DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, June, 2022.

Page Updated:- Friday, 24 June, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1887

(Name from)

London and Paris

Latest Aug 2001

(Name to)

30 Harbour Street

Folkestone

London and Paris Hotel 1895

Above photo is the London and Paris Hotel, 1895

London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone

Photo shows the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, date unknown.

London and Paris 1924

Above photo, 1924, showing men kitted out for the unloading of ice-blocks from a cargo ship. Identified by Alan Taylor.

Royal George and London and Paris

Above postcard, postmarked 1933, kindly sent by Graham Butterworth. "London and Paris" behind the signal box, left. Also showing the "Royal George" central.

Above photo, date unknown.

London and Paris Hotel

Above photo provided by Coleen date unknown, by kind permission of Kevan of Pub History.

London and Paris 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

London and Paris 1990

Above photo, circa 1990, kindly sent by Philip Dymott. Also showing the "Princess Royal."

London and Paris signLondon and Paris sign

London and Paris signs date unknown.

London and Paris sign 1977London and Paris sign 1977

Above signs 1977.

London and Paris sign 1992

Above sign October 1992.

Above signs with thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com

 

Previous to this name the building was the "American and Paris," but changed name in July 1887.

August 2001 saw the name changed again, this time to "Gillespies".

 

 

Folkestone Express 13 July 1889.

Local News.

The Corporation have obtained an injunction against Mr. Downing, of the Paris Hotel, restraining him from breaking open the pavement for the purpose of putting in a stopcock and guard box. The matter is expected to come on for argument in London today (Friday).

 

Folkestone Express 18 April 1891.

Saturday, April 11th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, Aldermen Pledge and Sherwood and W.G. Herbert Esq.

Michael Riley was summoned for using obscene language.

P.C. Keeler said on Sunday, the 5th, he was on duty near the Paris Hotel, and saw defendant there in company with other lads, one of whom asked him to go home with him. Defendant made a filthy remark.

Fined 10s. and 9s. costs, Colonel de Crespigny remarking that he ought to be “devilish well flogged”.

 

Folkestone Express 4 June 1892.

Auction Advertisement.

Banks and Son are instructed to sell by Auction at the Rose Hotel, Folkestone, on Thursday, 16th June, 1892, at three o'clock in the afternoon, in one Lot, all that well and substantially brick and cement built with slate roof, corner Freehold, Fully Licensed Hotel, known as the London and Paris Hotel, situate at the corner of Harbour and South Streets, Folkestone, and having a return frontage to the said streets of 115 ft.

Containing in Basement: Kitchen, Scullery, Wine, Coal, and Beer Cellars, and W.C.

round Floor: Two Entrance Halls, Two Bars, Two Bar Parlours, Billiard Room, and W.C.

irst Floor: Dining and Drawing Rooms, Four Bedrooms, Bathroon on half landing, and W.C.

econd Floor: Sitting Room, Six Bedrooms, Store Cupboard on half landing, and W.C.

hird Floor: Eight Bedrooms and Porter's Room.

ourth Floor: Three Bedrooms and Store Closet.

Particulars and Conditions of Sale may be had 14 days before the day of sale, of the Auctioneers, 73, Sandgate Road, Folkestone, and of Messrs. Hallett, Creery, Weldon, and Creery, Solicitors, Ashford, Kent.

 

Folkestone Express 18 June 1892.

Local News.

On Thursday afternoon, Mr. John Banks, of the firm Banks and Son, conducted an important sale of property at the Rose Hotel, at which there was a large attendance. The Paris Hotel, now let on lease for ten years at 150 per annum, was sold for 3,600.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 22 June 1892.

En Passant.

The Paris Hotel was sold by auction on Thursday, and fetched 3,600.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 July 1892.

Wednesday, July 13th: Before Councillor J. Holden, Aldermen Dunk and Pledge, Mr. J. Fitness and Mr. H.W. Poole.

Frederick Schulz, on behalf of the owners of the Paris Hotel – Messrs. Chapman and Sons – applied for a temporary licence for the sale of beers, liquors, etc. at this house.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 16 July 1892.

Wednesday, July 13th: Before J. Holden, H.W. Poole, J. Fitness and J. Dunk Esqs.

The licence of the Paris Hotel was transferred from Charles W. Downing to Frederick Schultz, appointed manager by the owners, Messrs. Chapman.

 

Folkestone Express 11 September 1897.

Local News.

On Thursday, Messrs. Cobay Bros. sold by auction, at the Queen's Hotel, the London And Paris Hotel, near the harbour, for the sum of 6,875, the purchaser being Mr. Edward Anderson, of Sloane Square Mansions, S.W.

 

Sandgate Weekly News 11 September 1897.

Local News.

The London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, was sold by auction on Thursday by Messrs. Cobay Brothers. The sum realised was 6,875, and the purchaser was Mr. Edward Anderson, of Sloane Square Mansions, S.W.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 15 September 1897.

Kaleidoscope.

The London and Paris Hotel, near the harbour, was sold by auction last Thursday at the Queen's Hotel by Messrs. Cobay Bros., and realised the large sum of 6,875. The purchaser was Mr. Edward Anderson, of Sloane Square Mansions, S.W.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 December 1897.

Wednesday, December 8th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. J. Fitness, and W.G. Herbert.

Mr. Anderson was granted the transfer of the licence of the Paris Hotel.

 

Folkestone Express 11 December 1897.

Wednesday, December 8th: Before The Mayor, J. Fitness, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

The licence of the Paris Hotel was transferred to Mr. Anderson.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 December 1897.

Local News.

The following licence was transferred on Wednesday at the sitting of the Folkestone Justices: Paris Hotel to Mr. Anderson.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 May 1898.

Police Court.

On Monday an application by Mr. George B. Gray for temporary authority to sell at the London and Paris was granted.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 14 May 1898.

Monday, May 9th: Before Captain Willoughby Carter, and Justices Hoad, Pledge, and Vaughan.

Mr. Grey, of the London and Paris Hotel, applied for a temporary licence, which was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 June 1898.

Wednesday, June 15th: Before Messrs. J. Hoad, J. Pledge, and T.J. Vaughan.

The transfer of the licence of the Paris Hotel was granted to Mr. Grey.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 June 1898.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday transfer was granted Mr. George Gray for the Paris Hotel.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 18 June 1898.

Wednesday, June 15th: Before J. Hoad, and Justices Pledge and Vaughan.

Transfer was granted to Mr. Grey, of the London and Paris Hotel.

 

Folkestone Express 19 July 1899.

Wednesday, July 12th: Before J. Hoad, J. Pledge, and W. Medhurst Esqs.

George Heath was summoned for leaving a horse unattended outside the Paris Hotel on the 4th July.

It was proved that the defendant was in the Paris Hotel, and left his horse and cart for nearly half an hour.

Fined 5s. and 11s. costs or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 17 May 1902.

Monday, May 12th: Before Aldermen S. Penfold, G. Spurgen, and T.J. Vaughan, Colonel W.K. Westropp, and G. Peden Esq.

Vladimir Hausen, a seaman of the Catherine, was charged with being drunk and disorderly on Sunday in Harbour Street.

P.C. Leonard Johnson said about eight o'clock on Sunday evening he was called into Harbour Street, where he saw the prisoner opposite the Paris Hotel, drunk and shouting at the top of his voice “Come out, you ----“ With assistance of another constable he handcuffed him and he was taken to the police station. On the way he acted like a madman.

George Gray, landlord of the Paris Hotel, said on the evening in question prisoner asked for a pint of beer, and there was an altercation about payment, witness being called. Eventually the man paid and went out, but he returned and brandished a knife. He was turned out by a police constable, but he again returned, and as he was violent he was taken to the police station.

A fine of 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days' was imposed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 June 1902.

Wednesday, June 25th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Alderman Salter, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert and C.J. Pursey.

Robert Thompson, a private in the North Lancashire Regiment (Militia), was summoned for being drunk on the licensed premises of the London and Paris Hotel.

On the case being called, the Chief Constable put in a letter from the defendant's commanding officer, in which it was stated that the man had been dealt with by the military authorities for the offence for which he was now summoned. Under those circumstances the Chief Constable said it was not his wish to punish the man twice for the same offence, and he would therefore ask leave of the Bench to withdraw the summons.

The Chairman said the Bench were quite agreeable that such a course should be adopted.

George Barclay Gray, proprietor of the London and Paris Hotel, was then called upon to answer a summons charging him with serving a drunken person, namely the man Robert Thompson.

The Chief Constable explained that the summons was taken out under Section 3 of the Licensing Act, 1872.

Mr. Minter (who appeared for the defence): Does this case refer to that which has just been before the Bench?

The Chief Constable: Yes.

Mr. Minter: Then a more disgraceful thing I have never heard of. However, I'll speak on that matter later. That letter should not have been tendered to the Bench.

On behalf of Mr. Gray, Mr. Minter then formally pleaded Not Guilty, and asked that all witnesses should be ordered to leave the Court, which request was granted.

The case for the prosecution was then opened by Inspector Swift, who said: On Wednesday, the 18th inst., at 9.30, I was on duty in South Street, accompanied by P.C. Thomas Sales, when I saw a soldier of the North Lancashire Regiment leave the public bar of the London and Paris Hotel. He was drunk and swayed about. I called P.C. Sales' attention to the condition of the soldier, who. After about two seconds, returned to the bar. I followed in after him to prevent him being served with any drink. I called out to the barmaid who was standing with her back to me and talking to someone in the other compartment. I said “Don't serve this man – he is drunk”. The soldier then said “I'll have my ---- beer”, and then staggered to the counter, from which he took a full glass of beer and drank from it. The barmaid saw this and, as the man drank some of the beer, I said “Have you served him?”, and she replied “Yes, I have served him with a half pint of beer, but I did not think he was so drunk as he is”. The barmaid then gave the soldier a penny back, and took the remainder of the beer from him. I then asked to see the landlord, Mr. Gray, who came into the bar. I said to him “You see the condition of this man?”, meaning the soldier, who said “Am I drunk, Mr. Gray?”, and Mr. Gray replied “Well, you are not sober, and I wish you would leave my premises”. I then said to Mr. Gray “Your barmaid has already served this man with a half pint of beer”. The barmaid then said “I did not serve him. I served that one (pointing to another soldier); two or three of them came in together”. The soldier then left the bar, and when in South Street he became disorderly, and I handed him over to the custody of the policeman. He was brought to the station, his name and number were taken, and he was then handed over to the military police. I told Thompson that I should prefer a second charge against him, that of being drunk and disorderly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter: I did not see the soldier with two others go into the house. Two other soldiers did not come out with him. When the man left I did not demand his name. I asked for his name, and he refused to give it. I persisted, certainly. I should have had his name under any circumstances. He denied being drunk. I took him into custody. At the station I made the charge, but did not enter it in the charge book. I did as I usually do in such cases, handed the man over to the military picquet. The picquet were in front of the Town Hall, and came down at my request. I did not serve a summons upon the man to attend here today. The summons was served on Monday. I do not know that the Regiment has now gone from the Camp. I think it is still here. I did not see a drunken civilian go into and come out of the house. In my opinion that would aggravate the case.

Mr. Minter: We don't want your opinion.

Witness, in further cross-examination, said: I did not say to the barmaid “These soldiers are drunk”, neither did I open the door. I followed the soldiers in as the door was open.

Mr. Minter: Did you see any men in the bar? – Yes.

Did you know any of them? No. I expect I should recognise their faces again.

Mr. Minter then called forward three witnesses for the defence.

Witness: I do not recollect seeing them in the bar. They mat have been there.

Mr. Minter: Perhaps it was not convenient to see them?

Re-examined by the Chief Constable: What first drew your attention to this man?

Witness: He was swaying and swinging about. I deliberately say that when I spoke to the barmaid she said that she did not know that the man was as bad as he was.

P.C. Thomas Sales said: About 9.30 in the evening of the 18th inst., I was in the company of Inspector Swift, when I saw a soldier who was drunk go into the bar of the Paris Hotel. The Inspector followed him into the bar, and I stood in the entrance. I heard the Inspector say to the barmaid “Don't serve this man, miss; he is drunk”. At the same time the soldier picked up a glass from the counter which contained liquor and drank from it. The Inspector then said “Have you served him?” and the young lady said “Yes, he came in quietly”. The Inspector then asked to see Mr. Gray, who came into the bar, and Inspector Swift said “You see this man's condition?”, and the soldier said to Mr. Gray “Am I drunk?” Mr. Gray replied “You certainly are not sober”. Mr. Gray then took a glass containing some liquor from the counter and the barmaid handed the soldier some money. In reply to a question put to the barmaid she said she had served the other soldier. The Inspector asked the soldier for his name and number. The man refused to give them and was taken into custody and subsequently handed over to the Military Police.

By Mr. Minter: I did not see any drunken civilian go into the bar and come out again. I was not watching the house. I saw this particular soldier go in. Another soldier went into the bar after him. When appealed to by the soldier, Mr. Gray did not say “No, you are not drunk”. The coin was not handed to another soldier. I saw it handed to this particular one. The Inspector was between me and the barmaid, so I could not say whether it was one or more coins. The soldier did protest that he was not drunk.

P.S. Lawrence said: I was on duty at the station on Wednesday evening, the 18th inst. About 8.40 the soldier was brought in by Inspector Swift and P.C. Sales for the purpose of obtaining his name and address. He was afterwards handed over to the Military Police.

Mr. Minter: Was the charge taken down in a book? – Yes, sir.

Be careful. Was the charge taken down in a book? – Yes.

Let us have the book then.

The witness produced the book, which was inspected by Mr. Minter, who handed it to the Magistrates with the remark “Yes; I think that'll explain it all”.

Witness, in further cross-examination, said: Two or three companions followed the man to the station. The man gave me his name and number willingly.

Mr. Minter: Just so!

Sergt. Elfick (6th Dragoon Guards) said: I saw Thompson on the night of the 18th of June about 9.50. The man was drunk and rolling all over the street. He was being marched to the Camp by the picquet.

By the Chief Constable: I had no doubt whatever as to the man's condition.

Mr. Minter: Where were you? – On the Cheriton Road.

Were you in charge of the picquet? – No; a corporal was in charge of the picquet. I passed them and went on to Cheriton.

Mr. Minter, in opening the defence and in the course of a long speech, said: Mr. Gray has of course to answer this charge, and you will see from the evidence that I am going to call that he really has nothing to do, or knew nothing whatever about the charge until the dispute arose. Unfortunately the law says that the landlord is responsible for his servants. I know, but from the evidence I am going to call before you I shall show you that the landlord is a perfectly innocent person. I said just now “The disgraceful thing the Superintendent did at the opening of this case”, and I now repeat it. It was done to prejudice Mr. Gray's case, and I say now, a more disgraceful thing I never heard of. Even a common criminal, if 50 times convicted, is at times protected. Take a case at the Quarter Sessions. The knowledge of previous convictions is kept carefully from the minds of the jury, and here before you, the Superintendent, who thoroughly appreciates what he is doing, instead of holding back this information purposely brings it before you. I dispute that the man was drunk.

Mr. Minter then referred to the charge book, which mentioned that one corroborative witness was present. That witness, however, was not there that morning. Again, the charge in the book amounted to “permitting”. Yet to secure a conviction he would suggest that permitting had been converted into selling when the summons was made out. It was a curious thing that this hawk-eyed, intelligent person (the Inspector) did not see a civilian that was drunk refused drink, but he did manage to see a soldier who was not drunk served. (Laughter) Was it likely that the landlord of a respectable hotel would imperil his licence by selling a penny glass of beer? He would ask the Bench to dismiss from their minds the Superintendent's preliminary remarks, and to say after hearing the evidence that no ofence against the licensing laws had been committed.

George Barclay Gray, the defendant, said: The barmaid, Miss Hookham, has been in my service about three or four months. She served in the bar. I knew nothing of this case until called by Miss Hookham, when I saw three soldiers, among them being the man referred to. I went to the Camp to bring him here as a witness today, but his regiment went away the next morning. Inspector Swift spoke to me on the night of the 18th, and said “Your young lady has served these men with beer”, and I said “Quite right”. At the time there were three glasses in front of them. Inspector Swift did not say anything else. The soldier said to me “Am I drunk?”, and I replied “As far as I am concerned, no, but Mr. Inspector thinks that you are, so I will give you your money back”. My barmaid gave the pence back to one of the other soldiers, but not to Thompson. The glasses were then collected up. My instructions to my barmaids are that upon no consideration whatever are they to serve intoxicated persons, under pain of instant dismissal.

By the Chief Constable: I admit that the man was served in my house with a glass of beer. I could not tell you how long the men had been in the house previously to the Inspector coming in. I did not see the man walk, neither did I see one of the soldiers go out and come back in again. As far as my judgement goes the man was perfectly sober. I cannot give you a single instance of a policeman on any other occasion following a man in and making a mistake. The police have been to the house on a former occasion and cautioned the barmaids not to serve persons whom they alleged to be drunk.

Miss Hookham said: On the evening of Wednesday, the 18th, I had several civilians in the bar. One asked for a glass of stout. The stout not being kept in that department, I left the bar to get it. At that time there were no soldiers in the bar. As I came back a drunken civilian came in, and I refused to serve him. Three soldiers came in before the civilian and stood at the counter and ordered three glasses of beer. A companion of Thompson's paid for the beer. The Inspector came in and said “Have you served these men? Can you see they are drunk?” Mr. Gray came in, and the man Thompson said “Am I drunk?”, and Mr. Gray said “No”. Mr. Gray added “If the Inspector thinks you are drunk I'll have no bother here” and directed me to return the money. It is not true that I said to Inspector Swift that I did not think the man was as bad as he was. The soldier Thompson was sober, or he would not have been served. Occasionally we get people in a state of intoxication, and I refuse to serve them. I do not suppose the soldiers had been in the house four or five minutes.

By the Chief Constable: I admit serving drink to the soldiers. They were in the house about four or five minutes altogether. I could not say whether one of the soldiers went out and then followed the Inspector in. Thompson was perfectly sober. On one occasion I have had a policeman call my attention to a man who was drunk. On that occasion the man went out without being served.

Leslie Edwards, an employee on the Harbour extension works, corroborated the last witness. In his opinion the man Thompson was perfectly sober.

By the Chief Constable: The police did not accuse more than one man of being drunk. He could not give any reason why this particular man should be picked out. He had no conversation with the soldier, but saw him come into the bar and go out.

Re-examined: He saw a drunken civilian come in.

Frederick Pettifer and William Martin (both harbour employees) also gave corroborative evidence.

This concluded the case for the defence, and the Bench retired for private deliberation.

After seven minutes' absence the Magistrates returned, and the Chairman said that after a long hearing, the Bench had come to a unanimous decision. They found that the soldier Thompson was drunk and was served upon Mr. Gray's premises. He would mention that the full penalty was 10, but in this case it would be reduced to 1 and 19s. 6d. costs. The police having been attacked in the course of the case, the Bench wished to say that they did quite right in bringing the case forward, and that they had behaved in a very proper manner in the conduct of the case. Finally, the licence would not be endorsed.

 

Folkestone Express 28 June 1902.

Wednesday, June 25th: Before W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey and W.G. Herbert Esqs., Alderman Salter, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Robert Thompson, a private in the 3rd Militia Battalion of the North Lancashire Regiment, was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises.

The Superintendent said this charge had been dealt with by the officer commanding the regiment, and as he had no wish to punish a man for the same offence twice he would ask the Magistrates to dismiss the case. This was done.

George Barclay Gray, landlord of the London and Paris Hotel, was summoned for selling liquor to Robert Thompson while he was in a drunken state. Mr. Minter appeared for the defendant.

Inspector Swift stated that about 9.30 p.m. on the 18th inst. he was in South Street at the junction with Harbour Street, in company with P.C. Sales. He saw a soldier come out and hold on to the knob of the door. He swayed to and fro and went inside again. Witness went inside and said to the barmaid “Don't you serve that man – he is drunk”. The soldier exclaimed “I will have my ---- beer”, and took a full glass from the counter and drank some of it. Witness asked the barmaid if she served the soldier, and she replied “Yes. I served him with half a pint, but I did not think he was as bad as he is”. She then gave him back a penny and took away the remainder of the beer. Witness asked for Mr. Gray, who came into the bar. Witness said “You see the condition of this man?” The soldier said “Am I drunk?” Mr. Gray replied “You are not sober. I wish you would leave my premises”. The soldier went into South Street, and as he refused to give witness his name and number he took him to the police station, and after having ascertained his name and number, handed him over to the Military Police.

Mr. Minter spent some time in cross-examining the witness.

P.C. Sales corroborated.

Mr. Minter: You were watching the house? – No.

Sergt. Lawrence deposed to taking the charge.

Sergt. Elphick, of the garrison police, said he superintended the pickets. About 9.50 p.m. on the 18th inst. he overtook a picket in Cheriton Road. They had Robert Thompson with them; he was drunk and rolling about.

Mr. Minter addressed the Bench and said he would bring witnesses to prove the soldier was not drunk. He referred to the evidence of the police, and spoke of that body in the most offensive way. He would bring honest witnesses who would speak the truth.

Alice Hookham, a barman, said that one soldier ordered beer for three, and it was the same man who she gave the money back to. When the soldier said to Mr. Gray “Am I drunk?”, Mr. Gray replied “No”.

Leslie Edwards corroborated.

In reply to the Superintendent, he said he had no conversation with the soldier, but only inferred he was sober because he did not stagger on going in or coming out of the door. The distance was about three or four steps.

Frederick Pettifer and W. Martin also gave evidence for the defence.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had given the matter a great deal of consideration, and they had no doubt as to the soldier's condition. A fine of 1 and 19s. 6d. costs would be imposed, but the licence would not be endorsed. The Chairman also remarked that the police had behaved uncommonly well and they did not deserve the censures which had been passed upon them by the defendant's solicitor.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 October 1902.

Thursday, October 16th: Before Alderman Banks, Mr. Wightwick, and Mr. Swoffer.

Alfred John Pope, in khaki, was charged with unlawfully wearing a military uniform, he not being a soldier. Prisoner pleaded Guilty, and said he did it as a joke.

P.C. Lemar deposed that he saw prisoner in Harbour Street, and turning into South Street. Witness followed him into the bar of the Paris Hotel, and, calling him out, said “What is the meaning of this, going about as a soldier?” Witness knew prisoner personally, as he was a resident of the town, and not a soldier. He replied “Oh! It's only a joke. I am just going aboard to take it off”. Prisoner sometimes went to sea, and worked also at the harbour. He said the tunic and trousers were given to him by a reservist of the Royal Engineers, and the puttees and spurs were lent to him by a man named Godfrey, of the Colonials. This witness subsequently found to be correct.

The Chairman said it was a very serious offence. It was not a joke. They had the power to inflict a fine of 5, or a month's hard labour. Prisoner had no right to wear the uniform. Prisoner would be fined 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 7 days' hard labour.

Prisoner asked for a couple of hours in which to get the money, which was granted. However, a friend in Court stepped forward and paid the amount.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 February 1903.

Saturday, February 7th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert.

Mary Graham was charged with having been drunk and incapable on Friday night. On being called upon to plead the lady said she supposed that she was Guilty, but could not remember anything about it.

P.C. Kettle said at 8.45 p.m. on Friday he saw defendant lying on the path near the London and Paris Hotel. Having lifted her up and found that she was drunk and incapable, he, with the assistance of P.C. Watson, took her to the police station.

Mary had no defence, except that she had recently been unwell.

The Chief Constable proved a conviction for a similar offence in 1893.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1903.

Saturday, February 7th: Before W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Mary Graham was charged with being drunk and incapable.

P.C. Kettle said about 9.45 the previous evening he was in South Street, where he saw prisoner lying on the pavement outside the London And Paris Hotel. Witness picked her up and found she was drunk and incapable. He obtained the assistance of P.C. Watson and conveyed her to the police station, where she was formally charged.

Prisoner was charged with a similar offence in 1893.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs; in default seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 7 March 1903.

Saturday, February 28th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer.

William Frederick Godfrey, on bail, was charged with being drunk and incapable.

P.C. Nash said on Saturday night he was called by Mr. Gray, of the Paris Hotel, where he found Godfrey drunk. He had not been served by Mr. Gray, who requested the man's removal. Witness persuaded defendant to go, and then he tried to get drink at the Harbour Inn and the Prince Arthur (sic). In both cases defendant was refused, and he then made his way back to the Paris Hotel. Witness took him to the police station.

Defendant pleaded Guilty to being drunk, but took exception to the statement that he was incapable.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 7 March 1903.

Monday, March 2nd: Before W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

William Fredk. Godfrey was charged with being drunk on licensed premises.

P.C. Nash said about 6.20 on Saturday evening he was called to the London And Paris Hotel, and there saw prisoner. At the request of the landlord witness turned him out. Prisoner then went to the Princess Royal Hotel, where he was refused drink. He then went to the Harbour Inn, where he was again refused drink. About 7.20 p.m. witness was again called by Mr. Gray to eject prisoner. On getting him outside, witness found he was drunk, and consequently arrested him.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1903.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held in the Town hall on Wednesday. In view of the opposition by the police to a number of the existing licences extraordinary interest was evinced in the meeting, and when the proceedings commenced at eleven o'clock in the morning there was a very large attendance, the “trade” being numerously represented. Representatives of the Folkestone Temperance Council and religious bodies in the town were also present, prominent amongst them being Mr. J. Lynn, Mrs. Stuart, and the Rev. J.C. Carlile. Prior to the commencement of business the Licensing Justices held a private meeting amongst themselves. When the doors were thrown open to the public there was a tremendous rush for seats. The Justices present were the following:- Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Mr. J. Pledge, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

Before proceeding with the business, the Chairman announced that at the Annual Licensing Meeting the Justices adjourned the renewal of 23 full licences and five on beer licences, and directed the Chief Constable to give notice of objection to the owners of the licences of the following nine houses:- Providence (Arthur F. East); Marquis Of Lorne (William R. Heritage); Granville (Charles Partridge); Victoria (Alfred Skinner); Tramway (Frederick Skinner); Hope (Stephen J. Smith); Star (Ernest Tearall); Bricklayers Arms (Joseph A. Whiting); and Blue Anchor (Walter Whiting). Since the former sessions the Justices had inspected all the houses objected to, and considered the course which they ought to pursue with respect to the same, with the result that they had directed the Chief Constable to withdraw the notices of objection served by him with respect of the Victoria, Hope, and Blue Anchor, and to persist in the opposition to the following:- Providence, Marquis Of Lorne, Granville, Tramway, Star, and Bricklayers Arms. As regarded the remaining 15 full licences and five beer licences they would renew the same this year, and deal with them next year according to the circumstances.

They warned the holder of the licence of the London And Paris Hotel, who was convicted on the 25th of June last year for selling beer to a drunken man, that any future breach of the licensing laws would jeopardise his licence.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 28th: Before Mr. J. Ward and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

P.C. Sales deposed that at 9.30 p.m. on the 24th inst. he saw Harry Johnson and William Quintet drunk in Tontine Street. He spoke to them for using bad language. Ten minutes later he saw them go into the London And Paris Hotel. He followed them in and told the barmaid not to serve them. He took their names and addresses. Neither of the defendants appeared.

Fined 5s., costs, 9s, in default seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 31 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 28th: Before E.T. Ward and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Harry Johnson and William Quintet, who did not appear, were summoned for being drunk on licensed premises.

P.C. Sales deposed that about 9.30 p.m. on the 24th inst., he was on duty in Tontine Street, where he saw defendants in company with several other men in a drunken condition. He had occasion to speak to Johnson for using bad language. The men then went to the Brewery Tap, but were refused drink. About 9.40 they went to the London and Paris Hotel. Witness followed and told the barmaid not to let the men have drink. He then took their names and told them that he should report them. They were both drunk when served with the summons.

Fined 5s. and 9s. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 October 1903.

Wednesday, October 28th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward and C.J. Pursey.

Harry Johnson and William Quintet were summoned for being drunk on licensed premises, viz., the London And Paris Hotel, Tontine Street.

Defendants, who did not appear, were fined 5s. and 9s. costs; in default, seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 8 July 1905.

Thursday, July 6th: Before Aldermen Penfold and Vaughan, Lieut. Cols. Fymore and Westropp, G. Spurgen and W.C. Carpenter Esqs.

Thomas Howard, South Lancs. Regt., was charged with being drunk and disorderly in South Street. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Minter said shortly before eleven the previous evening he was called by the landlord of the London and Paris Hotel to eject the prisoner. He was very drunk, and the landlord had refused to serve him. Witness requested him to go outside, and this he refused to do. Eventually prisoner was ejected, but as he refused to go away, and challenged witness to fight, he was taken into custody.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Daily News 3 September 1906.

Monday, September 3rd: Before Messrs. Vaughan and Fynmore.

Hugh Murray Taylor was charged with obtaining credit by fraud and larceny.

George Gray, of the Paris Hotel, deposed that prisoner came to his place on the 22nd August and took apartments, saying his father and mother were coming later on. He knew them very well. Being very full, prisoner was permitted to sleep in witness's bedroom one night, and afterwards he had a room on another floor till the 26th. He then left without paying anything. On the 29th witness missed 1 spider diamond ring, 1 with 3 diamonds, 1 gold watch, chain and pendant, 1 sapphire and diamond pin, and 1 gent's signet ring, the whole valued about 32. He last saw them safe on the 20th or 21st. Prisoner only slept in the room once. The articles produced were part of witness's property. The rings had not been recovered.

James Filmer, of the Guildhall Tavern, deposed that prisoner came to his house on Friday week, saying he had been to the races and was broke. He asked for a loan of 5s., and handed witness a lady's gold watch and chain, and also asked him to take care of a diamond pin which he said he might lose, as he had been drinking. Prisoner asked how much he owed, and witness told him 2s. He then said “Let me have another 3s., making it 10s. in all”, which he said he would get from his father on the following Saturday. Prisoner afterwards came and asked for another sovereign, but witness declined to lend it to him, but let him have 2s. 6d., making altogether 12s. 6d. Witness handed the chain and scarf pin (produced) to Sergeant Burniston, who afterwards searched prisoner in his presence and found the ring.

Prisoner was remanded till next Friday.

 

Folkestone Daily News 7 September 1906.

Friday, September 7th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Fynmore and Vaughan.

Hugh Murray Taylor was charged on remand with stealing a quantity of jewellery from the London and Paris Hotel.

G.E. Gray had the depositions of the previous hearing read over, which he signed, as did also James Filmer, of the Guildhall Tavern.

Detective Burniston said that he received a warrant to arrest prisoner on the 31st August on another charge. He found prisoner in bed at 38, Torrington Square. On hearing the warrant he replied that he was sorry that it had happened, and hoped it would be settled, as he had told Gray a lie. Witness took him to Tottenham Road police station, and from there to Folkestone, where he was charged and made no reply. He was charged with obtaining board and lodgings of G.E. Gray by a false statement. Prisoner had 8d. on him and some papers relating to horse racing, and a paper headed Guildhall Tavern, stating that he had borrowed 12s. 6d. on a scarf pin, which was to be forfeited if it was not redeemed by Sept. 1st, signed “J. Filmer”. In consequence of finding the paper, witness went to the Guildhall Tavern, and saw Filmer and found the goods produced at the last hearing. He then charged prisoner with stealing the goods as specified in this charge. The prisoner admitted taking the whole of the articles except the three stone diamond ring. One ring had been pawned for 9, and others were found in the urinal of the Guildhall Vaults. Witness found them there in the presence of Filmer. On Monday he went to London with Gray to Davis Bros., 59, Cheapside, and there saw the three stone diamond ring, which Gray identified as his property.

Mr. John Morris, pawnbroker's assistant, 59, Cheapside, London, deposed that to the best of his belief the prisoner left the ring on the 27th August, and pledged for 8 in the name of H. Harvey, of Gower Street. On the 29th he came and had a further advance of 1, and a duplicate of the ticket produced was given him. Mr. G.E. Gray identified the ring as his property.

Prisoner said he called on Mr. Gray, and was allowed to sleep in his room. He had some refreshment. While he was waiting for Mr. Gray to come up he saw the drawer was open a little, and he took the things and put them in his pocket and went to bed. At 7.30 the next morning he got up and found Mr. Gray had not slept in the room. The accused thought he was in the wrong room, and went downstairs, when Mr. Gray told him he had not been to bed. He (prisoner) had some refreshment, put his hand in his pocket, found the jewellery, and did not know what to do with it. He hid them all at first. He had no money, and asked Mr. Filmer, who lent him 12s. 6d., holding the pins as security. The other rings he pawned. Had he been sober he would not have done such a thing.

The accused was committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

Bail was allowed in 50, and two sureties of 25 each.

The London pawnbroker asked to be allowed to have the ring, but it was ordered to be left in the custody of the Court.

 

Folkestone Express 8 September 1906.

Monday, September 3rd: Before Alderman Vaughan and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

Henry Murray Taylor, a respectably dressed young man of good appearance, was placed in the dock, charged with obtaining credit by fraud, and also with larceny.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner was arrested on a warrant in London for obtaining credit by false pretences, but, from other enquiries made, they had found that he had stolen a quantity of jewellery from the London and Paris Hotel. He, therefore, offered no evidence in the charge of false pretences, and would only deal with the charge of theft.

Mr. G.B. Gray, the proprietor of the London and Paris Hotel, said on August 22nd the prisoner came to his place and asked for accommodation. He said he wished to stay at the hotel until the Thursday morning, when his father and mother were coming. Witness knew the prisoner's father and mother very well. He took him into the hotel, and on the first night, owing to the hotel being so full, he slept in prosecutor's bedroom. On the following night, until the 26th, he occupied another bedroom on another floor. On the 27th he left without paying his bill. On Wednesday, August 29th, prosecutor went to his own bedroom and made a search. From a drawer of the dressing table he missed one lady's five stone diamond ring, one three stone diamond ring, one gold watch chain with pendant attached, one gent's sapphire and diamond pin, and a gent's signet ring, value about 32. He last saw the jewellery safe on August 20th. Prisoner only slept in his bedroom once. The pin, chain, pendant, and ring produced he identified as part of the missing property.

James Filmer, the landlord of the Guildhall Vaults, Guildhall Street, said the prisoner on August 24th came to his house and said he had been to the races and was broke. He also asked him to lend him 5s., and handed to witness the lady's gold chain. Afterwards he asked him if he would take care of a diamond ring, because he had been drinking and might lose it. He also asked how much he owed witness, and he told him 2s. Prisoner then asked him to let him have another 3s., and make it 10s., saying he would let him have it, as he was sending for it from his father. About half past ten on the following day he came to the house again, and asked him to let him have another 1. Witness declined. And told him he was not a money lender. Prisoner then said he had no money, and asked him to let him have a shilling or two. Witness gave him 2s. 6d. On Saturday last Detective Sergeant Burniston called upon him, and he handed him the diamond pin produced. He was also present when the Detective Sergeant searched Taylor and found on him the pendant and ring.

The Chief Constable said that was all the evidence he could offer that morning. It was necessary to make further enquiries with a view to recovering the missing property, therefore he asked for a remand for a few days.

The prisoner was therefore remanded until Friday.

 

Folkestone Express 15 September 1906.

Friday, September 7th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Hugh Murray Taylor, a respectably dressed young fellow, was charged on remand with stealing a quantity of jewellery, valued at 32, the property of George B. Gray, of the London and Paris Hotel.

The evidence of Mr. Gray and Mr. Filmer, given at the previous hearing on Monday, was read over.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said on Friday, August 31st, he received a warrant for the prisoner's arrest on another charge. He proceeded to London, and at 8.00 a.m. the following day he found the prisoner in bed at No. 12, Torrington Square. He read the warrant to him and told him he was a police sergeant. Prisoner replied “I am very sorry this has happened. I know I told Gray a lie, and I hope this can be settled”. He took him into custody, and afterwards to Tottenham Court Road police station, where he was detained. Later he brought him to Folkestone police station, where he was formally charged with obtaining credit from George Gray, of the London and Paris Hotel, by false pretences. He made no reply. He searched the prisoner, and found in his possession 8d. in money, some papers relating to horse racing, and also the paper on which was written in pencil “28 August 06, Guildhall Vaults, Folkestone. You owe me 12s. 6d., for which I have a diamond crusted scarf pin and a gold watch chain, to be forfeited by September 1st, 1906. Signed C. Filmer and H. Harvey”. In consequence of that paper he called on Filmer, who handed him the diamond scarf pin and also the gold watch chain produced. After they had been identified by Mr. Gray, he said to prisoner “You will be further charged with stealing between the 22nd and 26th August, from a bedroom at the London and Paris Hotel, a five stone diamond ring, a three stone diamond ring, a signet ring, a gold Albert chain and pendant, and a diamond scarf pin”. He cautioned the prisoner, who said “I admit taking the whole of the articles, except the three stone diamond ring. I pawned one ring in London for 9. You will find the other ring and gold pendant in the urinal of the Guildhall Vaults”. Witness went there, and in the presence of Filmer he found the articles on the top of the cistern. They were also identified by Gray. On Monday he proceeded to London, accompanied by Gray, and went to Davison Bros., pawnbrokers, 59, Cheapside, where he was shown the five stone diamond ring, which was identified by Mr. Gray as his property.

Walter John Morris, assistant in the employ of Davison Bros., said the prisoner, to the best of his belief, pledged the ring. Prisoner came to the shop the first time on August 27th, when he left the ring produced. Prisoner then asked for 8 on it, so he lent it to him. He gave the name of H. Harvey, of 76, Gower Street, and witness handed him a ticket. Prisoner again came on August 29th, and asked for a further loan of 1 on the ring, and he lent it to him. The man gave him the ticket he received on the Monday, and witness handed him the duplicate of the ticket produced.

Mr. Gray, re-called, identified the ring produced by Mr. Morris as his property.

Prisoner said he called at Mr. Gray's on Wednesday about half past five, and he told him he could sleep up in his room. They stayed up until the early hours of the morning, having some refreshment, and then went off to bed. He half undressed, and he saw the drawer in his room was a little open. As he waited for Mr. Gray to come up he had a look in the drawer and took the things mentioned except the three stone ring. He put them in his pocket. He got into bed and woke up about half past seven in the morning, and looked round for Mr. Gray and he found he had not slept there all night. He, therefore, thought he was in the wrong room. He put on his things and went downstairs, and Mr. Gray told him he had not been up to bed. He had a little refreshment, and put his hand in his pocket and found the jewellery. He did not know what to do with it, so he hid them all at first. He asked Mr. Filmer, as he had not got any money, and he lent him what he wanted, and he (the prisoner) asked him to keep them as security. Of course he pawned the five stone ring. If he had been sober he would not have done such a thing.

The prisoner was then committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions, bail being offered, himself in 50, and two sureties of 25 each.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 September 1906.

Monday, September 3rd: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan and Councillor R.J. Fynmore.

Hugh Murray Taylor, a respectably dressed young man, was charged with obtaining credit by false pretences.

The Chief Constable said enquiries had been made, and it had been found that prisoner had stolen a quantity of jewellery from the London and Paris Hotel. He therefore proposed to offer no evidence in the case of false pretences, but to deal with the latter charge.

George Gray, an hotel proprietor, said he lived at the London and Paris Hotel, Harbour Street. Prisoner came there on 22nd August and asked for accommodation, saying his father and mother were coming on the Thursday morning. He knew the accused's father and mother very well. He took prisoner in the hotel, and as they were very full, the first night he slept in witness's bedroom. On the following night he slept in a bedroom on another floor, and stayed in the hotel till the Sunday following, when he left without paying his bill. On Wednesday, 29th August, from something his wife told him, he (witness) went to her bedroom and made a search. He missed from a drawer in a dressing table one lady's five stone diamond ring, one three stone diamond ring, one gold watch chain with pendant attached, one gentleman's sapphire and diamond pin, and one gentleman's signet ring, value in all 32. The two rings had not yet been discovered. He (witness) last saw the articles safe on Monday, 20th August, when they were in the drawer in the dressing table.

James Filmer, landlord of the Guildhall Vaults, said he knew the prisoner. On Friday night he came to his house, and said he had been at the races, and was “broke”; could witness lend him 5s.? Prisoner handed him the lady's gold chain (produced), and afterwards asked him if he would mind a diamond pin of his, saying that he had been drinking, and might lose it. He asked witness how much he owed him, and witness replied “Two shillings”. Prisoner said “Let me have another three, and make it ten”, telling him that he would get the money from his father, who would be sending it off. Next day (Saturday) at about half past ten in the evening, prisoner asked for him, and said there was not time for the letter to come back from London, so would he let him have another sovereign? Witness declined, remarking that he was not a moneylender. Prisoner said he had got no money, and asked if witness would let him have a shilling or two. Witness then gave him 2s. 6d., making a total of 12s. 6d. On Saturday last Sergt. Burniston called on him, and he (witness) handed him the scarf pin and chain (produced).

The Chief Constable said that was all the evidence he proposed to offer that morning, and as it was necessary to make further enquiries, he asked for a remand until Friday.

The accused was put back till yesterday.

At the Folkestone Borough Bench yesterday (Friday) morning, before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, and Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Hugh Murray Taylor was brought up on remand.

Detective Sergeant Burniston deposed that on Friday, 31st ult., he received a warrant for prisoner's arrest on another charge. On the following day he proceeded to London at 8 a.m., and found prisoner in bed at No. 12, Torrington Square. Witness read the warrant over to him, and he replied “I am very sorry this has happened. I knew I had told Gray a lie. I hope this can he settled”. At Folkestone he searched accused, and found on him 8d. in money, some papers relating to horse racing, and a piece of paper (produced) on which something was written in pencil. In consequence of finding the latter he called on Mr. Filmer, who handed him the diamond scarf pin, and also the gold watch chain (produced). He said to prisoner, after the articles had been identified, “You will be further charged with stealing, between the 21st and 26th August, from a bedroom at the London and Paris Hotel, one five stone diamond ring, one three stone diamond ring, one signet ring, one gold chain and pendant, and one diamond scarf pin”. He cautioned prisoner, who replied “I admit taking the whole of the articles except the three stone diamond ring. I pawned one ring in London for 9. You will find the other ring and the gold pendant in the urinal of the Guildhall Vaults”. He went to the Guildhall Vaults, and made a search in the presence of Mr. Filmer. He found on the top of the cistern, concealed, the articles, which were identified by Mr. Gray. On Monday he proceeded to London in company with Mr. Gray, and at Davidson Bros., pawnbrokers, Cheapside, was shown the five stone diamond ring, which was identified by Mr. Gray in the shop.

Walter John Morris said he was an assistant in the employ of Messrs. Davidson Bros. To the best of his belief prisoner was the man who pledged the ring. He came in on the 27th August, and had 8 on it, giving the name of Mr. H. Harvey, 76. Gower Street. Accused came in again on the 29th, and asked for a further loan of 1 on the ring. Witness lent him the money.

Mr. Gray identified the ring (produced) as his property.

Accused said he called on Mr. Gray on the Wednesday about half past five, and he told him he might sleep up in his room. They stayed up till the early hours of the morning, three or four of them having a little refreshment. Then he went to bed. He half undressed, and saw a drawer in the room just a little open. As he was waiting for Mr. Gray to come up he had a look in the drawer and took the things mentioned, except the three stone ring. He put them in his pocket and got into bed. He woke up at about half past seven in the morning, and had a look round for Mr. Gray, but finding he had not slept there all night, he thought he (prisoner) was in the wrong room. He put on his things and went downstairs. Mr. Gray told him he had not been up to bed. He had a little refreshment, and on putting his hand into his pocket, he found the jewellery. He did not know what to do with it, so he hid them at first. Then he asked Mr. Filmer, as he had no money, if he would lend him some, and as security he gave him the things. He pawned the five stone ring. If he had been sober he would never have done such a thing.

Prisoner was committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions for the borough, bail being offered, himself in 50, and two sureties of 25 each.

 

Folkestone Daily News 8 October 1906.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 8th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Hugh Murray Taylor, a young man very respectably connected, who was committed by the Folkestone Justices on September 7th, was charged with going to Mr. Gray's, at the Paris Hotel, for the purpose of obtaining apartments for his friends. As Mr. Gray was unable to accommodate him, being very full at the time, prisoner was allowed to sleep in the prosecutor's own bedroom. During the night accused stole a quantity of jewellery. On the next day he was accommodated with board and apartments, and shortly afterwards decamped without paying. Mr. Gray applied for a warrant to arrest him on a charge of obtaining board and lodgings under false pretences, and subsequently discovered that he had also stolen the jewellery. Hence the first charge was abandoned and the second one proceeded with.

It transpired in evidence that the prisoner had pawned one of the rings with a London jeweller, and some pins he left with Mr. Filmer, of the Guildhall Tavern, as security for some money he had borrowed. A document was found on him to the effect that he left certain goods with Mr. Filmer as security for a debt of 12s., and if the debt was not paid the goods were to be forfeited. The goods were worth several pounds.

Mr. Matthews prosecuted, and recited the facts that were heard before the Justices.

The Chief Constable deposed that the prisoner's father had given him a good education, but he had thrown his chances away, and he was forbidden in his father's house. He was the associate of prostitutes, bullies, and thieves, and had broken into his father's house and stolen plated goods.

His father had written asking for leniency, and said he would be sent to Canada.

He was sentenced to 3 months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 13 October 1906.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 8th: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

Hugh Murray Taylor, 22, described as a stationer, was charged with stealing a five stone diamond ring, a three stone diamond ring, a gold signet ring, a gold Albert chain, a gold tassel, and a diamond and sapphire scarf pin, to the value of 32, the property of George Barclay Gray, of the London and Paris hotel, on August 23rd. Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Matthew, on behalf of the prosecution, said the prisoner seemed to have taken a room at the hotel on August 23rd. In the room he occupied there were various valuable articles of jewellery. Taylor seemed to have opened the drawer and to have taken them out, and afterwards left the hotel without paying his bill. The things were not missed for a few days, and when the prisoner was apprehended, it appeared he had handed one of the rings to a man named Filmer, the landlord of the Guildhall Vaults, who lent him 12/6 on it, because the man represented he had lost his money at the races. He had also hidden some of the jewellery on the same premises, and others he pledged with a pawnbroker in London.

Prisoner handed in a statement to the Recorder, in which he said he went to Folkestone races on August 22nd. He went to the hotel, and Mr. Gray told him he could have a room. Four or five of them sat up drinking, and when he went to bed he was the worse for drink. He took the jewellery out of a drawer and put it in his pocket. He, however, did not touch the three stone diamond ring. Next morning he found the jewellery in his pocket when he got downstairs, and he did not know what to do with it. He hid some of it, and pawned some of it. He would not have done it if he had been sober. It was the first time he had been locked up. He had promised his mother and father he would turn over a new leaf. He was going abroad in order to get an honest living. He would do nothing wrong again.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner's father was a very respectable man living in London, and kept a boarding house in Torrington Square. He had given prisoner a good education, and his parents had done everything the possibly could to keep him right. Witness had learnt from the Metropolitan Police that he had been denied his own home, and that his parents would not have anything to do with him He was the associate of betting men, prostitutes, and bullies. He had been a great nuisance to his parents. A few nights before his arrest, prisoner had broken in and robbed his father's own house, and the property stolen had been found in pledge in London.

Prisoner said he was very sorry for what he had done.

The Recorder, addressing the prisoner, said he had received a letter from his father, who asked him to deal as leniently as he could with him, and arrangements would be made to send him to Canada. Those arrangements could be made while he was in prison, and in the meantime he would be imprisoned with hard labour for three calendar months.

The pawnbroker's assistant asked if the ring was to be paid for before it was returned to the owner.

The Recorder said there were no grounds for blaming the pawnbroker in that case, and he should leave the matter to be arranged by the two parties.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 October 1906.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 8th: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Hugh Murray Taylor was indicted for stealing, in the dwelling house of George Barclay Gray, one five stone diamond ring, one three stone diamond ring, one gold signet ring, one gold Albert chain, one gold tassel, and one diamond and sapphire scarf pin, together valued at 32, the property of the said George Barclay Gray, at Folkestone, on the 23rd August, 1906.

Mr. Theodore Matthew appeared for the Crown, and described how prisoner went to the London and Paris Hotel, and how, after leaving the hotel without payment, the jewellery enumerated in the charge was missed. He went on to recount how prisoner had hidden some of the articles, and how he had borrowed money from Mr. Filmer.

Prisoner handed a written statement to the Recorder. In this he said that on the 22nd August he came to Folkestone for the races, and Mr. Gray put him up. They stayed up with several others drinking, and when he went to his room he saw the articles in a drawer. He had been drinking, and put them in his pocket. Next morning he went down to breakfast and found all the articles, about which he had forgotten, in his pocket. He did not know what to do with them. That was the first time he had been in trouble. He had promised his mother to turn over a new leaf, and he was going abroad.

The Chief Constable, in reply to the Recorder, said that the prisoner's father was a very respectable man, keeping a boarding house in Torrington Square. He had given the prisoner a good education; in fact, the parents had done everything they could for him. For some considerable time he had been denied his own home. Prisoner had been the associate of betting man, prostitutes, and bullies, and was the source of great trouble to his parents. A few night before he committed the robbery in Folkestone he broke into and robbed his father's own house, and that property had since been found in pledge in London.

Prisoner said he was sorry for what he had done. It was his first offence, and he never intended to do anything of the kind again.

The Recorder: I have had a letter from your father, in which he asks me to deal as leniently as I can with you, pending your being sent to friends in Canada directly you are free. Arrangements may be made by your friends, but you will be imprisoned for three calendar months.

 

Folkestone Daily News 31 December 1906.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, December 31st: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

The Recorder asked Mr. De Wet to step into Counsel's seat. Addressing the solicitor, the Recorder said: At the last Quarter Sessions of this Court, a man, Hugh Murray Taylor, pleaded Guilty to stealing some things at the Paris Hotel, in this borough. I received a letter from the accused's father, stating that if I dealt leniently with him the accused would be sent out of the country. Upon that I sentenced the man to three months' hard labour. I now learn that the man at the expiration of his sentence (in February) is about to be arrested for illegally pawning. When giving sentence I made no order as to the restitution of the jewellery, leaving it to the pawnbroker and Mr. Gray. This proposed step seems to me to be a high-handed proceeding.

Mr. De Wet said that he represented Mr. Gray, and after the Recorder's sentence he wrote to Messrs. Attenborough for the return of the rings and asked what they required. Messrs. Attenborough replied 4 10s. 0d. (half the amount for which they were pledged). He (Mr. De Wet) knowing Mr. Gray had already been put to great expense, advised an offer of 2 10s. 0d. This was refused. Subsequently he wrote to Messrs. Attenborough, pointing out that as no order was made, under Section 30 of the Pawnbrokers' Act his client could demand the ring without payment.

The Recorder: Then the proposed proceedings appear to be spiteful.

Mr. De Wet: I quite agree. It seems that Messrs. Attenborough wish to give Mr. Gray further trouble.

The Recorder: Your client has done everything that is legal and proper. The offer of 50s. is one that I should have made, had I have made an order. I hope the members of the Press will take notice of the case, and that copies of the papers will be laid before the committing Magistrate if the accused is re-arrested.

 

Folkestone Express 5 January 1907.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, December 31st: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Before proceeding with the ordinary business the Recorder called Mr. De Wet forward. He said that at the last Quarter Sessions a man was brought before him, and he pleaded guilty in the name of Hugh Murray Taylor to stealing some articles from the Paris Hotel, and he (the Recorder) received before sentencing him a letter from his father, asking for a merciful sentence on the ground that he was going to send his son out of the country to Canada. He took that and all the circumstances into consideration, and that the rings had been pawned immediately by the man, and sentenced him to three months' hard labour. He had learned that the young man was about to be re-arrested, when all arrangements had been made for him to be sent abroad, on his leaving Canterbury on January 7th, on a charge of illegally pawning the diamond ring which he was charged with stealing. He had refreshed his memory from his notes of the case, and found that he had made no order as to the detention of the property, leaving it to Mr. Gray, the owner of the property, and the pawnbroker to come to an arrangement, and it came to him as a matter of some surprise to find that such a high-handed procedure should be about to be taken in the matter. He then asked Mr. De Wet if any arrangements had been made between his client (Mr. Gray) and the pawnbroker.

Mr. De Wet said as soon as the case was over application was made for the return of the ring. The solicitors for the pawnbrokers, Messrs. Attenborough and Sons, agreed to return it if the sum of 4 10s. was paid, that being half the amount advanced. Mr. Gray, who had already been a great sufferer and had lost about 12 outside the question of the ring, made an offer to pay 50s. That offer as not accepted, and Mr. Gray came to consult him. He wrote Messrs. Attenborough a very long letter, simply withdrawing the offer and saying that they had no title to the ring, and unless it was handed over at once he should take proceedings for the recovery of it. He also pointed out that under Section 30 of the Pawnbrokers Act there was a discretion for that Court to make an order, but he contended that as he (the Recorder) had made no order the property should be handed to Mr. Gray. They evidently considered that letter, and they wrote suggesting that he should advise Mr. Gray to again make his former offer of 50s. He consulted Mr. Gray, who said, rather than have the trouble of making an application to that Court, he would offer 50s. He (Mr. De Wet) wrote to them, and they accepted that amount, and gave him an order from the Chief Constable to hand it over to them. He should think that the proceeding referred to by the Recorder were brought out of spite because Mr. Gray would then be put to further trouble in having to go to London to give evidence.

The Recorder said he thought that Mr. Gray had done everything reasonable and proper. The sum offered by him would have been something about the amount he would have fixed. He saw no foundation for any further charge being brought against the man, and he sincerely trusted when the case came on in London, copies of the newspapers containing reports of the case would be laid before the committing Magistrates.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 January 1907.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, December 31st: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

The Recorder called Mr. De Wet, and asked the Press if they would please take notice of what he was about to say. At the last Quarter Sessions for the Borough, he proceeded, a man was tried before him - he thought he pleaded Guilty – by the name of Hugh Murray Taylor, for stealing some rings from the London and Paris Hotel, and he (the Recorder) received a letter from the man's father, asking for a merciful sentence, on the ground that he was going to send his son out of the country, to Canada. He took that into consideration, and took all the circumstances into consideration, including the fact that the ring had been pawned immediately by the prisoner, and sentenced him to three months' hard labour. He had since learnt – and he believed it to be a fact – that the man was now about to be re-arrested, after all arrangements had been made for him to be sent abroad, on his leaving Canterbury gaol on the 7th of next month, on a charge of illegally pawning one of the rings, the diamond ring, which he was charged with stealing before him (the Recorder). He had refreshed his memory from his notes, with the assistance of the Chief Constable, and found that he made no order as to the detention of the property, leaving it to Mr. Gray, the owner, and to the pawnbroker to come to an arrangement. It was a matter of some surprise to him that such high-handed procedure should be about to be taken in this case. “Has any arrangement been made with your client, Mr. Gray?” added the Recorder.

Mr. De Wet replied that as soon as the case was over application was made for the return of the ring. The solicitors for the pawnbrokers agreed to return it if the sum of 4 10s., half the amount advanced, was paid. Mr. Gray, who had already been a great sufferer, having lost about 12 outside the question of that ring, made an offer to pay 50s. That offer was not accepted, and Mr. Gray came to see him. He wrote to Messrs. Attenborough, solicitors for the pawnbrokers, a very long letter, simply withdrawing that offer, and saying that they had no title at all to the ring, and that unless the ring was handed up at once he would take proceedings for the recovery of it. He pointed out to them that under Section 30 of the Pawnbrokers' Act it was left to the discretion of the Court to make an order, and that as in that case the Recorder made no order, he contended that the property should be handed back to Mr. Gray. They wrote him again, suggesting that he should advise Mr. Gray to again make his former offer of 50s. He consulted Mr. Gray, and asked him if he was prepared to do that, and he said that rather than have the further trouble of an application to the Court, and his attending there again, he would offer the 50s. again. He (Mr. De Wet) wrote to Messrs. Attenborough, and soon they accepted the 50s., and gave an order to the Superintendent of the police to hand over the ring. If he might express an opinion, he should think that the proceedings were brought out of spite against Mr. Gray.

The Recorder said he could see no foundation for the further charge. He sincerely trusted that copies of the newspapers – if the Press had been so kind as to take note of that proceeding – would be laid before the committing Magistrate.

 

Folkestone Daily News 8 August 1907.

Wednesday, August 7th: Before Messrs. Spurgen, Vaughan, Stainer, Ames, and Fynmore.

Thomas Wilson was charged with being drunk and disorderly in South Street yesterday.

P.C. Chaney said at 1.10 in the afternoon he saw the prisoner very drunk and using obscene language. He was refused drink in one public house, and afterwards went into the Paris Hotel, where witness told the barmaid not to serve him.

P.S. Dawson said the prisoner was brought in at 5.30 last night. Prisoner had 11d. on him.

Prisoner admitted that he was a little the worse for drink, but did not use obscene language. He was down for a few days holiday.

The Chairman said the case would be dismissed, and he hoped the prisoner would be a wiser man in future.

 

Folkestone Daily News 22 January 1908.

Wednesday, January 22nd: Before Messrs Ward, Herbert, Vaughan, Carpenter, Leggett, Ames, Boyd, and Fynmore.

Mr. De Wet made an application in respect to the London and Paris Hotel, where certain alterations were proposed to be made, the principal alteration being on the ground floor. He submitted plans showing the proposed alterations, which the Magistrates, after inspection, approved of, and allowed the application.

 

Folkestone Express 25 January 1908.

Wednesday, January 22nd: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, T. Ames, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd Esqs.

Mr. De Wet mad an application for the Justices' sanction to plans for alterations at the London and Paris Hotel. He produced the plans and said he made his application under Section 11 of the 1902 Act.

The Magistrates inspected the plans, and the Chairman said the alterations seemed to be an improvement.

Mr. De Wet said he thought he might point out that instead of five entrances there would only be four if the alterations were carried out. Another special point was that if a man entered one bar he would have to come out of the house by the same entrance, whereas at present a person could go in the bar and walk into the billiard room, and out by the entrance to that room.

The Chairman said they would sanction the alterations.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 January 1908.

Wednesday, January 22nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Messrs. W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, T. Ames, and G. Boyd.

A special session was held for transferring alehouse licences.

Mr. De Wet said that he had an application to make in respect of the London and Paris Hotel. Plans had been deposited, and he asked the Magistrates to refer to them, and then they would see the exact alterations proposed to be made. He produced plans showing the premises as they looked before the alteration, and also as they would look after the alteration, which he was going to ask them to allow. He pointed out that instead of having five entrances there would only be four, and if a person entered by a certain door he would have to go out at the same door.

The Bench approved of the plans.

 

Folkestone Daily News 1 December 1909.

Wednesday, December 1st: Before Justices Herbert, Stainer, Leggett, Fynmore, Swoffer, and Linton.

The plans of proposed alterations to the London and Paris Hotel were amended.

 

Folkestone Express 4 December 1909.

Wednesday, December 1st: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Major Leggett, and Messrs. J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and G.I. Swoffer.

Permission was granted to amend plans passed some 18 months ago in regard to the London and Paris Hotel.

 

Folkestone Daily News 4 July 1910.

Monday, July 4th: Before Messrs. S. Penfold and Vaughan.

Felix White was charged with wilfully breaking a plate glass window at the Paris Hotel. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Butcher deposed that at 12.45 on Saturday night last he was on duty in South Street, and saw the prisoner sitting on the step of the Paris Hotel. Witness told him he could not stop there, and prisoner moved away, but came back again and raised his foot and put it deliberately through a plate glass window. He then turned to witness and said “There you are”. Witness took him into custody and charged him with wilfully breaking the window in question.

Mr. Gray, the landlord of the Paris Hotel, said damage was done to the extent of 12s. 6d.

Prisoner said the reason he sat down was because his head was bad. The constable flashed his lamp on him, which frightened him, and in stepping back his foot went through the window.

The Chief Constable said he understood the prisoner only came out of Canterbury gaol on Saturday, and he certainly didn't seem quite right in the head.

Mr. Gray said he had no wish to press the charge, and prisoner was discharged on promising to leave the town.

 

Folkestone Express 9 July 1910.

Monday, July 4th: Before Aldermen Spurgen and Vaughan.

Felix White was charged with breaking a square of glass in a window at the London and Paris Hotel. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Butcher said at 12.45 on Saturday night he was on duty in South Street, when he saw the prisoner sitting on the doorstep of the London and Paris Hotel. He told him he could not sit there, and prisoner said he could not get lodgings. Prisoner went away, but returned, and when he got opposite the London and Paris Hotel he raised his foot and deliberately put it through the landing window, which was of plate glass. He then turned to witness and said “There you are, governor”. He was perfectly sober. Witness took him into custody and brought him to the police station.

Mr. Gray, of the London and Paris Hotel, said the amount of the damage was 12s. 6d.

Prisoner said he came over queer in the head, and when the officer flashed his lantern on him it frightened him, and he stepped back and knocked up against the window.

The Chief Constable said White was a stranger, and he understood that he only came out of prison on Saturday.

Prisoner said that was the only time he had been in prison. He was a packer by trade, and came to Folkestone to find his sister.

Mr. Gray said he did not wish to press the charge, and prisoner was allowed to go on promising to leave the town.

 

Folkestone Express 14 November 1914.

Tuesday, November 10th: Before J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, W.J. Harrison, E.T. Morrison, and J.J. Giles Esqs., and Col. Owen.

John Keneally was charged with being drunk and disorderly. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Cradduck said about 6.30 the previous evening he was on duty in Harbour Street, when he saw the prisoner ejected from the London and Paris Hotel. He was drunk, and commenced a disturbance. He (witness) requested him to go away, but he refused, and went into the True Briton, from which house he was ejected. He (the constable) again asked him to go away, but he said “I don't care a ---- for a ---- policeman”. He went into the London and Paris again, so he took him into custody.

Prisoner said he was very sorry, but he worked at the London and Paris.

The Chief Constable said the man had worked at the London and Paris for a week, and that was his first pay-day. He went out early in the afternoon, and never returned until he arrived in that condition, when they would not allow him to go into the house again.

Fined 5/- and 4/6 costs, or seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 December 1916.

Friday, December 1st: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J.J. Giles, and Councillor W.J. Harrison.

George Gray, landlord of the London and Paris, and his barmaid, Jessie Martin, were summoned for supplying drink not paid for by the consumer, Sergt. Robert Wilcox for paying for the drink, and Geo. Mitchell and Burns Grant for consuming the drink. Mr. G.W. Haines represented all the defendants.

P.C. Piddock said on November 25th he was in the bar of the London and Paris Hotel and saw the barman hand to Wilcox a glass of beer, which he in turn handed to Mitchell and then paid for. Later Miss Martin served him with a bottle of ale and some spirits, for which he paid, giving the ale to Grant. When spoken to, Mitchell said “Would you be surprised to hear I paid for my own drink by giving him the money for it?” Mr. Gray had been in the bar during the whole time. The barmaid told him she thought the men paid for their own drinks. Witness saw no money pass between Wilcox and the other man.

By Mr. Haines: The other men might have handed money to Wilcox before he came to the counter.

P,C, Whittaker corroborated.

By Mr. Haines: He was close to Wilcox, but could not hear what orders he gave.

Miss Martin said that Wilcox came up to her and ordered three drinks. She told him she could not serve him with three all at once, and he then went round to the other men and collected the money for each man's drink. He gave the change he received back to one of the men.

By the Magistrates' Clerk: As Wilcox got each drink he got the money from one of the men and paid for it.

Corpl. Wilcox, of the Headquarters Staff, C.F.A., gave corroborative evidence, as did Lance Corpl. Mitchell and Gnr. Burns Grant.

Mr. Gray was fined 5, Miss Martin 2, and the other defendants 10s. each.

 

Folkestone Express 9 December 1916.

Friday, 1st December: Before Mr. J. Stainer and other Magistrates.

George Gray, landlord of the London and Paris, and Jessie Martin, his barmaid were summoned for supplying to persons drink which had not been paid for by themselves; Corporal Robert Wilcox for treating; and Bombr. George Mitchell and Bombr. Burns-Grant for accepting and consuming. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for all the defendants.

P.C. Pittock said P.C. Whittaker and he also visited this house on November 25th, and saw the Corporal order drinks for the other two soldiers. Grant said “This is a fair cop”. Mitchell said “Would you be surprised to know I paid for my own drink and gave him the money for it?” Witness informed him that he drink had been paid for with half a crown. All three of them then said “We paid for our own drinks”. Mr. Gray was in the bar the whole of the time. Miss Martin, when told she would be reported, said “I think they paid for their own”, while Mr. Gray, when similarly informed, said “I am very surprised at that”.

By the Clerk: Witness saw no money passed between the Corporal and the other two men.

By Mr. Haines: Witness could not agree that he had made a mistake. When he ordered ale and lemonade, the barmaid did not ask for whom was the ale.

P.C. Whittaker corroborated, and in cross-examination said he did not hear what Wilcox said to the barmaid. No money transaction could have taken place which witness could not see.

Miss Martin, giving evidence for the defence, said she had been at the London and Paris for fifteen months. On the Saturday in question, Mitchell and Burns were sitting in the bar when the police came in. One of the officers asked for a lemonade and a bitter, and witness asked whether the lemonade was for his friend. He nodded his head as though in assent. When Wilcox came in he called for a Guinness, a Scotch and a cigar, putting down half a crown. She refused, saying he could not have them all at once. She knew he might give them away if he had them all. Then he bought a cigar, and left 2s. 2d. change on the counter. After being refused all the drinks, he said “Very well, I will go and get the boys' money”. She heard him ask for their money, and saw each man take money out of his pocket. Wilcox called for a Guinness, and put down 4d. Then he put down 4d. for some whisky, and, coming to the counter again, took 4d. out of his pocket for a Bass for himself. All the time 2s. 2d. change remained on the counter.

Re-examined, witness said she was sure all the men were not there when the police officers came in. She had made no mistake as to the soldiers, because she knew the men.

Corporal Robert Wilcox said he went to the London and Paris with a man named Mackintosh. He saw the other soldiers in there and nodded to them. He then asked whether they “were going to have one”, but Miss Martin refused to take the order, saying that treating was not allowed. Mackintosh gave him half a crown to get him a cigar. When Miss Martin refused the order for the drinks, witness told the boys each must pay for his own drink. He took 4d. from one, and 4d. from another, and paid for his own drink separately. He took the cigar to Mackintosh, leaving 2s. 3d. change on the counter. Nothing was said about a “fair cop”. It might have been said and he did not hear it.

In cross-examination witness said he was aware that treating was prohibited.

Bombr. George Mitchell said he saw the police officers in the bar, and knew them as such. Wilcox said “You will have to pay for your own drinks”, and witness gave 4d. for some whisky. He (witness) did not want to get up from the couch where he was sitting.

Gunner Burns-Grant also said he gave 4d. to Wilcox to get his drink for him. He denied saying “It's a fair cop”.

Mr. Gray was fined 5, Miss Martin 2, and the three soldiers 10s. each.

 

Folkestone Express 10 February 1917.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before E.T. Ward, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, H. Kirke, and J.J. Giles Esqs., and the Rev. Epworth Thompson.

Mr. H. Reeve read his annual report as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are within your jurisdiction 115 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz; Full licences 71, Beer on 7. Beer off 5, Beer and spirit dealers 15, Grocers etc., off 7, Confectioners, wine, on 3. Chemists, wine, off 6, Total 115. This gives an average, according to the census of 1911, of one licence to every 291 persons, or one on licence to every 429 persons. This is the same number of licensed premises as were in existence last year.

At the adjourned licensing meeting, held on 6th March last, the licence of the Clarence Inn, Dover Road, was referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy, and at the principal meeting of that Committee held at Canterbury on 21st June, the renewal of the licence was refused. The question as to the amount of compensation to be paid was referred to the Inland Revenue Authorities, and has not at present been determined, consequently a provisional renewal of the licence will be applied for. During the past year five of the licences have been transferred.

For the year ended 31st December last 55 persons (28 males and 27 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness, of whom 32 were convicted and 23 discharged without conviction. Of the persons proceeded against 17 were residents of the Borough, 9 members of the Naval and Military Forces, 13 persons of no fixed abode and 16 residents of other districts. In the preceding year 174 persons (109 males and 65 females) were proceeded against, of whom 129 were convicted and 45 discharged.

Proceedings have been taken during the year against 14 of the licence holders for various offences, 7 of whom were convicted and 7 dismissed. The following are the cases in which convictions have been recorded, viz; 9th March, the licensee of the Guildhall Hotel was fined 1 for a breach of the “No Treating” Order; 24th March, the licensee of the Mechanics Arms Inn was fined 1 for allowing a child under 14 years to be in the bar of his licensed premises; 23rd June, the licensee of the Chequers Inn was fined 1 for dispatching intoxicating liquor from his licensed premises without a licence; 30th June, the licensee of the Morehall Wine Stores was fined 1 for dispatching intoxicating liquor from his licensed premises without the same having been previously paid for; 30th June, the licensee of 27 Rendezvous Street (off licence) was fined 1 for a similar offence; 1st December, the licensee of the London and Paris Hotel was fined 5 for a breach of the No Treating Order; 1st December, the licensee of the Pavilion Shades was fined 5 for a similar offence.

Nine clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, 7 for music only, and 1 for public billiard playing.

The Order of the Liquor Control Board which came into operation on 10th January last year, restricting the hours of sale and supply of intoxicating liquor to 4 hours each weekday and 4 hours on Sunday remains in force, and in my opinion is mainly the cause of the decrease in the cases of drunkenness recorded.

Under Regulation 10 of the Defence of the Realm Regulations, Orders have been made by the Competent Military Authority, and are still in force, closing 3 of the licensed houses to all members of H.M. Forces. The houses are the Jubilee Inn, Radnor Street, the Wonder Tavern, Beach Street, and the True Briton, Harbour Street.

The Chairman said with regard to the report the number of convictions was very satisfactory. Mr. Reeve said in his opinion that was due to the restricted hours. He (Mr. Ward) was sorry to see so many convictions of publicans – seven – which was a greater number than he remembered in any year. There was no doubt that publicans were faced with very great difficulties with so many restrictions placed upon them. He urged upon them the necessity of being very careful not to serve any wounded soldiers, or any soldiers waiting embarkation. There were very heavy penalties laid down for offences of such a nature – imprisonment for six weeks or 100 fine. He hoped all of them would be very careful. All the licences would be renewed with the exception of the seven against which convictions had been recorded, but those seven licences would be granted until the adjourned sessions in a month's time.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said with regard to the premises licensed for music and dancing the Magistrates had made new regulations. In future no structural alterations should be made in the licensed premises, and no alterations should be made in the stage, gangways, passageway or exits without the previous approval of the justices, and such gangways should be kept free from chairs or other obstruction during the hours of public entertainment, and all performances should be of an unobjectionable character, and good order and decent behaviour should be kept and maintained on the premises during the hours of licence.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 February 1917.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. J.J. Giles, Mr. H. Kirke, and the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson.

The Chief Constable read his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said he was sorry to see so many convictions of publicans, the greatest number he had seen for years. No doubt the difficulties of publicans were great owing to abnormal times. He would advise them to be very careful not to serve wounded soldiers or those who were soldiers about to embark. In regard to the licences, they would all be renewed, with the exception of seven, which would be considered at the adjourned sessions on March 7th.

 

Folkestone Express 10 March 1917.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Folkestone adjourned licensing sessions were held on Wednesday, Mr. E.T. Ward presiding on the Bench, when the licences of the Guildhall, the Mechanics Arms, the London and Paris Hotel, the Chequers, the Pavilion Shades, the Morehall Wine Stores, and Finn's Store, Rendezvous Street, were renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1917.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. H. Kirke.

The licences of the Pavilion Shades (Mr. E. Bishopp), the Mechanics Arms (Mr. J. Lawrence), Paris Hotel (Mr. G. Gray), Guildhall Vaults (Mr. Cousins), and those of Mr. J. Kent (Morehall), and Messrs. Finn and Co. Ltd. (Rendezvous Street) were renewed.

The Chairman, addressing the licensees, impressed upon them the great necessity of taking the greatest care in the conduct of their businesses, whilst at the same time acknowledging their difficulties.

 

Folkestone Express 30 March 1918.

Local News.

A summons against Mr. G.B. Gray under the Beer Prices and Description Order was adjourned by the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday until Thursday next.

 

Folkestone Express 6 April 1918.

Thursday, April 4th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, J.J. Giles, and H. Kirke.

George B. Gray, of the London and Paris Hotel, was summoned under the Beer Prices and Description Order made by the Food Controller for selling in the public bar of his house half a pint of beer which was of an original gravity of less than 1036 degrees at the rate of 5d. per pint. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. A.F. Kidson, the Town Clerk, prosecuted, and Mr. G.W. Haines defended.

Mr. Kidson said the Order made by the Food Controller provided that beer should be sold in the public bar by Imperial measure, and that prices should be for beer of an original gravity of less than 1036 degrees not exceeding 4d. per pint, and for beer of original gravity not exceeding 1042 and not less than 1036 degrees, fivepence per Imperial pint. The beer which was purchased from Mr. Gray, when analysed, showed that it was of the original gravity of 1031.44 degrees, practically five degrees below the figure at which the price should only be 4d. There was a clause in the Order that if it was proved that the publican sold the beer on the warranty of the brewer that it was of the original gravity specified in the Order, and notice of it was given to the prosecution, and it was proved, then he was entitled to the dismissal of the case. Mr. Gray had given them such notice, and forwarded invoices from Messrs. Bass, Ratcliff and Gretton. One dated February 28th referred to pale ale, the charge for which was 130s. per barrel. It also stated that the beer was of a gravity in excess of that mentioned in the Order for which retail prices were fixed. The second invoice was dated March 4th, and referred to two barrels of beer which were not of Messrs. Bass' brew. It stated that the gravity of the beer was between 1036 and 1042 degrees, and must be sold at a price not exceeding 5d. per pint. Mr. Kidson said the information supplied by Mr. Gray as to the invoices he had received concerning the beer could only be obtained by bringing him before the Magistrates.

Mr. G. Eyles, the food inspector, said he visited the hotel on March 6th, and went into the public bar. He asked for a pint of 5d. beer. The barmaid said he could not have a pint, but he could have half a pint. He had half a pint, for which he was charged 2d. It was served in a glass stamped “Half a pint”. He told the barmaid who he was, and that he was taking the beer for the purpose of analysis. He asked her to inform Mr. Gray, who came into the bar, and he (witness) told him the same. He poured the beer into a bottle, which he sealed heavily with wax. He left the beer with Mr. Stainer for analysis on the same day.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not ask to inspect the defendant's cellar. The beer was drawn through an engine.

Mr. J.W. Stainer said he analysed the sample of beer on March 6th, and found it to be of the original gravity of 1031.44.

In reply to the Clerk, Mr. Stainer said the gravity of the beer would not alter much after the beer was despatched from the brewery. It would not decrease from March 4th to the 6th.

Defendant said the invoice dated February 28th related to beer he received in his house on that day or the following day. On March 4th he received the invoice (produced) and the beer would arrive that day.

The Clerk: What does “G.A.” mean on the invoice?

Mr. Gray: Government Ale.

The Clerk: Not good ale, then! (Laughter)

Defendant said he purchased the beer in barrels only from Messrs. Bass. He had no more than two barrels of Government Ale in one week. On March 6th he had only two barrels in his cellar. The casks bore the price 5d. upon them. He never sold fourpenny ale. He sold the beer as it came in. The Government Ale came to his house through Messrs. Bass from Messrs. Leney, as Bass and Co. did not brew such ale.

Cross-examined, Mr. Gray said with regard to the first invoice, the price of the beer was 130s. per barrel, and the other 77s. per barrel. He supplied Mr. Eyles with the cheaper beer. The other beer he sold at 8d. He had never had the beer tested at all. He did not know the gravity of the bitter beer. He supplied bitter beer in the bar if it was asked for. The engine for the bitter ale was in the private bar.

In reply to the Clerk, defendant said the beer was delivered to him every Monday, and he produced invoices which represented all the Government Ale he had received since the end of January. He had no reason to believe that the gravity of the beer was under that mentioned on the invoice.

Mr. Haines said on the evidence he contended he had satisfied the Magistrates that the invoices were in accordance with the Order, and that the beer should be sold for 5d. a pint. He suggested that if the Food Control Inspector was going to take samples for analysis he should follow out the instructions of the Food and Drugs Act, so that the vendor could have a sample and the Bench could also have one.

The Clerk pointed out that the Order stated that the person authorised on behalf of the Food Controller should have all the powers of procuring samples given by the Food and Drugs Act. There was no direction as to the treatment of the sample. It was also an offence if the retailer declined to sell.

The Chairman said the point did not crop up in that case. On the evidence before them the case must be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 April 1918.

Thursday, April 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lt. Col. R.J. Fynmore, and Mr. H. Kirke.

Geo. Barclay Gray, landlord of the London and Paris Hotel, was summoned for an offence under the Beer Prices and Description Order, on March 6th, by selling half a pint of beer of a specific gravity of less than 1036 degrees at the price of 5d. a pint. He was represented by Mr. G.W. Haines and pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. A.F. Kidson (Town Clerk) prosecuted, and said the Order provided that beer should be sold in a public bar by Imperial measure, and that where the original gravity of the beer was less than 1036 degrees it should be sold at 4d. a pint, and where it was over 1036 degrees and not more than 1042 degrees it should be sold at 5d. a pint. In this case the defendant sold half a pint of beer in the public bar and charged 2d. for it. On an analysis being made it was shown that the beer had an original gravity of 1031.44 degrees – practically five degrees below the required standard. There was one defence that was permitted by the Order, and that was for the defendant to prove that he bought the articles as being of the nature and substance demanded, and that he had no reason to believe that they were otherwise. In this case the defendant had given notice that he would produce the invoices for the beer, showing that it was purchased as beer of a sufficient gravity to sell at 5d. a pint. One of the invoices, dated February 28th, was for one barrel of ale, and bore the remark “All beers brewed by us for sale by retail are of a gravity in excess of those beers controlled as to retail prices”. The other invoice, dated March 4th, was for two barrels of pale ale, and bore the remark “This must not be sold at a price exceeding 5d. a pint”. If these invoices were proved to relate to the beer in question, then the defence would have proved their point and were entitled to a dismissal.

Mr. George Ulyes, Food Inspector to the Folkestone Local Food Control Committee, stated that on March 6th he went into the public bar of the London and Paris Hotel and called for a pint of fivepenny ale. He was told that he could not have a pint, but that half a pint could be served. He then said he would have half a pint, for which he paid 2d. On being served, he put the beer in a bottle, sealed it, told the barmaid that he had got the beer for purposes of analysis, and advised her to tell the landlord that he had done so. He then saw the landlord and told him what he had done. Later in the day he took the bottle of beer to Mr. Stainer.

By Mr. Haines: He did not ask to see Mr. Gray's cellar. He was not refused anything that he asked. The beer was drawn from the engine.

Mr. J.H. Stainer stated that a bottle of beer was brought to him by the last witness. He analysed it and found the original gravity of it to be 1031.44 degrees. There had been no change in the beer during the short time it had been in his possession.

Replying to the Town Clerk, witness said the gravity would not alter much in the time between the dates of the invoices and the date of analysis.

Mr. Gray, on oath, stated that he received the beer invoiced on February 28th on February 29th. As far as he remembered, he received the beer invoiced on March 4th on the same day. The latter invoice was for two barrels of pale ale, and on the bottom of the invoice it stated that this beer might be sold up to 5d. a pint. It was stated that the specific gravity of the beer was about 1036 to 1042 degrees.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) asked what the letters “G.A.” on the invoice meant.

Defendant: Government Ale.

Mr. Andrew: Oh, not good ale. (Laughter)

Further questioned, defendant said he dealt only with Messrs. Bass. He always had two barrels of this beer a week, and there were never more of them in the cellar than two. Both the casks invoiced on March 4th were marked at 5d. a pint. He never had any beer in his cellar marked 4d. a pint. He had sole access to the cellar, and he had done nothing to the beer since its arrival. As it came in, so it went out.

By the Town Clerk: One of the invoices was for 130s. a barrel, and the other for 77s. a barrel.

Do you charge the same for both beers to your customers? – Certainly not.

Which beer did you supply to Mr. Ulyes? – The cheaper beer.

What is the price per pint of the cheaper beer? – Fivepence.

What is the price of the other? – Eightpence.

How do you know which beer Mr. Ulyes was provided with? – Because I was drawing it from that barrel. The other beer does not go to the public bar at all.

Have you had the beer tested at all? – No.

Do you know the gravity of the beer? – I really do not.

In reply to the Magistrates' Clerk, defendant said beer was delivered to him every Monday. Bass's made no cheap beer now, so they sent him Leney's by arrangement.

By Mr. Haines: He had had no complaint about the beer from anyone. He thought it was of the gravity stated on the invoice.

Addressing the Court, Mr. Haines said he thought he had satisfied them that the invoice was in accordance with the Order, that it stated that this beer should be sold at fivepence, and that this was the beer that was mentioned on the invoice. If the Food Controller was going to take analyses of food and drink he should follow the provisions of the Food and Drugs Act, and then the defendant might have had an opportunity of having his section of the sample analysed.

Mr. Andrew pointed out that the Order said that a person authorised by the Food Controller or Local Food Control Committee should have all the powers of taking samples conferred by the Food and Drugs Act. It did not say in what way the sample should be treated. It was an offence for a retailer to refuse to serve a sample.

The Bench dismissed the case.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 11th: Before The Mayor, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Councillor A. Stace, Col. Owen, Rev. Epworth Thompson, Councillor Hollands, Councillor Morrison, and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

Plans were submitted by Mr. G.W. Haines for alterations to the London and Paris Hotel, and these were approved.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions for Folkestone were held at the Police Court, the Mayor presiding.

An application to make certain alterations to his premises, on the part of the owner of the London and Paris Hotel, was granted. Mr. G.W. Haines supported the request.

 

Folkestone Express 24 December 1921.

County Court.

Tuesday, December 20th: Before Judge Shortt.

Margaret Dowling v Mrs. Gray: This was an application by an employee under the Workmen's Compensation Act.

Plaintiff said Mr. Gray kept the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone. She had been in his employ as cook. On the 13th August she burnt her finger. She was frying fish, and a small blister was caused on her thumb by a splash of hot fat from the pan. The blister got rubbed off. She had to keep putting salt on bad fish, and her thumb got very sore. On the Sunday she told defendant's son she had a bad thumb, and she put it in very hot water, and poulticed it. On the Monday she also told Mrs. Gray, who told her to go to the chemist, and he gave her boracic lint. On the Tuesday night her hand was so painful that she went to Dr. Crawford, and he told her to poultice it with linseed meal. She did so, and it was lanced on the Wednesday morning. She had no sleep owing to the pain, and Dr. Crawford lanced it again on the Thursday night. The next morning Mrs. Gray went into the kitchen, and said she was going to do the cooking, and she replied “You can do it with pleasure so far as I am concerned. I have come to get a drop of tea”. She returned to London, and went to the St. Mary's Hospital, and there they again lanced her thumb. She received 2 per week, with board and lodgings, at Mrs. Gray's. The top of her thumb was still of no use, and she had been out of work since last August. Now she was going to look for work. She was a pastrycook by trade. She had not been able to do any work up to the present, but she hoped to find employment.

Mr. Duckworth (barrister) represented Mrs. Gray, and in reply to his cross-examination, plaintiff said she was engaged as cook at the London and Paris Hotel and started work on the 9th August. When she started work she had not a bandage on her thumb. She had previously been employed at a fish restaurant. Her injury was not due to a fish bone, but to bad fish.

Mrs. Katherine Mary Gray, wife of the proprietor of the London and Paris Hotel, said she engaged plaintiff as cook, and she commenced work on the 9th August. She first complained about her thumb on the 10th, and simply said it was painful. On the 11th plaintiff showed her her thumb. It was discoloured, but there was no abrasion of the skin. She advised plaintiff to go to the chemist. On the 15th she had to speak to plaintiff about vegetables for lunch being cold, and plaintiff declined to send up some hot vegetables, and she had to do it herself. Plaintiff was abusive, and she said she had cut her finger cleaning the kitchen. Plaintiff gave her a week's notice. Plaintiff had never cleaned the kitchen.

Mrs. Emily Chadwick, employed in the bar at the hotel, said plaintiff went to the hotel on Monday night, and on the Tuesday morning, at 8.30, she noticed she had a piece of rag round her thumb.

His Honour said plaintiff had not satisfied him that the thumb was injured in her employment, or that a sound thumb had been injured in the manner described by the plaintiff. The doctor ought to have been called to prove the septic poisoning resulted from her employment. The case was left in doubt whether she had sustained the injury in the manner described. He considered furthermore that proper notice had been given. The application was therefore dismissed.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 December 1921.

County Court.

Tuesday, December 18th: Before Judge Shortt.

Margaret Dowling v George Gray: This was an application under the Workmen's Compensation Act for arbitration. Mr. H. Duckworth, barrister, appeared for the respondent.

Applicant said the defendant kept the London and Paris Hotel at Folkestone. She was employed there as a cook. On 13th August she was frying fish when she had an accident. Some hot fat splashed from the pan, and blistered her thumb. The blister got rubbed off. There was some bad fish in the house, and she poisoned her hand through handling this fish. Her thumb got very sore. She poulticed it, and put it in very hot water. On Monday she told Mrs. Gray, and she then went to a chemist's and got some boracic lint. On the Tuesday night her hand was so bad that she went to Dr. Crawford, and on Wednesday evening he lanced it. She went the next day and he lanced it again. She left defendant's hotel on the Friday and went to London. She received treatment in a London hospital for her thumb. Her wages were 2 a week, with board and lodging, and she was claiming 1 15s. a week disablement pay. She had been out of work since last August. She could not do anything with the top of her thumb. She was a pastrycook by trade, and expected to get work shortly.

Mr. Duckworth: When Ireland has peace you are going to start again. (Plaintiff spoke with a strong Irish accent)

Cross-examined, witness said she had not injured her thumb before coming to defendant's hotel. She had been employed at a fish restaurant previously. She was quite certain she had not poisoned her thumb before. She had no bandage on her thumb when she entered Mrs. Gray's employ.

Mrs. C.M. Gray, the wife of the proprietor of the London and Paris Hotel, said she engaged the plaintiff, who commenced working on Tuesday, August 9th. She complained about her thumb on the 10th. On Thursday, the 11th, she showed witness the thumb. There was no abrasion, but it was discoloured. Witness advised her to go to the chemist's. On Monday, August 15th, she went to see plaintiff about the vegetables being cold. She declined to heat up the vegetables, and witness had to do it herself. Dowling then gave notice, and said she had cut her finger cleaning the kitchen. Plaintiff never did clean the kitchen.

Mrs. E. Chadwick, employed in the bar at the London and Paris Hotel, said on the Tuesday after plaintiff came she had a piece of rag round her right thumb.

His Honour said the applicant had to prove that her injury arose out of and in the course of her employment at defendant's. He was not satisfied after hearing the evidence that her injury was sustained during her employment at this hotel. He was not satisfied that her thumb was injured in the manner described by the plaintiff, and he was not satisfied that the septic poisoning resulted from something which she did in her employment there. Therefore her case failed.

 

Folkestone Express 11 November 1922.

Local News.

The Magistrates on Tuesday agreed to the temporary transfer of the licence of the London and Paris Hotel from Mr. G.B. Gray, who has held it for 20 years, to Mr. J.W. Gathercole.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 November 1922.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday the licence of the London and Paris Hotel was temporarily transferred from Mr. G.B. Gray, who has held it for many years, to Mr. J.W. Gathercole.

 

Folkestone Express 25 November 1922.

Local News.

The following transfer of licence was granted at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday morning: London and Paris Hotel, from Mr. George Gray to Mr. James William Gathercole, London.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 November 1922.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday (Mr. G.I. Swoffer in the chair), the licence of the London and Paris Hotel was transferred from Mr. George B. Gray to Mr. James William Gathercole.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 October 1923.

Felix.

Many of his old friends will offer their congratulations to Mr. Percy H.R. Venner, a former resident of Folkestone, who has been unanimously nominated by the Town Council of Margate for election as Mayor of that town for the ensuing year. Although a Councillor but a brief time Mr. Venner has already made his mark amongst his colleagues. This is not surprising to those who have enjoyed Mr. Venner's acquaintance or friendship. He possesses a keen, penetrative mind, and this he has used in a business sense with great advantage. At one time he was proprietor of the Rose Hotel, Folkestone, and after he had disposed of it he went into semi-retirement. Whilst in Folkestone he was Chairman of the Licensed Victuallers' Mineral Water Association. At the present time he is the proprietor of the Clarendon Hotel and the Paris Hotel in this town, besides having other local interests. He is uncle to Mr. Roy Smiles, of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton. Since he has resided at Shottendane House, Margate, he has indulged in his favourite hobby of cultivating flowers and rearing pedigree poultry. Mr. Venner is a man of real progressive and up-to-date ideas, and it is easy to predict that in the Mayoral chair of Margate he will not be an unworthy successor of those who have preceded him.

 

Folkestone Express 17 November 1923.

Inquest.

On Tuesday evening Mr. G.W. Haines, the Borough Coroner, conducted an inquest on John James Slingo, aged 24, a barman employed at the London and Paris Hotel, who died suddenly when out walking in Warren Road, on Sunday.

Alfred Passmore, barman at the London and Paris Hotel, said he had known the deceased about a fortnight, he having been employed at the same hotel. During that time he had not complained of his health. On Sunday afternoon, after closing the bar, just before four o'clock they went for a walk in the vicinity of East Cliff. They proceeded along Warren Road towards the dust destructor, and when about 100 yards further on deceased staggered a few yards, and then fell forwards on to his face. Deceased made no movement until witness turned him over. He then saw foam coming from his mouth. He did not speak or make any movement. He (witness) asked a boy to go for a doctor, and the boy told him he was going for Dr. Crawford. The boy returned, and he said the doctor could not come. He, therefore, went to see Dr. Crawford himself, and he asked him to come to see a man who was seriously ill in the street, and he replied he could do the man no good, and the best thing he could do was to get him to the hospital. He did not tell the doctor he thought he was dead.

The Coroner: It seems strange a doctor should say he could do the man no good.

In reply to further questions, witness said the doctor told him if the patient was not very bad they would treat him at the hospital and let him out again, but if he was very bad they would detain him. The doctor also said if he came to see the man he would have to take the case on, but if he had been one of his patients he would have come with him. He returned to the spot, where he found P.C. Simpson had arrived. The motor ambulance then came, and the deceased was taken in it to the hospital. The House Surgeon examined the deceased in the ambulance and stated that he was dead. The body was ultimately taken to the mortuary. The deceased was 24 years of age.

P.C. Simpson said he was at home on Sunday afternoon when his wife called his attention to a large crowd on the private road leading to the dust destructor. He went to the spot, and saw the body of a man lying on the road. He tried artificial respiration for a time, but there was no response. He could not feel any beating of the pulse, and ultimately he assisted in conveying the deceased to the hospital in the motor ambulance, for which he sent. The last witness told him that he had been to Dr. Crawford, who refused to attend the man. On arrival at the hospital he told the House Surgeon that he had a dead man in the ambulance, and asked her if she would certify that he was dead. He told her that he was going to take the body over to the mortuary, and subsequently did so.

Dr. Rachael Bamford, the House Surgeon at the Royal Victoria Hospital, said on Sunday, shortly after four o'clock, the ambulance arrived at the hospital. The constable asked her if she would certify that the man was dead so that he could remove the body to the mortuary. She examined the deceased and found that he was dead, informing the constable to that effect. Subsequently she made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and found that his heart was enlarged, and the aortic valve was diseased. There was evidence of previous pericarditis. In her opinion deceased died from natural causes.

The Coroner returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence. He said there was one thing which he could not help commenting upon, and that was that a medical man was called upon in a case of urgency, and when told that the man was very seriously ill he did not render any help. It was very difficult to think that was so. Whether the witness misunderstood him or not he could not say, but it was strange for a medical man to say he could do no good, and that he could not go out because the man was not his patient and he did not reside in a house. It was also strange that he should advise the man to be taken to hospital when he did not know what he was suffering from. He (the Coroner) was very loath to believe such a thing happened, but that was as far as the evidence went. There might be some explanation. It was certainly within the doctor's power to go, but he apparently did not even ask what was the matter. On the face of it there seemed to be a want of feeling shown, particularly when he was asked for help and he refused that help. The Coroner concluded by returning a verdict of “Death from natural causes”.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 November 1923.

Inquest.

The Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines) conducted an inquest at the Town Hall on Tuesday afternoon touching the sudden death of John James Slingo.

Alfred Passmore, a barman employed at the London and Paris Hotel, said that he had known the deceased, who was also employed at the hotel as a barman, about a fortnight. During the time witness had known him he had not complained of his health. On Sunday afternoon they went out for a walk. That was about 4 o'clock. They went along Warren Road and across the line. When about a hundred yards from the railway deceased staggered and fell forward on his face. Witness turned him over and laid him on his back, but he did not say anything, although he was conscious. Witness saw foam coming from his mouth. A little later he called two little boys who were close by, and sent one of them to a house for help. Presently two men came out. Witness then asked the other boy to go to the nearest doctor, and the lad said that he would go to Dr. Crawford. The boy was rather a long time gone, and later witness went himself and when on his way met the boy coming back. The lad told him that the doctor said that he could not, or would not come. He (witness) was not sure which it was. Witness then proceeded to Dr. Crawford's house and told him there was a young man seriously ill in the street. The doctor refused to come and said that he could do no good, but that deceased should go to the Hospital. He said if the patient was not very bad they would treat him and let him out again, but if bad they would detain him. He said if the man had been in a house he would have come, if he had been one of his patients. He did not ask whether deceased had a medical man and he (Dr. Crawford) did not suggest that witness should go to another doctor or give witness any other medical man's name. Witness went back and found that P.C. Simpson was there. The ambulance arrived shortly after that, and deceased was put inside. Witness accompanied the ambulance to the Royal Victoria Hospital. On arrival there an attendant came out, followed a little later by the House Surgeon. Witness explained to her what had happened, and she examined the body and stated that Slingo was dead. Witness then went to the Coroner's Officer, and from there on to the mortuary, where he identified the body in the presence of Mr. Chadwick. Deceased was twenty four years of age.

P.C. Simpson stated that he was off duty and at home, when his wife called his attention to a large crowd up the road leading to the dust destructor. He proceeded there and saw the body of a man in the road. He was apparently dead. Witness tried artificial respiration, but there was no response. He sent for the Corporation motor ambulance and conveyed him to the Royal Victoria Hospital. Witness explained that he had a dead man in the ambulance and he wanted the House Surgeon to certify that he was dead, which she did. He told her he would take the body to the mortuary, and subsequently he did so.

Dr. Rachael Bamford, House Surgeon at the Royal Victoria Hospital, said that on Sunday last, just after four o'clock, an ambulance arrived at the hospital in charge of a police constable, who desired that she should certify that a man in the ambulance was dead. Witness did so, and informed the constable. Witness had since made a post mortem examination, and found that the heart was very much enlarged, and the aortic valve was diseased. There was evidence of previous pericarditis. In her opinion death was due to natural causes.

The Coroner, in returning a verdict of “Death from Natural Causes”, said that according to the evidence the doctor was informed that there was a man lying seriously ill in a street nearby. He asked no questions whatever. He refused to go, and said “Take him to the Hospital”. He did not think the doctor put a very high premium on his professional abilities. In this case, if he had attended, he could not have done anything, as the man was apparently dead, but there was the evidence before him, very clearly stated by the witness, and although it did not affect his verdict he felt that the facts required some comment. It might be that the doctor might have some explanation, but it was not before him that day.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 November 1923.

Letter.

Sir, In reference to your report of the inquest on the death of John James Slingo in your issue of the 17th inst., I should like to state a few facts to explain my position in the matter, which were not brought out on that occasion.

As mentioned in your paper, a boy came to my house in Wear Bay Crescent on Sunday afternoon (November 11th), and told me that a man was lying unconscious on the road in Thanet Gardens, and requested me to go and see him. On questioning him, I found that the man was a total stranger, and that an attempt had already been made to get the motor ambulance in order to take him to the Hospital, but without success. The ambulance is usually kept at the dust destructor premises during the week, but not on Sundays.

As the man was a stranger, and evidently some distance from his home, and in an unconscious condition, I felt that the most effective way of helping him was to get him rapidly conveyed into Hospital. I therefore promptly rang up the Fire Station, requesting that the motor ambulance might be sent immediately to Thanet Gardens, and to facilitate matters I told the boy to explain on the phone exactly where the man was lying. The lad then went away, and a few minutes afterwards I again telephoned to the Fire Station and enquired if the ambulance had started, and was told that it was leaving at once. A young man then appeared and begged me to go and see the patient, but I informed him that I had telephoned for the ambulance and that it would most likely be on the spot before I could possibly do so myself. Being at my private residence, I had no medical equipment at hand. I therefore impressed upon this second messenger that I was acting in the best interest of the patient by having him immediately carried to Hospital, where he would be at once received as an emergency case.

I afterwards made some enquiries amongst those who were actually on the spot at the time, and two very reliable witnesses stated that the man was apparently dead before the boy was dispatched to call me.

Taking all the circumstances into account I think it will be admitted that I took the most effective way of rendering a real service by acting as I did, and that he could not be properly treated while lying on the road.

Yours faithfully, T.W.W. Crawford.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday (before Mr. G.I. Swoffer) the licence of the London and Paris Hotel was transferred to Mr. Percy Henry Leonard (sic).

 

Folkestone Express 24 May 1924.

Wednesday, May 21st: Before the Rev. Epworth Thompson, Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Councillor W. Hollands, Mr. Blamey, and Col. P. Broome-Giles.

Alterations to the London and Paris Hotel were approved.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 May 1924.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Wednesday before the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson and other Magistrates, plans for alterations to the London and Paris Hotel were submitted to the Magistrates, who approved of them.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1926.

Obituary.

We regret to state that Mr. George Gray died on Thursday at 19, Bouverie Road West. Deceased, who was in his 72nd year, was a resident of long standing. He was originally proprietor of Gray's Temperance Hotel, Dover Road, subsequently becoming proprietor of the Paris Hotel, Harbour Street. Before coming to Folkestone he was a moulder, and assisted in the castings of some of the famous bells now hanging in the belfry towers of churches in various parts of England. The late Mr. Gray, in his younger days, was a remarkably fine tenor vocalist, and was well acquainted with the scores of many well-known operas.

Deceased was widely-known, especially amongst cross-Channel passengers. Many of these visited his hotel many times, knowing that Mr. Gray studied their comfort and provided the best of food. He abhorred shams, and had a habit of speaking his mind pretty freely on public matters. A native of Scotland, he was one of the most generous of men, doing most of his good deeds by stealth. Up to the last, although his health was failing rapidly, he preserved his geniality and had a cheery word for all. To his widow much sympathy is extended.

 

Folkestone Express 20 February 1926.

Obituary.

We regret to have to record the death of Mr. George Barclay Gray, at his residence, 17, Bouverie Road East, which took place on Thursday in last week.

The deceased gentleman, who was 73 years of age, was for 24 years at the London and Paris Hotel, Harbour Street, and previous to that he was the proprietor of the Gray’s Temperance Hotel, Dover Road for five years. He retired from business three years ago. He was in early life a bell-caster, and had cast some of the finest peals of bells all over the country, including some at Dublin and other places in Ireland, and in Scotland. His maiden peal of bells were cast for St. Andrew’s, Wells Street, London, at Lewis’, organ builders and bell founders, Brixton. From there he went to Messrs. Maudsley, Sons and Field, Westminster Bridge, remaining with them until he came to Folkestone. He was a very fine tenor singer, and there was little music that he did not know. He sang a good deal in London before he came to Folkestone. He was a native of Scotland. He was well known among the cross-Channel passengers. A man of great integrity, with a very genial character, he was ever willing to do what he could for others. He was very proud indeed of bell-casting and the bells he had cast. With the late Mr. Frank Davis he was the originator of the Poor Children's Fund, and for many winters attended St. Peter's School to help feed the little ones. He was a member of the Temple Lodge of Freemasons, and also of the Mark Masons.

The funeral took place on Monday, and a short service at the Parish Church was attended by a great many of his friends.

 

Folkestone Express 30 July 1932.

Obituary.

It is with deep regret that we have to record the death on Monday of Mrs. E.C. Garland, the wife of Mr. C. Garland, of the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, after an illness of several months, and the greatest sympathy will be felt for Mr. Garland, his son and daughter, and other relatives in the sad bereavement which has befallen them.

Mrs. Garland was known by a large circle of friends and she was very highly esteemed and respected.

The funeral took place on Wednesday at the Folkestone Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 August 1932.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death of Mrs. Edith May Garland, the wife of Mr. Claude Garland, of the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, who died recently after an illness lasting some ten months.

The late Mrs. Garland, was well known in Folkestone, and great sympathy will be extended to her husband and children in their sad bereavement. Mr. Claude Garland is the Chairman of the “Ellanpee” Golf Club, and the Treasurer of the local Licensed Victuallers' Association. Mrs. Garland took a very great interest in both these organisations, and she was a member of the Ladies' Licensed Victuallers' Auxiliiary Association.

Mrs. Garland had lived in Folkestone for some 16 years past, and she was held in high esteem by her many friends.

The funeral took place at the Folkestone Cemetery, Cheriton Road, on Wednesday last week.

 

Folkestone Express 16 February 1935.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual Licensing Sessions was held on Wednesday at the Folkestone Town Hall, when the Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) reported that there had only been 15 convictions for drunkenness, the number being the same as the previous year. One licence, that of the Mechanics Arms, was referred to the adjourned licensing sessions, all the others being renewed. The licensing hours were extended for the whole of the summer time period by half an hour, from 10 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. on weekdays.

Mr. R.G. Wood presided, and a number of Magistrates were on the Bench.

Licences Transferred.

The following licences were transferred: London and Paris Hotel, from Mrs. Venner to Mr. C. Garland; Mechanics Arms to Mr. Moxon.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 April 1939.

Local News.

A very pleasing incident took place on Wednesday afternoon during the quarterly meeting of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers’ Protection Association, when Mr. Claude Garland, licensee of the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, was presented by the Chairman (Councillor E.J. Price) on behalf of the Association with a collar and jewel of office. Mr. Garland was unanimously elected u Vice-President in recognition of his eight years’ Treasurership and 25 years total membership of the Association.

Councillor Price, making the presentation, congratulated Mr. Garland who in reply said his one aim during his membership was the success Of the Association, especially the financial side.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 November 1940.

Local News.

At a sitting of the Folkestone Licensing Magistrates at the Town Hall on Wednesday the licence of the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, was transferred from Mr. Claude Garland to Mr. Alfred Ernest Millard.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 December 1941.

Local News.

A protection order was granted by the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday to Mr. P. Attwood in respect of the licence of the London and Paris Hotel, Harbour Street, which he is taking over.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 January 1942.

Local News.

At Folkestone Licensing Transfer Sessions on Wednesday the licence the London and Paris Hotel was transferred from Capt. A.E. Millard, a representative of Messrs. Bass and Co., to Mr. P.W. Attwood, formerly of the Shakespeare Inn.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1946.

Local News.

An attempted forcible entry of the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, early on Thursday morning, was foiled by the vigilance of the proprietor, Mr. Pat Attwood. Mr. Attwood, who lives on the premises with his wife and eight years old grandchild, was going to bed shortly after midnight when he heard the sound of breaking glass downstairs.

“I at once went downstairs carrying a police truncheon”, he told the Folkestone Herald, “and saw that a window in the public bar had been smashed. I saw a soldier start to pull the glass away, and then his head and arm came through. I hit him twice with the truncheon; first across the forehead and eye, and then on top of the head. I heard him groan and I went through another door into the street, but when I got there the soldier had disappeared”.

Mr. Attwood believes that the would-be intruder must have had some companions with him, because, in his opinion, he must have been too severely injured to have got away without assistance.

 

Folkestone Gazette 22 October 1952.

Local News.

Licensee in Folkestone for nearly 50 years and a well-known sporting personality, Mr. P.W. (Pat) Attwood, of the London and Paris Hotel, is retiring shortly.

It was in 1904 that Mr. Attwood entered the licensed trade, helping his father in the management of the Castle Inn, Foord Road. Two years later he became mine host there and remained for 22 years. He left there to take over the licence of the Shakespeare Hotel in Guildhall Street.

“In January, 1939, I decided to retire and was looking forward to a restful time”, Mr. Attwood told the Gazette, “but the war upset my plans”.

But it was not back to the licensed trade that Mr. Attwood went. Instead, he joined the Auxiliary Fire Service, completing about a year’s service, when he was invited to accept the licence of the London and Paris.

They were grim days in Folkestone then, and grimmer ones were to follow, for within a short time of taking over the “L and P” the premises were not only damaged by air raid action but they came under repeated shellfire from the Nazis’ big guns on the other side of the Channel.
The tall building stood out very conspicuously in the vulnerable Harbour area and the military authorities had it camouflaged; possibly the only pub in the country to be dealt with in that way. The London and Paris remained open throughout the war except for one fortnight in March, 1943, when it was considerably damaged by a cross-Channel shell which fell just behind the premises. “It happened one evening about nine o'clock when there were about a dozen in the bars”, said Mr. Attwood. “No-one was hurt although we were pretty well shaken. We had to close for a time to get things straight again. Altogether the place was damaged 22 times as the result of enemy action”.

A Folkestonian - his father was one-time park keeper at Radnor Park - Mr. Attwood has also been closely associated with sport in the town.

In his younger days he was a very good oarsman; he won the Championship of Folkestone one year and the Championship of Folkestone and Dover combined on another occasion. About that time there were only four towns with rowing clubs - Folkestone, Dover, Herne Bay and Hastings. He was also a cricketer and footballer, playing for the old Wingate club on Park Farm. Mr. Attwood was one of the first members of the Folkestone Park Bowls Club. In his possession he has a group of bowlers who went to Chelsea to play a match. Mr. Attwood is the only one still living. His interest in Folkestone football clubs has extended over many years. He was a shareholder of the old Folkestone Football Club in the days when the club played on the Canterbury Road ground. He was a member of the committee, as he was of the Folkestone Football Club formed after World War 1. During the last war Mr. Attwood was also associated with Folkestone Wartime Football Club.

Mr. Attwood, who is 71, is still a very active man. Not infrequently he can be seen on his bicycle and although he says he is retiring, well, who knows what he will turn his hand to next?

He was a foreman plumber before he went into the licensed trade, and altogether had 10 years' experience in the building trade.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 October 1952.

Local News.

Mr. P.W. (Pat) Attwood, 71, of the London and Paris Hotel, one of the best known personalities of the licensed trade in Folkestone, will retire shortly. He has held the licences of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, and the Shakespeare, Guildhall Street. He has been in the trade for over 48 years.

During the war the London and Paris was damaged in air raids and by shellfire. It remained open throughout the war except for a fortnight in March, 1943, when it was considerably damaged by a cross-Channel shell which fell just behind the premises. “Altogether the place was damaged 22 times as the result of enemy action”, Mr. Attwood told the Herald.

A Folkestonian - his father was one-time park keeper at Radnor Park - Mr. Attwood has long been closely associated with sport in the town. In his younger days he was a very good oarsman; he won the Championship of Folkestone one year and the Championship of Folkestone and Dover combined on another occasion. He was also a cricketer and footballer, playing for the old Wingate club on Park Farm. Later he became one of the first members of the Folkestone Park Bowls Club. His interest in Folkestone football clubs has extended over many years.

 

Folkestone Gazette 29 October 1952.

Local News.

Granting a protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the London and Paris Hotel, the Chairman (Ald. W. Hollands), at Folkestone Magistrates' Court yesterday, wished the outgoing tenant, Mr. P.W. Attwood, a very happy retirement.

“I believe you are the oldest licensee in the town”, he said. “Personally I have known you come to this court in connection with licensing matters for 34 years. On behalf of the Bench I wish you a very happy retirement”.

The new licensee is Mr. Alec Stephen Wales, former building foreman, of Cheriton Road.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 November 1952.

Local News.

Granting a protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the London and Paris Hotel, the Chairman (Ald. W. Hollands) at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday wished the outgoing tenant, Mr. P.W. Attwood, a very happy retirement. “I believe you are the oldest licensee in the town”, he said. “Personally I have known you come into this Court in connection with licensing matters for 34 years. On behalf of the Bench I wish you a very happy retirement”.

The new licensee is Mr. Alec Stephen Wales, former building foreman, of Cheriton Road, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 November 1952.

Local News.

Folkestone Magistrates on Wednesday approved the transfer of licence as follows: London and Paris Hotel from Mr. P.W. Attwood to Mr. A.S. Wales.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 August 1954.

Local News.

A former well-known Folkestone personality, Mr. Claude Garland, licensee of the Gamecock Inn, West Kingsdown, near Sevenoaks, died on Sunday. Mr. Garland, who was 79, took over the Gamecock Inn in January 1942. For many years he was a committee member and Treasurer of Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers’ Association. Mr. Garland became manager of the Clarendon Hotel. Folkestone, in 1914, and subsequently was the licensee of the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, from 1932 until he retired in 1940. After a period of retirement at Hawkhurst, he resumed his active life and became licensee of the Gamecock. In his younger days he was employed in the same trade at Victoria and Bromley. While at Folkestone he was one of the founders of the Brotherhood of Cheerful Sparrows and of the Ellanpee Golf Club. Mr. Garland leaves two sons and one daughter.

The funeral took place at Charing Crematorium on Thursday.

 

Folkestone Gazette 29 June 1960.

Obituary

Well-known licensee and sportsman, Mr. Percy (Pat) Attwood, 44, Earls Avenue, Folkestone, died at his home on Monday after four weeks’ illness. He was 79.

Mr. Attwood was born in a cottage, now demolished, on the old Manor Farm. His father was park-keeper at Radnor Park. An old boy of North Council School in Black Bull Road, Mr. Attwood started in the plumbing business, and soon became a master plumber. On the death of his father, who had become the proprietor of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, Mr. Attwood, or Pat as he was affectionately known by his many friends in the district, commenced in 1904 his long association with the licensing business. He took over the Castle Inn, and remained for some 20 years, a popular and much respected licensed victualler. Later he took over the licence of the Shakespeare, at the corner of Guildhall Street and Bouverie Road East, and in 1942, under shell-fire, moved to the well-known harbour hostelry, The London and Paris. At this time Folkestone harbour was badly shelled and the hotel itself was damaged, but Mr. Attwood kept the business going. A great personality, Mr. Attwood had a large clientele and many famous people, especially actors and boxers, visited him to make The London and Paris their first port of call from the harbour. About eight years ago Mr. Attwood relinquished the hotel, and took a half interest in the Bristol Hotel, on The Leas. He retired about five years ago.

An enthusiastic sportsman, Mr. Attwood was an expert oarsman in his younger days and won many trophies while a member of Folkestone Rowing Club. He was Chairman of the Club for a number of years. He was also very interested in boxing, cricket and football, which he helped to promote in Folkestone during the last war, being a founder member of the Folkestone Wartime Football Club. He was a member of Folkestone and Hythe Licensed Victuallers’ Association for many years, and he was a prominent Freemason.

The funeral service will be held at Hawkinge on Thursday, followed by cremation.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 July 1960.

Local News.

The funeral service of a well-known local Freemason, Mr. Percy (Pat) Attwood, of 44, Earls Avenue, Folkestone, who died on Monday, took place at Hawkinge on Thursday, followed by cremation. Mr. Attwood, who was 79, had been ill for the past four weeks.

Born in a cottage, now nonexistent, at the old Manor Farm, the son of a park-keeper at Radnor Park, Mr. Attwood was educated at the North Council School in Black Bull He started work as a plumber, and soon became a master man, but in 1904 succeeded his father, who had become the proprietor of the Castle Inn, Foord Road, and took over the premises to start his long association with the licensing trade. Mr. Attwood, or “Pat”, as he was affectionately known to his many friends in the district, remained at the Castle for about 20 years. He then moved to the Shakespeare at the corner of Guildhall Street and Bouverie Road East, and then in 1942 took the licence of the London and Paris under shell-fire. This well-known harbour hostelry was among the many buildings damaged in the area during the war period, but Mr. Attwood kept the business going. Many famous people, including actors and boxers, used to make the inn their first port of call when arriving at the harbour. About eight years ago he left the London and Paris and took a half interest in the Bristol Hotel, on The Leas, finally retiring about five years ago.

A keen sportsman, Mr. Attwood was an expert oarsman in his younger days. He won many trophies, and was club champion of Folkestone Rowing Club, of which he later became chairman for a number of years. He was closely interested in football and before the last war was a director of Folkestone Town. He was a founder member when Folkestone Wartime F.C. was formed in 1942, and continued to support the club.

As a young man he played cricket for Swingate C.C. and also supported the Folkestone team for many years. He was interested in boxing.

During World War I, Mr. Attwood served with the Royal East Kent Regiment (“The Buffs”). When he was stationed at Chatham at the beginning of the war the barrack room he was billeted in was hit by a shell, and some 30 soldiers were killed. At the outset of World War II he was a member of the National Fire Service for a time.

Always a very active man, Mr. Attwood could often be seen at the London and Paris golf course, where he played until 10 years ago. He rode a bicycle until four years ago, but his main hobby in recent years was gardening. Mr. Attwood was greatly interested in the Turf, and on the Saturday before he died he had a winner at Newbury.

Mr. Attwood’s wife died in March, 1950. He is survived by a daughter.

 

Folkestone Gazette 24 May 1961.

Local News.

Two more piles of pennies were knocked over at Folkestone during the weekend. One at the London and Paris Hotel raised 11 2/-, and the other, at the West Cliff Shades, 18 10/6. The money goes to the Folkestone Branch of the British Empire Cancer Campaign.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1965.

Local News.

Police statements about the responsibility of publicans towards drunken drivers have brought protests from local landlords. Superintendent Frederick Coatsworth said at Seabrook last week that licensees exerted a tremendous influence on their customers and had a vital role to play in the prevention of offences involving drink, especially where motorists were concerned.

Reaction from Mr. Reg. Gard, landlord of the George Inn in George Lane, Folkestone, was “It just doesn’t make sense. We’re supposed to be mind- readers now, asking customers their age to see if they are over 18. The only thing we can do is to refuse to serve drinks to anyone who has obviously had too much. And, of course, thirsty motorists could always wear a ticket around their necks saying “I’m a driver. Please can I have a drink?””

Mr. Ron Letts, licensee of the Globe on The Bayle, said “It’s ludicrous. Our job is to sell drinks. A fair proportion of my customers are drivers, and in the nine years I have been here I have found they are generally responsible people. On the odd occasion, when you know your customer, it’s O.K. to say “Give me your keys—you’d better take a taxi home”. But how can you say that to a perfect stranger?”

Mr. Alec Wales, of the London and Paris, near the Harbour, who is chairman of Folkestone, Hythe and District Licensed Victuallers’ Association, put most of the blame on restaurants. “You cannot hold a publican responsible for what customers drink”, he declared. “I don’t allow anyone who is obviously drunk in my house, but when they can get served at a restaurant, what can you do? I certainly don't think the majority of drunks come from pubs”.

At Folkestone Brewster Sessions on Wednesday Supt. Coats worth reiterated his opinion. “Licensees, particularly those whose premises attract what is known as the motor car trade, have a vital contribution to pay in regard to safety on the roads”, he said. The police are the first to realise in a town such as Folkestone that all persons do not obtain their liquor in licensed premises. But, as responsible citizens, licensees can exert a great influence on their customers by always bearing in mind the effect which alcohol taken in excess might have on drivers of a motor vehicle”.

The last word came from Mrs. Maud Lewis, licensee of the Guildhall Hotel, chairman of the Women’s Auxiliary of the local L.V.A. After Brewster Sessions she told the Herald “We all try to do our stuff. If we think customers have had enough we tell them so. Irrespective of whether they're driving or not, I'm firm with them on the question of drink”.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 April 1965.

Local News.

Mr. William (Billy) Banks retired as barman at the London and Paris Hotel, Folkestone, on Wednesday. He had been there for the past nine years.

The customers contributed to a parting gift and presented him with an electric razor on his last night at the bar. The landlord, Mr. A. Wells, gave him 10, and his wife presented him with 5.

Mr. Banks, who is 68, has been a barman for 45 years. Before going to the London and Paris he worked at the White Lion, Cheriton, and the Swan Hotel, Hythe. Mr. Banks lives with his sister in Radnor Park Crescent, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Gazette 26 May 1965.

Local News.

When 43-year-old Neil Hoyle was found by a policeman he was standing in the middle of a pedestrian crossing by Folkestone Harbour trying to direct the traffic. Earlier police had received a complaint about his behaviour in the London and Paris public house. At Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday Hoyle pleaded Not Guilty to being in charge of an offensive weapon and being drunk and disorderly.

John Henry Featherbee, of 105, Shaftesbury Avenue, Cheriton, said he was in the London and Paris when Hoyle came up to him. “He knocked my cap off” said 63-year-old Mr. Featherbee, and then told me to come outside”. I would not, because I knew he was in possession of a knife. He had been showing it to three other men in the pub”.

Charles Thorne, of 10, Clifford Mansions, said he was standing at the bar. “I started whistling”, he said, “and Hoyle came up to me and told me I was whistling the wrong tune. He had upset several other customers and the landlord told him to get out. I rang the police”.

P.C. J. Cornelius said he saw Hoyle trying to direct traffic. Several motorists had to stop. He asked him to move on, but he became abusive. He (witness) took a knife from his belt.

Hoyle, who is lodging in Shellons Street, Folkestone, said “I was sacked from my job on Saturday. I bought the knife for 1s. 6d. to prepare food. It was in my belt the whole time. I only remember speaking to one man in the pub”.

Hoyle, who had five previous convictions, including two in Vancouver, was fined 5 for being in possession of an offensive weapon, and 2 for being drunk and disorderly.

 

Folkestone Gazette 23 February 1966.

Local News.

One big push by Miss Folkestone – Maureen Irving – and down goes another pile of pennies at the London and Paris Hotel. Watching her on Friday night were the licensee, Mr. Alex Wells, and Mrs. Wells, customers and members of the local committee of the National Cancer Research Fund. The pennies, totalling more than 11, will go to the fund. Altogether it has received more than 60 from piles of pennies collected at the hotel over the past three years.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 June 1968.

Local News.

When a man was arrested by police at the London and Paris public house in Harbour Street, Folkestone, his brother tried to free him. Then when he was arrested as well, a third man rushed up and started struggling violently with the police. This led to an allegation by one of the three men, who all pleaded Not Guilty to various charges at Folkestone Magistrates’ court last Friday, that during the scuffle a chief inspector aimed a punch at his nose.

Thirty-year-old power station worker Robin White, of Woodfield Close, Cheriton, also claimed that when his brother, Michael White, of Cheriton Road, was arrested, police dived on him and pulled him backwards by the hair. But Robin White, who had four previous convictions including one for assault occasioning actual bodily harm, was convicted on a charge of unlawfully obstructing a policeman, fined 15 and bound over to keep the peace for a year in the sum of 10. The case against his brother of obtaining credit by fraud was dismissed. The third man, 21-year-old hod carrier Alan Barton, of Black Bull Road, was fine 5 and also bound over to keep the peace, for causing a breach of the peace. Barton, a father of two, had a previous conviction and a finding of guilt as a juvenile.

Mr. Leon Glenn Hill, prosecuting, said the charges arose from an incident in the bar of the London and Paris on May 24. A man in a group of four or five men and some women ordered drinks and then others ordered drinks. The round cost 1 10s. 11d.

Eighteen-year-old Miss Price said in Court that she recognised both the White brothers, but neither had ordered the first drinks.

Mr. Roland Price said when he asked who was paying for the drinks, a man said: “I am not paying 1 10s. for two drinks”.

P.C. Timothy Worthington, of the East Kent Special Patrol Group, said when he arrested Michael White, he said: “I have not done anything”.

Pointing to the licensee, he added “That man is lying”.

P.C. John Bibby, also of the special patrol group, said he saw Robin White trying to pull his brother away from P.C. Worthington. P.C. Bibby said when he tried to restrain Robin White, he struggled violently and was taken outside by other officers. Oustide the pub Barton rushed up shouting and started struggling violently.

Questioned by Robin White, P.C. Bibby agreed that when White was taken to Folkestone police station, he was first charged with obstructing him and not P.C. Worthington which was the subsequent charge.

Chief Inspector Alan Bourlet said while he was talking to Michael White inside the pub, Robin White became argumentative. He told Robin White not to be difficult. But he intervened when Michael White was asked his name and address and told his brother not to say anything. He moved between the Chief Inspector and his brother. Chief Inspector Bourlet said he told White to keep out of it and mind his own business. He again asked Michael White his address and he replied “Yogi Bear.” Michael White was arrested by P.C. Worthington and was taken outside. Robin White started struggling with the officers who were taking his brother away and it was necessary to restrain him. Inspector Bourlet said he and P.C. Bibby had hold of Robin White when Barton shouted “Leave him alone”. Barton lowered his head and approached at virtually a charge with the intention of freeing Robin White. The Chief Inspector said he warded Barton off with one hand but he became more violent and all three men were taken to Folkestone police station.

D.C. Allan Forbes said when he saw Michael White at his home on June 14, he denied being the first to order drinks. White agreed to take part in an identification parade but added “I can’t see the point as I am bound to be picked out as one of the blokes who ordered drinks”.

Michael White said in Court that one of his friends came to the bar and said “Get the drinks in, Terry’s paying for the round”. He ordered drinks for himself and his wife and the others started shouting out orders. His friend, Terry, said “I'm not paying 1 10s. for two drinks”. White claimed that he told the Chief Inspector that his name was Yogi Bear because that was his nick-name. The reason he struggled with the police was because his wife was being pushed around.

Robin White claimed that eight policemen dived on his brother. “They pulled him backwards by the hair”, he said, “and twisted his arms up his back”. White went on to claim that a punch was aimed at his nose by the Chief Inspector. White said he ducked and the blow hit him on the head. White said he had nothing to do with the purchase of the drinks. He denied telling his brother to say nothing to the police and said he had not tried to release his brother.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 August 1968.

Local News.

The Sunshine Homes for Blind Babies were given 42 10s. on Tuesday evening when a pile a pennies was pushed over at the London and Paris Hotel in Harbour Street, Folkestone.

Representatives from the Sunshine Homes and of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers’ Association crowded with customers into the public bar to see the pile go over.

The chairman of the Folkestone and District L.V.A., Mr. John Buckle, and Mrs. A. Rayner, chairman of the Women’s Auxilliary, sent the pennies crashing into a blanket. A total of 27 15s. 8d. was realised from the pile. The extra money was raised from a competition.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 May 1971.

Local News.

When 1,400 continentals visit Folkestone next Thursday the doors of local pubs will be open to them all afternoon. On Tuesday local Magistrates decided in favour of a second application to allow 17 pubs to remain open especially for the visitors. They had vetoed a previous application. The second made by publicans was amended to allow for a half-hour break at 5.30 p.m. before their premises opened for the evening session.

Mr. J. Medlicott, for the publicans, told the Magistrates that the visitors were delegates attending a conference in Bruges. One of its highlights was to be a visit to England. He referred to a letter received by Folkestone Corporation from the British Tourist Authority supporting the publicans' application. The visit – by Dutch, Swiss, Belgians and Germans – was a special occasion, not just a shopping expedition, said Mr. Medlicott. It had been arranged by a Bruges tourist organisation which had particularly asked that pubs should be open in the afternoon.

Police Inspector R. Sanders made no formal objection to the application – but doubted whether the visit was a special occasion.

The Chairman of Folkestone Chamber of Trade, Mr. Alan Stephenson, said later “The cross-Channel visitors' committee of this Chamber is very pleased that this has been seen as a special occasion by the Justices. When one is reminded that this extension is no more than happens in many market towns every week of the year, it seems a fair request, especially as Folkestone’s image abroad could be much influenced by the original decision not to allow the pubs to open”.

The pubs which will stay open are; Jubilee, Ship, Oddfellows, Royal George, London and Paris, True Briton, Harbour Inn, Princess Royal, Clarendon, Brewery Tap, Earl Grey, Prince Albert, George, Globe, East Kent Arms, Guildhall and Shakespeare.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 May 1971.

Local News.

About 1,400 Germans successfully invaded Folkestone on Thursday to enjoy themselves. The visitors - members of the BMW enthusiasts’ club - strolled about the town shooting local scenes with their cine cameras and went shopping. Many bought driving gear, ranging from tyres to goggles and crash helmets - but fewer than expected went to the pubs. They were visiting Folkestone during an international convention of their club, held this week at Bruges, in Belgium. Local licensees had gained extensions of opening hours to cater for them. But it was the locals who patronised some of the 17 town centre and harbour area pubs that stayed open.

At the Shakespeare, in Guildhall Street, Mr. Ron Balsom, said “It was a complete waste of time staying open. I only had 13 Germans in all day”.

Mr. John Tobin, landlord of the East Kent Arms, in Sandgate Road, said most of his customers had been regulars.

The Oddfellows Arms, in The Stade, was closed by 3.15 p.m. A spokesman there said “It was a complete and utter waste of time”.

At the True Briton a spokesman said “We did very well - thanks largely to our regulars”.

The London and Paris, at the harbour, was busy, but a spokesman said the pub had not taken a great deal of money.

However, one very pleased landlady was Mrs. M.M. Lewis, at The Guildhall. “It has been absolutely fantastic”, she said, "We have teen completely packed out with both German visitors and regulars".

Folkestone's publicity officer, Mr. Charles McDougal, said “The original letter we received from Belgium about this visit gave the departure time as 6 p.m. It was not until two days before the visit that we learned otherwise".

Mr. Alan Stephenson, chairman of Folkestone Chamber of Trade, said “These people wanted to come to Folkestone, and their visit gave them an opportunity to sample the pleasures of the town as a holiday resort rather than just a shopping centre”.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 April 1973.

Advertising Feature.

As a ceremonial bottle of champagne shattered against the side of Folkestone’s London and Paris Hotel yesterday, at least one of the invited guests half-expected to see the harbourside inn slip its foundations, slide across Harbour Street, drop gently into the Pent Basin and float off in the general direction of France.

For the London and Paris is no ordinary English pub. Landlord Brian Scott and his attractive wife Sheila are not only geared for the Common Market - they have entered it. Continental visitors are immediately attracted by the Les Routiers plaque in the window of what used to be the public bar. For the uninitiated, the sign adorns 4,000 stopping places - most of them on the Continent - in which road travellers are made welcome. It stands for prompt service, good quality at reasonable cost and a welcoming atmosphere.

That the London and Paris is the only pub in Folkestone bearing the sign is testimony enough to the standards which Brian and Sheila have achieved. The long bar, familiar to locals and holidaymakers alike, has disappeared to make way for the London Bar – a pleasant, gaily decorated sanctuary for the discerning, with London show posters festooning the walls. In the corner is a salad bar which is expected to prove a popular innovation during the summer months. The alterations, which give the bar a new dimension, have the professional touch. Hardly surprising, really, since Brian has spent much of his life as a theatrical master carpenter, working behind the scenes at some of London's biggest hit shows. Brian still keeps his hand in at his old job and recently lent his talents, in an advisory capacity, to the Rita Tushingham drama, Mistress of Novices, at the Picadilly Theatre. Margaretta Scott, one of Miss Tushingham’s co-stars in this production, was due at the London and Paris yesterday to officially open the revamped London Bar.

As yesterday’s guests discovered, the London and Paris has really brought the Entente Cordiale to Folkestone. Even the sign outside, with a London view on one side and Paris on the other, reflects the pub’s dual personality. Inside, visitors can turn left for a touch of the Cockneys and right for la Belle France. The Paris Bar, like its next-door neighbour, has a fair smattering of wall posters – this time in French. These are not just decorations, for the customers are just as likely to be speaking in French as English! In recent months, since the London and Paris was awarded the coveted Les Routiers sign, more and more French customers – many of them long distance lorry drivers – have found their way to the pub at the harbour. That they keep returning is the finest possible recommendation for the quality and price of the food and drink on offer. Mind you, there have been problems. Brian and Sheila are still wrestling with one of them. Frenchmen drink wine like we drink water – and they don't expect to pay very much for it. Which is one of the reasons why Brian is trying to get his brewery, Bass Charrington, to supply a suitably inexpensive vin ordinaire. He said “Even with our limited French we know that the Continentals are surprised to find that they cannot get a glass of wine for a few pence”. This, however, is one problem which will not arise today. To mark the new alterations, the brewery is providing a free glass of wine to anybody ordering a meal in the London and Paris. With the Continental barriers coming down, Britain is expecting a rush of visitors from the other side of the Channel. One thing is certain. Those coming through Folkestone harbour won’t have to travel very far before feeling at home. The odds are too that the well-thumbed English-French phrase book behind the bar of the London and Paris is going to look a little dog-eared before the season is over.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 August 1978.

Local News.

An argument over drinks led to a pub landlord being punched in the mouth by one of his customers. At Folkestone Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, Robert McCrudden, 21, of Rendezvous Street, Folkestone, admitted causing actual bodily harm to Mr. Clive Simpson at the London and Paris public house, Harbour Street, on June 3.

He was given a three-month prison sentence suspended for two years.

Mr. Michael Batt, prosecuting, told the court that McCrudden had resented Mr. Simpson telling him not to keep the staff waiting for an order and was barred from the pub after an argument. McCrudden returned to the bar, where he had been having a meal with his girlfriend and some friends and punched Mr. Simpson in the mouth. During a tussle which followed on the floor Mr. Simpson was struck in the eye, Mr. Batt said.

In a statement to police McCrudden had said: “I’ve got an uncontrollable temper and it's got me into trouble before”. He said that he had lost his job as assistant manager of a butcher’s shop because of the pub incident.

 

South Kent Gazette 12 March 1980.

Local News.

Travellers' cheques and French and Spanish money were stolen from a customer at the London and Paris pub at Folkestone on Saturday.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 October 1980.

Local News.

A cheque for more than 1,000, raised through a sponsored pub-crawl, was presented to the Kent Association for the Blind on Tuesday.

At the London and Paris pub, in Harbour Street, Folkestone, the association's general secretary, Mr. Ted Stratten, received the money from postman, Mr. Dave Garrod, who organised the event. Last August, 64 people took part in the 10-mile crawl from Folkestone to Hythe and back, calling at various pubs on the way. A shield was given by the London and Manchester Assurance Company to the London and Paris for raising the largest sum of 186.20. Also smaller trophies were presented by Mr Peter Bailey, the company’s unit manager, to members of the pub’s team who were Sue Garrod, Donny Thiele, Sue Reeve and Sharon Richardson. A work basket made by the blind was given to Sue Garrod for her individual effort of raising 129.80. The money will be used to buy talking clocks for the blind and to help equip a club in Sandwich for blind and deaf people.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 April 1981.

Local News.

Charrington Bass pubs in Folkestone have been hit by a drayman's strike at the Canterbury depot. Draymen are strijing because of what a spokesman described as an internal dispute. The strike is expected to last until after Easter, and deliveries to three Charrington Bass pubs in Folkestone have been affected.

Mr. Clive Simpson, of the London and Paris said “We are all right at the moment and we will get through Easter, but I don't know what will happen after that”.

Mr. Michael Wildey, manager of the Bouverie Arms, said “We are well-stocked and will survive Easter, a very busy period”.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 October 1981.

Local News.

Bookie Frank Sprenger, who was left lying in a pool of blood after being attacked outside a Folkestone pub on Saturday, was back at work on Tuesday. Mr. Sprenger, 55, discharged himself from the William Harvey Hospital on Monday, after X-rays revealed that he did not have a fractured skull as was first feared.

He was leaving the London and Paris pub in the harbour with two friends when the apparently unprovoked attack happened. All three were beaten to the ground in a hail of punches and kicks. The assailants, who had followed them out of the pub just before closing time, then ran off. Still sore and bruised from the ordeal, Mr Sprenger told the Herald and Gazette on Wednesday that things happened so quickly he can hardly remember anything about the attack. He confirmed other eyewitness reports that the assault was completely unprovoked, but believes there were four attackers and not three as first reported. They were all aged about 20, and Mr Sprenger says he is certain they were soldiers with Scottish accents. Despite several nasty cuts on his head and chin, which needed 15 stitches, Mr. Sprenger discharged himself from hospital a day early and returned to work rather than sit “moping about” at home. His companions, 30-year-old David Martin, of the Lancastrian Hotel, and 26-year-old John Leighead, of Church Street, Folkestone, were allowed home after treatment for head injuries. He has seen them since the incident and both are all right.

Mr Clive Simpson, landlord of the pub, said “It’s a wonder he wasn’t killed. Especially the way he was left, lying in the road in a great pool of blood”. The attackers, who he had never seen in the pub before, were “just looking for trouble”. They started making a fuss about 10 minutes before closing time, but there was no trouble and they were just eased out, he said. He cannot understand why they picked on Mr Sprenger and his friends. What happened was completely unprovoked, he said. “Mr. Sprenger is a regular at the pub and one of the most inoffensive men I know”, he added.

 

South Kent Gazette 16 June 1982.

Local News.

A pre-Christmas drink turned into a brawl, Folkestone Magistrates heard on Wednesday. Two groups of drinkers at the London and Paris pub near the town's harbour were involved in the fight on December 18 last year.

Gary Porter, 28, of Pilgrim Spring, Folkestone, and Roy Lockett, 29, of Bedfordshire, were charged with assault causing actual bodily harm to Marlene Atkins and Peter Warman. Lockett was also accused of breaking a window. But in order to avoid a lengthy and costly court hearing, both defendants agreed to be bound over to keep the peace. The charges of assault and damage were dropped and both men were charged with breach of the peace. They were bound over for one year to the sum of 50.

Miss Diane Wray, representing Lockett and Porter, said they both denied the original charges and would have defended along that line.

Mr. Gareth Isaac, prosecuting, said the fight started when a group of drinkers was asked to move from one table to another in order to vacate an eating area. The second group of people, who wanted to eat, were eventually taken to another table after one of the drinkers seemed reluctant to move. “Words were exchanged, and things got a little out of hand”, said Mr. Isaac. “One man pushed or fell with one of the defendants through a pane of glass and a woman was hit”.

Miss Wray said the first group of drinkers felt annoyed at being asked to move. They decided to drink up and go because they did not want any trouble. “It marred the pre-Christmas drink, without a doubt”, Miss Wray said of the fracas. She added the defendants had acted very sensibly in agreeing to be bound over.

Presiding Magistrate, Mr George Garnum, said the court was appreciative of Porter’s and Lockett’s decision. “It could have been a long and dreary case”, he said.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 November 1982.

Local News.

Kent Association for the Blind received a 1,194 cash boost on Monday, thanks to a sponsored walk and pub crawl in Folkestone and Hythe.

Dave Garrod, who annually raises large sums of money for the Kent Blind, presented a cheque to the association’s general secretary, Mr. Les Ellis at the London and Paris public house. The landlady, Mrs, Ingrid Simpson, collected a shield on behalf of the pub regulars who raised the highest single amount of 295.95. There were 38 money-raising walkers on the 10-mile, 10-pub sponsored walk and they were joined by 24 others. Highest individual amount raised was 183.80 by Mike Kingston.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 March 1989.

Local News.

The drink and good cheer was flowing for the re-opening of the London and Paris pub hotel in the Harbour, Folkestone. Brewers, Charrington, completely re-designed the interior, creating one large bar. The pub now opens at 8.30 a.m. for coffee and breakfast, either continental or a full cooked meal. Both snacks and meals will be served throughout the day, with vegetarian food available to order.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 June 1989.

Local News.

A man is wanted in connection with an attack on a strike-breaking seaman. It happened at the London and Paris pub in the harbour on May 1 at 4.30 p.m. He is described as white, six feet two inches tall and clean shaven. He is well-built with a pot belly and has black collar-length hair, curled at the bottom. He spoke with a broad Liverpudlian accent. If you know this man, contact Folkestone police on Folkestone 850055.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 September 1992.

Local News.

Pubs are shutting down tomorrow (Saturday) for fear of violence after an Anti-Nazi demo. Campaigners say they will demonstrate at Folkestone Central railway station against an expected rally there by Nazi skinheads. And some publicans, particularly in the Harbour area, are taking no chances with their property and staff.

The assistant manager of the Royal George in Beach Street, who did not want to be named, said “We could be in a prime area for trouble and we are shutting all day. It is not worth staying open, even if only a few hundred pounds worth of damage is caused”.

Landlady Sue Welch said her pub, the London and Paris in Harbour Street, would certainly close during the day and possibly in the evening. She said “The place could get wrecked. We can't risk that”. Her son, barman Alan, 19, said “There could be real danger. This is the area where there is most likely to be trouble because Fascists from Europe may travel here by Seacat”.

Some pubs and bars, such as Jolson's in Tontine Street, are definitely staying open. A member of staff, who did not want to be named, said “We didn't close when the bombs and shells came down during the war. Why should we close now for a bunch of skinhead idiots?”

Other pubs are taking advice from the police and may make their decisions tomorrow morning.

A spokesman at the Park Inn, next to Folkestone Central Station, said “A lot of people are frightened by this. I know of some people who say they won't go into work at the town centre tomorrow. But we don't know if we will shut because we are not certain the rally will go ahead”.

Last Saturday anti-fascist activists leafleted the town asking people to attend the demonstration. Anti-Nazi League member Kelvin Williams told the Herald 4,000 flyers were handed out and 500 names taken on a petition. He said “I've done a few of these in my time and I have never known such a favourable response. My guess is there will be 400 people turning up”.

Last week a spokesman for the far-right Blood and Honour organisation, which had hoped to stage a concert in Folkestone, said nothing was now planned.

But Mr. Williams countered this week; “Our information is that they will be mobilising in London to come down here”.

Jon Steel, a spokesman for Kent Police, said “People ought not to be panicking because if there is any disturbance it will be quashed very quickly. We will have whatever resources are necessary to deal with whatever happens”.

 

From the Dover Express, 14 April, 2000

By Toby smith

Water workers make amazing find near pub.

Old harbour wall is found

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have discovered an old harbour wall during water works near Folkestone port.

Folkestone harbour wall

The remains of the 16th Century wooden wall have been found near the London and Paris pub.

Richard Cross, of Canterbury Archaeological Trust, said the wall, known as a revetment, would have stretched about a 100m along Harbour Street.

It has been dug to a depth of 3m but the trust believes it may go down to 5m.

The harbour has moved further out to sea through the ages. Earlier harbour walls would have been as far back as the harbour car park.

Mr Cross said: "We are lucky because the digs Southern Water have done have allowed us to excavate a trench. If you look at the old maps that Folkestone was a convenient harbour in medieval times."

The revetment was found in a trench the water company has uncovered for sewer works as part of a 120million wastewater scheme.

A Southern Water spokesman said: "We always ensure that construction and conservation go hand in hand which is why we carry out surveys before we do any major work.

"We have worked very closely with Canterbury Archaeological Trust and have managed to cooperate so that we can preserve the past while building for the future."

Other finds by archaeologists during the last few weeks have been 16th Century smoking pipes, some beams, leather shoes, and evidence of the old Pent Valley stream.

The trust members are allowed on site at times during the Southern Water works to inspect or remove items of interest.

Trust field officer Keith Parfitt said; "We used to believe that there were principal sites across the country where archaeological remains were to be found.

"The main thing we have learned over the last few years is that ancient man travelled everywhere."

He praised the company for giving them access to their sites, even though it is not usually required by law.

Other finds over the last two years on the pipeline. which runs from Folkestone to Broomhill Bank, Dover have included a hand axe, found near West Hougharn, which could be 250,000 years old.

 

LICENSEE LIST

HILLS Alfred 1887-88 Bastions

Last pub licensee had DOWNING Charles 1888-92 Bastions

SCHULTZ Frederick 1892-97 Next pub licensee had Bastions

ANDERSON Edward 1897-98 Bastions

GRAY George Barclay 1898-1922 Bastions

GATHERCOLE James 1922-23 Bastions

VENNER Percy H 1923-35 (Proprietor) Kelly's 1934Bastions (Also "Clarendon Hotel")

Last pub licensee had GARLAND Claude 1935-40 (age 24 in 1938) Bastions

MILLARD Alfred 1940-42 Bastions

Last pub licensee had ATTWOOD Percy 1942-52 Bastions

WALES Alex 1952-66 Bastions

MASKELL James and CONCHIE Ian 1966-67 Bastions

PRICE Ronald 1967-71 Bastions

STEPHENS Peter Next pub licensee had and BRETT Edward 1971 Bastions

CLEGG Raymond 1971 Bastions

SCOTT Brian 1971-74 Bastions

HARRINGTON-SIMPSON Clive 1974-87 Bastions

THOMSON Gordon 1987-88 Bastions

YOUNG Clive and SPICER Gordon 1988-90 Bastions

YOUNG Clive and BARNETT Maureen 1990-92 Bastions

WHITEHEAD Roger and WELCH Susan 1992-93 Bastions

WHITEHEAD Roger and WELCH Alan 1993-94 Bastions

WELCH Alan 1994 Bastions

ADAMS Paul 1994-95 Bastions

BURKE Adrian 1995-98 Bastions

JOYCE Lynn and BAKER Tracy 1998 Bastions (Holding managers)

GILLESPIE Kevin and MILLER Francis 1998-99 Bastions

GILLESPIE Kevin and MILLER Francis and JOYCE Lynn 1999- 2001 Bastions

Renamed "Gillespie's."

 

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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