. The late Mr. J.P. Scott, a prince of local whips, who met with such a tragic death at Barham, was also proprietor of the East Kent Arms. Scotty was one of the rough and ready sort, taciturn, very outspoken, true as steel to his friends, and straightforward to a degree. He was not, however, “anybody's ha'porth”. Although there was, perhaps, something stern about him, yet he had a certain magnetic quality that made him much sought after by many “lively boys” and “young bloods”. Thus one day a bill was posted about the town that Scotty's 50th birthday would be celebrated at the well-known hostelry in Sandgate Road, at 11 a.m., with free champagne and cigars. What a gathering there was. Those “in the know” were looking on with glee, whilst what became of poor Scotty on the occasion I do not remember. However, I do know that everything was taken good-humouredly, and in the nature of an innocent practical joke.

Just now I was referring to Scotty. Well, it reminds me how fond he was of reading. Similarly to many others, he enjoyed “a quiet five minutes” to himself. Although a licensed victualler, he never, at least in later years, allowed any alcoholic liquors to pass his lips. Very often he could be seen with one leg perched in a chair (he was lame), pince-nez balanced on his nose, and a book in hand. Thus, sitting in the cosy parlour of the East Kent, he would often be deeply immersed. Those of us who knew him well were aware that such a time was not opportune to open a conversation with our hero. To do so would mean a deserved snub. Yes, there's no harm in stating it, some of us really loved old Scotty. I remember once some years ago one of those hee-haw gilded dons came in. He was a complete stranger. The famous whip was enjoying his book, briar, and a cup of cocoa, when the young don suggested that the weather was fine. Came a curt “Yes” from Scotty. Then came a string of inane questions and remarks from the “toff”. This was too much. Whether Scotty had a particularly interesting book in hand, I know not, but he removed his pince-nez, and, liking the stranger in the face, said “I don't know who the Mephistopheles you are, but of this I am certain, you have never been to a school of manners. Haven't you got the common sense to see that I am reading?” The don collapsed, drank up his ginger ale, and departed a wiser, if a sadder man. Scotty renewed his reading. And when we come to think of it the rebuke, though perhaps forcibly expressed, was deserved.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 May 1910.

Local News.

An extraordinary accident occurred near Hythe in the early hours of Thursday morning. As a party of Folkestonians, including Mr. C. Major, of the East Kent Arms, was returning from Lydd in a taxicab, when near the Metropole Laundry, in the Dymchurch Road, the car suddenly swerved and turned over on its side, throwing the occupants out into the road. Fortunately nearly all of them escaped with a bad shaking, but Mr. Major was thrown out on his hand, and sprained his wrist rather badly. The back of his mouth and throat was also slightly injured by the stem of a pipe he was smoking at the time.

After the accident the party walked to Hythe, where they telephoned for another car.

The damaged car remained at the side of the road until late in the morning, when a trolley was placed under a wheel which was smashed, and the vehicle dragged into Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Daily News 4 March 1911.

This morning at about 8.15 a thrilling scene was witnessed in Sandgate Road such that has never been seen before.

The Folkestone Corporation possess two steam rollers, which are both out of repair.

They have just been repairing the road in Church Street, which is now lined with metal, and requiring a steamroller they had hired one from Hythe.

It left Hythe this morning, was proceeding to Church Street, and when arriving in Sandgate Rd. near Underwood and Penfold's, the brakes refused to act and the driver lost control, and although he is alleged to have shut off steam, the machine dashed at a furious rate down the Sandgate Road.

It seems that there was some defect in the steering gear, otherwise the driver might have turned to the right into West Cliff Gardens, and thus pulled up, instead of which he sped on his mad career until the road narrowed near Weston's shop, where he seemed to have collided with the curb, and into the door of the East Kent Arms Hotel, and pursuing his wild course he dashed into the bar.

The impact was terrific. It tore away the brickwork, cracked the principal column that carries the house, and, we understand, moved the whole floor by some three inches.

It is marvellous and providential that no-one was injured or killed. We tremble to contemplate what the consequences would have been if the accident had occurred a few minutes later and collided with one of the heavily-laden motor coaches.

It seems nothing short of a miracle that in the busiest thoroughfare of the town on a Saturday morning such an occurrence could have taken place without some fatality, and of course we are all thankful that it is so.

It is needless to say that a large crowd assembled, amongst whom were many distinguished officials and members of the Corporation.

Alderman Dunk and the Borough Engineer were in close conversation, looking very grave and very wise. The Alderman is the Chairman of the Highways Committee, and the one who has control over these matters.

A.F. Kidson Esq., Town Clerk, was consulting with other members of the Council, who were even then discussing liabilities and compensation.

Cameras and snapshot machines abounded, but the one who seemed to attract most attention was one of the young gentleman pupils in the Borough Engineer's office. He was congratulating himself that he had seven plates showing the roller in all positions.

Even this failed to satisfy his artistic veracity, and he was seen to mount and enter the sacred precincts of the Inland Revenue offices over Heron's, the grocers.

Reckless of the danger he got out of the window and stood on the parapet, sighting his machine with the precision of a Sidney Street refugee.

For the moment he attracted more attention from the crowd than the damaged engine and hotel, and several cameras were sighted to focus the artist.

Probably in a week's time, when the matter is almost forgotten, some of the leading Corporation subsidised papers may give an account with illustrations, but in local journalism we are not content to compete. We lead, and serve up the news, fresh and accurate.

 

Folkestone Express 11 March 1911.

Local News.

An extraordinary accident happened to the Hythe Corporation steam roller in Sandgate Road yesterday morning, with the result that the engine was totally wrecked. The facts are very simple. The Folkestone Corporation, owing to the axle of their small steam roller having broken, applied to the Hythe Corporation for the loan of their roller to repair Church Street. Accordingly at a quarter past six on Saturday morning the steam roller left Hythe in charge of John Blackman and proceeded to Folkestone. The driver's own story is that the engine was under his control until it was within some twenty yards of the East Kent Arms. It is a rather steep gradient, for a heavy machine, from Lloyd's Bank to the Town Hall, and the steam roller began to gain speed rapidly. Until Marks's shop was reached the roller was on the north side. Blackman quickly discovered that the steering gear was working irregularly, and he immediately reversed the lever for a backward motion and put on steam. This, however, did not have the desired effect, and the steam roller came on to the pavement right in front of the Maypole Dairy Co.'s shop, travelling at a speed between ten and fifteen miles an hour. The engine continued its course along the pavemanent until it reached the East Kent Arms, when it ran full tilt into the main entrance with a loud crash and then collapsed. The mud plug was knocked in and, the steam and water escaping at high pressure, caused a noise which could be heard many yards away, greatly alarming Mr. Bayly's horse, which was standing near. The steam roller presented a very forlorn appearance after the accident. The axle was broken and the wheel on the right hand side was disconnected. The engine, therefore, leaned over at an acute angle. The forks were lying nearby, while the engine faced the East Kent Arms. The machine was thus pitched forward. It weighed ten tons. The course of the runaway could be traced by the slabs of the pavement, which were broken and depressed. The damage to the East Kent Arms, although not apparent at first sight, is extensive. The engine crashed into the brickwork left of the door, and the stucco and bricks were broken, while the partition was pushed in. So tremendous was the impact that the interior of the building had the aspect of a dwelling after an earthquake. The flap of the bar overlapped.

In an interview, Mr. Charles Major, landlord of the East Kent Arms, said at about a quarter to nine he heard a rattling noise, followed by a tremendous crash. The foundations were shaken, and he thought the house was coming down. Volumes of steam issued from the engine into the bar, so that it was impossible to see across it. So great was the velocity of the steam that, hitting against the broken brickwork, it shot the sand to the further side of the bar, and the bottles and decanters were covered with grit. The floor became very wet, and the bar was soon full of water. Mrs. Major, who has been confined to her bedroom for some time, received a great shock.

There were several stories afloat as to people having narrow escapes from being injured. In one instance a little girl, who it was said had been to a confectioners' shop in Sandgate Road to purchase bread, became frightened and confused, and dashed across the road in front of the steam roller. She took refuge in the East Kent Arms, which was somewhat remarkable. It was fortunate that the steam was able to get free, or there might have been serious trouble with the boiler, and the driver, who behaved in a most courageous manner, might have been seriously scalded.

The accident was soon noised abroad, and the wrecked steam roller was the centre of attraction throughout the morning. Messrs. Aveling and Porter, engineers, Rochester, the makers, were communicated with.

The steam roller remained in Sandgate Road until Monday morning, when it was taken to pieces and loaded on to trolleys for removal.

People are now much perturbed as to who will have to pay for the damage. We must “Wait and see”.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1911.

Local News.

Folkestone was treated on Saturday morning to the extraordinary spectacle of a runaway steamroller. Considerable damage was caused, and it must be accounted as distinctly providential that no loss of life occurred.

The accident was the indirect result of another. The previous day, while one of the Folkestone steamrollers was working in the town, one of the axles broke, and the engine was stranded. Folkestone possesses two steamrollers, one large and one small, and it was the small one that was damaged. Church Street was at the time in process of repair, and as the large engine was of too great width to roll the street conveniently, it was decide to hire the engine belonging to the Hythe Corporation for the purpose. This was the engine to which the principal accident occurred. It left the Cinque Port on Saturday morning, driven by John Blackman, a Hythe driver, for Folkestone.

All went well till the steamroller was coming down Sandgate Road. Then, for some reason which at the time could not be ascertained, the engine suddenly became out of control. Just before arriving at Mr. Sainsbury's shop the huge bulk started to plunge forward unchecked. The driver flung over his reversing gear, but this failed of its purpose. The brakes apparently refused to act, and to add to the calamity the engine did not answer to the steering gear.

The time was about 8.45 a.m., and there was naturally a large number of people about. Shouts and the clatter of the runaway engine warned them of the danger, and they fled in all directions, many screaming. The assistants in the Maypole Dairy were startled by a sudden inrush of people, and wondered what the cause was, till a second later they saw the engine crash on to the pavement outside. The stones were splintered, and the curb smashed, but the steamroller gathered speed every instant, the gradient being considerable. There were one or two narrow escapes, one in particular being that of a little girl, who seemed unable to move from where she was in the road through fear. She escaped death by inches only.

Still the engine plunged onwards, and by the time it reached the East Kent Arms was travelling, according to the driver's estimate, at 15 miles an hour. Ten tons weight careering along uncontrolled at 15 miles an hour represented a very alarming spectacle of deadly force, particularly as the Town Hall and a right angled turn, round which the engine could not have been steered, lay right ahead.

Fortunately, however, the runaway did not reach as far as the Town Hall. Outside the East Kent Arms the front part swung round sideways and struck a glancing blow at the outside wall. Had it struck it with full force, it must have utterly wrecked the building, but as it was the damage was serious enough. The base of a supporting pillar was knocked down, and a large fissure appeared in the front wall. One theory is to the effect that the front wheel came off and that only this struck the building, this accounting for the fact that the front wall was not entirely knocked down, as would seem probable had the full force of the engine struck it.

The engine itself immediately collapsed. The front wheel lay across the pavement, and the front part of the engine fell like a broken kneed horse into the gutter. The back axle broke, and the whole engine became a battered wreck, a strange example of power self-hurled to destruction. There was great danger that the boiler would burst, in which case the damage to surrounding property must have been prodigious, but, miraculously, in the collision the mud plug which forms a valve at the base of the boiler was knocked in against the steam, this showing the force of the impact, and through the hole thus made the steam and water escaped with a tremendous roar, which was heard for a long distance. He driver also helped to avert this potential final catastrophe of a burst boiler, for he very pluckily stuck to his post till the end, and opened the steam escape valve before jumping clear.

The feelings of the people inside the East Kent Arms were naturally those of extraordinary amazement and alarm. The shouts, the rush of people, the crash of the collision and the roar of the escaping steam – these things occurring at their very door was extremely terrifying.

The whole thing from the time the engine started to run away till it was finally at a standstill probably did not occupy more than ten seconds, and in that short interval it was difficult to grasp really what was occurring. People in several houses further down the road declared that the ground shook, and thought that an earthquake had happened. Inside the East Kent Arms, of course, the accident was more appalling. So great was the force of the impact that the bar counter was actually shifted bodily an inch or two, and several other things moved. Unhappily, Mrs. Major, the wife of the lessee, was ill in bed, and she suffered severely from the shock.

The news of the disaster naturally attracted a large crowd of people, and all day long the police were occupied in moving on numbers of interested sightseers.

Special appliances had to be sent for from the works of Messrs. Aveling and Porter, Rochester, the makers of the engine, to remove the wreck. The firm's men set to work late on Saturday evening, and after working nearly all Monday with a tripod crane, powerful jacks, and other apparatus, succeeded in clearing the road on Monday evening. Their procedure was to take away the front wheel of the engine, the fly wheel, and some other parts separately. They hoisted the back of the engine on jacks, took out the broken axle, replaced it by a new one, put on the old back wheels, then hoisted the front part of the engine on to a strong motor lorry, and so dragged it away to Shorncliffe, where it was taken by rail to Rochester.

The extent of the damage to the house and engine has not yet been finally ascertained, but it is expected to cost something like 500. The question of liability is also the subject of discussion between the Hythe and Folkestone Corporations. A private meeting of the Hythe Corporation has been held to consider the report of their surveyor on the matter, but no details were communicated to the press.

The driver of the steamroller was seen by one of our representatives during the week. Mr. John Blackman lives at 68, Stade Street, and has been there for over twelve years. He told the Herald man that on that fateful Saturday morning he started away from Hythe at 6.30. On his arrival at Westbourne Gardens at Folkestone he got some water for the engine, and proceeded on his way, subsequently coming to the hill. About fourteen yards down the hill he found that the engine was striking to the right, and accordingly turned the steering wheel slightly more. But he found that this would not answer. He then turned the wheel over as far as it would go, but with no effect. The next thing he did was to reverse the engine, for that was the only thing left for him to do, but the roller went faster. Mr. Blackman then knew he could do nothing else, and his only hope, as he explained, was that he would not run over anybody, for the engine was entirely out of control.

“I remember seeing a little girl”, said the driver, “who seemed to be sometimes running by the side of the roller, and very near the front of it, but none of the onlookers had the presence of mind to snatch her away. Of course, everybody was running away from the roller out of danger. I can only remember that”, said Mr. Blackman, “and I hardly knew where the roller was until it went smash against the wall. I did not seem to think about myself at all; I did not realise that there was any danger for me”.

Continuing, he said that as far as he could remember the back wheel caught the wall first, and the roller afterwards went smash against the wall from the rebound. When the front wheel caught this had the effect of loosening the part which subsequently caused the boiler to empty itself. Realising this, the driver then put the fire out with the aid of water, so that no further mischief could occur.

Mr. Blackman, it may be mentioned, has been working on steamrollers, on and off, for about twelve years, and during the whole of that time he has been in the almost constant employ of the Hythe Corporation. It is only very recently that he was at work with the roller on the very steep Blackhouse Hill. From all sources we learn that he is a very reliable man. As a boy he used to be fond of taking journeys upon steamrollers when he had the chance.

 

Folkestone Express 7 March 1914.

Tuesday, March 3rd: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Jenner, J.J. Giles Esq., and Col. Owen.

The licence of the East Kent Arms was temporarily transferred from Mr. C. Major to Mr. Frank Funnell.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1914.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday and application for the temporary transfer of the licence of the East Kent Arms from Mr. C. Major to Mr. Frank Funnell, the well-known jobmaster, was granted, and on Wednesday the licence was transferred.

 

Folkestone Express 11 April 1914.

Local News.

On Wednesday morning at the police court the licence of the East Kent Arms Hotel was transferred from Mr. C. Major to Mr. F. Funnell.

 

Folkestone Express 29 May 1915.

Thursday, May 27th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Spurgen and Colonel Owen.

Samuel Matthews was charged with being drunk and incapable the previous evening. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Cheyney said about 6.35 p.m. he saw the prisoner in company with two or three soldiers. He was very drunk, and went into the East Kent Arms, where he was refused drink, and had to be ejected. The soldiers refused to have anything to do with him, so he (witness) took him into custody.

Fined 5/-.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 September 1916.

Friday, September 8th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Frank Funnell, landlord of the East Kent Arms, was summoned for selling intoxicating liquors on licensed premises during prohibited hours.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the defence, and stated at the outset that an adjournment might be necessary because he had to call for the defence several officers who were not present now. He did not know whether the Bench would prefer to adjourn at once, in order that the officers might be subpoenaed to appear, or if they would hear as much as possible of the case and then adjourn.

The Chief Constable intimated that he had no objection to an adjournment.

The Bench decided to hear the prosecution. Mr. Mowll said he would plead Not Guilty.

Major Sir Herbert Raphael, Assistant Provost Marshal, deposed that at about 9 p.m. on the 31st August he went with Sergt. Major May, of the Military Police, to the East Kent Arms. He rang the bell repeatedly, but could get no answer. The bell was at the side of the gate giving access to the yard, and the only bell on the front of the premises. He then looked through a slit in the gate, and saw a man standing in the lighted room opposite. In about ten minutes' time the man came out. Witness called to him to leave the gate open, whereupon he immediately slammed it behind him. Witness had a conversation with him in the street. About ten minutes later witness heard Sergt. Major May calling him, and saw a lady at the gate, which the Sergeant Major pushed open. Witness entered the premises, and went into a room adjoining the bar, where he saw five officers in uniform, a civilian, and the defendant. On the table were five glasses containing whisky and water or whisky and soda. On another table was a number of empty glasses, which had been used. Witness took the names and regiments of the officers present, and left the room. Almost at once he returned and examined the glasses, which all smelt of whisky. By their appearance the whisky must have been recently served. When he was leaving the room the second time, Lieutenant Cotton said to witness “We're all right; I'm a bit of a lawyer myself. We ordered the drinks before eight o'clock”. Witness told him that had nothing to do with the matter, and that he was not there to argue the legal aspect of the case with him. Defendant accompanied witness from the room, and said “I am very sorry. I hope it is not serious”. Witness said “It is extremely serious”.

By the Magistrates' Clerk: It must have been about 9.25 when he actually entered the house.

By Mr. Mowll: Witness did not hear the bell ring when he pressed the button. When he got through the gate he found the door of the house open. Witness knew defendant was also a jobmaster, and could quite imagine he would have business with officers. Whilst he was in the room a young lady entered, but he did not hear her say “Supper is ready”, nor did he go into the coffee room and see the supper. He officers were still there when he left the premises. According to a standing order for troops, they had no right to be there. Witness did not ask defendant for any explanation as to why the men were there or whether they had consumed intoxicating liquors since closing time.

In reply to Mr. Andrew, witness said the whisky, from its aeration, was certainly freshly served.

Sergt. Major May, of the Military Foot Police, corroborated, and said when he entered the room he saw four officers, a warrant officer, a civilian and defendant. On the table were four glasses containing liquor, and some empty glasses. Whilst Sir Herbert was taking the names, one of the officers rose from his chair at the table, holding a glass at his side, and placed it on the table while Sir Herbert's back was turned. The glass contained whisky. Witness also smelt another glass, and found it, too, contained whisky.

This closed the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Mowll submitted that this case was under the Liquor Control Order, and therefore certain onuses of proof imposed upon the licensee by the Licensing (Consolidation) Act, 1910, did not apply. The summons was that the defendant had permitted the consumption of intoxicating liquor at 9.20 p.m. It was for the prosecution to prove that such consumption took place at the time named. The mere presence of the liquor, which under the Licensing Acts would have thrown on the licensee the onus of proving that no liquor was consumed, did not apply to this case. He submitted that the prosecution had not proved any case against defendant.

The Magistrates overruled this point.

Mr. Frank Funnell said he had been the landlord of the East Kent Arms since March, 1914. On August 31st Lieut Cotton, who was a personal friend of witness, came to the house about 7.45. There also came a Major Mitchell, who frequently had meals at the house, and who ordered supper for that night. There was also at the house Lieut. Cameron (who lived with Major Mitchell), who frequently used defendant's telephone four or five times in a night, and did a good deal of writing in defendant's office. Lieut. Jenkins was also present. At 8 o'clock witness cleared the rest of the company out, but the officers remained in the bar parlour, waiting for supper, with the exception of Lieut. Cameron, who was in the office telephoning. From 8 o'clock onward no intoxicating liquor of any kind was served to the officers or anyone in the house. Witness had his supper, and then sat in the bar parlour with the officers, telling them their supper would soon be ready. Witness had not cleared the bar, and there were about 25 glasses of all kinds standing about. Just when Sir Herbert was in the bar, witness's daughter came to say supper was ready.

Mr. Mowll: Was any liquor consumed in the house after 8 o'clock? – I didn't see any.

Was there any opportunity of anyone to consume any after hours? – Not unless they had it in their glasses before, and I certainly didn't see any.

By the Chief Constable: Witness saw the Assistant Provost Marshal smell one large glass. Lieut. Cotton never said a word; it was Lieut. Jenkins who spoke. Witness thought he said “Why don't you taste it?”. He also said “You're wrong. We've had nothing to drink here since 8 o'clock”. Three of the officers frequently had supper at the house, but never had anything to drink after hours.

By the Magistrates' Clerk: Witness was in the dining room for supper from 8.20 to 9.05, leaving the officers alone in the parlour. Witness could not say what they had to drink before 8 o'clock, as he was not serving them.

Suppose they had got served with liquor before 8 o'clock, what was there to prevent them consuming it after 8 o'clock? – I take it there is nothing to prevent them.

In reply to Mr. Mowll, defendant said the bell at the gate could be heard all over the house, the yard, and in the street if it was in order. The bell never rang that night. The bar was locked, and the officers could not have had anything to drink without witness knowing it. It might be possible for them to have drink left over after closing hours, but he would trust them as honourable gentlemen not to drink after hours. After the Major had gone, the officers had supper together at the house.

Lieut. J.D. Cotton, C.E.F., stationed at Folkestone, said that on August 31st he went to the house at 7.45. He had two Scotches before closing hour, but consumed nothing after that time. Witness was in the parlour till the Major came, and could confidently say no-one consumed any drinks there after 8 o'clock.

By the Chief Constable: Five officers and one civilian sat down to supper. The civilian was a Mr. Ross, whom he had met at the house before. Witness never spoke to the Major, except to give him his name. There was some conversation, but he could not swear as to who spoke or what was said.

The case was then adjourned until Tuesday next.

 

Folkestone Express 16 September 1916.

Friday, September 8th: Before G.I. Cwoffer Esq., and other Magistrates.

Frank Funnell, of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, was summoned for an alleged breach of the Liquor Control Order.

Mr. Rutley Mowll, who appeared for the defendant and pleaded Not Guilty, mentioned that it might be necessary to ask for an adjournment, as a number of officers he proposed to call were not all then present.

The Chief Constable said he had no objection to an adjournment, but he did object to opening the prosecution, thus showing the whole of their cards, and there being an adjournment of the case after that.

The Bench decided to hear the prosecution.

Major Sir Herbert Raphael, A.P.M., said about nine o'clock on the evening of the 31st, in consequence of information received, he went with Sergt. Major May, of the Military Police, to the East Kent Arms. He rang the bell repeatedly without being able to get any answer. This bell was at the side of the gate giving access to the premises, and was the only bell in front. He looked through a slit in the gate, and saw a man standing in a lighted room opposite. In about ten minutes' time this man came out. He called out to him to leave the gate open, and he immediately slammed it. Witness had a conversation with him. Witness again rang repeatedly, and ten minutes later he heard Sergt. Major May call to him. He turned round and saw a lady at the gate, and then the Sergt. Major pushed the gate open. Witness thereupon entered the premises, and went into a room adjoining the bar. He saw there five officers in uniform, a civilian, and Mr. Funnell. They were all sitting down. On the table were five glasses containing whisky and soda or whisky and water. On another table were a number of empty glasses. He took down the names and regiments of the officers present. Witness left, but returned to ascertain what was actually in the glasses, and satisfied himself that they contained whisky. When leaving the second time, a Lieut. Cotton said to him in defendant's presence “We're all right; I'm a bit of a lawyer myself (or words to that effect); we ordered the drinks before eight o'clock”. Witness told him that that had nothing to do with the matter, and he (witness) was not there to argue the legal aspect of the case with him. When he left, Mr. Funnell accompanied him, and said “I am very sorry; I hope it is not serious”. Witness replied “It is extremely serious”.

The Clerk: What time was it that you actually entered the house?

Sir Herbert: It must have been at twenty five minutes past nine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: When he pressed the button he could not hear the bell ring. The door of the premises after he passed through the gateway was open. Mr. Funnell was a job-master besides being the holder of the licence, and he could quite imagine he would have business to do with the officers. While he was in the house a young lady came in from the bar, but he did not hear her say that supper was ready. He did not go into the coffee room and see that supper was ready. When witness finally went away he left the officers there. He was not able to admit that the officers had a right to be there if they were not consuming intoxicating liquor. He asked Mr. Funnell no questions.

By the Clerk: The liquor he saw in the glasses had been freshly served.

Sergt. Major May, M.F.P., attached to the Town Commandant's staff, corroborated. He said in the room he saw four officers, a warrant officer, and two civilians, one of whom was the defendant. One of the officers rose from his chair, and witness noticed he had a glass in his hand. He put the glass on the table, and witness noticed it contained some liquor, which he subsequently ascertained was whisky. When they were leaving, defendant said to sir Herbert “This is serious”, but witness did not catch Sir Herbert's reply.

Mr. Mowll, pointing out that his client was charged with permitting a certain gentleman to consume intoxicating liquor at twenty five minutes past nine, submitted that there was no evidence to support that charge.

The Bench overruled this view, and Mr. Mowll proceeded to apply for an adjournment in order to call witnesses.

The Bench held that Mr. Mowll should call what evidence he already had.

Defendant, in the box, said he had held the licence of the East Kent Arms since March, 1914. On the night in question he was in the house all the evening. Lieut. Cotton came in about a quarter to eight. He was a personal friend of witness, and had meals with him nearly every Sunday. Another officer present was Major Mitchell, who frequently took his supper at the house. That evening he had asked if he could have supper for himself and friends. There were also present Lieut. Cameron, who lived with Major Mitchell, and Lieut. Jenkyn. When eight o'clock arrived witness cleared the house, the officers remaining in the bar parlour, with the exception of Lieut. Cameron, who was in witness' office writing. From that time no intoxicating liquor was supplied. It was necessary for defendant and his family to have supper first, and meanwhile the officers remained in the parlour. Having finished his supper he came into the parlour and sat with the officers. Witness' niece came into the room and said “Major, supper's ready”.

Mr. Mowll: Now, was any intoxicating liquor consumed after eight o'clock or not? – I never saw any consumed.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: The A.P.M. smelt one large glass. Lieut. Cotton did not speak, but Lieut. Jenkyn said “Why don't you taste it?” He also thought Lieut. Jenkyn said “You are wrong. We had nothing to drink here since eight o'clock”, but he did not take much notice.

By the Clerk: Witness could not say what the officers had to drink before eight o'clock, as he did not serve them. There was nothing to prevent them consuming after eight o'clock drink that was supplied to them before eight.

Re-examined by Mr. Mowll: He did not hear the bell ring on this evening. He would trust them as honourable gentlemen not to consume drink after eight o'clock. After the A.P.M. had gone the officers sat down and had supper.

By the Clerk: The bell was not in order on the night in question.

Lieut. J.D. Cotton, C.E.F., who had been wounded at the Front, said he had been a personal friend of the defendant's for two years. On August 31st he went to the East Kent Arms at a quarter to eight and had two Scotches and soda water. These drinks were consumed before eight o'clock. He had nothing to drink after eight; nor did the other persons in the room have anything to drink after that hour. After the A.P.M. left witness and the other officers sat down to supper.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: He paid 5d. for each whisky. He went to the house alone. Six of them sat down to supper including one civilian. He said nothing to the A.P.M. about being a bit of a lawyer. Something was said to that effect, but he did not know who said it. He was sitting in the room from 8 till 9.30 and did not have any drink, nor did the others in the room.

The case was adjourned till Tuesday.

When the hearing of the case was resumed on Tuesday (before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates), Mr. Mowll called Dorothy Hogben, Mr. Funnell's niece, who said she was in charge of the bar on the evening in question. She closed the bar at eight o'clock. After this she went into the dining room and had supper with her uncle and his children. Having finished, she got supper ready for the officers and going into the room where the officers were, she said “Supper is ready”.

From eight o'clock onwards, was any drink served in the house? – No, sir.

Could they have got any drink without your knowledge, you having locked up the bar? – No, sir.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: She was the only one who had the keys of the bar. She did not know what happened during the time she was having her supper. She did not remember serving drinks to the officers.

The Clerk: Might you have served them without you remembering?

Witness: Oh, yes, sir.

Regimental Q.M.S. Hugh Sinclair Duncan, C.E.F., said on the evening in question he met Major Mitchell about a quarter to eight. In Canada they had worked together, witness having been a Dominion Express Customs agent. He had not seen the Major since the outbreak of the War, and they had a good many old times to talk over. They went into the East Kent Hotel, and Major Mitchell ordered supper there, witness staying. They did not have anything to drink after eight o'clock; nor, to his knowledge, did he see any drink consumed after eight o'clock.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: Before eight o'clock he had some Scotch and water, which was served by a lady. He had two drinks in a quarter of an hour, and none afterwards. He did not see any drink in glasses when the A.P.M. came in. There were, however, some slops in some glasses, he believed. He did not see the A.P.M. examine the glasses. They sat in the room from eight o'clock till 9.30 and had no drink whatever.

What did you have to drink with your supper? – Tea, sir.

Hot? – Hot.

Rather a change after whisky and water.

Lieut. David Jenkyn, C.E.F., said in civil life he held the position of chief court reporter in the Supreme Court of Alberta. He was not a qualified lawyer. On the night in question he went into the East Kent Hotel, and at eight o'clock the bar was closed. After that he had no intoxicating liquor whatever. He remained in the bar parlour with the other officers until the A.P.M. came in, and saw no intoxicating liquor consumed. After the A.P.M. took the names of the officers, witness said “Hadn't you better taste it?” (the liquor in the glasses). The Sergt. Major said something, and the A/P/M/ picked up a glass and smelt it. Witness said something to the effect about them being perfectly justified in being there under the circumstances, and the A.P.M. said he was not there to argue the matter. Witness also said something to the effect that he knew a little of the legal aspect of the matter.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: He was positive that he did not say that he was a lawyer and that the drinks were bought before eight o'clock. Witness consumed his drink before eight o'clock, and so far as he knew, all the other officers did the same. Witness had tea and some water with his supper.

By the Clerk: Witness was aware that it was against the law to consume liquor on licensed premises after eight o'clock.

Major George Mitchell, C.E.F., said on August 31st he went into the East Kent Hotel about a quarter to eight and had two drinks before the bar closed. The bar was closed at eight o'clock. He had met Duncan, an old friend, and witness ordered supper. From the time the house closed until the A.P.M. came in he had no intoxicating liquor, nor, to his knowledge, did any of the others consume intoxicating drink.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: Witness paid for the supper, which worked out at 2s. a head. No intoxicating drinks were served; they had tea. He saw the A.P.M. pick up a glass which he (witness) presumed contained slops.

By the Clerk: Witness knew they were not entitled to consume intoxicating drink after eight o'clock.

It was explained that Lieut. Cameron could not be present, as he was ordered to London on military duty.

Mr. Mowll, addressing the Magistrates, said if there was any prima facie evidence of actually permitting consumption of intoxicating liquor on these licensed premises after eight o'clock, that prima facie presumption had been overwhelmingly displaced by the volume and weight of evidence the Court had heard. If the Bench thought these gallant officers, who had left their home in Canada, had come here to perjure themselves in order to help Mr. Funnell, then the Bench would convict; but, if not, he claimed an acquittal.

The Magistrates having retired to consider the case, the Chairman (Mr. G.I. Swoffer) on their return said: The Bench have given careful consideration to this case, which they feel is one of great gravity. The evidence of the prosecution establishes a strong prima facie case of defendant's guilt, but in view of the evidence of defendant's witnesses we feel there are elements of legal doubt in this case, and we are bound to give the defendant the benefit of that doubt. The case will be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 September 1916.

Tuesday, September 12th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

Mr. Frank Funnell, landlord of the East Kent Arms, appeared on an adjourned summons for an alleged infringement of the Liquor Control Board's Order, by allowing intoxicating liquors to be consumed on his licensed premises during prohibited hours. Mr. Rutley Mowll represented defendant, who pleaded Not Guilty.

When the case was last before the Bench, Sir Herbert Raphael, A.P.M., stated that he visited the defendant's premises at 9 p.m. and found there five officers, a civilian, and the defendant, with several glasses containing whisky on the table. Defendant denied that any whisky or other liquor was consumed after hours, and the case was adjourned for Mr. Mowll to call further evidence.

Dorothy Hogben, niece of the defendant, now said she was in charge of the bar on the night in question. She closed the bar at 8 o'clock, and finally closed the house about 10 o'clock. The bar was locked during the whole of that interval. Witness got the supper ready for the officers and called them for supper. The A.P.M. was there when she called and after he had gone the officers had their supper. No drink was consumed after eight o'clock, and no-one could have got any drink without her knowing it.

By the Chief Constable: Mr. Funnell had no keys to the bar. Witness took the keys direct to her bedroom when she locked the bar. She was away at supper for an hour, and could not say what went on during that time.

By the Magistrates' Clerk: Mr. Funnell was present all the time witness was having supper. She did not remember serving the officers before eight o'clock. The other girl in the bar might have done so.

Quartermaster-Sergeant Hugh St. Clair Duncan, of the C.E.F., said at 7.45 p.m. on August 31st he met Major Mitchell, who had worked with him in the Dominion Customs for several years, and who asked him to come into the East Kent Arms with him. Witness stayed with him and had supper in the dining room. He had nothing to drink after eight o'clock, and saw no drink consumed by anyone.

By the Chief Constable: Witness had tea to drink with his supper.

The Chief Constable: How many cups of tea? – One, sir.

Lieutenant Jenkyn, C.E.F., said that in civil life he was chief court reporter of the High Court of Alberta, and had had considerable legal training. He went into the house about 7.45 and had two drinks, but had none whatever after 8 o'clock. He remained in the parlour with the other officers till the A.P.M. came in, and could say that no-one consumed any liquor there. Witness said to the A.P.M. “Hadn't you better taste it?”, whereupon Sir Herbert Raphael smelt at a glass near witness. Witness said “I know something of the legal aspect of the thing” and the A.P.M. told him he was not there to argue. Witness had a faint recollection that he told Sir Herbert that nothing had been bought since eight o'clock.

By the Chief Constable: They were not all empty glasses there, but there were no “heel taps” there. By “heel taps” he meant drinks.

By the Magistrates' Clerk: Witness knew it was illegal to consume after hours liquor which was bought during hours. The glass on the table was a glass of dregs.

The Magistrates' Clerk: Then your object in asking the A.P.M. to taste it was to convince him it was dregs? – Well, I just wanted to see him taste it. (Laughter)

Major Mitchell, C.E.F. stated that he went to the East Kent Arms about 7.45 and had some drinks before the bar closed. He had met Duncan previously, and asked him to stay for supper. No drinks were consumed after hours.

By the Chief Constable: The glass the A.P.M. picked up contained liquor, which he believed was slops.

Mr. Mowll, addressing the Bench, said he believed the question of consumption had been overwhelmingly dispelled by the weight of evidence. The case depended entirely on evidence, and if the Bench thought these gallant Officers, who had left their homes as volunteers, had come to Court to perjure themselves to save Mr. Funnell, then let them convict him. Otherwise he (Mr. Mowll) claimed an acquittal.

After retirement, the Chairman announced that the Bench had given serious consideration to the case, which was one of considerable gravity. The evidence for the prosecution had established a strong prima facie case against defendant, but owing to the weight of evidence for the defence an element of legal doubt was introduced of which they must give the defendant the benefit. The case would accordingly be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 30 June 1917.

Local News.

About 10.45 a.m. on Monday, P.C. Smith was on duty in Sandgate Road and noticed smoke coming from the East Kent Arms yard, and finding the Fire Brigade had not been called, he gave the alarm by telephone from the police station at 10.50, another call being given immediately afterwards from Messrs. Lambert Weston. The motor tender was at once turned out with five men, arriving four minutes afterwards. Chief officer Jones, who was at the Corporation Offices, arrived just before them. Pending the arrival of the Brigade, the stable staff, with Mr. A.J. Camburn, Mr. Carter, and the police, endeavoured to keep the fire, which was in a servant's bedroom on the first floor, in check with chemical extinguishers and pails of water, but the walls and ceiling of the room being of woodwork, had got well alight, and a jet from the first aid pump on the motor was found insufficient to extinguish the flames. A line of hose was therefore attached to the hydrant in Sandgate Road, and the fire was got under control in about a quarter of an hour after the Brigade arrived, but not until damage to the estimated extent of 50 to 60 had been done to the room and its contents. The cause of the fire was an old opening made into the kitchen flue (which ran though the bedroom) in a previous tenancy of the premises, to take an iron flue from a stove in the bedroom, removed before Mr. Frank Funnell occupied the premises, and not efficiently blocked up, so allowing the heat from the kitchen fire to get though the wall and ignite the back of a chest of drawers standing in front of the flue. The existence of the opening in the flue was quite unknown to Mr. Funnell, as it had been covered with a thin iron plate fixed to the wall. Had the outbreak not been quickly noticed and smartly extinguished the whole range of lofts and stabling would have been involved, as so much woodwork was present in the construction of this part of the premises.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 June 1917.

Local News.

On Tuesday between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. smoke was seen to be issuing from the rear of the East Kent Arms, and it was found that a fire had broken out through an old flue which ran through one of the bedrooms. In less than five minutes the new motor engine of the Fire Brigade was on the spot under Chief Officer Jones. Previously to this, Mr. Carter, the hall porter of the Queen's Hotel, ran across to the East Kent yard with some extinguishers, and with these did excellent service, Mr. A.J. Camburn and Mr. F. Funnell's workmen also rendering assistance. The fire obtained a good hold, but there being a plentiful supply of water it was soon got under. Mr. Funnell was away from the town at the time. Miss Hogben, his niece, who was in charge, desires to thank all those who helped to extinguish the fire.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1919.

Friday, August 29th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor Harrison, and Councillor G. Boyd.

Frank Funnell, of the East Kent Arms, was summoned for selling two bottles of ale at 9.20 p.m. on the 23rd August for consumption off the premises. The defendant said he had no defence.

P.C. Fox said that at about 9.20 p.m. on the 23rd August he was outside the Town Hall, when he saw a lad employed at the Victory Cafe come out of the Cafe and enter the East Kent Arms. A few minutes later he came out carrying two bottles in his hand. He stopped the lad, and from what he said he took him back to the East Kent Arms, and asked to see Mr. Funnell. He said to Mr. Funnell “This lad has just come out of your premises with these two bottles. It is now 9.25”. Defendant said “I don't know anything about it”. Defendant went inside, and returned again, and took the bottles away from the lad, who then went inside and had his money returned.

Mr. Funnell said he had not seen the boy in his house, and it was against his wishes. His wife was ill, and the girl had lost her father on Saturday night.

Fined 2.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 11th: Before The Mayor, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Councillor A. Stace, Col. Owen, Rev. Epworth Thompson, Councillor Hollands, Councillor Morrison, and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

Mr. H. Reeve (the Chief Constable) presented the following report: I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 113 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz.; Full licences 70, beer on 7, beer off 6, beer and spirit dealers 15, grocers, etc. off 6, confectioners wine on 8, confectioners wine off 6, a total of 113. This gives an average, according to the Census of 1911, of one licence to every 296 persons, or one on licence to every 495 persons. During the past year 13 of the licences have been transferred. Since the last annual licensing meeting the licensees of the undermentioned premises have been convicted as follows: Prince of Wales Tavern, fined 10s. on 23rd May, for allowing a child to be in the bar of his licensed premises; East Kent Arms, fined 10s. on 29th August for supplying drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Star and Garter, fined 10s. on 30th November for supplying intoxicating drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Globe Hotel, fined 10 on each of two summonses on 4th December for charging more for whisky than the maximum price allowed under the Order made by the Food Controller. During the year ended 31st December, 46 persons (35 males and 11 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 34 were convicted and 12 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. In the preceding year 26 persons (17 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 14 were convicted and 12 discharged. The regulation of the Liquor Control Board restricting the hours for the sale and consumption of intoxicating liquor remains in force. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. There are 24 premises licensed for music and dancing, 2 for music only, and 2 for public billiard playing. Numerous visits have been made by the police at irregular intervals during the year to the licensed premises and places of entertainment, and I am pleased to report that the houses generally have been conducted in a satisfactory manner.

The Mayor said the Magistrates had considered the report, and they thought it very satisfactory. There had been a little increase in drunkenness, but they hoped that would disappear again. With reference to the licences, the Bench had decided to renew them all, except the Prince of Wales Tavern, East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, and Globe Hotel, in consequence of new legislation that might come on. The licences referred to would come up for consideration at the adjourned meeting.

The adjourned sessions were fixed for the 10th March.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions for Folkestone were held at the Police Court, the Mayor presiding.

Mr. H. Reeve presented his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Mayor said the report was very satisfactory, although there was a little increase in drunkenness. They would renew all the licences to the licensed premises, except the four mentioned in the report, which would be adjourned to a later court.

 

Folkestone Express 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 10th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer and G. Boyd, Col. Owen, and Messrs. A, Stace and G.H. Blamey.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, the Prince of Wales, the Globe, and the Star and Garter were renewed, they having been adjourned from the annual meeting.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 9th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G.P. Owen, Councillor A. Stace, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Mr. J.H. Blamey.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, Globe, and Prince of Wales, deferred at the annual sessions, were now renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 May 1923.

Local News.

The East Kent Arms: The well known licensed premises in Sandgate Road were put up for auction on Wednesday at the Queen's Hotel by Messrs. Wickenden and Son. The reserve price was not reached, and the property was brought in at 13,750.

 

Folkestone Express 5 July 1924.

Local News.

East Kent Arms Hotel.

At the Police Court on Wednesday the licence of this very old established hotel was temporarily transferred from Mr. F. Funnell to Mr. P.F.M. Hooker, of Margate.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 July 1924.

Local News.

At a special transfer sessions of the Folkestone Licensing Magistrates on Wednesday the licence of the East Kent Arms was temporarily transferred from Mr. F. Funnell to Mr. P.F.M. Hooker, of Margate.

 

Folkestone Express 23 August 1924.

Local News.

The Magistrates on Wednesday at the Police Court transferred the licence of the East Kent Arms Hotel, Sandgate Road from Mr. F. Funnell to Mr. P.F.N. Cooper, formerly of Margate.

 

Folkestone Express 27 September 1924.

Tuesday, September 23rd: Before Messrs. G.I. Swoffer and W.R. Boughton, and Dr. W.W. Nuttall.

John Palmer, a farmer of West Hythe, was charged with being drunk and disorderly on Saturday. He pleaded Guilty.

Inspector Pittock said at 9.35 p.m. on Saturday he went into the Guildhall public house, in consequence of what he had heard. He there saw the defendant, who was drunk. He made a communication to the landlord, and Palmer went out of the house, where he was joined by six other men. They all went into the East Kent Arms, so he followed them. He told Palmer that he had had enough to drink, and that he had better get out of the house. He went outside the house, and struggled when others tried to get him away by a bus. He eventually took him into custody, and at the police station he charged him with being drunk and disorderly. At Palmer's own request a doctor was called in and examined him. The doctor issued a certificate stating that the prisoner was suffering from the effects of alcohol.

The Clerk said the certificate was given by Dr. C. Barrett.

Defendant said he was very sorry. He had been to Canterbury all day. He there bought a horse, and he had the misfortune for the animal to drop down dead. That rather upset him, so he had one or two drops of whisky. He had not been used to drink. If the Magistrates would overlook that case he would give them his promise that he would not drink anything again.

Mr. Beesley (the Chief Constable) said there were 42 previous convictions for various offences, including drunkenness, obscene language, and assaulting the police.

The Magistrates fined the defendant 2, and when he asked for time in which to pay, the Clerk said the money could be paid out of the 16 which was in the defendant's possession when taken into custody.

 

Folkestone Express 22 May 1926.

Saturday, May 15th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Alderman R.G. Wood, and Col. Owen.

Ernest William Hammond was charged with been drunk and disorderly in Sandgate Road on Friday evening, and he pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Williams said that at 9-10 the previous night he was called by the landlord of the East Kent Arms, and on proceeding there he found a number of soldiers the worse for drink trying to enter the premises. He told them to desist. Prisoner, although told repeatedly to go away and go home, refused to do so. He started shouting, and started to fight with another soldier, and he had to check him. A crowd congregated, and he took prisoner to the Police Station. He was drunk.

Prisoner said that the previous night, about 9.45, he went to the East Kent Arms with five others. They called for drinks, and he was standing talking to one of his pals, and the barmaid took the drinks away. He wondered what was the matter, and he heard one of the fellows with him use some obscene language.They bundled him outside, and he followed them. People gathered outside, and when the police went and said "Move on”, he replied “It is all right, I am not drunk”. He wanted to go and apologise to the landlady on behalf of the other man for what he had said, and the policeman would not let him do so.

An officer said prisoner had had four years’ service, and there were no civil convictions against him.

Fined 5s.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 May 1926.

Saturday, May 15th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Alderman R.G. Wood, and Colonel G.P. Owen.

Ernest William Hammond was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Sandgate Road on Friday evening. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Williams said at 9.40 p.m. on May 14th he was called by the landlord of the East Kent Arms. He went there, and found a number of soldiers the worse for drink. He told the prisoner to go home, but he would not do so and started fighting with another soldier. He ejected defendant into the Sandgate Road, where he continued his disorderly conduct. Witness took defendant into custody.

Prisoner said he went to the East Kent Hotel with five more soldiers. They called for drinks, and while he was standing talking to one of his pals the barmaid caught hold of the drinks and took them away. He heard one of the fellows who was with him make use of obscene language, and he took him outside. A man and a policeman came up and told him to move on. He replied “I do not want to. I am not drunk. I want to go back and apologise to the lady for what this man said”.

A fine of 5s. was imposed.

 

Folkestone Express 1 January 1927.

Tuesday, December 28th: Before the Mayor and other magistrates.

Annie Ottaway was charged with having been drunk and incapable on the 27th December, and she pleaded guilty.

P.C. Whitehead said that at 10.15 on Monday night he saw prisoner sitting on a window ledge of the East Kent Arms. He went to her, and advised her to go home. She made an attempt, and fell. He picked her up, and with the assistance of P.C. Oliver, he took her to the Police Station.

Defendant: I am very sorry it happened, but it is quite true.

The Chief Constable said there were three previous convictions, but nothing since April 1923.

The Mayor said the magistrates were very lad to know defendant had not been there since 1923. They thought she had been endeavouring to mend her ways, in fact she had succeeded up to now, and the case would be dismissed. They did not want to see her again, not where she was that day.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 January 1927.

Tuesday, December 28th: Before The Mayor and other Magistrates.

Annie Ottaway was charged with being drunk and incapable in Sandgate Road on December 27th. She pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Whitehead said that at 10.15 the previous night he saw the prisoner sitting on the window ledge of the East Kent Arms in the Sandgate Road. He advised her to go home. She made an attempt, but after a few steps fell and was unable to get up.

Defendant said that she was very sorry that it happened, but, of course, it was quite true.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said that there were three previous convictions against the defendant for drunkenness, but there had been nothing against her since 1923.

The Chairman said that the Bench felt glad to know that prisoner had not been there since 1923. They thought defendant had been endeavouring to mend her ways. The case would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 11 October 1930.

Local News.

On Wednesday morning, at about 8.25, an outbreak of fire occurred at the East Kent Arms, 21, Sandgate Road, of which Mr. Percy F. Booker is the licensee. It was ascertained that the fire was under the floor of the hall, and the Folkestone Fire Brigade were summoned, but the outbreak had been extinguished before they arrived.

The cause of the fire was the fusing of an electric wire, and the damage was estimated at only a few pounds.

 

From the Folkestone Herald, 9 May 1931.

Mr. Percy F M Booker was the chairman of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association in 1931.

Mr P F. M. Booker 1931

Folkestone Express 17 October 1931.

Tuesday, October 13th: Before The Mayor, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, and Mr. W. Smith.

Anthony E. Bowles, of Dover, was charged with being drunk and incapable of taking care of himself in Sandgate Road on Saturday. Defendant pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Dickenson said about 12.25 p.m. on Saturday he saw the defendant in Guildhall Street. He was standing by the side of a car when the defendant came up to him and said “I am not going to steal that car”. Defendant was under the influence of drink. He entered the Queen's Hotel Vaults and witness stopped him from being served, and he then went to the East Kent Arms. Witness stopped him from being served there. Defendant then went and leaned against a car. He then took him into custody and charged him with being drunk and incapable of taking care of himself.

Defendant said he regretted the thing had occurred. He did not remember much about it.

Chief Inspector Pittock said the defendant was a very respectable man and nothing was known against him.

The Bench imposed a fine of 10s.

 

Folkestone Express 17 September 1932.

Saturday, September 10th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood and Mr. W.R. Boughton.

Frank Justus Youngs, a waiter, was charged with being drunk on licensed premises. Defendant said he pleaded Guilty to a certain extent.

P.C. Fry said at 12.55 p.m. on Friday he was on duty in Sandgate Road, when he was called to the East Kent Arms by the proprietor, Mr. Booker. There he saw the defendant in the saloon bar, and Mr. Booker said he wished to have the man removed from his premises. Witness was of the opinion that the man was drunk. With the assistance of Mr. Booker he got the man outside, where he then became violent, and it became necessary to remove him to the police station. When he was charged with being drunk on licensed premises, defendant replied “Yes, I am”.

P.F. Fox said at 1.15 p.m. he was on station duty when defendant was brought in. He concluded Youngs was drunk, because he was very violent and was swaying about. He refused to give his name and address, and when he was charged he replied “Yes, I am”. Three officers had to hold him while he was being searched.

Mr. P.F. Booker, licensee of the East Kent Arms Hotel, Sandgate Road, said at noon on Friday he was making his usual visit to the bar when he saw the defendant, who was all right then. When witness returned half an hour later he went to the same bar and saw that defendant had vomited all over the counter. Seeing that he was drunk, witness requested that he should leave, and he followed him out into the yard, where he told him the best thing he could do was to go back to the hotel. Defendant then came back and asked for lunch, and witness again told him to leave, but he refused, so witness went for the assistance of P.C. Fry, who helped him to remove the defendant. In consequence of defendant's behaviour all of his customers left.

Defendant said he was not so drunk as they had said, for it was early in the morning, and he had only had six beers. He was also suffering from slight gastric trouble, and he came over queer in the bar and he had had nothing to eat. He came back to ask for something to eat, and he was told to leave. If he had been asked politely he would not have made a fuss. He also did not think he was so violent as they had made out, for he was not naturally a violent man.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said the defendant was a waiter in one of the west-end hotels. He had been employed in hotels since he was eighteen, and he had never been before the Court for being drunk previously. He had experienced a good deal of trouble lately, losing his wife three weeks ago, she dying under an anaesthetic, which might have accounted for the defendant's loss of balance.

Alderman R.G. Wood said the case had clearly been proved against the defendant that he had given a lot of trouble to the police constable and the proprietor, but as they had heard that he had had trouble himself they would not fine him the full amount, but only 5s. They were very sorry to see him there as he had never been in Court before. If the defendant would allow him to give him advice, he would say that he should take drink in moderation or not at all.

Youngs said that would be a lesson to him.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 September 1932.

Local News.

When Frank Justus Youngs, a waiter, was charged at Folkestone Police Court on Saturday last with being drunk on licensed premises on the previous day, it was stated that three policemen had to hold him while he was being charged at the police station. Youngs pleaded Guilty.

The Magistrates were Alderman R.G. Wood and Mr. W.R. Boughton.

P.C. Fry said that at 12.55 p.m. on the previous day he was on duty in Sandgate Road, in uniform, when he was called to the East Kent Arms hotel by Mr. Booker. In the saloon bar he saw defendant, and Mr. Booker said “I wish you to remove this man from my premises”. Defendant was, in witness's opinion, drunk, and with Mr. Booker's assistance he got him outside. Outside, defendant became violent, and it became necessary for Mr. Booker to assist removing him to the police station, where he was charged.

P. Sergt. Fox said at 1.05 p.m. on the previous day he was station officer when P.C. Fry brought defendant there, and preferred a charge of being drunk on licensed premises against him. Defendant was drunk and very violent. He kept swaying about, and there was difficulty in obtaining his name and address. After he had been charged, he replied “Yes, I am”. It took three officers to hold him because he was so violent.

Percy Frederick Miles Booker, licensee of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, said at 12 noon on the previous day he made the usual round of the bars, and saw defendant, who then seemed all right. Half an hour later witness was called to the same bar and saw defendant, who had vomited over the counter. Witness thought he was drunk and requested him to leave, and defendant went out. He later came back and requested some lunch, but witness refused to serve him and told him to leave. He refused to go, and as a result of his behaviour other customers were leaving. Witness then called P.C. Fry, and together they got defendant out.

Youngs told the Bench he was not so drunk as had been stated, because it was so early in the morning, and he had had, at the most, six beers. He had had nothing to eat, and he became queer with gastric trouble, and tried to get out of the bar. He came back, and said he had better have something to eat, but Mr. Booker told him to get out. If Mr. Booker had asked him politely to leave, there would not have been all that trouble.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said that Youngs was a waiter at an hotel in the West-end of town, and had been employed in various parts of the country as a waiter during the past 12 years since he left school. On the previous night, the Chief Constable said, he was told defendant had had some trouble recently, which might have accounted for his loss of balance. Defendant lost his wife only three weeks before, when she died under an anaesthetic.

The Chairman said it was quite clear that what defendant was charged with had been proved, and he thought he gave the landlord and the police considerable trouble. If it had not been for what the Chief Constable had just said, they would have fined him the maximum amount of 10s., but now they would make the fine 5s.

“If beer had that effect on me I would leave it alone”, advised the Chairman. “I should either drink it in strict moderation or not touch it at all”.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 January 1933.

Felix.

A golden wedding, in which a considerable amount of interest is interwoven, took place at 19, Foord Road on Christmas Day. The happy pair are Mr. Thomas Burch Pilcher, son of the late Mr. Thomas Pilcher, job master of Margate, and Miss Elizabeth Sarah Mann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mann, of New Romney. The marriage was solemnised at Christ Church by the Rev. E. Duke.

As is often my habit, I was walking quietly along the King's highway the other day accompanied by my briar and stick when I met an old friend.

“Tom”, I remarked, “a little bird has whispered to me that you celebrated your Golden Wedding on Christmas Day”. At this he smiled pleasantly, indicating at the same time that I was correct in my surmise. I followed this up by suggesting that Tom could tell me a thing or two about his career. I even went so far as to suggest that I should interview him at his home. Our hero again smiled and rather pooh-poohed the idea of being brought into the limelight. However, after a little talk I got my way. To come to the point, I subsequently found myself in Tom's cost little home at 19, Foord Road.

A feeling of delight seized me when I tapped at the door of Tom's cottage, my summons being answered by a lady, whose eyes, rather like Milton's, were “rolling in vain to catch the light of day”. Subsequently I discovered, from her own lips, that she had been blind for several years. There is a great thing about this. Mrs. Pilcher, in spite of her handicap, is very happy and possesses, too, an intellect of a penetrating character.

Anyway, I spent an hour or so with this happy couple and my interest did not falter until I finally left them with a “God bless you both”.

“Tom, I suppose you have been associated with horses, coaches and the like all your life?” That was my opening query.

“Well”, answered Tom, “my father was a job master at Margate and ran the regular four-horse coach between Margate and Canterbury, and as a boy I tootled the coach horn. That was about fifty six years ago. Subsequently I came over to Folkestone, and in my younger days was employed by one or other of the livery stables in various capacities. It was at this period I rode in the Wye steeplechases for three years in succession and came in a winner in one of the events on Invicta – a splendid mount, whilst on another occasion at Terlingham Meadow, Hawkinge, I rode a horse against the late Mr. Jones' selection for 20 a side, and I lost”, remarked Tom, “and Mr. Jones (one of the best of men) honestly won”. Mr. Jones, who was a well-known livery stable keeper, was highly regarded at the time. I remember a considerable amount of money changed hands between local sportsmen.

“How about your connections with the Folkestone-Canterbury four-horse coach? I know something about this, Tom, for many's the time and oft I have travelled on it”.

Tom reflected upon this for a moment, and then gave utterance to the following: “Ah, Felix, this is a big story, and one knows hardly how to commence it. I was 'the man with the yard of tin'”. Chaffing me, Tom remarked “You know all about that”. There is something in this, for I often “ran over” by this means to the Cathedral City.

In reference to the coach, Tom said: “These were days of magnificent horse-flesh. Mr. J.P. Scott was the whip – and world famous at that. He drove the coach from Folkestone to Canterbury for many seasons”.

Tom, at this point, warmed up. “Scotty”, he said, “was a stern man with a heart of gold. He possessed consummate skill, and handled the ribbons in masterly style. He could do almost what he liked with a horse, and this without punishment. And that is true. If ever a man loved a horse, it was J.P. Scott”.

Tom here unconsciously drew a picture. He said “Just imagine. It is the height of the summer season. The coach, with its fine-matched team of greys, turns out of the East Kent Livery Yard into Sandgate Road. Scotty is on the box seat with his white top hat gently tilted. A privileged passenger (it may be a lady) has the honour of a place beside him on the box seat. The passengers have taken their places. Note those perfectly groomed horses, their coats glistening in the sun. They champ at their bits, impatient to be prancing along the road. A little crowd gathers round. Scotty, all alert, with the ribbons in their rightful places, between his fingers, calls out to me “All right, guard?” “Yes” I would reply. Then I tootled the music on the horn. The horses get into their collar, and they are soon prancing proudly along the Cheriton Road towards Elham. Where's your motors with this lot, Felix?” Well, what could I reply? But there is no comparison.

Tom reminded me that Scotty worked this coach with 16 horses, changing both at Elham and Barham. After the season, with Scotty's careful handling, they were sold at Tattersalls, often fetching fancy prices.

“Scotty”, continued Tom, “was a most generous man. He was a splendid conversationalist, and could spin coaching yarns by the score. Many are the distinguished people whom he would often carry on his coach”.

With pride, the old guard said of his employer: “Why, Scotty at the opening of the season would invite the Mayor and Corporation to take a trip on the coach to Canterbury and entertain them into the bargain with a champagne luncheon”. The old guard here pointed to a picture on the wall depicting members of the Corporation on the coach, and remarked, “Ah, they were the days then, if you like”.

I don't see why I should not mention it, but on one occasion when I was travelling on the coach Scotty pulled up outside a blacksmith's shop outside Barham and would insist upon me singing “The Village Blacksmith”. The coach was loaded with passengers. I at first refused the request, but Scotty being adamant, I had to comply, and did my best under strange but perhaps appropriate circumstances.

Tom here again took up the running. He said the people in the village kept the time of day by the sound of his “yard of tin”. Glorious was it at times up the valley. “Ah, Scotty was beloved in the countryside”.

Tom's voice rather faltered when I remarked: “Ah! That was a terrible happening when the coach overturned at Barha, and dear old Scotty was killed”. Tom said: “Yes, in a sense it was terrible, but Scotty frequently expressed a hope that he would die with the “ribands” in his hands”. He had his wish. Similarly to the captain of the ship he stuck to his post to the last. The passengers escaped, but Scotty, terribly injured, grasped the reins with a death grip. His injured body was carried to the neighbouring cottage, where he passed away.

Explaining this accident, Tom said the horses had been feeding well with a good proportion of corn for months. They were as frisky as kittens. One of the team shied, causing the coach to swerve, with the result we all deplored.

Scotty was buried at Folkestone, and his funeral was a demonstration of respect. Whips representing the great coaching organisation in London were present, and messages were received from both sides of the Atlantic. He was the prince of whips, and no-one can contradict that. The flowers sent to the funeral were light and cheerful.

Scotty did not believe in things morbid, but preached and acted the gospel of cheerfulness and doing good by stealth. If ever a man knew Scotty, it was Tom Pilcher, and the bridegroom of 50 years ago treasures his memory. Tom knew how to manage horses in the stable and turned them out to the satisfaction of one of the sternest of critics. And Scotty once drove the coach through the winter between London and Virginia Water.

 

Folkestone Express 23 September 1933.

Saturday, September 16th: Before DR. W.W. Nuttall, Alderman T.S. Franks, and Mr. W. Smith.

Robert Clarke was charged with placing himself in Sandgate Road for the purpose of gathering alms on the previous day.

Detective Constable Duke said at 7 o'clock the previous evening he was in Sandgate Road accompanied by Detective Constable Pierce. When near Timothy White's premises he saw the prisoner accost several pedestrians. He kept him under observation and saw him receive something from two men, but did not give anything in return, and he had nothing in his hands. He saw him go into the saloon bar of the East Kent Arms in Sandgate Road and speak to several customers. He eventually left that bar and went into the private bar and spoke to customers in there. As he left the premises, he (witness) went up to him and told him he was a police officer and that he had had him under observation for 15 minutes, and that he would take him to the police station and charge him with placing himself in Sandgate Road for the purpose of gathering alms. Prisoner replied “What the ----?” His breath smelt strongly of methylated spirits, but he was not drunk. He brought the prisoner to the police station where he later charged him. He replied “I was selling postcards”. On being searched at the police station, he (witness) found in prisoner's possession one sixpenny piece, 8d. in coppers, thirty picture postcards, some bundles of bootlaces, and an empty bottle which had contained methylated spirits.

Prisoner: Did I have some laces in my hand?

Witness: No, we found them in your pocket when we got to the police station.

Prisoner: You can only charge me with peddling without a certificate. I cannot get any work.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said only the previous morning the prisoner was warned by his officers to leave the town. He was then in suspicious circumstances, obviously begging. He, however, would not go. The prisoner had been before that Court tow or three times, the last occasion being on August 1st, when he was given 21 days' hard labour for begging. Clarke was what they would call a roadster. He had several convictions got drunkenness, and had been in that Court in 1930 for drunkenness. He only came out of prison on August 21st, but he had been at New Romney, Eastbourne, Hastings, Ramsgate, Dover, and Canterbury since.

The prisoner said he could not get any work. He had a few postcards and a dozen laces which he was offering for sale. He was unfit for work. He only came out of Dover Hospital just before he got the 21 days. He was wanting to get some money in order to get a pedlar's certificate.

The Chief Constable: He would not be granted a pedlar's certificate under any circumstances.

The Chairman: You do not seem to be able to learn a lesson. You need never starve. The Guardians will always provide for you. You were sentenced to three weeks recently, but it does not seem to have had any impression on you. You will have a month's hard labour this time.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 September 1933.

Local News.

Robert Clarke, who was sentenced to three weeks' hard labour last month for begging, was again before the Folkestone Magistrates on Saturday on a similar charge, and this time he received a month's hard labour. He was charged with begging in Sandgate Road the previous day. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Detective Constable Duke said at 7 p.m. the previous day he was in Sandgate Road in company with Detective Constable Pearce, when he saw Clarke accosting pedestrians outside Messrs. Timothy White's premises. Witness, continuing, said he kept prisoner under observation and saw him receive something from two men. He did not give anything in return, and he had nothing in his hands. He next went into the saloon bar of the East Kent Arms and spoke to several customers. He then left the bar and went into another, the private bar, and spoke to customers in there. As he left the premises, witness added, he went up to accused and told him he had had him under observation for 15 minutes. Clarke's breath smelt strongly of methylated spirits, but he was not drunk. When charged at the police station he said “I was selling postcards”. On being searched, he found in his possession one sixpenny piece, 8d. in coppers, 30 picture postcards, some bundles of bootlaces, and an empty bottle which had contained methylated spirits.

Clarke: Didn't I have some laces in my hand? – No, they were in your pocket when I charged you at the police station.

Clarke: You can only charge me with peddling without a certificate. I cannot get any work.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said only the previous morning Clarke had been warned by one of his officers to leave the town. He had been before the Court two or three times. On the last occasion he was given 21 days' for begging. He was what they called a roadster. The Chief Constable said Clarke came out of prison on August 23rd. He had been to New Romney, Rye, Hastings and Eastbourne, and then worked his way back to Folkestone.

Clarke said he could not get any work; in fact he was unfit for work. If he had 5s. he would have got himself a pedlar's certificate.

The Chief Constable: He would not be granted a pedlar's certificate under any circumstances.

The Chairman (Dr. W.W. Nuttall) said Clarke did not appear to have learned a lesson after his previous conviction in the court for begging. He need never starve; the Guardians provided for him. He sentence of three weeks' imprisonment last time did not seem to have made any impression on him; he would have a month's hard labour this time.

 

Folkestone Express 12 June 1937.

Local News.

On Tuesday at the Folkestone Police Court the licence of the East Kent Arms Hotel was transferred from Mr. P.F.M Booker to Mrs. D.H. Funnell.

Mr. W.J. Mason, in making the application, said Mrs. Funnell would become Messrs. Worthington’s tenant if the magistrates agreed to it. Mr. Funnell held the licence previously, but the reason that he did not now undertake the same position was that he was not in good health. However, Mrs. Funnell managed the hotel for her husband when he was the licensee. She also managed the Swan Hotel at Hythe when her husband was the licensee there for five years. It was really a request that an experienced woman should be to take a licence in her own name and which she had previously managed.

The Chairman (Mr. W.R. Boughton) announced that the magistrates agreed to the temporary transfer, and Mr. Booker was excused attendance at the transfer sessions.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 June 1937.

Local News.

An application for a Protection Order in respect of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, was made to the Magistrates at the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday. The transfer was from Mr. Percy F.M. Booker to Mrs. Dorothy H. Funnell, 126, Sandgate Road.

Mr. W.J. Mason, making the application, said the house had been sold to Messrs. Worthington, and Mrs. Funnell would become their tenant. Mrs. Funnell had managed this very properly for many years when the licence was held by her husband, Mr. Frank Funnell.

The Magistrates granted the application.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 January 1951.

Local News.

Folkestone Magistrates on Wednesday approved plans for extensive alterations and improvements at the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road.

Speaking on behalf of Messrs. Worthington, the owners, Mr. H.G. Wheeler said the proposed alterations were quite extensive. As they were probably aware, the East Kent Arms was a very old building indeed, and at present it was inconvenient to both the public and the licensee. For a long time past it had been obvious that the sanitary conditions were little short of disgraceful. It was, he continued, very necessary to provide suitable sanitary arrangements and make general improvements. It was proposed to convert the existing five bars into two bars and to make the whole of the downstairs space licensed premises, and upstairs private living quarters.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 April 1952.

Local News.

Approval of plans for alterations to bar accommodation at the East Kent Arms was given by Folkestone Licensing Justices on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Gazette 23 April 1958.

Local News.

A licensee described to Folkestone Magistrates on Friday how he grabbed hold of a man he found with four bottles of beer in the yard of a Folkestone public house.

He alleged the man was Aaron Beazley, Elverton Close, Folkestone, who was charged with stealing 12 bottles of beer, valued at 16/-, the property of Mr. T.E. Moore. Basil Hinds, Woodfield Close, Folkestone, charged with a similar offence, was also alleged to have stolen a knife, worth 5/- belonging to Mr. Moore. The accused, who pleaded Not Guilty, were committed for trial. Both were granted bail.

Mrs. Isobelle Moore, of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, Folkestone, said at approximately 8.30 p.m. on March 21st she was serving in the saloon bar when her attention was drawn to Hinds and Beazley, who were in the public bar. Two pies, she said, were purchased by another customer for Hinds. Two knives were supplied with the pies, but when the plates were returned one of the knives was missing. Mrs. Moore stated that she noted the accused kept going out to the toilet. “When I saw Hinds climbing over the gate I put on the light and ran downstairs. I went into the street but could find no trace of him. I went back to the public house, and to my astonishment I saw Hinds sitting in the public bar”.

Thomas Edward Moore, licensee of the East Kent Arms, said at 9.30 p.m. he received a telephone message and returned to the public house. He went to the yard where he met Beazley, who had two full bottles of beer in each hand. “I grabbed him by the neck, took him into the house, and asked my wife to dial 999”, continued Mr. Moore. Beazley said to me “You are not going to “nick” me for four bottles of beer?” Witness said when he checked the contents of the bottle store 12 bottles of beer were missing.

Replying to Mr. W.J. Coley, representing Hinds, witness said he did not check the bottles in the public house.

Questioned by Beazley, witness agreed that when he accused Beazley he took some notes out of his pocket but he refused to serve him.

P.C. McKenna stated that at 10.05 p.m. on March 21st he went to the public house where he saw Beazley with Mr. Moore, who said he had found accused with four bottles of beer, which, he alleged, had been stolen from the premises. Beazley replied “All for four bottles of brown ale”. Told he would be taken to the police station, accused said “Only four bottles”. The officer said he went into the public bar where Hinds was sitting with a number of men. Mrs. Moore alleged that earlier the same evening she had seen Hinds climbing out of the bottle store. Told he would be taken to the police station for further enquiries, Hinds asked “Why me?” At the police station accused produced a knife from an inside pocket of his jacket. He said “I must have got it from home”. Later Mrs. Moore identified the knife as her husband's property. The officer said he found two bottles of beer and a smashed glass in the gentlemen’s toilet at the public house. The officer referred to a statement alleged to have been made by Hinds in which accused denied stealing the beer and the knife.

Replying to Mr. Coley, the officer said Hinds had been drinking, but he was by no means drunk. When Hinds was charged he replied “I did not take no knife”. Beazley was charged with the theft of the beer and he said “I did not have nothing”.

Mr. Coley submitted there was no evidence against Hinds on the charge of stealing the bottles of beer. “There is not a shred of evidence that Hinds had any of the beer or took it away”, he said. “The evidence we have heard is that Beazley had four bottles in his hands, and two were found in the toilet. Nothing has been said about the other six”.

The Magistrates found a case to answer and committed Hinds and Beazley to the East Kent Quarter Sessions at Canterbury, on May 19th. The accused were granted bail.

 

Folkestone Gazette 31 May 1961.

Local News.

When arrested outside the East Kent Arms public house in Sandgate Road, Folkestone, on May 19th, Robert Leslie Payne, of 7, Weymouth Road, Folkestone, was wearing a bloodstained handkerchief around his right hand. The blood, it was alleged at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Friday, came from a cut which Payne had received while wilfully breaking a window in the lavatory at the rear of the public house. The Bench fined him 3 for causing wilful damage, and ordered him to pay 1 restitution. He was also fined 2 for being drunk and disorderly.

Inspector P.C. Gwynne, prosecuting, said that at about 10.25 p.m. on the evening in question the noise of breaking glass was heard from the rear of the public house. The licensee, Mr. T. Moore, went out to investigate and saw Payne standing near a broken window. When asked who had done the damage Payne replied “Some bloke”. Later, however, Mr. Moore heard Payne telling some friends that he himself had broken it.

Payne became abusive when challenged about it, and the police were called. P.C. Fisher found him drunk and staggering around, so he arrested him and took him to Folkestone police station.

Payne, who admitted breaking the window, denied being drunk. He told the court “I had a few drinks. I was merry, but I was not staggering around. I was disorderly but I was not drunk”.

 

Folkestone Gazette 28 November 1962.

Obituary.

The licensed trade in general, and particularly in the Folkestone area, suffered a severe loss through the sudden death, on Sunday morning, of Mr. Thomas E. Moore, licensee of the East Kent Arms, Folkestone. Mr. Moore, who was 61, appeared to be enjoying his usual excellent health the previous night, and the news of his death came as a severe shock to his many friends and acquaintances.

Mr. Moore, who was born and educated at Dover, enlisted in the 17th Lancers in 1920, and served in Ireland, chiefly as chef in the Officers' Mess. He left the Army in 1927 to join the Pullman Car Company as a chef. Mr. Moore entered the licensed trade in 1933, when he became landlord of the Royal Oak Inn, Capel. During World War II he joined Naval Intelligence, his wife in the meantime carrying on the business of the inn. After the war Mr. Moore became licensee of the White Lion Hotel at Cheriton, and remained there until about five years ago, when he moved to the East Kent Arms in Folkestone. His enthusiasm for the trade and its responsibilities was unbounded. He was a past Chairman of the Folkestone, Hythe and District Licensed Victuallers' Association, and was Secretary at the time of his death, as well as being Treasurer of the Kent Federation, a member of the Kent Panel, and a trustee of the L.V. Convalescent Home. Mr. Moore is survived by his widow. Mrs. I. Moore, who is Chairman of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Folkestone and District L.V.A., and by a daughter, Mrs. Young, who will help her mother in the future running of the East Kent Arms. Mr. Moore’s many activities also included a keen interest in various darts competitions, including those in aid of the Blind People of Kent Association, of which he was Secretary, and of the Kent Cricket Lovers’ Society.

A funeral service will be held at Folkestone Parish church tomorrow at 3 p.m., followed by cremation at Hawking. Mr. Moore's ashes will be interred in the Garden of Rest in Folkestone Parish Churchyard at 10 a.m. on Saturday.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 December 1962.

Obituary.

A funeral service for Mr. Thomas E. Moore, licensee of the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, took place at Folkestone Parish Church on Thursday afternoon, and was followed by cremation at Hawkinge. Mr. Moore died early on Sunday morning at the age of 61. His death came as a great shock to his many friends in the town and district, as he appeared to be enjoying excellent health the previous evening, and the licensed trade in general and in Folkestone in particular suffered a great loss.

Mr. Moore, who was born and educated in Dover, enlisted in the 17th Lancers in 1920, and served in Ireland during the rebellion, chiefly as chef in the Officers' Mess. He left the Army in 1927 and joined the Pullman Car Company as chef. Mr. Moore entered the licensed trade in 1933, when he took over the Royal Oak Inn at Capel. During the War he served on Naval Intelligence while his wife carried on the business at the inn. The Royal Oak became famous as a journalists' base during the war years, when reporters in “Hellfire Corner” had a front seat view of the bombing and shelling of convoys in the Channel from the cliff tops opposite the inn. After the war Mr. Moore became licensee of the White Lion Hotel at Cheriton, and remained there until 1957, when he moved to the East Kent. His work and enthusiasm for the good of the licensed trade was unlimited. He was a past Chairman of the Folkestone, Hythe and District Licensed Victuallers' Association, and was Secretary at the time of his death, as well as being Treasurer and a past President of the Kent Federation, a past President of the Kent Panel, and a Trustee of the L.V. Convalescent Home.

Mr. Moore is survived by his widow, Mrs. I. Moore, who is Chairman of the Women's Auxilliary of the Folkestone and District L.V.A., and by a daughter, Mrs. Young, who will help her mother in the future running of the East Kent Arms.

Mr. Moore's other activities included a keen interest in the Blind of Kent Association, for whom he organised many darts matches in aid of their funds, and Hon. Secretary of the Folkestone Branch of the Cavalry Old Comrades' Association.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 January 1964.

Local News.

Mr. Charles Walter Ernest Perkis, of 42, Sandgate High Street, Folkestone, late licensed victualler, formerly of the East Kent Arms, Folkestone, who died on August 7th last, left 16,018 19/1 gross, 15,774 16/11 net value. (Duty paid 1,583).

 

Folkestone Herald 15 February 1964.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

A licence was granted to Messrs. John Alfred Strath and Dudley Charles Grey-Wilson in respect of the East Kent Arms. Approval of plans to alter the interior of the tavern was also granted. The premises were formerly operated under a protection order granted to Mrs. I. Moore on the decease of her husband.

 

Folkestone Gazette 8 September 1965.

Local News.

Michael McGuiness, of 1, Brabner Close, Folkestone, had been drinking heavily before he went into the saloon bar of the East Kent Arms with a friend. The licensee, Mr. Dudley Wilson, refused to serve them. McGuinness began swearing and arguing and, as he left, slammed the door against a wall.

Mr. Wilson told Folkestone Magistrates on Friday that the impact almost tore the door off its hinges and split the door frame, causing over 8 damage.

McGuinness, who had pleaded Not Guilty to wilful damage, was fined 5, ordered to pay 8 1s. 9d. compensation and warned to moderate his drinking.

McGuiness said he had been drinking but was not drunk. When Mr. Wilson refused to serve him he became angry and slammed the door, but did not intend to damage it.

 

Folkestone Gazette 15 June 1966.

Local News.

Alderman Wilfred Lawrence, Chairman of Folkestone Town Planning Committee, pulls a pint at the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, Folkestone, on Wednesday, when the remodelled public house was officially opened.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 March 1970.

Local News.

Brian Michael Flynn - a man who was said to have spent half his life in institutions - was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment by Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday, the sentence to be suspended for two years.

Flynn, of no fixed address, had pleaded not guilty to two charges of assaulting police officers, to obstructing a police officer, and to wilful damage.

The magistrates found him guilty of all the offences and sentenced him to three months for each assault, and one month for obstructing a police officer, the sentences to run concurrently. He was fined 5 for wilful damage and ordered to pay 1 15s. restitution and 4 10s. costs.

Mr. R.A. Webb, prosecuting, said the offences occurred when Flynn interfered with police officers who were assisting a drunken man from the East Kent Arms public house, Folkestone. “Flynn tried to push himself between the police officer and the drunk”, said Mr. Webb, “and on one occasion struck one of the officers on his left arm. When a second officer spoke to Flynn he was threatened. Flynn put his hand on his left side and when told to let go, gripped tighter”.

Flynn told the court that he thought the policemen were handling the drunken man roughly, and he decided to intervene.

He said “I remember knocking the policeman’s hand from the man’s arm, and the next thing I knew I was being cuffed and shoved in the van”. That, said Flynn, was the only time he touched a policeman. He denied damaging a cell inspection flap at Folkestone police station.

A probation officer said that Flynn was almost 30 years old, and at least half of his life had been spent in institutions. He said much of Flynn’s trouble was caused by drink.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 May 1971.

Local News.

When 1,400 continentals visit Folkestone next Thursday the doors of local pubs will be open to them all afternoon. On Tuesday local Magistrates decided in favour of a second application to allow 17 pubs to remain open especially for the visitors. They had vetoed a previous application. The second made by publicans was amended to allow for a half-hour break at 5.30 p.m. before their premises opened for the evening session.

Mr. J. Medlicott, for the publicans, told the Magistrates that the visitors were delegates attending a conference in Bruges. One of its highlights was to be a visit to England. He referred to a letter received by Folkestone Corporation from the British Tourist Authority supporting the publicans' application. The visit – by Dutch, Swiss, Belgians and Germans – was a special occasion, not just a shopping expedition, said Mr. Medlicott. It had been arranged by a Bruges tourist organisation which had particularly asked that pubs should be open in the afternoon.

Police Inspector R. Sanders made no formal objection to the application – but doubted whether the visit was a special occasion.

The Chairman of Folkestone Chamber of Trade, Mr. Alan Stephenson, said later “The cross-Channel visitors' committee of this Chamber is very pleased that this has been seen as a special occasion by the Justices. When one is reminded that this extension is no more than happens in many market towns every week of the year, it seems a fair request, especially as Folkestone’s image abroad could be much influenced by the original decision not to allow the pubs to open”.

The pubs which will stay open are; Jubilee, Ship, Oddfellows, Royal George, London and Paris, True Briton, Harbour Inn, Princess Royal, Clarendon, Brewery Tap, Earl Grey, Prince Albert, George, Globe, East Kent Arms, Guildhall and Shakespeare.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 May 1971.

Local News.

About 1,400 Germans successfully invaded Folkestone on Thursday to enjoy themselves. The visitors - members of the BMW enthusiasts’ club - strolled about the town shooting local scenes with their cine cameras and went shopping. Many bought driving gear, ranging from tyres to goggles and crash helmets - but fewer than expected went to the pubs. They were visiting Folkestone during an international convention of their club, held this week at Bruges, in Belgium. Local licensees had gained extensions of opening hours to cater for them. But it was the locals who patronised some of the 17 town centre and harbour area pubs that stayed open.

At the Shakespeare, in Guildhall Street, Mr. Ron Balsom, said “It was a complete waste of time staying open. I only had 13 Germans in all day”.

Mr. John Tobin, landlord of the East Kent Arms, in Sandgate Road, said most of his customers had been regulars.

The Oddfellows Arms, in The Stade, was closed by 3.15 p.m. A spokesman there said “It was a complete and utter waste of time”.

At the True Briton a spokesman said “We did very well - thanks largely to our regulars”.

The London and Paris, at the harbour, was busy, but a spokesman said the pub had not taken a great deal of money.

However, one very pleased landlady was Mrs. M.M. Lewis, at The Guildhall. “It has been absolutely fantastic”, she said, "We have teen completely packed out with both German visitors and regulars".

Folkestone's publicity officer, Mr. Charles McDougal, said “The original letter we received from Belgium about this visit gave the departure time as 6 p.m. It was not until two days before the visit that we learned otherwise".

Mr. Alan Stephenson, chairman of Folkestone Chamber of Trade, said “These people wanted to come to Folkestone, and their visit gave them an opportunity to sample the pleasures of the town as a holiday resort rather than just a shopping centre”.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 June 1971.

Local News.

Retired postman Mr. Herbert Philpott is such a regular Regular that the landlord of the East Kent Arms at Folkestone sets his clock by him. On the rare occasions when he fails to appear, someone telephones him at home to find out if he is on his way. Mr. Philpott, known to the locals and the landlord, Mr. John Tobin, as Pop, has been coming to the pub for 74 years. In recognition of his loyalty, the pub and the brewery, Bass Chairington’s, presented him, on Wednesday, with a silver goblet inscribed with the words “To Herbert Philpott, Pop, from the East Kent Arms - many beers for many years - June 1971”.

Pop has been granted an extra perk - a free first drink every night for the rest of his life. The presentation was a complete surprise to him.

His family had managed to keep it secret, and eight of his nine children were at the East Kent Arms to join the celebration. He also has 19 grandchildren and 25 great grandchildren.

Mr. Peter Stevens, district manager for Bass Charrington’s, called the occasion unique. He said “It is a little bit of history. And we are proud to think we are associated with it. Pop started coming here when he was 13 years old - he only had a lemonade! Seventy-four years later he is still coming to the East Kent Arms”.

Pop casually lit his pipe and laughed. After drinking a champagne toast to him, the crowd that had gathered sang For He’s A Jolly Good Fellow and Happy Birthday To You. Pop celebrated his 87th birthday this week. A buffet and a birthday cake were provided by the pub. Pop, who lives in Bolton Road and was a postman for 48 years, said he would always make his daily trip to the East Kent Arms – “come rain, snow or blow”.
Members of his family said he drank an average of two pints of beer a night. The only time he had ever stopped his nightly ritual was during.

A daughter said “He never worries or grumbles. He laughs at everything. He can look after himself, and is in good health. Even when he is off colour, he still insists on going to the pub”.

Pop is also a keen football fan and supports Folkestone Town at home matches - whatever the weather.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 April 1973.

Advertising Feature.

How many times have you walked into a pub tired, parched and hungry, ordered a long, cool drink, and then asked whether there was anything to eat, only to be offered a bag of crisps and peanuts? For many it is a sad and annoyingly frequent experience. But, to be fair, in recent years, more public houses have woken up to the idea of actually feeding their customers in addition to offering liquid refreshment. Large numbers provide rolls and sandwiches, some even supply hot snacks.

The East Kent Arms in Sandgate Road, Folkestone, has gone one better and joined the ranks of the elite by opening up a food bar. The bar has been installed by Mr. Brian Sinclair and his wife, Carol, who have managed the pub since coming to the town from Eastbourne six months ago. It has enabled the East Kent Arms to provide proper meals for as many as 60 or 65 people at any one time. And they are offered at a reasonable price too. After all, there aren't many places where you can buy a four ounce minute steak with chips and peas for 55 pence.

Mr. Sinclair explained that the idea was to provide a better variety of food and raise the standards of the pub without charging high prices. “We have found that we are becoming more and more of a family pub”, he said. “W get a lot of people in here who enjoy something to eat, but they obviously can't afford to spend a lot, so we try to keep the prices at a reasonable level. The food is fresh, our fish comes from the fish market and our meat from a local butcher, and it is cooked in front of the customers while they wait, so they can see exactly what they are getting”.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 June 1974.

Local News.

From his early teens, through three score years and ten to the grand age of 90, Mr. Herbert Philpott has been a regular at the East Kent Arms, Folkestone.

A drinking life that has spanned 75 years is certainly something of which to be proud. To celebrate his 90th birthday he was presented with a gold watch by fellow Folkestonian Mrs. Doris Winder. Present were six of his nine grandchildren - Mrs. Eva Williams, Mrs. Jessie Carey, Mrs. Elsie Featherbe, Mrs. Lillian Jenner, Mrs. Joan Musk and Mr. Albert Philpott. Unable to attend were; Fred, Horace and Percy Philpott.

The money for the watch and a special birthday cake was collected by other regulars. On the back of the time piece was inscribed “To Pop, from all his friends at the East Kent Arms in appreciation of 75 years’ loyal drinking”. There was also a birthday card bearing a mass of signatures.

Mr. Philpott, of 14 Bolton Road, Folkestone, worked for the Post Office all of his life. It was a job that first took him to the East Kent when it was a coaching inn. As a telegraph boy he delivered messages to bookmakers who frequented the pubs during race weeks when the coaches used to leave from the premises with racegoers for Ascot and the Derby. Remembering old days brought a smile to Mr. Philpott’s face. “They were good days, everyone was far happier then”, he said. “Beer was only 2d. a pint - and it was real beer”. He has seen nine landlords come and go at the East Kent. Mine host now is Mr. Brian Sinclair, a comparative new boy - he has been there for only 18 months. As Mr. Philpott lifted his glass he said “They all knew me”.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1978.

Local News.

One of the oldest regulars of the East Kent Arms, Folkestone, Mr. Herbert Walter Philpott, has died at the age of 93.

Mr. Philpott, of Bolton Road, Folkestone, was a regular in the pub for well over 60 years. A few years ago his patronage was rewarded when he was presented with a silver goblet by the landlord. Mr. Philpott, who was affectionately known as Pop to his many friends, was born and lived in Folkestone all his life. He started working with the Post Office when he was 14 as a telegraph boy, and had various other duties, including sorting and delivering letters, until he retired at the age of 65. During the 1914-18 War he served with the Royal West Kent Regiment, and was taken prisoner of war. Mr. Philpott was a regular supporter of Folkestone Football club. A widower, he leaves nine children.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 June 1979.

Local News.

Two punk rockers, one who had blond and green hair, were both fined 200 on Tuesday for assaulting a policeman. They were cleared by Folkestone Magistrates of a number of other charges arising from a fight in the town's East Kent Arms pub on the night of February 17.

Geoffrey Preece and Stuart Denham had denied assaulting P.C. Robert Burns in the execution of his duty, but they were found Guilty. In addition to the fines they were each ordered to pay P.C. Burns 50 for his injuries, plus 9 witness expenses and 25 prosecution costs. Seventeen-year-old Denham, of Sholden Close, Aylesham, and Preece, of Archers Court Road, Whitfield, were both cleared of behaving in a violent manner in licensed premises, using threatening behaviour and using violence to get back into the pub. Eighteen-year-old Preece was also cleared of damaging a table and glasses.

Pub manager Brian Smart told the Court that two youths wearing “punk type gear” had been involved in a fight in the pub. He did not see how it started. “One was growling like a bear. He was a bit cross, I think”, Mr. Smart said. They managed to get them out, but one of them, Preece, came back in again. He saw Preece push someone over a table, which broke under the weight. He later pointed out the two youths involved to the police.

A customer in the pub, Alan Simpson, of Hollands Avenue, Folkestone, said he heard a scuffle, went over and saw two punk rockers fighting. They were rolling around on the floor. After they were put out of the pub they both barged back in again and started going for people. They were thrown out again. Mr. Simpson said the two punks had been behaving like “animals”. He did not actually see the fight start and said a few people had hit the youths to restrain them.

Barman Brian Houghton said he first noticed one of the youths because his hair was blond and green. Some trouble started and he tried to stop it. The two punks had not been fighting each other, but fighting someone else. Everyone else started piling in. They were thrown out, ut then came back in. Mr. Houghton denied that he hit the defendants over the head with a table leg.

P.C. Burns said that when he shouted to the defendants outside they came towards him. Preece punched him in the stomach and Denham hit him on the side of the face. He tried to restrain Preece and they fell over. He fell on top of Preece. Denham was striking him from behind. Help arrived. Denham was taken away and he arrested Preece.

Preece told the court' someone m the pub tapped him on the shoulder and pushed him. He fell backwards and others joined in. He was being kicked and punched as he lay on the floor. Denham came over and tried to pull his attackers off. He was knocked out. Some people picked him up and he came round as he was being taken out of the pub. Then he was pulled back inside and the barman hit him over the head with a table leg. The table was broken when he fell backwards after being hit. He was knocked out again. The next thing he remembered was being outside and turning round to someone he thought had been one of his attackers in the pub. He had no reason to believe the person was a police officer. He had come running up behind them and put his hand on his shoulder. He turned round and hit him once. He then realised who he was. The officer knocked him to the ground and he offered no further resistance.

Denham said that when he was in the pub he heard a crash and then saw Preece on the floor with about four or five people kicking him. He went over and tried to pull Preece up and pull people off him. Then the five lads started on the two of them, punching and kicking. They tried to shield themselves and push their attackers away. Some friends helped them out of the pub. It seemed that people had been hitting them purely because they were punk rockers. Outside, someone grabbed Preece, dragged him back into the pub and struck him with a table leg. Later, after they had got out of the pub again and were walking up the road, they heard running footsteps behind them. He thought one of the people from the pub was going to hit him again. He pushed the man away; the man grabbed hold of him and he started struggling. When the man said he was a police officer he stopped. He denied striking the policeman.

Four people who had been in the pub that night also gave evidence for the defence. One of them, a 15-year-old Dover schoolgirl, said that five men seemed to be picking an argument with Preece. One of them pushed Preece on the shoulder and he pushed back. The man hit Preece and a fight started. Other people joined in, dragging Preece across the pub and kicking and hitting him.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 March 1980.

Local News.

Brian Houghton went into the East Kent Arms, in Sandgate Road, Folkestone, at opening time one evening and was refused a drink by the barman because of his condition. He started shouting and used “foul” language. The assistant manager, Mr. George Warren, went up to him and Houghton was very abusive. He took off his jacket and said “I will get you; no bastard is going to kick me out”.

A police officer arrived and took Houghton, of Bradstone Road, Folkestone, out of the pub, telling him to go home. But he refused and was arrested.

Houghton, aged 25, admitted being drunk and disorderly on March 6 when he appeared before Folkestone Magistrates' Court, and was fined 15.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 September 1980.

Local News.

A hen party in a Folkestone pub ended in a woman being hit above the eye by a glass. The injury required 18 stitches, Folkestone Magistrates were told on Tuesday.

Leonard Donald Gerrard, aged 23, of Manor Road, Folkestone, admitted wounding Miss Christini Gunsun, and was ordered to carry out 180 hours' community service.

When Gerrard was arrested he admitted throwing the glass and said he had not intended to hurt anyone, Inspector William Wharf told the Court. Miss Gunsun was in the East Kent Arms, Sandgate Road, and a hen party was in progress, with women singing, said the Inspector. A young man started singing alone and was told to shut up by Gerrard, who pushed him. A fight broke out in which Miss Gunsun felt a bang on her head as she was picking up her handbag. The police had been unable to trace the other man in the fight, the Inspector added.

Gerrard told the Court that he had had a few drinks. “I did not mean to throw the glass. It sort of happened. I threw it at the floor, like”, he said.

 

South Kent Gazette 15 October 1980.

Canterbury Crown Court.

A barman at the East Kent Arms public house in Folkestone claimed that a customer had pushed a broken glass into the side of his head and back when he tried to break up a fight. And Alexander Warren told Canterbury Crown Court on Friday that his attacker was 25-year-old Glenn Williams, of Hollands Avenue, Folkestone. Williams, who denied wounding Mr. Warren with intent to do grievous bodily harm and an alternative charge of malicious wounding, was acquitted by the jury of both and discharged from the dock.

Mr. Warren, of East Cliff, Folkestone, told the Court he had been tidying up the bar after a pre-Christmas drink at the pub last year when a scuffle broke out. “I went to try to sort out the trouble. As I went to approach them I was grabbed by someone and pushed up against the bar”, he said. The person was leaning over me, whereupon he swept a load of glasses off the counter, then he smashed one. It was a spirit glass like a very small goblet. After smashing the glass he went and stuck the glass in my ear and he also stuck the glass into my back”. He said he had hospital treatment later for the injuries, which involved a number of stitches being put into the cuts, and he was off work for about five days. During the incident he was able to turn and saw that the attacker was Williams, who was easy to recognise because of hi bright ginger hair, Mr. Warren said.

The bar manager, Mr. Brian Smart said he saw the incident and also identified Williams as Warren's attacker.

Williams denied he had been responsible for the assault. He claimed he had tried to stop Mr. Warren getting involved in the fight “for his own good”. He had pushed the other man apart and when one of them tried to attack Mr. Williams with a glass he took it off him. But Williams was not the only person with bright ginger hair in the bar that night. There was also another man with hair the same colour and they were also “much the same age and build”, he said.

 

South Kent Gazette 19 May 1982.

Local News.

Barmaid Ms. Maureen Hoare lost pounds and made money when her sponsored slim raised 37.40 for Parkfield School. The 39-year-old mother of three, who originally weighed in at 11 stone ten pounds, lost two stone three pounds.

A member of Folkestone's Slimming Magazine slimming club, Maureen works at the town's East Kent Arms pub in Sandgate Road. Regulars of the pub sponsored Maureen, who lives with her family in St. John's Street, to raise much-needed cash for the special school in Parkfield Road, Folkestone. On Thursday a slimline Maureen said “I was slimming anyway, so I though I might as well try and raise some money by it”.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1983.

Local News.

A teenager who assaulted a policeman during a brawl outside a pub also sent an ex-girlfriend a rotting pheasant's head and neck. The youth, 18-year-old Mark Chamberlain, was fined a total of 200 when he appeared before Folkestone Magistrates last week. He admitted assaulting P.C. Philip Hendry, causing him actual bodily harm, using threatening behaviour and sending a “noxious substance” through the post.

Chamberlain, of Cheriton High Street, was in the dock with four other youths who were fined various amounts for their parts in events the night of the disturbance outside the Folkestone pub. Danny Brown, 19, and Alan McClew, 23, both of Dallas Brett Crescent, Folkestone admitted threatening behaviour. Brown was fined 35 and McClew 30. William Cribben, 21, and Stephen Maddison, 24, both from High Halden, were each fined 80 with eight penalty points for taking a car and 60 for having no insurance. Maddison was also fined 30 for threatening behaviour and 5 for not having a driving licence. He was ordered to pay 40 legal aid. Cribben was also fined 20 for being drunk and disorderly. They admitted all the offences.

Mr. Gareth Isaac, prosecuting, described the events which took place on the night of April 1/2. It was clear all the defendants were affected, to varying degrees, by drink, he said. Police were called to a disturbance outside the East Kent Arms in Sandgate Road at 11.50 p.m. When the first officers arrived they saw a number of young man and women standing outside the pub. Two of the youths started scuffling, shouting at each other and lashing out with their fists. Officers tried to separate the youths, one of whom was Chamberlain, said Mr. Isaac. They managed to restrain him, but he was struggling, shouting, lashing out with his fists and kicking. Then some friends grabbed Chamberlain, dragged him away and appeared to be trying to calm him down. But he continued shouting at youths who appeared to be “on the opposite side”, ran down the road, grabbed hold of someone and got involved in a scuffle. Some youths appeared to be still trying to restrain Chamberlain. An officer pulled him to one side and said he was being arrested. He was put in a police van and appeared to go berserk, said Mr. Isaac. He lashed out with his fists and threw himself at P.C. Hendley, who fell backwards, hitting his head on the seat as he went down.

Although blood was streaming down one side of the officer's face he managed to keep Chamberlain in the van, which went to the police station. Another officer who went to the scene thought Brown and McClew were more involved than anyone else in a disturbance. The parcel containing the rotten pheasant’s head and neck was sent to Mandy Hamill, who was quite sick when she received it. A few days later she was in the White Lion pub in Cheriton and remarks Chamberlain made indicated he was the person responsible. When she went to the police station to complain the head and neck were in such a bad state they had to be destroyed immediately for health reasons, said Mr. Isaac.

For Chamberlain, Mr. Anthony Curran said the offences were the result of people drinking too much. Chamberlain had no recollection of being involved in a scuffle or fighting that night and did not know the other four defendants. He had drunk a lot of beer and some vodka. He did not mean to hurt the officer and his injury was not the result of a blow aimed at him. It seemed Chamberlain was trying to get out of the police van and was probably too drunk to know why he had been put in it. When he heard the police wanted to talk to him about the parcel he went to them voluntarily. He sent it in a fit of pique because he had heard the girl was saying silly things about his association with a couple of his aunts who are only slightly older than him.

Brown told the court he went out and had too much drink and was sorry about what happened. McClew said he just went out, had a few too many and “got a bit boisterous”. Cribben said he could not remember much about what happened. It was not intentional and he did not know why he did it.

Mr. Sproule Bolton, for Maddison, said the taking of the car was probably as a result of them “topping up” on the drink they had had during the evening.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 June 1984.

Local News.

Violence broke out over the weekend as temperatures nudged the seventies. In two separate attacks with broken bottles, one man was taken to hospital with facial injuries after a fight in the East Kent public house in Folkestone, and another man with a four-inch gash to his face after a bottle attack in the Old High Street.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 July 1988.

Local News.

Thirsty summer drinkers in Shepway will have to wait for all-day pub openings because of a Whitehall glitch. The Government has been forced to delay the controversial new licensing laws until September 1. This has been caused by a technical problem at the Home Office which means present “last orders” for another two months. Then pubs will be able to serve alcohol from 11a.m. to 11p.m. all week. But not all Shepway landlords reckon it will be worth the bother.

Horace Brickell from the East Cliff Tavern said “It’s a great idea for some pubs, but for the ones in restricted areas, like us, it’s not much good.

Where we are placed, it won’t make any difference and it will be a waste of time staying open”.

William Taylor, landlord of the Pullman Wine Bar and chairman of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers Association, said "There is some confusion, but no-one is forced to stay open. They will be able to choose the hours that suit them.” Mr. Taylor said there were mixed feelings about the changes. “Pubs in busy areas are welcoming them but small, rural or out-of-the-way places are indifferent. Personally, I’m in favour. I think it will give flexibility to the licensee and the public. I don’t think it will cause more drunkenness because people only have a certain amount of money to spend each week. And I don’t mind the extra hours involved because we will get extra staff which will help the dole queue”.

Barry Chamberlain from the White Lion in Cheriton agrees. He said “I think it’s about time change was made. Pubs will become much more suitable for families, and will be more like restaurants. We will try to stay open all day. We are just about to redecorate the pub with the new freedom in mind”.

Michael Norris from the East Kent Arms told us “I’ve accepted that the new laws are coming, although I have mixed feelings about them. I think it’s a shame we are not being allowed to stay open later at night rather than all afternoon. Of course we will be making full use of the new hours and will try to serve food all day. It’s all right for us because we are so centrally placed”.

Eileen Lewis from The Guildhall in The Bayle summed up the feelings of most landlords when she said “If I’m making money, I’ll stay open”. She added “It’s all right for more central pubs, but I can’t see us staying open in winter. The brewery has asked us to give it a three-month trial period. Like other pubs, we’ll just have to feel our way when the change comes”.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 July 1993.

Local News.

A Folkestone pub has refused to accept 50 notes because there are so many forgeries around. Pat Morgan, owner/licensee of the East Kent Arms, on Sandgate Road, said “We have been getting forgeries, so we've stopped taking fifties. There are problems with 20 notes too. The number we get varies. It depends when people get paid”. She added “I check the notes we take. I used to work in a money printer's so I know how to tell whether a note is a forgery or not. It's a secret of the trade, but I'm not telling you what it is”.

Inspector David Kimber said “There does appear to be an increase in the number of forged banknotes surrendered to the police”.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 July 1995.

Local News.

Thugs befriended a man in a pub only to beat him up and rob him when he left. The 36-year-old met the three men in the East Kent Arms in Folkestone's Sandgate Road precinct in the early evening and drank and chatted with them for two hours. But Det. Con. Ray Bovis, the police officer hunting the attackers, said “The three men followed the victim when he went outside. They asked him to give them his mobile phone and when he refused one of them broke his nose with a punch to the face. He fell to the ground and they went on kicking him, then they took his mobile phone and made off”.

The man needed treatment for his injuries at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Folkestone. The shocked victim, who lives in the town, is now afraid to be named for fear of reprisals.

Mr. Bovis said “This was a very brutal crime and all the more shocking because the man had been drinking with the three others in the pub beforehand, and the attack was totally unprovoked”. He issued an electronic picture of one of the attackers, who was heard to be called Rob, and had a Scottish accent. No description of the other two men was given.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1998.

Local News.

A man had his face slashed when he tried to defend his girlfriend in Folkestone town centre. The man called into the East Kent arms pub in Sandgate Road, leaving his girlfriend outside, when she was approached by two men. When the boyfriend saw what was happening he left the pub and ran to the rescue, but he was attacked by the two men with bottles. Anyone with information about the attack should call police on 850055.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 March 1998.

Toby Jugs.

Those of us who enjoy the odd pint – or worse – were prepared for the usual pounding on Tuesday. How much longer, Toby Jugs wonders, before we pay more in tax for the cost of our wines, beers and other naughties? Perhaps it is as well that our liver-corroded and lung-blackened friends are now having to pay for the cost of their health care. But those of us who indulge in the odd night out, or desperate evening courtesy of the local off-licence, are being hammered for our harmless relaxation.

Not surprisingly, my friends at the East Kent Arms are up in arms at the Chancellor's latest swipe at those of us who enjoy the odd tipple. A straw poll of boozers at the hostelry gave the whole puritanical enterprise the thumbs-down. And quite what sense there is in setting the figures for these duties is beyond me – I mean, why, say, 4p on wine? Either it is legal to drink or it is not, and if it is dangerous then why not stick 10 on it, 20, 100 on our booze?

Helen Barton, assistant manager of the East Kent Arms, hit the nail on the head when she said the rises are just a way of making ordinary people suffer.

Thomas Merton called the rises “absolutely ludicrous”, and said with our low-duty-levying neighbours so near, duties should be scrapped.

Susan Carroll called the rises “ridiculous”, and said the extra money should come from those who were “paid too much”.

So, here is the mystery – if no-one will admit to liking the rises why do they happen? Well, Toby Jugs can only say it is that old hairshirt making its comeback, just as it does with our beloved opinion pollsters at elections. After all, would you admit in the street to being against all that money from our vices going to worthy causes? It's our way of appeasing our conscience.

Well, Mr. Jugs stands before you and admits it now: I am for no duty on alcohol whatsoever. I rest my case. Cheers.

Thomas Merton, a drinker at the East Kent Arms, clearly didn't hear my question. Before an interesting conversation, sir, on the evils of tax, the dialogue as you sipped your spirits went like this:

TJ: Do you think the Chancellor should be slamming extra money on our alcohol and cigarettes?

TM: They are very careful with the service here and they do particularly good bread rolls.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 July 1998.

Toby Jugs.

Drinkers are advised to be on their guard: I'm reliably informed that some people go to pubs and pinch unfinished drinks. The latest incident, a regular told me, happened at the East Kent Arms. One minute the beer was on the table next to him, and the next it was gone. Was it a mistake or a joke? Jugs wouldn't like to say, but has a confession to make. In one incident – years ago, naturally – I reached around, grabbed a drink, and after a few gulps found it wasn't mine. Readers, the fight was defused in its early stages by profuse apologies.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 October 1999.

Maidstone Crown Court.

Two soldiers have been jailed for two and a half years after attacking a man with bottles after he answered a woman's screams for help. As a result of the sentence, Jerome Pinnock and Lee Coe have been thrown out of the Army. Pinnock was about to be promoted and his “moment of madness” was said to have ruined a promising career.

Paul True was left bleeding and in need of some 60 stitches after he was cornered by the two men and had heavy bottles smashed over his head.

Recorder David Lamdin told them “You gave him a vicious, brutal beating, both armed with bottles. You continued to attack him even after you knew he was wounded”.

The cowardly attack happened after Mr. True went to the East Kent Arms pub in Folkestone on January 21 to get change for snooker tables at the Rendezvous Club in the town. He came out of the bar to see the squaddies grabbing at the woman. Mr. True ran over and pushed Pinnock, 23, away. But he was then hit on the head with a Jack Daniels bottle. Coe, 21, joined in, striking the victim in the face with a Drambuie bottle.

Mr. True told Maidstone Crown Court that the two bottles smashed on impact. “My face was wet with alcohol and blood”, he said. “I went down to the ground. I saw the two men – they were enjoying it”.

Pinnock stuck the broken bottle neck in Mr. True's face before he managed to escape into the pub. Both he and the woman asked drinkers – including soldiers – for help, but were ignored. Mr. True grabbed a bar stool and went back outside. He tried to raise it above his head but dropped it because it was too heavy. Pinnock, described as being very fit, continued to attack Mr. True and Coe joined in the punching and kicking. They eventually walked off.

Pinnock was with the Duke of Wellington Regiment, stationed in Hounslow, London, and due to be promoted from Private to Lance Corporal. Coe was in the 6th Platoon, based in Lancashire. At the time of the incident they were on manoeuvres at Lydd.

They denied indecent assault, wounding with intent, unlawful wounding and affray, claiming they acted in self-defence. They were convicted of unlawful wounding and affray and cleared of indecent assault and wounding with intent. Coe admitted two thefts and three handling charges committed from Worksop Magistrates' Court and was given an additional six month sentence.

Fiona Moore-Graham, for Pinnock, said he was remorseful and appalled about his behaviour, which was out of character. “The Army are very keen on this young man and do not wish to lose hise services”, she said. “If placed into custody he will lose his career. The Army has been his life and he wishes to continue. I ask you not to prejudice his entire career because of what happened that night”.

Judith Butler, for Coe, said that, unlike Pinnock, he did not have the Army's support. Neither did he have the support of his well-to-do family.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

Last pub licensee had SCOTT John Paul Oct/1885-96 (age 49 in 1891Census) Post Office Directory 1891Bastions

SCOTT Mrs Amy 1896-1901 Kelly's 1899Bastions

CHECKLEY Walter 1901 Bastions

MAJOR Charles 1901-14+ Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903Post Office Directory 1913Bastions

FUNNELL Frank 1914-24 Post Office Directory 1922Bastions

BOOKER Percy F M 1924-37+ Kelly's 1934Bastions

FUNNELL Mrs Dorothy H 1937-42 (age 55 in 1939) Post Office Directory 1938Bastions

PERKIS Charles 1942-57 Bastions

MOORE Thomas 1957-63 Bastions

MOORE Isobelle 1963-64 Bastions

GREY-WILSON Dudley & STRATH John 1964-66 Bastions

GREY-WILSON Dudley & MASKELL James 1966-68 Bastions

COMER Leslie & WILSON William 1968-71 Bastions

TOBIN John & STEPHENS Peter 1971-72 Bastions

Last pub licensee had STEPHENS Peter & SINCLAIR Brian 1972-76 Bastions

WEST John (also "Bouverie Arms") & LOUGHTON Keith 1976-78 Bastions

WORKMAN Stuart & SMART Brian 1979-80 Bastions

RUGG-GUNN Michael & SMART Brian 1980 Bastions

RUGG-GUNN Michael 1980-81 Bastions

RUGG-GUNN Michael & KING Carlo 1981-82 Bastions

ATTFIELD Kenneth & KING Carlo 1982-83 Bastions

NORRIS Michael 1983-91 Bastions

GODDEN John & MORGAN Patricia 1991-93 Bastions

DELANEY Eamonn & CARTWRIGHT Maurice 1993-96 Bastions

DICK-CLELLAND Ross & COLLINS Glenn 1996-97 Bastions

THOMAS Jane & BARTON Helen 1998 Bastions

BARTON Helen & MCDUFF Lisa & HOLLINGSWORTH Mark 1998-2004 Bastions

WARREN Robert and Helen 2004+ Bastions

https://www.whatpub.com/east-kent-arms

 

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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