DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 12 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1849

Globe

Latest 1987

(Name to)

42 The Bayle

Folkestone

Globe

Above postcard, date unknown, kindly sent by Debi Birkin.

Globe 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

 

Now changed name to the "Guildhall."

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 January 1856.

Inquest.

Considerable excitement was occasioned last week by the rather sudden death of Mr. Darley, attributed to an injury received by a blow from a stick given by Mr. John Craxford, a retired timber merchant. In consequence of the various reports, the coroner ordered an enquiry to be made, which took place at the Guildhall on Thursday last, before S. Eastes, Esq., Coroner, on the body of William Henry Darley, a master mariner, aged 46 years.

Two witnesses who were said to be present when the injury was received not being in attendance, the medical witnesses were examined.

Mr. William Taylor Tyson, surgeon, deposed: Last Monday week deceased came to me and showed me his arm. Without inquiring into his case, I told him to go home to bed. He said he had the rheumatic gout. I called upon him, and he then told me, after I had examined his arm, that he had knocked his left arm on board his own ship. I found his arm much swollen, and observed above the elbow joint, a dark mark, about two inches long, rather of a triangular form ; the whole limb was swollen down to the fingers. From Monday night to Wednesday he was constantly out of doors. He appeared much excited, told me that unless he received some pecuniary assistance he should be ruined. His arm appeared to give him no care, but his mind was much troubled. On Wednesday evening hee was so exhausted and depressed, that I had little hopes of his surviving the night. On Thursday he rallied and was better. I attributed it to his affairs having been settled and his mind better; he then began to think about his arm. On Sunday I found that he was sinking and his stomach rejected food. He died about 7 o'clock that evening; he was quite sensible up to the time of his death.

In answer to a question from the Coroner, the witness said: I think the want of care and exposure to the cold (it being very severe at that time, blowing a S/E wind) and great anxiety of mind almost caused his death. It was not such an injury as would have produced death in a healthy man. On Wednesday, finding I had no control over him, I asked Mr. Wm! Bateman to go and see him.

By a juror: The deceased told me that he hurt himself on board the vessel, and he never contradicted that statement; the skin was not broken. When he came to me his arm appeared swollen; his countenance showed that he was full of anxiety. He did not lay up till Wednesday evening, and kept his bed until he died. I found his habits of drinking were great, and I ordered him stimulants. It is impossible for me to judge of the violence of the blow.

Mr. William Bateman, surgeon, deposed: I called in on the 19th, by request of Mr. Tyson, to see the deceased. I found him suffering from a severe attack of erysipelas of the left arm, from the elbow to the fingers; it was swollen twice its natural size and covered with large vesicles. I noticed the mark of a bruise above the elbow, which he said he got from falling against something on board his ship. I paid very little attention to the bruise, as I looked to the bad state of his constitution and the great depression of his vital powers. The blow appeared to be slight; the only chance of saving the deceased was by rest and stimulants; his constitution was in that state that the slightest injury might have caused his death. I saw him again on Friday.

By a Juror: If he had applied for assistance earlier, and kept quiet, there would have been a chance for his life being spared. I should have expected erysipelas to be produced more easily by a wound than a blow. Cold would produce it.

At this stage of the inquiry the inquest was adjourned to Saturday, at 2 o’clock.

At the adjourned inquest, John Titus, builder, deposed: I live at Folkestone, and was present at Mr. Maycock s house, the Globe, on the Bayle, last Thursday fortnight. I was reading a newspaper intently, and did not observe what took place; there was a stir there, and from what I gleaned afterwards, I found that a blow had been struck by Mr. John Craxford. The deceased and Mr. Craxford were on very intimate terms. The only persons in the parlour were, I think, Mr. Craxford, the deceased, and Mr. Shawcross. I heard no high words between them; if there had been I should have heard them. Deceased and Mr. Craxford were continually joking. Deceased mentioned to me that he felt the pain of his arm to his fingers, and that the “ old chap” had hit him quite as hard as was pleasant.

By the Coroner—He appeared to look upon it as done entirely in a joke.

William Shawcross, of Gravesend, assistant inspector of wavs and works on the South Eastern Railway, deposed: I was at Mr. Maycock’s, last Thursday fortnight. Deceased was there and Mr. Craxford; the latter was the worse for liquor, and spoke to the deceased, who did not appear to wish to speak to him. Mr. Craxford, to direct the deceased’s attention to him, struck him on the arm, who complained that he struck him hard, and said he liked a joke, but not such a one as that; that occurred between lO and 11 o’clock in the evening. Mr. Craxford was standing behind the deceased, when he gave him, as I imagine, a left handed stroke with the stick he had in his hand.

By a Juror—Heard the blow struck; the deceased was sitting in front of the fire resting his hand on his knees. Deceased complained of pain, and Mr. Craxford said “Don’t be vexed,” and received an answer, that he should if he hit him again like that. The greatest friendship •usually appeared to exist Between them. Mr. Craxford left the room shortly afterwards. The stick was a common walking stick.

By the Coroner: I lodged in Mr. Maycock’s house. Mr. Craxford was that evening poking persons about with his stick; I have seen him do it on several occasions. Deceased showed me his arm on the Monday following; it was very much inflamed. The witness afterward stated that he was not sure whether it was Thursday or Friday night the affair occurred alluded to above, or whether it was a fortnight or three weeks since.

The witness, in answer to a question put by a juror, said he was sober that evening ; recollected the deceased saying to him, “You saw this done,” and replying, “Yes, I did.”

This being the whole of the evidence, the coroner summed up, and explained the law of the case, the want of care taken by the deceased after the accident occurred, and the habits of the deceased. The jury retired, and 14 out of 15 agreed to the following verdict, “That the deceased died from natural causes.”

The Coroner had told the jury that a verdict of “Accidental death” would be preferable to “Natural causes”, but the jury dissented from that, and returned as above. The Coroner said that he wished to inform the jury that he had not caused an enquiry to be made on account of any application made from the deceased’s friends, but from the reports that had been circulated and from being informed that the deceased had died from some injury received.

 

Southeastern Gazette 8 January 1856.

Local News.

The late Inquest on Mr. Darley. Our attention has been called to a paragraph in one of the cheap journals patronized by Mr. John Bright, which is trying the customary arts to acquire notoriety in Folkestone, impuguing the accuracy of our correspondent’s account of the inquest on the late Mr. Darley. As, however, the weakly print alluded to merely comments on the facts which it has obviously drawn from the South Eastern Gazette and garbled, we may safely dispense with all comment on the sample of “rigmarole” meant to inveigle us or our correspondent into a controversy.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 October 1857.

Wednesday September 30th:- Before the Mayor, and T. Golder, W. Major, J. Tolputt, G. Kennicott, and J. Kelcey esqs.

This being the adjourned general annual licencing meeting, the licence for the Globe Tavern was transferred from Thomas Maycock to Susannah Clark.

Note: This transfer does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 February 1860.

Wednesday February 1st:- Before W.F. Browell and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

James Killenburgh, fly-driver, was summoned for using obscene language in the presence of some young ladies belonging to a boarding school in the town, towards Richard Hambrook, of the Globe Inn. The case was fully proved, and defendant fined 10s., and costs, 16s., or fourteen days' imprisonment. The fine and costs were paid.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 March 1860.

Death.

March 6th, at Folkestone, Hester, wife of Mr. Richard Hambrook, of the Globe Inn, aged 53 years.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 17 March, 1860.

DEATHS.

Folkestone. March 6, Hester, wife of Mr. Richard Hambrook, of the "Globe Inn," Bayle, aged 53.

 

Folkestone Observer 27 April 1867.

Inquest.

Mr. James Morford Pilcher, the omnibus driver, whose accident while driving to the Upper Station we reported a fortnight since, died on Sunday, and on Wednesday last an inquest on the body was held at the Globe Inn by Mr. Coroner Minter.

William Pilcher, shoemaker, identified the body as that of his brother, James Morford Pilcher, who died on Sunday evening. He was 39 years of age, and an omnibus driver in Mr. Valyer's employ.

John William Mullett, in the employ of Messrs. Lukey and Son, said that on the evening of the 10th instant, about half past eight o'clock, he got onto the box of Valyer's town omnibus, of which deceased was driver, opposite the King's Arms, and deceased drove towards the Upper Station. Going down Mill Lane he heard something snap, which he believed was a bolt in the springs. Deceased was driving very slowly, but when the bolt broke the front part of the bus was slewed around against the near horse, which then set to kicking, and both horses set into a gallop. Deceased endeavoured to pull the horses up, and in doing so himself jumped up. Witness sat on the box next to the driver, and two persons sat on his left, Filmer Tyas, and Mr. Underdown, foreman of the Corporation men. A basket was on the footboard, and when deceased jumped up the near horse pulled off and dragged deceased over the bus, and witness felt the bus go over him. Tyas and Underdown attempted to get off. If they had not got off, they might have saved deceased, for they might have stopped him as he passed them. Witness was perhaps as much frightened as they were, but he sat still. Witness stopped the horses, but could hardly tell how he got hold of them, he was so frightened. He believed that when the spring got down on the axle, that steadied the horses. Believed that deceased was sober. He was not driving fast.

Filmer Tyas, fly driver, got on the bus at four o'clock in the afternoon, and rode with deceased. About half past seven o'clock at the request of deceased he took out the horses from the omnibus, and at twenty five minutes to nine he put the horses in the bus again. Put the buckles in the same holes in the leather straps as they had been before. Had been brought up to horses ever since he was a little boy, and could harness horses with anybody. Was sitting on the extreme box seat as they went down Mill Lane. About half way down the hill he found the horses going faster than he thought proper, and he called to Pilcher to pull up. He pulled up as well as he could till he got to the bottom of the hill. Saw Pilcher got up, but whether he dropped the reins and was trying to get them again he could not say, but he fell right beyond witness. When they got to the New Inn he jumped off, but he first tried to get hold of the reins. Did not hear the last witness persuade him to sit still. Did not notice the front part of the omnibus go on to the back part of the horses. Noticed the dashboard touching one of the horses, and then the other. The near horse did a kick once or twice. He is not a kicker. Looked at her directly he got off, and found she had a piece out of the top of her hoof. Could not say that he heard the bolts break. Looked at the omnibus after the accident, and found that the two bolts were broken that ran up to hold the spring on the axle. They ran through a block of wood.

William Bateman, surgeon, said on arriving at the house of deceased he found him sitting up in his bedroom, and complaining of a great pain in his chest. Found that the sterna end of the clavicle had started from the sternum or breastbone, and all the ribs on the right side connected with the sternum were broken. Bandaged up the ribs and clavicle. The next morning found that he was coughing a good deal, breathed with difficulty, spat blood, and suffered great pain in the trachea or windpipe, which no doubt was injured. That was relieved with leeches, and he seemed to be going on well for a day or two. Was in hopes he would have recovered, then inflammation of the lungs set in, and from inflammation of the lungs, caused by the injury he had received – the direct injury to the lungs – no doubt he died, on Sunday last.

The Coroner said to the jury he had no doubt the death of Pilcher was caused by his having been run over by an omnibus, and according to the evidence of Mullett, that was an accident caused by the breaking of the bolt, which brought the omnibus on to the horses. Supposing the bolts had been defective, then he thought the unfortunate deceased would be the person responsible, for the omnibus was under his charge. It would appear to be that the bolts suddenly broke, and the roads were in a disgraceful state. He had not the slightest doubt that if it could be conclusively proved it would be shown that the bolts were broken from the disgraceful state the roads were in. There were a number of omnibuses and vehicles going to the station, and he was only surprised that there were not more accidents.

The jury then consulted, and returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and expressed a desire that the condition of the roads be represented to the Corporation. They also gave their fees to the widow and family of the deceased.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 April 1867.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Globe Inn on Wednesday afternoon, before J. Minter, Esq., borough coroner, on the body of James Morford Pilcher, omnibus driver, who it will be remembered met with an accident on the 10th inst., while driving to meet the 9 o’clock train. John William Mullett, working for Mr. Lukey, deposed that he was on the box of the omnibus at the time of the accident. As they were going down the hill he heard a snap, which he afterwards discovered to have been caused by the breaking of the bolts which secured the spring to the axletree, and directly the front of the omnibus swung round and touched the near horse, which commenced kicking. Both horses started off, and shying to the near side pulled the deceased off the box over a basket that was up there, and the wheels went over him. Deceased was sober.

Filmer Tyas a fly driver, corroborated.

Mr. W. Bateman, surgeon, who attended deceased, stated that several of the man’s ribs were broken, and he died between six and seven o’clock on Sunday evening from inflammation of the lungs brought on by the accident.

The jury consulted, and returned a verdict of “Accidental death,” and expressed a desire that the condition of the roads be represented to the Corporation. They also gave their fees to the widow and family of the deceased.

 

Folkestone Express 16 June 1883.

Auction Advertisement.

Folkestone, Kent.

Auction sale of the Globe Hotel.

John Banks is instructed by the proprietors to sell by Auction, at the Rose Hotel, Folkestone, on Thursday, July 5th, 1883, all that well and substantially built Brick and Tile Detached Leasehold and Fully Licensed House, known as the Globe Hotel.

With large brick paved Yard, Urinal, and Coal Shed in the rear.

Containing on the First Floor – Drawing Room, Six well-proportioned Bedrooms, Landing and W.C.

On the Ground Floor – Public and Private Bars, Bar Parlour, Smoking and Coffee Rooms, Kitchen, Scullery and Pantry.

Basement – Very commodious and dry Wine, Spirit and Stock Ale Cellars, fitted with Stone Bins.

The hotel is one of the best-built hotels in the town, of modern elevation, and detached, and there are every available means for carrying on a large and profitable trade, and for the reception of visitors. The late Mr. Richard Hambrook and the present proprietors have been in occupation for the last 25 years, and are well known for their able management. The house is in excellent order and condition, and ready for immediate occupation.

All the Stoves and Ranges will be included in the Sale.

The property is held under a lease from the Earl of Radnor and Viscount Folkestone for a term of 99 years from the 24th day of June, 1848, at the low annual Ground Rent of 8 8s. 0d. The Furniture, Fixtures, Licenses and Utensils of trade will have to be taken by the purchaser at a valuation in the usual way, an inventory of which will be produced at the time of Sale. The Stock In Trade is also to be taken at the like valuation, but the value is not to exceed 100.

Particulars and Conditions of Sale may be had at the Office of the Auctioneer, 73, Sandgate Road, and of W.G.S. Harrison, Solicitor, Cheriton Place, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 8 May 1886.

Auction Advertisement.

The Globe Hotel, Folkestone.

An attractive and substantial property on The Bayle, a populous and commanding position.

Messrs. Alfred Thomas, Peyer and Miles will sell by Auction at The Mart, London, on Monday the 24th May, 1886, at Two o'clock, the above Compact Hotel, on a small scale.

It is in Capital order and well-arranged with all conveniences for the conduct of the excellent trade now carried on.

Particulars may be had of the Auctioneers, 2, Adelaide Place, London Bridge, London E.C., and of Messrs. Hallett, Creery & Co., Solicitors, Ashford, Kent.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 May 1886.

Local Intelligence.

On Monday last Messrs. Thomas, Payer and Miles offered for sale, at the Auction Mart, Tokenhouse Yard, London, by order of the executors of the late Mr. Arthur Langton, the Imperial Brewery, at Folkestone, together with 16 public and beerhouses connected with it. The total sales were said to have averaged for the last four years nearly 7,500 per annum. The houses are said to be all within easy range of the brewery, eight being in Folkestone, one at Sandgate, six at Hythe, and one at Swingfield, producing altogether a rental of 576 per annum.

The same auctioneers also offered for sale the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, Folkestone. The first offer was 1,500 and the property was sold for 1,910.

 

Folkestone Express 29 May 1886.

Local News.

The Globe Hotel, Folkestone, belonging to Mr. C.W. Downing was bought by Messrs. Chapman, Brewers.

 

Folkestone Express 18 September 1886.

Wednesday, September 15th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Sherwood and Caister, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was transferred to Mr. Joseph Harris provisionally.

 

Folkestone Express 19 February 1887.

County Court.

Tuesday, February 15th: Before Judge Selfe.

G.M. Smith v Joseph Harris: Claim of 7 14s. for goods sold and delivered. Defendant is landlord of the Globe Hotel. Verdict for plaintiff, in 14 days.

 

Folkestone Express 2 July 1887.

Wednesday, 29th June: Before W. Bateman, W.J. Jeffreason, J. Fitness and E. Ward Esqs.

The licence of the Globe Hotel, on the Bayle, was transferred from Mr. Harris to Mr. G.F. Cripps. The licence was stated to have been mislaid.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 August 1887.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before General Armstrong, Surgeon General Gilbourne, and J. Banks Esq.

Mr. Harris applied that the licence of the Globe might be transferred to Mr. Cripps. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 6 August 1887.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before General Armstrong, Alderman Banks and Surgeon General Gilbourne.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was transferred from Mr. Harris to Mr. Cripps.

 

Folkestone Express 15 June 1889.

Thursday, June 13th: Before Captain Carter, J. Holden, J. Fitness, and E.T. Ward Esqs.

An occasional licence was granted to Mr. Tritton, of the Globe Hotel, to sell refreshments on Sandgate Plain on the occasion of the Corporation cricket match.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 December 1889.

Tuesday, December 17th: Before The Mayor, Colonel De Crespigny, Alderman Banks, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick and J. Brooke Esqs.

Patrick Cass, a private belonging to the Leinster Regiment, was charged with stealing a watch and chain, valued at 35s., from the person of John Pegden, on the night of the 14th inst.

John Pegden, living at 20, Park Street, a painter, said he recognised the prisoner, but could not positively swear to him. He was in Mr. Tritton's Globe Hotel, on The Bayle, on Saturday night, in company with a man named Morrison. He asked a soldier to have a drink. The soldier asked him the time, and he said “Twenty to nine”, looking at his watch. He left the house in company with the soldier. Witness was rather the worse for liquor, and he missed his watch on Sunday morning. There was a small steel chain attached. The watch produced was his property, but the chain was not. It was a different chain. Witness gave information to the police on Sunday evening, and on Monday morning he went to the Camp with Sergt. Pay, and the man Morrison picked him out from a number of other soldiers paraded.

P.S. Pay said he accompanied the last witness and a man named Morrison to Shorncliffe Camp. The whole of the Leinster Regiment were paraded, and Morrison picked out the prisoner as the man he had seen in company with prosecutor on Saturday night. He took the prisoner to the Orderly Room and cautioned him. Witness said “Where were you on Saturday evening?” He replied “I was in Folkestone. I have his watch. Prosecutor was drunk, and dropped it, breaking one of the hands off. I picked it up”. Prisoner produced the watch from the top of a beam and the prosecutor identified it as his property. In answer to the charge, prisoner replied “Very well”.

Prisoner said he picked the watch up off the ground and intended to take care of it for the prosecutor. He went out on Sunday night for the purpose of finding him, but failed to do so.

The prisoner's officer gave him an indifferent character, and he was sentenced to two months' hard labour.

Shortly after the prisoner was removed below he was taken in a fit.

 

Folkestone Express 21 December 1889.

Tuesday, December 17th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Colonel De Crespigny and W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Patrick Cross, a private in the Leinster Regiment, was charged with stealing a watch from the person of John Pegden.

Prosecutor, a painter, said on Saturday he was in the Globe Hotel on The Bayle, between eight and nine in the evening, drinking with a man named Morrison. He got into conversation with an infantry soldier and asked him to have a drink. They left the Globe and went to various places in the town – he could not recollect where. He had his watch when he was in prisoner's company, and did not miss it until next morning. It had a small steel chain attached to it – not the one produced. It was worth 35s. He bought it of Mr. Bettle, and the number on it corresponded with Mr. Bettle's books. He went on Monday morning with Sergeant Pay and the man Morrison to Shorncliffe Camp, and Morrison identified the prisoner as the soldier who was in his company on Saturday. The went together to a urinal, and there prisoner produced the watch. The second hand was missing.

Sergeant Pay said he went on Monday to Shorncliffe with the prosecutor and Morrison to the quarters of the Leinster Regiment. Morrison picked out the prisoner, and witness asked him where he was on Saturday evening. He replied that he was in Folkestone, in the company of the prosecutor, who was drunk and dropped the watch. Witness asked him where it was. Prisoner replied “At the rear”. He went with prisoner to the latrine, where he produced the watch and chain produced from the top of a beam. He told prisoner he would be charged with stealing the watch, and he made no reply. At the police station the charge was read over to him, and he replied “Very well”.

Prisoner, who received a bad character from an officer of the regiment, was committed for two months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 February 1890.

Saturday, February 8th: Before The Mayor, Major H.W. Poole, Surgeon General Gilbourne, W.G. Herbert and W. Wightwick Esqs.

Mr. Thomas Hall applied for the transfer of the licence of the Globe Hotel from Mr. Tritton. Granted.

 

Folkestone Express 15 November 1890.

County Court.

Tuesday, November 11th: Before Judge Selfe.

P. Upton v Robert Carter: Claim 3 1s. 9d. Defendant is a publican. Committed for 14 days. Order suspended for 28.

Note: Oddfellows Arms.

Wednesday, November 12th: Before H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs., and Surgeon General Gilbourne.

Thomas Lister, a marine store dealer, was charged with committing a criminal assault on Emily Newing, and also with stealing two two shilling pieces from her on Tuesday evening.

Emily Newing, the wife of William Newing, a labourer, lodging at the Bricklayers' Arms, said the prisoner and his wife also lodged there. She met the prisoner about seven o'clock on Tuesday evening near the Globe, on The Bayle. Up to that time she had never spoken to him. He asked her to mind his bag for a few minutes, which she did. When he returned he asked her to go into the Globe and have something to drink. They each had two glasses of porter. They were in the house five or ten minutes and left together. He then dabe her goodnight and went towards High Street. She went down the Parade Steps. When she was halfway down the prisoner came behind her and threw her down. She had two two shilling pieces tied in her handkerchief, which prisoner took, and he then ran away up the steps.

Dr. Bateman stated that the prosecutrix was taken to him on the previous night at about 10.30. He examined her and saw nothing to lead him to suppose that the assault complained of had been committed.

P.C. Scott said he took the prisoner into custody for stealing two two shilling pieces, and when charged prisoner said “It's a lie”. Up to the time prisoner was taken into custody the woman made no other statement. He searched the prisoner and found one two shilling piece, four shillings and some bronze.

Supt. Taylor having given evidence, the Bench called the prosecutrix to the front and said the story told was so improbable that they had no hesitation in dismissing both the charge of assault and theft.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 November 1890.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, Thomas Hall, landlord of the Globe Hotel, was charged with selling intoxicating liquors during prohibited hours on the 14th instant.

Mr. Minter prosecuted, and stated that the police entered the house at five and twenty to twelve on the night in question, and found two soldiers and two prostitutes drinking.

Defendant pleaded Guilty and no evidence was taken.

Defendant: I should like to ask the constable (P.C. Dawson) how he got the information.

Supt. Taylor: Oh, no, thank you; we can't oblige. (Laughter)

Alderman Pledge: What is your object for asking?

Defendant: Because there was no policeman there at the time.

Mr. Bradley: You mean you didn't see any. (Laughter)

Mr. Minter: Perhaps the Superintendent can tell you the character of the house.

Superintendent Taylor said the defendant was a new landlord, and so far had conducted the house very well indeed.

Fined 2 10s. and 8s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 29 November 1890.

Wednesday, November 26th: Before The Mayor, J. Holden, J. Clark, S. Penfold, and J. Pledge Esqs.

Thomas Hall was charged with selling intoxicating liquors during prohibited hours on the 14th November.

Mr. Minter, who prosecuted, said on the 14th inst. the police appeared at the house at 25 minutes past eleven and found two soldiers and two prostitutes. There was an excuse made that the soldiers were going to stay there, but they said they were not. He understood it was the first offence, and as the defendant had pleaded Guilty he would leave the Bench to deal with it.

The defendant desired to know how the police got the information. He did not know the women were prostitutes.

Superintendent Taylor said he did not press for a heavy penalty. It was the first offence, and up to that time the house had been very well conducted.

The Bench fined the defendant 50s. and 8s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 13 December 1890.

Saturday, December 6th: Before Captain Carter, J. Holden and E. Ward Esqs., and Aldermen Pledge and J. Sherwood.

Two soldiers and also two “ladies” were charged with being found on licensed premises at the Globe Hotel on the 14th November.

P.C. Dawson said he visited the house at 11.35 at night and found the four defendants there. The landlord had been fined 50s. and costs.

The defendants all pleaded that they did not think it was so late. The men said they had only recently come from India and were not aware of the rules.

The defendants were each fined 5s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 August 1891.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before J. Clarke, J. Pledge, J. Holden, W. Wightwick, H.W. Poole and F. Boykett Esqs.

Superintendent Taylor objected to the renewal of the licence of the Bellevue Hotel (Mr. Adams), and also to the renewal of the licence of the Globe Hotel (Mr. Hall). The latter was represented by Mr. F. Hall.

The licenses of both these houses were withheld until the adjournment.

The adjourned Sessions will be held on the 23rd of September.

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 September 1891.

Licensing Sessions.

The annual Licensing Sessions were held on Wednesday, when objections were raised against the renewal of the licences for the Globe Hotel, the Bellevue Hotel, The Bouverie Hotel, and the Tramway Tavern. Mr. Rooke appeared on behalf of the council of the Folkestone Temperance Society, and the whole of the cases were eventually adjourned until Sept. 23.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 September 1891.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Globe Hotel.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before J. Clarke Esq., Major Poole, J. Holden, W. Wightwick, F. Boykett and J. Pledge Esqs.

Mr. Hall attended for a renewal of the licence of the Globe Hotel. Mr. F. Hall appeared for the applicant.

Superintendent Taylor stated that Hall was fined 50s. and 8s. costs on the 26th of November for allowing four persons to remain in the house after closing time.

In answer to Mr. Hall, the witness said they were discovered about twenty five minutes after eleven. He had had no other complaints about the house, the general conduct of which was good.

The Chairman said the licence would be renewed, but he would advise the landlord to be very careful in future as there was a disposition to reduce the number of licences.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1891.

Adjourned Licensing Day.

The Globe Hotel.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before J. Clark, J. Holden, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, F. Boykett and J. Pledge Esqs.

Mr. F. Hall applied on behalf of Mr. Thomas Hall for a renewal of this licence.

Superintendent Taylor said on the 21st November last applicant was convicted for selling during prohibited hours. The licence was not endorsed.

In answer to Mr. Hall, Superintendent Taylor said the time was between eleven and half past. Two soldiers and two women went in after hours. There had been no other complaint against the house, the general conduct of which was good.

The licence was renewed, the applicant being cautioned as to the future conduct of the house.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 2 October 1891.

Local News.

A burglary was committed at the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, early on Thursday morning, and a sum of 40 and a silver watch belonging to the landlord, Mr. Thomas Hall, stolen. The burglar was disturbed and chased, but managed to evade capture.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 October 1891.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court yesterday, before The Mayor, Alderman Sherwood, Captain Carter, Alderman Pledge, and W. Wightwick Esq., Edmund O'Burke, of New York, was charged with burglariously entering the Globe Hotel at an early hour on Thursday morning, and stealing therefrom 35 in gold, a pocket-book, 1 6s. in silver, a 5 bank note, and a silver watch and chain.

The case created a great deal of public interest, the Court being densely crowded.

The prisoner, who pleaded Guilty to the charge, is about 5 ft. 6 ins. in height and about 25 years in age.

P.S. James Campany, of the Dover Police Force, said: At twenty past eight this morning I was in Military Road, Dover. I there saw the prisoner. In consequence of information I had received from the Folkestone Police, I arrested him. I told him I should take him into custody on a charge of robbing an hotel at Folkestone. He said “Very well”. I took him to the Dover Police Station, where I searched him. I found one 5 Bank of England note, 28 10s. in gold, 1 7s. 3d. in silver, a foreign silver coin, fivepence in bronze, a silver watch and chain, a pocket book –

Prisoner: And a Continental phrase book.

Witness (continuing): I brought him to the Folkestone Police Station. On the way he told me he had left his shoes in the Hotel, and asked me if I thought they would let him have them. I told him I didn't know.

Thomas Hall said: I am the landlord of the Globe Hotel, and woke about half past four yesterday morning. I was awakend by seeing a light go past my bedroom. I did not hear anyone in my room. I looked out of the door and asked who was there, but I received no answer. I heard a window pushed up in the next room, and I at once looked out of my own bedroom window. I saw a man drop from the window-ledge of the adjoining room. He landed on the cellar flap, and then ran away. I could not see his face distinctly, and am unable to identify the prisoner. He appeared to be dressed similar to the man in the dock. I called out “Stop, thief!” Mr. Goldsack, the sweep, was coming round the corner, and he ran in pursuit of him. They ran in the direction of the Bayle Steps. I examined my bedroom, and found that he had taken my keys from my trousers pocket, and unlocked my portmanteau. He had taken my wearing apparel out of my room, and I afterwards found them in the scullery. I missed 35 in gold from the portmanteau; also one five pound note, and about 1 6s. in silver. The money was in a little pocket book. I missed the watch and chain, produced, from the till in the bar, and I found the pair of boots, now produced, in the scullery. The boots are not my property.

Superintendent Taylor asked for a remand until Wednesday.

Prisoner: I should regard it as a very great favour if the Bench will sentence me at once.

Mr. Bradley said even if a prima facie case were made out against prisoner, the Bench could not deal with it. He would have to be sent to the Maidstone Assizes.

The Chairman: You will be remanded until Wednesday.

Prisoner: May I have my boots to wear, gentlemen?

Mr. Bradley: You won't want them just yet. (Laughter)

The prisoner was then removed below.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 October 1891.

Local News.

Late on Wednesday night, or early on Thursday morning, a daring burglary took place at the Globe Hotel. Mr. Hall states that he was sleeping alone on the night in question, and was aroused by a man walking about his room with a light. He at once challenged him, but received no reply. Mr. Hall at once dressed himself, and the miscreant made his escape through the window. A cry was raised of “Stop, Thief!”, and a man endeavoured to close with the burglar, but he was soon lost to view. An examination of the hotel proved that a serious burglary had taken place, and the police were at once communicated with, who, with commendable promptitude, put the telephone and electric wires at work, with the result that the man “wanted” was found at Dover early yesterday (Friday) morning. The police deserve great praise for the successful measures they took to ensure the capture of the man.

Police proceedings yesterday.

Before The Mayor, Capt. Carter, Alderman Sherwood, Mr. W. Wightwick, and Mr. James Pledge.

Edward O'Burke, who gave no address, was brought up and charged with burglary at the Globe Hotel on the night of Wednesday last, and with stealing 36 6s. in money, a Bank of England 5 note, watch and chain, etc.

The evidence of Mr. Hall, who identified the articles produced as his property, and that of a police sergeant from Dover proving the arrest, having been heard, the prisoner was remanded till Wednesday next.

 

Southeastern Gazette 6 October 1891.

Local News.

A burglary was perpetrated at the Globe Hotel on Thursday, when about 50 and a watch belonging to the landlord were stolen. The burglar was alarmed and pursued, leaving his boots behind.

At the Folkestone police-court on Friday, before the Mayor, Alderman Sherwood, Capt. Carter, Alderman Pledge, and Mr. W. Wightwick, Edmund O’ Burke, of New York, was charged with burglariously entering the Globe Hotel at an early hour on Thursday morning, and stealing therefrom 45 in gold, a pocket-book, 1 6s. in silver, a 5 note, and a silver watch and chain. The prisoner, who pleaded guilty to the charge, is about 6ft. 6in. in height, and about 25 years of age.

P.S. James Campany, of the Dover police force, said he went to Folkestone Road and arrested the prisoner. On searching him witness found one 5 note, 28 10s. in gold, 1 7s. 3d. in silver, a foreign coin, 5d. in bronze, a silver watch and chain, and a pocket-book.

Prisoner: And a Continental “phrase-book.”

Thos. Hall said: I am the landlord of the Globe Hotel, Dover (sic). About half-past four yesterday morning I was awakened by seeing a light go past my bedroom. I did not hear anyone in my room. I looked out at the door and asked who was there, but I received no answer. I heard a window pushed up in the next room, and I at once looked out of my own bedroom window. I then saw a man drop from the window ledge of the adjoining room. He landed on the cellar-flap and then ran away. I could not see his face distinctly, and am unable to identify the prisoner. I called out, “Stop thief.” A man was coming round the corner, and he ran after the person escaping. I found my wearing apparel in the scullery. I missed 45 in gold and other money from my portmanteau, the keys of which had been taken from my trousers pocket.

Supt. Taylor asked for a remand until Wednesday.

Prisoner: I should regard it as a very great favour if the Bench will sentence me at once.

The prisoner was then remanded.

 

Folkestone Express 7 October 1891.

Local News.

Early on Thursday morning a burglary was effected at the Globe Hotel, which is kept by Mr. T. Hall, and the burglar, we hear, got clear away with about 40 in cash, and an old silver double-cased watch; the maker's name “Boxer, Folkestone” is engraved upon it. Mr. Hall states that he was sleeping alone in a front room of the hotel, his wife being at Sandgate. About a quarter to five on Thursday morning he was awoken by someone in his bedroom with a light. He called out to know who was there, but there was no answer. He got up and went to the window, when he saw a man drop from the window ledge on to the trap door of the cellar in front of the house. He opened the window and called out “Stop. Thief!” A man named Goldsack, who has a stable at the back, came out, and ran after the man, who seems to gave gone across the garden of the old Parade houses and down to High Street, and Goldsack lost sight of him. Mr. Earl states that a stranger was stopped by his dog about that time in the morning. Mr. Hall examined the premises, and came to the conclusion that an entry had been effected by placing a ladder up to the closet window, after which the thief went downstairs and opened the door and removed the ladder, which was found lying on the ground. Mr. Hall's clothing was found in the scullery, having apparently been taken from the bedroom and carried down there to be searched to find the keys. Then the thief returned and from a pocket book in a portmanteau he took about 40, consisting of 32 or 33 in gold, a 5 note, and 1 in silver. The burglar had removed his boots, which were found just inside the kitchen door. They were patent leather, with brown tops, and a man who wore similar boot has, it is said, been seen about the house lately. In the dim light Mr. Hall was unable to recognise the man, but he was rather tall and dressed in dark clothes. He had been into the bar, where he helped himself to some sherry and cigars. The boots and other articles are in the hands of the police, but up to last night no tidings had been heard of the thief.

The Folkestone Police, having received information which led them to believe the burglar had taken refuge in the Warren, were busily engaged all day on Thursday searching for him. Information was also sent by Superintendent Taylor to Dover, where members of the police force were also on the alert. Sergeant Campany, of the Dover Police, succeeded in apprehending a man answering the description which was given of a stranger who had been seen wandering about in the Warren, and nearly the whole of the missing property was found upon him. He at first refused his name, but subsequently gave that of Edmund O'Bourke, saying he was an American and of no occupation. He had obtained another pair of boots from a person to whom he represented that he had lost his others while bathing. He stated to the police that he came from Calais on Wednesday night, and came straight on to Folkestone, committing the burglary in the morning.

The prisoner was brought up at the Folkestone Police Court on Friday morning, when he was remanded after the following evidence was given:-

Sergeant James Campany, of the Dover Police, said: About twenty minutes past eight this morning I was in the Military Road at Dover, and there saw the prisoner. In consequence of information received from the Folkestone Police I arrested him. I told him I should take him on charge of robbing an hotel at Folkestone. He replied “Very well – all right”. I took him to the police station at Dover and searched him. I found on him a 5 bank note, 28 10s. in gold, 1 7s. 3d. in silver, a foreign silver coin, fivepence in bronze, a silver watch and chain, and two small books.

Prisoner: A pocket book and a Continental phrase book.

Witness: I produce the note and the money. I handed prisoner over to the Folkestone police. On the way to Folkestone, prisoner told me he had left his shoes in the hotel, and asked me if they would let him have them. I replied I did not know.

Prisoner asked no questions.

Thomas Hall said: I am landlord of the Globe Hotel, Folkestone. Yesterday morning I was awoken about half past four or a quarter to five by a light going by my bedroom. I went outside and asked who was there and got no answer. I looked out of the bedroom door and asked who was there. I received no answer. I heard the window go up in the next bedroom to mine. I looked out of my own window, and saw a man drop from the window ledge of the adjoining room. He landed on the cellar flap beneath the window, and I saw him run away. I could not see his face distinctly, and I cannot identify the prisoner. The man was dressed similar to what the prisoner is – in dark clothes. It was between the lights and there was a gas lamp burning. I called out “Stop. Thief!”. Mr. Goldsack, a sweep, was coming round, and ran after the man, who went in the direction of the Bayle Steps. I missed my clothes from my bedroom, and found them in the scullery. My keys I kept in my waistcoat pocket, and they were missing. I also had an American coin in my pocket. That produced is the one. On returning to my bedroom I found a portmanteau had been unlocked. The key was on the bunch taken from my waistcoat pocket. I missed from the portmanteau about 35 in gold, a 5 note, and about 26s. in silver. No bronze money. The money was in a little pocket book. I afterwards missed a watch and chain, which was taken from the till in the bar. The watch and chain produced is my property. The name on the watch is “Boxer, Folkestone”. I do not know the number. In the scullery I found the pair of boots produced. They are not my property.

Prisoner said: I came from New York to Havre. I should regard it as a kindness if would sentence me at once.

The Magistrates' Clerk: The Magistrates can't deal with you. If there is a prima facie case, you will go for trial at the Assizes.

Prisoner, who is a man about 25, said part of the money belonged to him.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 7 October 1891.

Parish Patrol.

We don't often have a scare about burglars in Folkestone, but last Thursday morning, just at break of day, an alarm was given that aroused the dwellers on The Bayle, and one of the “Bill Sykes” fraternity might have been seen dropping from a first floor window of the Globe Hotel and making a rush for the Parade Steps, closely followed by a sweep in pursuit!

Mr. Hall, landlord of the Globe, had enjoyed the sleep of the just through the night, and was aroused by a light carried by the unjust interloper in his bedroom. On jumping out of bed, throwing up his window, and calling out “Stop, thief!”, Mr. Hall saw his intruder drop out of the next window, down to the ground. On searching the premises Mr. Hall found that his clothes had been removed downstairs to the kitchen, where they had probably been searched by the thief and some keys extracted from the pockets. With these keys it is presumed that the robber returned to the bedroom, unlocked a portmanteau, in which was a pocket book where Mr. Hall had placed about 40, and which was appropriated by the burglar – over thirty pounds in gold, a five pound note, and some silver. In the bar it was found that the stranger had helped himself to some cigars and sherry, and at the back door of the house, which was found open, a pair of brown leather shoes stood on the mat. These were the only objects of interest secured by Mr. Hall. The thief also purloined an old silver watch, on which was the name of “Boxer, Folkestone”, a watchmaker of half a century ago.

This burglar pal of Bill Sykes vanished for only a few hours. On Friday morning at twenty minutes past eight o'clock Sergeant Campeny of the Dover police spotted him walking into Dover by the Military Road, and by the intuitive instinct of a thief-catcher recognised him as the man enquired for at Folkestone. The police sergeant immediately bade him good morning and insinuated that he had been robbing a hotel, to which he replied “Very well, all right”, and submitted to be searched at the police station, when 28 10s. in gold, one 5 Bank of England note, 1 7s. 3d. in silver, and 5d. in bronze – blow the fivepence, these policemen are so particular – were found in his possession. He had also the identical silver watch and chain and two books on him. On being asked to describe the books the sergeant of police hesitated, when prisoner volunteered the description – “pocket book and Continental phrase book” – by which it would appear he was off to the “Continent”.

Superintendent Taylor asked for a remand till Wednesday next, when prisoner, who answered to the name of Edmund O'Bourke, said that he had come from New York, and that he would regard it as a great kindness if the Magistrates would sentence him at once, but the Magistrates' Clerk said he would have to come up again on Wednesday, and then be committed to the Assizes to take his trial. He was accordingly remanded to this day.

O'Bourke must have passed about the most miserable twenty four hours between the time of his coup at the Globe and his capture possible to conceive. He made tracks direct for the Warren, where he was literally run to earth. Being traced going in this direction, the police to a man turned out and scoured the locality through and through, from the sea shore to the top of the cliffs. At one time the prisoner alleges that as he laid hid in the middle of a blackberry bush he heard two men conversing, when one said he would make it hot for the robber if he came across him. He tried the smugglers' cave for a short time, but the pursuit was hot, and from there he got to the railway at Abbot's Cliff Tunnel, and begged of a watchman a pair of shoes, saying he had lost his own while bathing. All night long he kept close, and crept into Dover early in the morning. He went to a coffee house and ordered breakfast, but could not eat. He was wet through, and his clothes smeared with mud and chalk. This aroused suspicion, and the police were communicated with – then came the inevitable.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 9 October 1891.

Local News.

The man who committed the burglary at the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, last week, was arrested at Dover on Friday morning. He gave the name of Edmund O'Bourke, and said he was an American. He was handed over to the Folkestone police, and brought up before the Magistrates and remanded till Wednesday, when he was again brought up and committed for trial at the Assizes.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 10 October 1891.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, before Captain carter, J. Clark Esq., and Aldermen Dunk, Pledge, and Sherwood, Edward O'Burke was placed in the dock, charged with having burglariously and feloniously entered the Globe Hotel on the 1st instant, and stolen therefrom upwards of 40, the monies of the landlord, Mr. Thomas Hall.

The depositions of Sergeant Campany, of Dover, who apprehended the prisoner, were read over and confirmed, and also those of Mr. Hall. The latter added that all the doors of the hotel were fastened by him on the night in question, but that there was no fastening to the ground floor window at the back of the house.

Stephen Goldsack was then called, and said: I am a chimney sweep, and live opposite the Globe, on The Bayle. About half past four on Thursday morning I was in my stable, which is behind the Globe Hotel. As I passed the hotel with my pony I saw a man getting up off the cellar flap in front of the house. There is a Bray's lamp near the spot, and the man passed close to by. He was near the lamp, and went towards the Parade Steps. At that time Mr. Hall called out from his bedroom window “Stop that man: he has robbed me”. I left my pony and ran after the man. I did not overtake him. I nearly caught him at the top of the steps when he sprang to the bottom, and when I got there I lost him. I did not notice whether he had any boots on. I had noticed a light in a bedroom of the Globe. It disappeared when I opened the stable door.

Thomas Kennett, a gardener in the employ of Mr. Pilcher, at Bowles Well, near the Junction Station, said: I was in the garden at ten minutes to six on the morning of Thursday. At that time a man came to me and asked for a drink of water. I took him to a shed and gave him some. He then turned away to the right and went in the direction of the Warren, by the Warren Road. He had no shoes on – only brown socks. The prisoner is the man.

Lewis Gatehouse, a constable in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, said: It is my duty to patrol the line between Dover and Folkestone. About twenty minutes to nine on Thursday morning I was walking from Dover to Folkestone along the line. I walked through the Abbot's Cliff Tunnel, and met the prisoner at the other end. I asked him his business. He said he was going to Dover. I told him he could not go that way, but that he must go back again, and I offered to show him the road up the cliff. He said he could not walk fast, as he had no shoes, and that he had lost them whilst bathing on the beach. I took him to the signal box, to John Hickmott, who gave the prisoner a pair of shoes. The prisoner offered me a shilling, but I told him he could give it to Hickmott for the shoes if he liked. I showed him up the cliff and did not see him afterwards.

Police Sergeant Lilley said he visited the Globe Hotel about half past six on Thursday morning and examined the premises. He found that no forcible entry had been effected. On Friday he met the prisoner in custody at the Junction Station. He said he got into the house through the back window, from the yard on the ground floor. He commenced talking about the robbery without witness questioning him. He said it was a big jump getting out and that he hurt his feet. When the charge was read over to him he said “Those boots (indicating the boots produced) are mine. Can I have them? I shall plead Guilty and make a short job of it”.

Prisoner said it was not true what witness had said. He made no observation, only when questioned.

The usual caution was read over to the prisoner, who, when asked if he had anything to say, said “I reserve my defence”.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the County Assizes.

Prisoner: Can you tell me about when that will be?

Mr. Bradley: Probably at the end of this month.

Prisoner: Thank you.

The Court was densely crowded throughout the hearing and a great number were unable to gain admission.

 

Folkestone Express 10 October 1891.

Wednesday, October 7th: Before Captain Carter, J. Clark Esq., Aldermen Pledge and Sherwood.

Edmund O'Bourke was brought up on remand, charged with burglary at the Globe Hotel on Wednesday morning.

The evidence taken on Friday was read over as follows:-

Sergeant James Campany, of the Dover Police, said: About twenty minutes past eight this morning I was in the Military Road at Dover, and there saw the prisoner. In consequence of information received from the Folkestone Police I arrested him. I told him I should take him on charge of robbing an hotel at Folkestone. He replied “Very well – all right”. I took him to the police station at Dover and searched him. I found on him a 5 bank note, 28 10s. in gold, 1 7s. 3d. in silver, a foreign silver coin, fivepence in bronze, a silver watch and chain, and two small books.

Prisoner: A pocket book and a Continental phrase book.

Witness: I produce the note and the money. I handed prisoner over to the Folkestone police. On the way to Folkestone, prisoner told me he had left his shoes in the hotel, and asked me if they would let him have them. I replied I did not know.

Prisoner asked no questions.

Thomas Hall said: I am landlord of the Globe Hotel, Folkestone. Yesterday morning I was awoken about half past four or a quarter to five by a light going by my bedroom. I went outside and asked who was there and got no answer. I looked out of the bedroom door and asked who was there. I received no answer. I heard the window go up in the next bedroom to mine. I looked out of my own window, and saw a man drop from the window ledge of the adjoining room. He landed on the cellar flap beneath the window, and I saw him run away. I could not see his face distinctly, and I cannot identify the prisoner. The man was dressed similar to what the prisoner is – in dark clothes. It was between the lights and there was a gas lamp burning. I called out “Stop. Thief!”. Mr. Goldsack, a sweep, was coming round, and ran after the man, who went in the direction of the Bayle Steps. I missed my clothes from my bedroom, and found them in the scullery. My keys I kept in my waistcoat pocket, and they were missing. I also had an American coin in my pocket. That produced is the one. On returning to my bedroom I found a portmanteau had been unlocked. The key was on the bunch taken from my waistcoat pocket. I missed from the portmanteau about 35 in gold, a 5 note, and about 26s. in silver. No bronze money. The money was in a little pocket book. I afterwards missed a watch and chain, which was taken from the till in the bar. The watch and chain produced is my property. The name on the watch is “Boxer, Folkestone”. I do not know the number. In the scullery I found the pair of boots produced. They are not my property.

Prisoner said: I came from New York to Havre. I should regard it as a kindness if would sentence me at once.

The Magistrates' Clerk: The Magistrates can't deal with you. If there is a prima facie case, you will go for trial at the Assizes.

Prisoner, who is a man about 25, said part of the money belonged to him.

Mr. Hall now added to his evidence: I have recovered my keys. They were in the portmanteau. I locked up the house on the night of Wednesday, the 30th. At eleven o'clock I locked all the doors and saw that all the windows were fastened except the kitchen window, which had no fastening. It is on the ground floor at the back of the house. When I returned to my house after pursuing the prisoner I examined the premises. I found the scullery doors open, and also the door leading from the yard into the lane. All the other doors were secure. I bolted the doors the previous night, but did not lock them. The lower sash of the window of the bedroom adjoining my bedroom was open. It was shut when I retired to bed on the previous evening, and fastened. I did not shut my bedroom door when I went to bed. The American coin which I lost is that produced. It's value is one dime.

Stephen Goldsack said: I am a chimney sweeper, and live on the Bayle, opposite the Globe Hotel. About half past four on Thursday morning I was going to my pony in the stable. As I passed The Globe I saw a man getting up off the cellar flap. He appeared to have fallen. There is a Bray's lamp at the corner of the enclosure in front of the hotel. The man passed me near the lamp and ran in the direction of the Parade Steps. I saw his face, and I identify the prisoner as the man. Just at that time Mr. Hall called out to me to stop the man, who had robbed him. I left my pony and ran after the man, but could not overtake him. He jumped from the top step right down, and I lost sight of him. I did not see whether he had boots on or not. When I first entered the stable I noticed a light in a top bedroom window of the hotel, and it disappeared.

Thomas Kennett said: I am a gardener in the employ of Mr. George Pilcher, and work in his garden at Bowles Wells, between the Dover Road and the permanent way. I was in the garden on Thursday, about ten minutes to six. A man came to me and asked for a drink of water. I took him to the shed to get the water, when he said “Never mind about the water”, and turned to the right and went towards the railway bank. I saw him cross the Warren Road and go in the direction of the Warren. I noticed that he had no shoes on. He had brown socks. I identify the prisoner as the man.

Lewis Gatehouse said: I am a constable in the employ of the South Eastern railway Company. It is my duty to patrol the line between Dover and Folkestone. About twenty minutes to nine on Thursday evening I was coming from Dover to Folkestone along the line. I walked through Abbot's Cliff Tunnel, and in the tunnel I met the prisoner. He then had on a different pair of shoes. I asked him his business. He said he was going to Dover. I told him he could not go to Dover – he must go back again. He went back. He said he could not walk fact because he hadn't got any shoes. I saw then that he had no shoes. He told me he had lost them while bathing on the beach. I took him to the signal box and then showed him the Royal Oak path. John Hickmott keeps the signal box. I asked him to give the prisoner a pair of shoes, and he did so. Prisoner asked me what he should give me. I told him I did not want anything, but if he liked he could pay the man for the boots. He said “Here's a shilling for you”. It was not a shilling, but some other piece of money. I saw him go up the path, and saw no more of him.

Sergeant Lilley said: On Thursday morning, October 1st, I visited the Globe about half past six. I observed the premises, but could not find that any forcible entry had been effected. On Friday, the 2nd, I went to the Junction Station, and met Sergeant Campany with the prisoner in custody. Prisoner said “I got in the back window on the ground floor in the yard”. He was talking generally of the robbery all the way to the police station without questioning. He said “It was a big jump getting out, and I hurt my foot very much”. At the police station the charge was read over to the prisoner by Supt. Taylor in my presence. Prisoner said “Those boots are mine. Can I have them? I shall plead Guilty and make a short job of it”. The boots produced came from the Globe Hotel.

Prisoner: He is quite incorrect in some parts of his evidence.

Mr. Bradley: Very well. You can ask him any questions.

Prisoner: You say I said that without any questions? – I do.

Prisoner: I said nothing to you about the job. I used no slang at all. I said nothing to you except on being questioned.

Mr. Bradley: Is that so? – No, sir.

Prisoner: It is useless for me to question these gentlemen if I am to be made out a liar.

Sergeant Lilley said: I did not receive the boots produced from Mr. Hall. They were at the police station when I saw them.

The evidence was then read over, and also the formal charge and caution.

Prisoner: I reserve my defence.

Captain Carter told the prisoner he was committed for trial at the Assizes.

Prisoner: Can you tell me when it will be?

Mr. Bradley: About the end of the month, I should think.

The Dover Chronicle on Saturday said: About seven o'clock yesterday (Friday) morning a man, shabbily dressed, entered the Railway Coffee Tavern, on the Folkestone Road, and said he wanted a wash and brush-up. Mr. Turner, the proprietor, took him into the kitchen, where the man ordered a mutton chop for his breakfast, and also wanted a room, so that he could change his clothes. He further wanted a tailor, a barber, and a bootmaker to be called in. Mr. Turner – who had been furnished by the police with a description of the man wanted at Folkestone – believed that his new customer was the same person, and at once informed the police. When the police arrived, the man had just left Mr. Turner's shop and was walking up the Christ Church steps. He was overtaken by the police on Military Hill and arrested on suspicion.

 

Southeastern Gazette 13 October 1891.

Local News.

On Wednesday, at the Town Hall, a young fellow of somewhat slim and shabby appearance, who had given the name of Edmund O’Bourke, was charged on remand with stealing, at the Globe Hotel, about 40 in cash, a silver watch, and a few other articles, the property of Mr. Thomas Hall, the landlord.

Sergt. Campany, of the Dover police, deposed to arresting the prisoner at Dover on Friday morning. Prisoner had on him a 5 Bank of England note, 28 10s. in gold, 1 7s. 3d. in silver, 5d. in bronze, a silver watch and chain, and two small books.

Thomas Hall, landlord of the Globe, deposed that about a quarter to five on Thursday morning he was awakened by a light passing the door of his bedroom, which was partly open. He called out, “Who is there?” and hearing the window go up in the adjoining room he looked out of his bedroom window, and saw a man drop from the ledge of the adjacent window. Witness found his clothes had been removed from his bedroom to the scullery. His keys had been taken from his waistcoat, a portmanteau, which was in his bedroom, unlocked, and about 35 in gold, a 5 note, and 26s. in silver taken; also an American coin, a “dime.” A watch and chain had been taken from the till in the bar. Witness identified the watch and the American coin found on the prisoner.

Evidence was also given by Stephen Goldsack, Thomas Kennett, and Louis Gatehouse, a constable in the employ of the S.E.R. Company.

Sergt. Lilley, of the Folkestone police, deposed that when he received prisoner the latter began talking generally about the robbery, said he got in at the back window on the ground floor, that “it was a big jump ” getting out, and that he hurt his feet very much.

Prisoner, who said he reserved his defence, was committed to the Assizes.

 

Folkestone Express 5 December 1891.

Local News.

A telegram was received on Tuesday by the Superintendent of Police, stating that during the previous night Edmund O'Burke, alias Toomey, who was awaiting his trial at the Assizes for burglary at the Globe Hotel, had escaped from Canterbury gaol, and he is understood to be still at large. The prisoner is a man of slender build, 5 ft. 7 in. high, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, blue eyes, and was dressed in dark clothes, conststing of brown jacket, bluish coloured striped trousers, prison shirt, socks, and flannel hard round felt hat. The man has undergone various terms of imprisonment, and was only released from Chatham a few days before he was apprehended at Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 December 1891.

Local News.

The Globe Hotel burglar appears to have made his escape from Canterbury prison in a very clever manner. He was confined in one of the upper cells, and by making a hole in the wall he gained the top of a network of walls, along which he made his way, dodged the warders, and eventually reached the females' exercising ground. This portion of the prison is not patrolled at night, so that he was able to get away without detection. O'Burke is an old hand, having already served five years' penal servitude.

Kent Winter Assizes.

The commission of these Assizes was opened at Maidstone on Monday by Baron Pollock. The trial of prisoners commenced on Tuesday. The following case was disposed of on Wednesday.

In the case of Edward O'Burke, 24, tailor, who was charged with burglariously breaking and entering the Globe Hotel and stealing a Bank of England note of the value of 5, the sum of 36 6s. in money, a pocket book, and a silver watch and chain, the money and goods of Thomas Hall, on the 30th September, Mr. Matthew asked that the witnesses might be discharged, the prisoner having escaped from Canterbury Gaol, and there being no probability of his being recaptured.

 

Southeastern Gazette 12 December 1891.

Assizes.

Edward O'Burke. 24, tailor, who was charged with feloniously and burglariously entering the dwelling- house of Thomas Hall, and stealing therein a Bank of England note of the value of 5, the sum of 36 6s. in money, a pocket book, and a silver watch and chain, the moneys and goods of the said Thomas Hall, at Folkestone, on the 30th Sept. Mr. Matthew applied that the witnesses might be discharged, prisoner having escaped from Canterbury Gaol, and there being no probability of his being re-captured.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 January 1892.

The man O'Burke, who contrived to escape from Canterbury prison by eluding the warder on the 30th November last, was, by a remarkable coincidence recaptured at Dover on Wednesday. It will be remembered that prisoner was awaiting his trial on a charge of burglary at the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, he having been arrested at Dover, and committed for trial at the Kent Assizes recently held. The remarkable feature in the affair is that the arrest was effected on both occasions through the instrumentality of a local eating house keeper, Mr. R. Turner, of the Railway restaurant, Folkestone Road.

From the time the prisoner made his escape from Canterbury no trace whatever could be found of his movements, though vigilant enquiries and active searches were instituted by the police authorities. The following is the description of the man circulated: Edward Toomey, alias O'Burke, who escaped from H.M. Prison, Canterbury, on 30th November, 1891, while awaiting trial at the Kent Assizes for burglary at Folkestone. Age, 25; height, 5 ft. 7 in.; complexion, pale; hair, dark brown; eyes, grey; large scar on top and back of head; three small scars on stomach; scar left side; two scars left hip; scar left buttock and knee; top joint little finger bent. Convicted C.C.C. 29th Mat, 1883, burglary, 18 months; ditto, 14th December, 1885, 12 months; ditto, 10th January, 1887, receiving and previous convictions, 5 years P.S.; and convicted four times summarily at Greenwich. The opposite side of the card on which this was printed contained photos, front and side face, of the prisoner. It now appears that the secret of his long elusion of the police authorities, in spite of all their precautions, is due to the fact that the prisoner, who is said to be an American, succeeded in getting to the London Docks, where he secreted himself on board the American liner, France. He was, however, discovered when in the Channel, and put ashore at Dover, where, owing to the sharpness of Mr. Turner, he had not been long before his arrest was effected. The prisoner had managed to get safely to the Priory Station, and in all probability he would yet have been at large, had it not been for his timely recognition. Prisoner was taken back to Canterbury the same afternoon.

As the fact of Mr. Turner's assistance in the capture of O'Burke in the first place was not adduced at the preliminary trial, our representative called on him on Wednesday evening, for the purpose of obtaining particulars pertaining to this, which will no doubt be perused with interest by our readers.

In reply to a question as to how he came to suspect the prisoner, Mr. Turner said: on the Thursday night previous to the day on which O'Burke was arrested, I was given a description of the prisoner by the police, who stated him to be 5 ft. 9 in. in height, with a scraggy beard, and in brown clothes. The following morning a man came in, who did not answer this description in one point. He asked to be allowed to have a wash and brush up, which I granted, and after ordering dinner he asked me if he could have the use of a room in order “to change his clothes before he went to see the old folks”. He also asked me whether there was a barber's shop about, and wished to see a daily paper. Despite the fact he did not answer the description, something seemed to tell me that my visitor was O'Burke. I mentioned the matter to my wife, who tried to persuade me that I was wrong, but the conviction was so strong that I determined to give information to the police. Slipping out by the back way, I went to the police station, and told them that I believed O'Burke to be at my house, but that he did not answer the description they gave me. I then went back, and found prisoner just preparing to go. I kept him in conversation for a few minutes, but he left before the police arrived. As he went out he looked down the street and saw the police sergeant coming up. Instead of turning into the barber's shop as he had stated to be his intention, he kept on, and went up the steps leading past the back of my house. When the sergeant came into the house, I told him the way the prisoner had gone, and took him through my house, and he thus effected O'Burke's arrest.

And I understand you got no credit for the arrest, Mr. Turner?

No. Not the least. My name was not mentioned in connection with the matter.

That gave you very little encouragement to assist in his recapture. In what manner was your attention drawn to O'Burke today?

Well, I happened to go to the door (which is a partially glass one), and on looking through, you may conceive my astonishment on seeing O'Burke pass. Considering how I had been treated before, I at first thought to let him go, and take no trouble in the matter, but just at that time, Mr. Baker, the Market Inspector, happened to pass, and I told him the escaped prisoner from Canterbury had just gone up the street towards the station. At his request I went with him to the Priory Station, where, on my pointing out the man, he arrested him.

A reward of 5 was offered for the re-arrest of O'Burke, and we think this has been justly earned by Mr. Turner, who speaks in high terms of the courtesy shown him on Wednesday by Superintendent Sanders.

 

Folkestone Express 9 January 1892.

Local News.

The man O'Burke, alias Toomer, who was awaiting trial at Canterbury gaol for burglary at the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, and who escaped from prison a few days before the Assizes, was recaptured at Dover on Wednesday under strange circumstances. It will be remembered that after the burglary a man named Turner, an eating house keeper at Dover, was instrumental in effecting his capture. O'Burke had stowed himself away on board the France, which left London docks, but he was discovered and put ashore at Dover. He was passing the eating house of Turner, on his way to the Priory Station, about one o'clock on Wednesday, when Turner recognised and followed him. At the station Turner pointed prisoner out to Market Inspector Baker, and he was at once arrested. The prisoner had 4s. in his pocket, and was no doubt anxious to get away as soon as possible from such a dangerous neighbourhood. He was taken to Canterbury by the two o'clock train and safely lodged in prison.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 January 1892.

Local News.

O'Burke, alias Thomas Toomey (sic), who was committed for trial at the Assizes for burglary at the Globe Hotel, (a piece of the report torn here) eluded the warders and escaped from Canterbury Prison, was captured at Dover on Wednesday last. It will be remembered that the prisoner was arrested at the last named place through the instrumentality of an eating house proprietor named Turner. From the time the prisoner escaped from gaol no trace whatever could be found of him, in spite of searches and enquiries instituted by the police authorities, until Wednesday, when by a strange coincidence he was detected by the same person at Dover. It appears that the prisoner succeeded in getting to the London Docks and secreted himself on board the American liner, France. He was, however, discovered when the vessel was in the Channel, and sent ashore at Dover, where he had not been long before he was recognised by Turner. The prisoner has been removed again to Canterbury Gaol.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 February 1892.

Local News.

Before the County Magistrates at Canterbury, Edmund O'Burke was charged with having committed damage in Her Majesty's Prison at Canterbury, while confined there awaiting trial for a burglary at Folkestone.

Mr. R.M. Mercer prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury.

The evidence of the prison Governor (Mr. R.W, Chidley) went to show that O'Burke disappeared from his cell one night in December. During the two months he had occupied the cell he had succeeded in loosening the screws of an iron grating communicating with the ventilation shaft and removed the bricks from the interior of the wall, which was two feet in thickness. By dropping the debris into the ventilator and re-fixing the grating every morning, no trace was observable of the damage until after the night of the escape, when it was found he had broken the remaining crust of the wall inside and out, and crawling through, had managed, by means of a scaffold pole, to scale the exterior wall. He made his way to London and secreted himself on an outward-bound vessel, but was discovered and put ashore at Dover. There, by a remarkable coincidence, he was noticed by the individual who had previously been the medium of his capture, and he was, after a month's liberty, again incarcerated.

The Magistrates committed the prisoner for trial for prison breaking.

 

Folkestone Express 20 February 1892.

Local News.

At the Central Criminal Court on Friday, three men, two named Milligan and one named Martin, were charged with wounding Henry Smith, a constable, with intent to murder him. The allegation was that the three prisoners were surprised while committing a robbery at the Maze Hill Station of the South Eastern Railway, on the 4th January. Martin, it was contended, was in bed at the time, and the witnesses had made a mistake, the real man being a man named Toomey, who was committed for burglary at Folkestone, escaped from Canterbury gaol, and was at large on the 4th January. Martin was acquitted, and the others sentenced, one to fifteen years, and the other to seven years penal servitude. Toomey, it seems, made his escape, and got on board an outward bound vessel, from which, it will be remembered, he was put ashore at Dover, and re-apprehended.

At the St. Augustine's Petty Sessions on Saturday, Edmund O'Burke, who is confined in St. Augustine's gaol, awaiting trial for burglary at Folkestone, was brought up in custody, charged with having wilfully broken a quantity of bricks in the wall of Her Majesty's Prison, Canterbury.

Mr. R.M. Mercer prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury, and stated that the accused was brought to prison in October on a warrant, charged with having committed burglary at Folkestone. He was confined in a cell on A wing, on the first tier. On the 30th of November, he was seen in his cell in the evening, and his safety could be proved. In the morning, however, at about five o'clock, he was gone. Mr. Mercer went on to explain that in the right hand further corner of the cell were two wooden shelves fitted in the wall. One of them was only 10 or 12 inches from the ground. Under this shelf was an iron grating communicating with the ventilation shaft. The grate was closely barred and fastened with screws. These screws the prisoner appeared to have loosened. He also picked out the bricks and dropped them down the ventilating shaft, thus making no mess in the cell. The grating was evidently replaced every morning before the warder visited the cell. Having completed the destruction of the wall and left a thin layer of bricks inside and also outside, he finally broke away the shelf, and, picking away the inside crust, made a hole big enough to get through. Taking his bedding with him, he went round to the back of the prison and got on to the top of the shops. He moved some slates, evidently with the idea of getting some of the tools out, but unfortunately for the prisoner there was a boarded ceiling to the shops under the roof. Then he went opposite to the female department, where some building operations were going on, and on getting one of the scaffold poles went round to the back of the debtors' prison where there is a low wall. By means of the pole he got over the wall, leaving his bed inside. He was not recaptured until the 6th January.

Mr. Robert William Chidley, Governor of Canterbury Prison, deposed that the prisoner was received in custody in October for burglary at Folkestone, on a warrant dated 7th October. Witness saw prisoner on the 30th November, soon after ten in the morning. In the further corner of the cell were two shelves, one about ten inches from the floor. Underneath was an iron ventilator, which passed under the cell floor. It was secured with screws. On the 7th December, in consequence of a report, witness examined the cell. Witness found the shaft had been removed. The ventilator was left it it's proper position, but one screw had been loosened. There was a large hole in the wall going right through to the outside. That was caused by the removal of bricks, which laid on the cell floor. The hole was only just large enough for a man to pass through. There were small pieces of wood, which appeared to have been used for the purpose of working away the mortar. There were some bricks in the shaft between the cell wall and the outside wall. There were no bricks in the yard outside. From the utside to the inside he should say the wall was about 2 ft. thick, including the shaft. There were some scaffold poles near the female prison. His attention was drawn to a scaffold pole which had been placed against the exterior wall, and also the blankets and bedding of the prisoner's cell. Prisoner was received back on the 6th January. On the 8th February he served the prisoner with a notice that he would be brought before the magistrates for breaking out of prison. He explained to him that he could consult a solicitor if he felt inclined, communicate with his friend, and write letters, etc., for his defence, the same as if he were outside the prison.

Walter Harrison Wall deposed that he locked the prisoner up in his cell at 8.20 on the evening mentioned. At 5.30 the watchman rang witness's alarm bell unusually loud, and on going down the watchman made a report to him of the removal of a scaffold pole. Witness sent him to look at all the walls, but he could not find it. Witness himself went round, and saw the scaffold pole against the exterior wall. When the officers came at six o'clock, witness sent a warder round to examine every cell. A report was made to him that a hole had been found in the wall, and also that the prisoner had gone. He was at the gate on the 6th January at three o'clock in the afternoon, and received the prisoner back from Superintendent Sanders, of Dover. Prisoner asked him when the Assizes would be held, and witness said he did not know.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the Assizes.

 

Folkestone Express 12 March 1892.

Kent assizes.

At the Assizes on Monday, Edmund O'Burke, 24, tailor, was charged with feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Hall, and stealing therein a Bank of England note of the value of 5, the sum of 36 6s. in money, a pocket book and a silver watch and chain, the monies and goods of the said Thomas Hall, at Folkestone, on the 30th September, 1891. Prisoner was further charged with breaking out of H.M. Prison at Canterbury by breaking, cutting, and removing a quantity of bricks from a part of a wall on the 30th November, 1891. Prisoner pleaded Guilty to both charges. Mr. D'Eyncourt, who prosecuted, gave particulars of the offence prisoner had committed, and proceeded to describe how and by what means he had tried to escape from the gaol. Prisoner admitted a previous conviction in 1878, and was now sentenced to seven years' penal servitude.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 March 1892.

Local News.

Edward O'Burke, the young tailor, 24, who broke into the Globe Hotel in this town, and stole a 5 note, the sum of 36 6s. in money, a pocket book, and a silver watch and chain, the moneys and goods of Thomas Hall, on the 30th Sept., 1891, and who was further charged with breaking out of H.M. prison at Canterbury, pleaded Guilty at the Canterbury Assizes last week to both charges. He also admitted a previous conviction in 1878, and was now sentenced to seven years' penal servitude.

 

Sandgate Visitors' List 12 March 1892.

Local News.

Edmund O'Bourke, the man who burglariously entered the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, was at the Maidstone Assizes on Monday sentenced to seven years penal servitude.

 

Folkestone Express 9 April 1892.

Transfers.

Wednesday, April 6th: Before H.W. Poole, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was transferred to Mr. W. Rickett.

 

Folkestone Express 23 April 1892.

Transfer.

Wednesday, April 20th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Pledge, Sherwood and Dunk, J. Fitness, J. Holden, Geo. Spurgen and W. Wightwick Esqs.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was transferred to Mr. M.H. Ricketts.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 May 1895.

Local News.

Mr. Charles Sparrow, late of the Railway Tavern, has entered upon the tenancy of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, and business at this old house is looking up in the hands of the new tenant, whose sporting and other friends are very numerous. By going to the Globe now one can see a lively Sparrow and get a very refreshing swallow at the same time.

 

Folkestone Express 1 June 1895.

Saturday, May 25th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Pledge and Sherwood, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Temporary authority to sell at the Globe Hotel was granted to Mr. Charles Sparrow.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 7 June 1895.

Local News.

At the Borough Police Court on Wednesday the temporary licence granted to Mr. C. Sparrow to sell at the Globe Hotel was extended to the next special licensing day.

 

Folkestone Express 8 June 1895.

Wednesday, June 5th: Before C.J. Pursey and W. Wightwick Esqs.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was transferred to Mr. C. Sparrow.

 

Folkestone Express 25 April 1896.

Wednesday, April 21st: Before J. Pledge and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

An occasional licence was granted to Mr. C. Sparrow to sell refreshments on the Football Field on the occasion of the Fire Brigade Tournament on the 29th.

 

Folkestone Express 21 August 1897.

Saturday, August 14th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Salter, Spurgen and Pledge, and T.J. Vaughan and J. Holden Esqs.

Joseph Charles Pettifer applied for temporary authority to sell at the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, and it was granted.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 16 February 1898.

Kaleidoscope.

On Monday morning at the Folkestone Police Court E.W. Prebble and J. Inglis were charged with stealing a quantity of furniture from the residence of the Hon. Ralph P. Nevill, at 2, Clifton Crescent, on various occasions since the month of October last, from which date the tenants have been absent. The case was adjourned until Monday next. It is expected that evidence will then be given of a surprising character.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 February 1898.

Monday, February 14th: Before Messrs. J. Hoad, J. Holden, J. Pledge, and T.J. Vaughan.

Ernest Prebble and George Inglis were charged with stealing a large quantity of furniture, bedding, etc., from 2, Clifton Crescent, the property of the Hon. Ralph Pelham Neville, over the value of 5, at divers times since October last.

Walter Richford Warner, landlord of the Clarence Hotel, Dover Road, said he remembered Prebble coming to the house about a fortnight ago. Witness knew him as a customer. He offered a writing table (produced) for sale. Witness saw it outside in charge of Inglis. Prebble asked 12s, for it, but witness declined to buy. On Saturday, January 29th, witness was called into his private bar by his wife about 7 o'clock, and saw the two prisoners there with a man named Welch. Inglis had two blankets under his arm, and offered them for sale for 5s. They said they bought them at a sale. He told them he knew a party who would be glad of them, and recommended them to Mrs. O'Brien.

By Inglis: He could not swear which one said he had been to a sale.

Mrs. Minnie O'Brien, widow, 45, Bournemouth Road, said two men came to her house on February 29th at 7.30 p.m. One of them asked her to buy a pair of blankets, saying Mr. Warner had sent him. He said he was selling them for Prebble, the upholsterer. Witness purchased them for 5s. She handed them to P.S. Lilley on Saturday.

Inglis: I brought the blankets, and said I was selling them for Prebble.

Albert Jenner, 42, Sidney Street, carter, said about seven on the 25th February he saw Inglis near the Globe Hotel on The Bayle. He asked if witness would buy a table, but he declined. Witness saw Prebble in the Globe, and said he was hard up. He saw the table in the garden of the hotel. Witness gave him 5s. for it. Witness gave the table up to P.S. Lilley the previous day.

Mary Lomax, 26, Bradstone Road, said he had been engaged at 2, Clifton Crescent since October. Witness did not live in the house, but went once a week to keep it clean. The house was furnished, and witness missed articles from it almost every week, and informed Mr. Goldsack at Mr. Sherwood's office. She identified the articles produced as those missed. She always got the keys from Mr. Sherwood's and returned them to him. She identified the blankets and the tables produced. The former had the name of Neville on a piece of tape, but it had been cut off. She always found the door locked, but it appeared to her that someone had entered by the back door, as there were marks of feet. She had bolted the back door, but had found it unbolted.

Superintendent Taylor asked for a remand for a week, which was granted, in order that other goods might be traced.

Inglis said he was innocent, and Prebble could clear him if he liked.

Supt. Taylor strongly opposed bail being granted, but the Bench decided to accept two sureties for each prisoner in 25 each, and themselves in 50 each. Failing to get bail, prisoners were remanded in custody.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 19 February 1898.

Monday, February 14th: Before J. Hoad, J. Holden, J. Pledge, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

Ernest William Prebble and George Inglis, two young men, were charged with stealing two birch tables, a pair of blankets, a pair of china figures, one despatch box, and other articles of furniture, &c., the property of the Hon. Ralph Pelham Nevill, from 2, Clifton Crescent. The prisoners pleaded Not Guilty.

Walter Richard Warner said: I am landlord of the Clarence Hotel, Dover Road. It was about the third week in January that Prebble came as a customer into the private bar, where I was at the time. He asked me if I wanted to buy a writing table. I followed him outside the house, when he showed me a polished writing table which was standing just off the curbstone in front of my house. Inglis was in charge of the table. I looked at it, and Prebble said “That is cheap for 12s.” Inglis said nothing. I remember Saturday evening, the 29th ult. I was called into my private bar by my wife about seven o'clock, when I saw the two prisoners and a man of the name of Welsh. They were apparently accompanying one another. Inglis was carrying two blankets, and offered them for sale at 5s. I asked if the things were all right, and where the prisoners had got them from, and Inglis said they had been to a sale. I said I knew a friend of ours who would be very glad of them, Mrs. O'Bryan, 45, Bournemouth Road. The three men then left, carrying the blankets with them.

By Inglis: I think it was you who said you had been to a sale, but am not quite sure. It was either you or Prebble.

Minnie O'Bryan: I am a widow, living at 45, Bournemouth Road. I remember Saturday, the 24th, about 7.30 p.m. I was called to the front door by a knock. The passage was dark, and I cannot identify the man, but a man came and asked me if I would buy two blankets. He said he came from Mr. Warner, of the Clarence Hotel. I asked him the price, and he said he would sell them for 5s. I bought them for that sum and paid him. I have since handed them to Sergeant Lilley.

Inglis: Did not I say they were all right or I should not have brought them to you?

Witness: I believe you did.

Alfred Jenner, of 42, Sidney Street, said: On Friday, the 28th January, in the evening, I was near the Globe Hotel at The Bayle, when Inglis came and asked me if I would buy a table. He was not carrying anything. I told him a table was of no use to me, and he asked some people who were standing near. I shortly afterwards went into the bar of the hotel, where I saw Prebble, who said he was hard up and wanted money. Before I went to the bar, Inglis had pointed out a birch table to me. Inglis said he was trying to sell for Prebble. Eventually Prebble sold me the table, and I took it away. I have since given it up to the police.

Mary Lomax, wife of Henry Lomax, 26, Bradstone Road, said: I was engaged to look after 2, Clifton Crescent in the absence of the family, and to look after the house once a week, dust it, and keep it aired. I first went there the last week of October. The first week I was there two or three days, and I have continued going there up to the present time. I obtained the keys from Mr. Sherwood. Nearly every time I went I seemed to miss something either from the dining room or the library. The first thing I missed was a rug. That might be in November or later on. I informed Mr. Sherwood's clerk (Mr. Goldsack) when I returned the keys. I missed a large number of things from the house. I identify the blankets and tables produced. I found the back door unbolted on several occasions, but it was always locked with a key. I never found a window open. The back door lock was in bad condition. I always locked the front door. I had no difficulty with it.

Supt. Taylor then asked for a remand.

Inglis asked for bail, and said that Prebble could prove his innocence if he liked to speak out.

Supt. Taylor opposed bail on the ground that Inglis had no settled residence and the robberies had been of a most extensive character.

The prisoners were remanded for seven days, bail being allowed to Inglis, himself in 50, and two sureties in 25 each.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 23 February 1898.

Kaleidoscope.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Monday morning, E.W. Prebble and J. Inglis, who were remanded on the previous Monday, were again brought up on a charge of stealing a quantity of furniture at various times from No. 2, Clifton Crescent, the summer residence of the Hon. Ralph P. Nevill. Further incriminating evidence was given, and the prisoners were committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions for the Borough, bail being allowed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 February 1898.

Monday, February 21st: Before Messrs, J. Hoad, J. Holden, and J. Fitness.

Ernest William Prebble and George Inglis were charged on remand with stealing a large quantity of furniture, bedding, etc., from 2, Clifton Crescent, the property of the Hon. Ralph Pelham Neville. Mr. Haines appeared for Inglis.

The evidence of Mr. Warner, given last week, was read over. Mrs. Lomax's evidence was also read, and she was cross-examined by Mr. Haines. He elicited that the articles had been missed since the beginning of November. When she informed Mr. Goldsack, he thought the goods had been taken away for repair.

Francis Poulston, manager, West End Poultry Stores, said he recognised Prebble as the man he bought a table of after Christmas. He asked 10s. for it, and witness gave him 7s. 6d. A week later he purchased a copper stock pot of him. He asked 10s., and said he was very hard up. Witness gave him 6s. for it. He did not know Prebble, and he did not give any name. A few weeks after, Prebble brought a clock, saying he bought it at a sale. Ultimately witness gave him 10s. for it, although he asked 15s. He said he got his living attending sales, in reply to a question of witness's. On Christmas Eve witness purchased a table from a man named Minnis. Prebble said his things came from the same sale.

By Mr. Haines: He believed he gave Minnis 1 for the table.

The Bench declined to admit the evidence as to Minnis as it did not affect Inglis in any way.

Joseph Charles Pettifer, landlord of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, said he knew both prisoners as customers. He purchased a dilapidated chair from Prebble about January 3rd, and believed he gave 6s. for it. About a week later Prebble offered him a clock. He declined to buy, as he did not know if it kept time. Prebble left it for five or six days, and then witness gave him 15s. for it. Prebble and Inglis came together a few days after. Prebble took no part in the sale. Prebble came later with a table and a stationery case. He was accompanied by a man named Welch, whom witness knew had just left the Royal Artillery. He bought the articles for 15s. Shortly afterwards he bought an armchair from Prebble for 4s. or 6s. He knew Prebble was the son of an upholsterer in the town, and believed the articles belonged to him. He said his father often had good old furniture to sell, and would let witness know when he had any. Witness handed all the articles to the police.

P.S. Lilley said he arrested Prebble at the Globe Hotel on the 12th inst. Inglis and several others were present. He cautioned Prebble, and asked him where he got the things he sold to Miss Beasley in Dover Road. At first he denied selling any, and then said he got them from his own house. He made no reply when charged. On the way to the station, Prebble ran away in Rendezvous Street, but witness caught him. When charged at the police station by Supt. Taylor, prisoner said he sold the articles for a gentleman in London, and had a letter to say he would be down shortly. Witness searched him, and found on him a bunch of small keys and a large door key. Prebble endeavoured to conceal the latter. He said they were his. The large key fitted the lock of the back door of 2, Clifton Crescent, the key of which was missing. About five o'clock on the same day, the prisoner Inglis went to the police station and said “I hear you want me, Sergeant Lilley”. Witness replied “Not just yet”. Pointing to the inkstand, Inglis said “I know something about that, and I can tell you where you can get some of the things. I sold two blankets in Bournemouth Road, and was with Prebble when he sold some things at the Globe, a shop in Bouverie Road, and a shop in Dover Road”. After making inquiries, witness arrested Inglis on the 13th. Both prisoners were charged with being concerned in the thefts. Inglis said “I'm as innocent as an unborn babe”. Prebble said “He knows nothing about it”. Whilst taking Prebble back to the cells, he said he should like to give some information. After being cautioned, he told witness where several articles were, and witness recovered them. Only about half a dozen articles were now missing.

By Mr. Haines: I had searched Inglis's house and had found no stolen property. The information he gave voluntarily was quite correct.

Marion Stockfort, housekeeper at 2, Clifton Crescent, identified all the articles produced as the property of the Hon. Ralph Nevill. She said the family had not occupied the house since September, 1896. From July, 1897 till September 24th Mr. Beddington occupied the house. On Oct. 1st witness went over the house and everything appeared all right. Witness estimated the value of the articles at about 40.

Mr. Haines submitted that there was no evidence of stealing against Inglis. He merely assisted Prebble to carry some heavy articles. Two other men had sold articles for Prebble, but they were not charged. Inglis went to the police as soon as he knew anything was wrong, and gave what information he could.

The Bench committed both prisoners for trial at the Quarter Sessions. They offered Inglis bail – two sureties in 10, and himself in 25.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 April 1898.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 6th: Before Theodore Matthew Esq.

Ernest Prebble, 28, French polisher, was charged with breaking and entering the dwelling house of the Hon. Ralph Nevill and stealing a quantity of furniture, of value 30. Charles Inglis, 32, groom, was similarly charged, and was further charged with receiving the goods, well knowing them to be stolen. Prebble pleaded Guilty, saying “I am guilty, but this man is innocent”. Inglis pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Mavrogani, instructed by Mr. J. Minter, prosecuted, and Mr. Bowles defended.

Mr. Mavrogani went over the case briefly against Inglis.

Walter Warner, Minnie O'Brien, Robert Jenner, Jos. Pettifer, Mary Lomax, and Mrs. Stockford repeated their evidence given before the magistrates and reported at the time.

P.S. Lilley deposed as to the arrest of Inglis, when he said he was innocent. He had given the police every assistance in tracing the goods.

Mr. Bowles submitted that there was no evidence to go to the jury against Inglis as to housebreaking. As to receiving also, there was no evidence to show a guilty knowledge. He merely acted as porter to Prebble, who was the son of a well-known furniture dealer in the town.

Mr. Mavrogani said he should abandon the charge as to housebreaking, but he contended that there was evidence as to receiving, as the goods were sold for such low prices.

Mr. Bowles submitted that that had nothing to do with Inglis, as Prebble did the dealing.

Mr. Matthew said he could not say there was no evidence to go to the jury. It was for them to say if there was a guilty knowledge.

Mr. Mavrogani replied, with a view to showing that Inglis had a guilty knowledge.

Mr. Bowles, at the suggestion of a juryman, produced a business card of the prisoner Prebble, showing he was a dealer.

Mr. Pettifer, re-called, produced a similar card.

Mr. Bowles addressed the jury, denying that the prosecution had produced a tittle of evidence showing that Inglis knew the goods were stolen. He merely carried furniture about for Prebble. Others had done the same, yet they were not charged. If he was guilty, were they not equally so?

In summing up, the Deputy Recorder said the only thing the jury had to consider was whether Inglis knew the goods were stolen. He pointed out some circumstances which might be suspicious in the course of the dealing, and also the weakness of the evidence against him in many ways. If the jury believed Inglis only acted stupidly, then he must be acquitted; but if they thought he acted guiltily he must be convicted. If any doubt existed, he must be given the benefit of it.

The jury considered for a minute, and found Inglis Not Guilty. There was some applause at the verdict.

The Deputy Recorder said he quite concurred in the verdict. He hoped Inglis would not act so stupidly in the future. He was then discharged.

Prebble said it was his first offence,, and, as he had already been in prison two months, he asked to be leniently dealt with.

Mr. Mavrogani said there was nothing previously against Prebble, and his father was a most respectable tradesman in the town.

Mr. Matthew said the offence was a very serious one, but it was prisoner's first. He would be sentenced to three months' imprisonment with hard labour.

The prisoner: Thank you, sir.

The goods were ordered to be given up to the Hon. Ralph Nevill.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 April 1898.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 6th: Before Theodore Matthew Esq.

Ernest William Prebble, described as a French polisher, aged 28, of imperfect education, and George Inglis, a groom, aged 32, and also of imperfect education, the latter surrendering to his bail, were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of the Hon. Ralph Pelham Nevill, and stealing therein twelve chairs, seven tables, one stationery case, etc., together value 30, the goods of the Hon. Ralph Pelham Nevill, on the 29th January last, at Folkestone. Inglis, and with receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen.

The prisoner Prebble pleaded Guilty, and said “This man (meaning Inglis) is innocent”. Inglis pleaded Not Guilty on each count. Mr. Mavrogani appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Bowles for Inglis.

The facts have been already fully reported in the Herald.

Inglis was acquitted; Prebble was sentenced to three months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 9 April 1898.

Quarter Sessions.

Wednesday, April 6th: Before Mr. Theobald Matthew.

Ernest William Prebble, 28. French polisher, and George Inglis, 32, groom, were charged with feloniously breaking into and entering the dwelling house of the Hon. Ralph Neville, and stealing therefrom twelve chairs, seven tables, one stationery case, etc., together value 30, the property of the Hon. Ralph Pelham Neville, on the 29th January, and on other dates, at Folkestone. Mr. Mavrogani appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Bowles for the prisoners.

When asked to plead, Prebble said: I am Guilty. This man (Inglis) is innocent.

Inglis: Not Guilty.

Mr. Mavrogani, in stating the case to the jury, said: You have heard the charge against the prisoners of housebreaking and stealing from the house, No. 2, Clifton Crescent, articles of which we have just heard read. Inglis is charged together with Prebble, who has just pleaded Guilty of the same offence. The facts of the case, shortly, are as follows: Prebble and the prisoner Inglis for some time past in the month of January went about stealing furniture, and subsequently it was discovered that this furniture had been taken from an unoccupied house at Clifton Crescent. Prebble, as you have heard, has pleaded Guilty to the offence, and the only question for you to decide is as to whether Inglis is also Guilty. Prebble, I may tell you at once, has said that Inglis is innocent of the charge. As regards Inglis, the case for the prosecution is that about the third week in January, Prebble and he went to Mr. Warner, the landlord of the Clarence Inn, and offered writing table for sale. There was some bargaining about the table, as Mr. Warner did not want it. He asked them where they had got it, and one of them, Inglis, I think, said “We have been to a sale”. He told them with regard to some blankets which they had also been offering him that they might take them to a Mrs. O'Bryan, who perhaps wanted them. Accordingly Inglis took the blankets to Mrs. O'Bryan and sold them to her for 5s. On the 28th January, Inglis went to a Mr. Jenner and asked him if he would buy the table. The only other evidence against Inglis is that he was seen about with Prebble carrying the table, which was sold to a Mr. Pettifer. Gentlemen, the only question for you to decide is whether Inglis, when carrying these goods about, and when assisting Prebble to dispose of them, knew that they were stealing them, although he did not take any part in the transaction, and I may tell you that when Prebble was arrested, Inglis apparently heard of it, and immediately went to the police and said “I hear you want me, Sergeant Lilley”, addressing the sergeant, and the sergeant said “No, I don't want you at present”. So Inglis went to the police before the police had any charge against him, and afterwards, when he was charged, he said “I am as innocent as the babe unborn”, and Prebble said in his presence “Inglis knows nothing about it”. These are the facts that I am going to prove, and when they are proved it will be for you to say whether you think the prisoner is guilty or not.

The following evidence was then called:

Walter Warner said: I am the landlord of the Clarence Inn, Folkestone. In January, the prisoner Inglis came with a writing table. I did not buy it. Shortly afterwards I saw Inglis again. He came with two blankets. Both prisoners were together, and there was another man. I spoke to the three. I told them where to go if they wanted to get rid of the blanket. They went to a Mrs. O'Bryan.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bowles: I saw nothing strange in the fact that Inglis was carrying the table. I could not swear that Inglis said they had been to a sale. When they came again, Prebble did the talking.

Minnie O'Bryan said: I am a widow, living at 45, Bournemouth Road. I remember on the 29th of January a man (Inglis) bringing me some blankets. He came to the door, and told me he was selling them for an upholsterer. He told me to go to the last witness for reference. I did not know that Prebble was a dealer. I bought the blankets, and gave 5s. for them.

By Mr. Matthew: I do not often buy blankets; 5s. was a good price to give for them, because they were second hand.

Mr. Matthew advised the witness to be more careful for the future in buying second hand goods.

Alfred Jenner said: I am a carter, living at 41, Sidney Street. I remember seeing the prisoner Prebble on the 28th January. He asked me to buy a table. Inglis fetched it for me, and I bought it. I gave 5s. for it. I did not know that Prebble was a furniture dealer.

By Mr. Bowles: I thought it was quit a natural transaction. Prebble was not there.

By Mr. Matthew: I do not often buy furniture and know very little about it.

Mr. Matthew: I should advise you not to buy any more.

Joseph Pettifer: I am the landlord of the Globe Inn. I have only known the prisoners a few months. Inglis offered me a table. Prebble brought it, and Inglis carried it for him. Prebble came in with all the things, and they were always carried by Inglis, who brought the table on the 10th January. The clock was brought by Prebble about the 8th or 9th January. There was nobody with him then. Prebble sold the table himself. Inglis was with him.

By Mr. Bowles: The prisoner Inglis looked to me as though he were a hired man, carrying the furniture for Prebble. I did not think there was much wrong with a dealer having a man to carry goods for him.

By Mr. Matthew: I gave 15s. for the clock. I rather objected to take the clock without I had time given to test it, and I got a week's time. I gave 6s, for the chair produced, 16s. for the card table, 12s. for the other table behind and from 4s. to 6s. for the framework of a chair. I do not think I got the goods extra cheap. I bought them as second hand articles. The table was out of repair. I had not the slightest suspicion that the goods had been stolen.

Mrs. Lomax, wife of Henry Lomax, No. 6, Bradstone Road: I used to go to the Hon. Mr. Neville's house at Clifton Crescent to dust. There is a garden to the house, and an iron gate with a lock. When I went to the house I used to unlock the garden gate, and then the door of the house. I have frequently missed things from the house, and identify articles produced. I never left the house without locking or bolting the door.

By Mr. Bowles: I do not identify the prisoner Inglis. I have never seen him near the premises.

By Mr. Matthew: Prebble has been in the habit of visiting the house, but he was not visiting it while the things were missed, to my knowledge.

Marian Stockford: I am housekeeper to the Hon. Mr. Neville. The family left the house in 1897. Last October I went over the house and saw everything in order. The things produced were all missing property.

P.S. Lilley: I am a police sergeant of the Borough. I saw Inglis the day that I apprehended Prebble. I was at the police station about five o'clock on the evening of February 12th, when Inglis came to me and said “I sold some of the articles at a shop on the Dover Road, and another on the Bouverie Road”. Inglis then went away, but was apprehended on the next day. I charged both prisoners together.

By Mr. Bowles: Inglis made a statement voluntarily I had previously searched his rooms.

This evidence closed the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Bowles (addressing Mr. Matthew) said: I humbly submit that there is no charge whatever against Inglis. As to the charge of housebreaking, there is no evidence whatever to go to a jury. As to the other count of receiving, I again submit that there has been no evidence that Inglis had any guilty knowledge. Inglis was simply working as a porter for a well-known man in the town, who was in business as a furniture dealer, and had parents in the same line of business. He was therefore perfectly entitled to take the position of porter, and to work for Prebble. Nor has it been proved that he had a knowledge whence the furniture came.

Mr. Mavrogani: As to the housebreaking, I do not intend to proceed, but with regard to the count of receiving I submit that there is evidence to go to the jury.

Mr. Matthew (to Mr. Bowles): What do you say as to the evidence on the second count? The goods are proved to have been stolen and sold at an unreasonable price.

Mr. Bowles: As far as the receiving goes, it is Prebble who did the dealing.

Mr. Matthew: If the jury think that, well and good, but I cannot say that there is no evidence to go to a jury.

Mr. Mavrogani then addressed the jury. He said: The only question for you to decide is whether Inglis received these goods knowing them to have been stolen. Did he know these goods were being taken from Clifton Crescent? We have heard that shortly after these things were missed they were being hawked about Folkestone in a way that did not excite any suspicion, because it happened that the father of the prisoner Prebble was a furniture dealer. It is for you to say whether the man that Prebble employed knew that the goods were being taken wrongfully from this house, or whether he thought that they were goods that he had in the shop. With regard to that there is one rather significant point. When the table and the blankets were taken to Mr. Warner, you will remember that there were three men there, the two prisoners and another man, and one of them said “We have been to a sale”. It is entirely a question for your consideration whether that was an explanation of the prisoners outside the inn that the furniture was furniture they had bought. If Inglis told a lie about that furniture, or acquiesced in the telling of a lie by any person, I submit that there is evidence of his knowing where the furniture really came from. Then you have the fact that as soon as he knew Prebble had been arrested, Inglis went to the police station. It may be that Inglis was anxious to give all the information he could. It might also be that he knew his own arrest was merely a matter of time, and that he went there entirely to save trouble.

Mr. Bowles (addressing the jury) said: I shall not keep you very long on the subject. You have heard that the charge of housebreaking has been withdrawn. Therefore the only fact you have to deal with is the fact of receiving goods well knowing them to have been stolen. In order to be successful, the case against Inglis ought to be proved up to the hilt. Has my learned friend brought any evidence to show that there was a guilty knowledge on the part of Inglis as to the place from which the stolen goods came? A furniture dealer in the position of Prebble might be quite justified in engaging an assistant like Inglis to take furniture round. Every tradesman has to employ somebody when moving about furniture. What on Earth was there to prove that Prebble had got the furniture dishonestly? A man taking work from Prebble had reason to believe that he was an honest dealer. Inglis was only working as Prebble's servant. Whenever there is any dealing you will find that Prebble does all the talking. Inglis was never in it in any way whatever so as to incriminate himself. There was nothing incriminating about him. I addressed the Deputy Recorder on the ground that there was not sufficient evidence to go before a jury. The Deputy Recorder thought there was, but I repeat that there is nothing to show that Inglis necessarily knew that the things were stolen.

Mr. Matthew, in addressing the jury, said: You have been told quite properly that there is only one matter to be proved, and that is whether the prisoner Inglis received these goods knowing them to have been stolen. Prebble you can dismiss from your minds altogether because he has pleaded guilty, and the learned counsel for the prosecution has not thought it proper to proceed with the more serious charge against Inglis. Gentlemen, you have heard all the witnesses in the case, and I know I have listened to them, but perhaps I may remind you shortly of what it is that they speak, and what their evidence came to. Warner, as far as the prisoner Inglis was concerned, said only this, that Prebble and Inglis came to his place with a writing table. There is no doubt that the writing table had been stolen from the Hon. Mr. Neville's house, and that Inglis was then in possession of it. He was in possession of it in company with Prebble, who we know had stolen it, and they were offering it to Warner at a low price. Warner says he saw Inglis a short time afterwards when Inglis had some blankets with him. That was all that Warner said with regard to Inglis, except this, that one member of the party – whether it was Inglis or Prebble or a third man he did not say – had been to a sale, and had bought the blankets there. Mr. Mavrogani, the counsel for the prosecution, asks you to say that that is evidence against Inglis, evidence of his guilt, because he was giving an untrue account of his possession of the goods. On the other hand it is possible that Inglis did not make that statement. If Prebble said he had been to a sale Inglis may or may not have known that the statement was true, and therefore you must not rely upon that particular piece of evidence as against Inglis. Mr. Bowles says it is quite true that Inglis came with the stolen goods, but he knew that Prebble was a furniture dealer, and that these goods may have been Prebble's honestly. Prebble might have had the goods from his father's premises, and so far as Inglis knew it was quite possible that the thing was fair and square. The principal evidence against Inglis is that the goods were offered and sold at a small price. Now I suppose it is left to you to decide that perhaps Inglis did not know the price was small. Perhaps he was not experienced in furniture dealing, and it was only a matter in which Prebble was concerned, and Inglis only carried the things as a hired man. You will probably consider that Inglis left Warner's place and went to Mrs. O'Bryan and said that he was selling some blankets for Prebble, an upholsterer, and I think we are justified in calling attention to the fact and saying that it is not the sort of thing a guilty man would do – tell a person where the goods came from. I feel quite justified in relying upon that fact as an evidence of innocence. Then came the witness Jenner, and he too said that Prebble and Inglis came together on one occasion with a table, and on another occasion with a clock. Inglis asked if Jenner would buy a table. You have further the evidence of Mr. Pettifer and that of Sergeant Lilley, who said Inglis fairly and honestly came and told the police where the stolen things were to be found. He told the police about the blankets and certain other things, and when the policeman went to Inglis's house he found nothing incriminating. It may be therefore that Inglis acted throughout perfectly honestly. He went about, as far as we know, in the broad daylight. It has not been proved he shared in the profits Prebble made in respect to these transactions. If you think that he only behaved stupidly you will acquit him, but if you think the case against him has been proved you will find him guilty.

A juryman: What was Inglis paid?

Mr. Matthew: We do not know anything about that. We have no evidence.

After a brief consideration of the case the jury returned a verdict of Guilty against Prebble, and Inglis Not Guilty.

Mr. Matthew: Well, Inglis, the jury have done right in acquitting you. You were very stupid in going about with this furniture, and you must be very careful for the future, but I am sure you did not intend to do anything criminal.

Prebble (to the Deputy Recorder): This is the first offence. I hope you will deal leniently with me as I have been already in prison two months.

Mr. Matthew: Is there any previous conviction?

Mr. Mavrogani: Not that I know of.

Prebble then wished to call the Rev. Mr. Dale, but that gentleman did not appear.

Mr. Matthew: I understand this is your first offence, but it is a serious one. You have stolen a deal of property worth a lot of money, and you have led another man into temptation. You have put that man Inglis in very serious danger. However, it is your first offence, and I must remember that in passing sentence. You are sentenced to three months' hard labour.

Superintendent Taylor stated, in answer to Mr. Matthew, that unless he was otherwise instructed, the furniture mentioned in the indictment would be returned to the owner.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 13 April 1898.

Kaleidoscope.

At the Folkestone Quarter Sessions held at the Town Hall last Thursday, Mr. Theobald Matthew acted as deputy for the Recorder.

The last case was the indictment of Ernest William Prebble and George Inglis for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of the Hon. Ralph Pelham Nevill, at Clifton Crescent, Folkestone, and stealing therefrom various articles of furniture. Prebble pleaded Guilty and also stated that Inglis was innocent. Inglis pleaded innocent, and on the evidence given by various witnesses the jury returned a verdict of acquittal. Prebble pleaded that it was his first offence and asked for leniency from the Court as he had already been two months in prison.

The Deputy Recorder, in passing sentence, said that it was a very serious offence, and that the least he could do was to sentence him to three months' imprisonment with hard labour. An order was made for the restitution of the goods stolen to Mr. Nevill, the owner.

 

Folkestone Express 20 May 1899.

Saturday, May 13th: Before Colonel Hamilton and J. Stainer Esq.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was provisionally transferred to Mr. Faber.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 June 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Saturday last temporary authority was granted to Mr. Faber for the Globe.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 3 June 1899.

Saturday, May 27th: Before Col. Hamilton and J. Stainer Esq.

Mr. Carl Faber was granted the transfer of the Globe, on The Bayle.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 June 1899.

Local News.

The following licence transfer has been granted: Globe Hotel, to Louis Faber.

 

Folkestone Express 17 June 1899.

Wednesday, June 14th: Before J. Hoad, W. Wightwick, J. Stainer, T.J. Vaughan, J. Pledge, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.,

The licence of the Globe Hotel was transferred from Joseph Charles Pettifer to Louis Faber.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 June 1899.

Felix.

Whether it is a sign of general prosperity or otherwise there is quite a “boom” in local public houses. There is scarcely a place which is not being rebuilt or smartened up. I note in this connection that the Shorncliffe Hotel, which for years was tenanted by the late Mr. Quested, has now passed into the hands of Mr. Bull, of Folkestone, and that the Globe Hotel, on The Bayle, is now held by Mr. Faber, who for a long period of time was head waiter at the Queen's and also at the Lord Warden and the Dover Castle Hotel, Dover. Mr. Faber ought to know something of the business, and I shall be very much surprised if he does not make things hum all round. The new White Lion at Cheriton, too, admirably conducted by Mr. Sid Saunders, is a grand improvement to the locality. Of course there are those in the world that would raze all public houses to the ground, but when a publican conducts his business in an honourable and respectable manner, then he is entitled to the highest esteem. Mr. Saunders is one of these. He is essentially the right man in a difficult place. His new bar is one of the largest in the country, and is capable of accommodating a large number of customers. The house is well fitted from top to bottom, and is a credit to the builders. I note that Mr. Cliff Willars, the upholsterer of Folkestone, has been entrusted with furnishing the bars, etc., and right well he has carried out his work.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 June 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday the following transfer was granted: Globe Hotel, Mr. Louis Carl Faber.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 17 June 1899.

Transfer of Licence.

Wednesday, June 14th: Before J. Hoad, J. Pledge, W. Wightwick, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Globe, The Bayle: Joseph Charles Pettifer to Louis Carl Faber.

 

Folkestone Express 24 June 1899.

County Court.

Tuesday, June 20th: Before Judge Selfe.

Phillips v Pettifer: Mr. Watson, of Dover, for plaintiff, and Mr. Minter for defendant. Claim 13 4s.

Plaintiff is a licensed valuer at 65, Biggin Street, Dover, and he was instructed to make an inventory and valuation of the effects in the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, for defendant. Plaintiff said he commenced the work, and on that day he met Mr. Hayward, who was the valuer for the opposite party. He had some conversation with Mr. Hayward and left. The next he heard of the business was a letter from Mr. Faber, the new tenant, and he went to see him. Mr. Faber told him that Mr. Pettifer had thrown him over and taken on Messrs. Banks and Son, because he was trying to get him out of the house and leaning to the side of the brewers, Messrs. Leney and Co. He subsequently saw Mr. Pettifer, on whom he called. He asked him when it would be convenient for him to complete the work. Defendant said he would not be allowed to do any more because he was acting on behalf of the brewers, and trying to bundle him out. He produced the book, in which he made his entries at the valuation, and also letters from Mr. Pettifer relating to the matter. He said an agreement was as usual presented to Mr. Pettifer, drawn by Messrs. Worsfold and Hayward, but he refused to sign it, on the ground that the date was blank. The reason of that was that the date would be fixed to suit the convenience of the outgoing tenant. He had valued all but the bar fixtures and the stock. The usual commission was five percent on the first 100, and 2 on the remainder. The valuation of Messrs. Banks and Son was 428.

In cross-examination by Mr. Minter, complainant said he represented Messrs. Watts, spirit merchants of Deal, and had in that capacity supplied Mr. Pettifer with spirits. He was in the habit of meeting Mr. Hayward as opposing valuer but he never received any intimation from Mr. Hayward of any change likely to take place in a public house. Mr. Pettifer informed him that he was under notice to quit on the 24th May. At that time he did not know Mr. Faber. He knew him later, but had not taken any order from him for Messrs. Watts, although he believed Messrs. Watts were supplying him. He requested Mr. Pettifer to sign the agreement, leaving the date open. Mr. Pettifer refused, and said he might be bundled out at any moment if he signed the agreement with the date blank. He told him that was absolutely untrue. He made no notes until the day fixed for making the inventory. He made his inventory in the valuation book produced. Mr. Pettifer said his own furniture was mixed up with the other, and he had not made up his mind what he was going to take. That was before he made his official valuation – sometime in March. At that time, as he understood, Messrs. Leney were anxious that Mr. Faber should take possession on the 25th March. He had charged on the amount for the stock – that was usual.

His Honour requested plaintiff to cast up the figures in his book.

Louis Charles Faber said he understood Mr. Phillips was valuing for Mr. Pettifer. The valuation came to 428. Mr. Hayward acted for him and for the brewers.

Mr. Minter said he was not going to deny that plaintiff was told on the first occasion he would be employed.

Witness said Mr. Pettifer told him that he had “chucked” Phillips because he wanted to bundle him out.

In reply to Mr. Minter, witness said he was offered the house six months before he took it. He understood then that Mr. Pettifer wanted to get out, but found out afterwards that he did not want to leave till the 24th May.

Mr. Minter's contention was that if Mr. Pettifer did actually engage Mr. Phillps to make the valuation that he never did any work at all. If His Honour came to the conclusion that there was a breach of contract, then it would be for him to say what defendant would have to pay for that.

The defendant said Mr. Phillips saw him at the Globe Hotel a few days after he had notice to quit. He did not then engage him as his valuer. On the 4th March Mr. Hayward took him an undated agreement. He declined to sign it until he had had time to look over it. Mr. Phillips saw him and asked him to sign it, and he asked why he was in such a hurry to get him to leave. His suspicions were excited that he was working for the other side, and then he told Mr. Faber he would have nothing more to say to him. Mr. Phillips went round the house, and made a few notes. He went round the whole house except the bar, the glassware and the stock. He was engaged about three hours. He made notes in a small book. Defendant met him two or three times while he was engaged. He subsequently told Mr. Phillips he should have no more to do with him, and he replied “Then you'll hear from my solicitor”.

The plaintiff's valuation came to 160.

His Honour said it was admitted the defendant engaged the plaintiff, but subsequently cancelled it. The correspondence did not show he had good ground for cancelling the appointment, and was ill-advised in quarrelling with him on that ground. The question was, what amount Mr. Phillips was entitled to? There was no evidence of any custom, and it therefore remained to be said what he did, and what he should be paid for his work. He was engaged for three or four hours, and had done a considerable portion of the work, but nothing like all. He gave judgement for 5 5s. and costs of one witness.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1899.

County Court.

Tuesday, June 20th: Before Sir W. Lucius Selfe.

Phillips v Pettifer: This was a claim by Mr. Phillips, licensed valuer, Dover, against Mr. Pettifer, late landlord of the Globe, Folkestone, for 13 4s. commission. Mr. Watson appeared for the complainant; Mr. Minter for defendant.

Plaintiff deposed: I saw the defendant, I believe, in the early part of March. I went to see him at his hotel. He told me that he had notice to leave from his brewers, and that he was under notice to quit on the 24th May. When I discovered that Mr. Pettifer was leaving his house, I solicited his business to act in valuation for him, and after some little thought Mr. Pettifer engaged my services to take him out. A day was fixed for his doing so. A little bit later he consulted, I believe, his wife and daughter upon the time when it would be convenient for me to come over and take the inventory. One or two days were mentioned by me and he selected a day. I thereupon came over at the time he fixed himself, and I then proceeded to do my work. There was one small section of the work left undone because it was the bar. As they were busy, it was arranged that I should complete my work in the course of a week or so, considering there was plenty of time up to the 24th of May when he would leave the house. That was to suit the defendant's convenience. I was to await his orders when to come and complete the work. The first occasion I went there I saw Mr. Pettifer and his daughter in the bar. On the same afternoon when I was about to leave, Mr. Hayward, the opposing valuer, was there. Mr. Pettifer said, turning to me, “This is my man”. I received a letter from the new tenant, Mr. Faber, upon a matter that he wished to see me about. I went to see him. Mr. Faber said Mr. Pettifer had thrown me up and engaged Messrs. Banks, of Folkestone. I asked him if he knew why. He said “Because Mr. Pettifer says you are acting on the side of the brewers and trying to bundle him out”. I said that there was not an atom of truth in the assetion that I was leaning over to the brewers. Messrs. Leney always employed Mr. Hayward. I was on my way from Hythe and called on him. I asked when it would be convenient for me to come and complete his work. He said that I wouldn't do any more work for him; I was acting on the side of the brewers and trying to bundle him out. My reply was that it was untrue, I was acting on his side, and it was an absolute untruth. I said “No doubt you will hear from my solicitor”. I did my very best.

Letters were read which witness had received from Mr. Pettifer. One asked him to be good enough to delay his visit for a fortnight, when they would be ready for him. In another letter, Mr. Pettifer deferred signing an agreement, a date in which had been left blank, he saying that if he signed any date might be fitted in to suit the other side.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter, witness said he held an agency for a firm at Deal, and was in the habit of selling spirits to the defendant. If he met Mr. Hayward, it would be as opposing him. Mr. Pettifer informed him that he was under notice to leave. The stock was valued on the day of exchange.

Mr. L.C. Faber also gave evidence.

Mr. Minter spoke at some length on behalf of Mr. Pettifer, who he called as a witness.

Mr. Pettifer deposed: I received a notice on the 21st February to quit on the 24th May. Mr. Phillips was a friend of mine and a traveller for a firm of spirit merchants. He came down a few days after the notice to quit. I told him. He solicited to act for me as my valuer, and I did not consent to employ him then, but did afterwards. In March, Mr. Hayward brought me an agreement to sign for going out in favour of Faber. The date for leaving was not in. I refused to sign it there and then. Mr. Phillips two or three times asked me to sign. I asked him why he was in a hurry. I found out from Mr. Faber that it was agreed upon that he should come into my house on the 25th March. I told Mr. Phillips that he was working on the other side. I would not have any more to do with him. On one occasion, Mr. Phillips said he would just run round. I said I didn't want this to go on, and told him not to interfere at all. He said it would be all right; it would not make any difference whatever. I told him what he was doing was on his own responsibility, and I was not going to pay. He was there three or four hours. I handed him my inventory before he went round; he had the use of it. He had a small book to take it down in. I did not go round and point the things to him,, only on one or two occasions I met him in the rooms. He never did anything beyond that.

Ultimately His Honour gave judgement for five guineas.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 24 June 1899.

County Court.

Tuesday June 20th: Before Sir William Lucius Selfe.

Phillips v Pettifer: The plaintiff is a valuer at Dover, and the defendant was recently landlord of the Globe, on The Bayle.

Mr. Watson, of Dover, appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. J. Minter, of Folkestone, for the defendant.

The plaintiff claimed 13 4s. for an outgoing valuation of certain effects, etc., at the Globe.

Cornelius Phillips said: I am a licensed valuer, carrying on business at 65, Biggin Street, Dover. I have known Mr. Pettifer ever since he has had his hotel. Some time ago, I went to see him at the Globe Hotel, and he informed me that he had had notice from the brewers to leave. After a conversation, he engaged me to make a valuation for him. The date of his leaving was the 24th May. I awaited his orders for the completion of the work. I remember going into the smoking room where I saw Mr. Hayward, the opposing valuer. The next I heard of the matter was from Mr. Faber, the new tenant of the house. I saw him at Canterbury, when he told me that the defendant had thrown me over, and engaged Messrs. Banks, of Folkestone, as he (the defendant) believed that I was working on the side of the brewers, and trying to turn him out. I afterwards heard a confirmation from the defendant of the report I had had from Mr. Faber, and was told by the defendant that I should do no more work for him. I said “Very well; I shall have to consult my solicitors”. It is always usual when a man leaves an hotel to sign an agreement between the outgoing and incoming tenant. Mr. Hayward handed me a copy of the agreement. It is always usual to have an agreement to sell. It is the custom of the outgoing and incoming tenant to assign a convenient date. The usual commission is 5 per cent on the first 100, and 2 per cent afterwards. The valuation was 428, I believe.

Mr. Minter: I do not understand how the claim of 15 is made out.

Mr. Watson: I believe I have explained that. The claim has been reduced to 13 4s. We did not know the exact amount of the valuation when we took out the summons.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter, the plaintiff said: I was in the habit of going to the Globe and selling spirits to the defendant. I was not at the Globe on the 21st February, when the defendant received notice to quit. I said the defendant could leave the date to go out open in the agreement between himself and Messrs. Leney. The defendant said I was acting in the interests of the brewer, as the fact that I wanted him to sign an agreement with the date space left blank showed. I did not go over the house until the date fixed for my inventory, in March. The defendant said there were a lot of things he intended to take away with him. He went round the premises and pointed out the things he should want to take away. Sometimes we take out inventories two or three months beforehand. Messrs. Leney wanted the defendant to leave in March. I am not interested in that firm of brewers. I was informed, however, that they wanted him to leave on the 25th March, so I thought I had better get through my valuation as soon as possible.

By His Honour: My valuation was 428.

Louis Charles Faber: Mr. Pettifer gave me to understand that Mr. Phillips was going to act as his valuer. Mr. Hayward, of Dover, was acting for the brewers. He also acted for me. I remember meeting Mr. Phillips, and telling him that the defendant intended to change his agent.

By Mr. Minter: I had applied for the Globe. I was given to understand that he wanted to go out on the 25th March, but I found that I should have to wait.

By His Honour: I entered the house on the 24th May.

Mr. Minter, on addressing the Court on behalf of the defendant, argued that the attempt of Mr. Phillips to induce the defendant to sign the agreement as to leaving the Globe left undated was a good ground for the defendant's conduct in cancelling the arrangement with the plaintiff. As a matter of fact, valuations were not made as Mr. Phillips said they were. The defendant only allowed Mr. Phillips to go round the premises so early as March for the purpose of taking a few notes. In fact Mr. Phillips was not a proper agent for the defendant, because he was acting in the interests of the brewers. The contention on behalf of the defendant was that Mr. Phillips did not do the work in connection with the outgoing valuation, because the arrangement with him was cancelled.

The following evidence was then called for the defence:

Mr. Pettifer: I was formerly landlord of the Globe, under Messrs. Leney, and received a notice to leave on the 24th May. Mr. Phillips used to travel to my house for orders. He solicited to act as my valuer. When I first saw him I did not instruct him to act as my agent. I instructed him when I got the agreement from Mr. Hayward. Mr. Phillips recommended me to sign the agreement with a blank where the date should be. Mr. Phillips seemed to wish the incoming tenant to enter on the 25th March, and the way in which he acted excited my suspicion, and I told him I should not pay him for working further for me. In March he went over my place, and was engaged upwards of two or three hours. He had the use of my inventory, and had a small book in his hand when he was taking notes. I did not go round with him. I had my work to do. I could not make out why Mr. Phillips was in such a hurry to make an inventory.

By Mr. Watson: It is not a fact that I wanted to leave on the 25th March. Mr. Phillips said if I was going to act like I was doing he should consult with his solicitor, and cut up rough. I said “All right. I shall cut up rough too”. Otherwise I had nothing against Mr. Phillips at all.

His Honour, in giving judgement, said that in this case it was admitted that the defendant employed the plaintiff, but for a sufficient reason, as he thought, had cancelled the engagement before the work was done. He (His Honour) must confess that he did not think the evidence bore out the view that there was a good reason for cancelling the engagement, because Mr. Phillips took every care to protect Mr. Pettifer's interests, and to do nothing to cause him to be turned out before the proper date. Therefore Mr. Pettifer was ill advised to quarrel with Mr. Phillips. That being so, the question arose what Mr. Phillips' rights were, having regard to the fact that he was admittedly engaged, and that the engagement was cancelled. It could not be stated that he should receive the amount he would have had if the engagement had gone through. The defendant was entitled to cancel the engagement, but not to refuse reasonable compensation for what the plaintiff actually had done. What had Mr. Phillips done? He had gone through the defendant's house on the 4th March, and was there four hours. It was stated, on the other hand, that he had done so without consent. It was plain that he had not only made a partial inventory, but had had to submit it to the parties on the other side. He was of opinion that five guineas would be ample compensation, and judgement would be for that amount.

 

Folkestone Express 5 March 1904.

Wednesday, March 2nd: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Westropp, and W.G. Herbert Esq.

The Bench endorsed the licence of the Globe Hotel.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 March 1904.

Saturday, February 27th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. E.T. Ward, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was temporarily transferred from Mr. Faber to Mr. Hardy.

 

Folkestone Express 12 March 1904.

Local News.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was on Wednesday last transferred from Mr. Faber to Mr. Hardy. In our police report the notice read “endorsed”, which was, of course, a slip of the pen on the part of the reporter.

 

Folkestone Express 16 April 1904.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Westropp, G.I. Swoffer and J. Stainer Esqs.

The Globe Hotel licence was transferred from Geo. Faber to Allen Hardy.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 April 1904.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before Ald. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Licence was transferred as follows:- The Globe, from Mr. Faber to J. Allen Hardy.

 

Folkestone Daily News 8 July 1905.

Saturday, July 8th: Before Ald. Penfold, Ald. Vaughan, Ald. Herbert, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

An application for the transfer of the licence of the Globe Hotel from Mr. Hardy to Mr. Allen was granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 July 1905.

Wednesday, July 12th: Before Messrs. Ward, Carpenter, Westropp, Vaughan, and Fynmore.

The transfers of licences of the Black Bull and Globe Hotels from Mr. Hardy and Mr. Warne to new tenants were granted.

 

Folkestone Express 15 July 1905.

Saturday, July 8th: Before Alderman Penfold, Lieut. Col. Westropp, Alderman Vaughan, and W.G. Herbert Esq.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was temporarily transferred from Mr. Hardy to Mr. Allen.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 August 1905.

Local News.

As you will have noticed by the last few issues of our paper, this old-established and popular hostelry has recently undergone a proprietorial change, and now claims Mr. Arthur O. Allen as its owner. The new proprietor is a gentleman who has had several years' experience of hotel life in Hull and Oxford, and has piloted licensed properties to success in both places. In the University City he held the Market Vaults Hotel, High Street, and many tourists to Folkestone who have included it in their current summer's itinerary have not failed to renew their acquaintance with Mr. Allen, with whom he was so deservedly popular. He is a gentleman whom no-one can mistake as a Yorkshireman, and has to all appearances the best part of business life in front of him. For the short time he has been in possession of the Globe Hotel, which is so centrally situated on The Bayle, Mr. Allen had had hosts of daily and weekly boarders, and our French visitors, who have largely patronised his hotel, have congratulated him on the excellence of his cuisine.

 

Folkestone Daily News 31 August 1905.

Thursday, August 31st: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Westropp, Vaughan, and Fynmore.

Frank Albert Turnham was charged with stealing money, the property of Edward James Wood.

Edward James Wood said he was an assistant to Mr. Camburn, butcher, High Street, and kept his money in a tin box in his clothes box. He kept his clothes box locked, and carried the key in his pocket. On going to bed he usually laid the key on the dressing table with his purse. The prisoner occupied a bed in the same room. Witness missed a sovereign from his box on August 7th, and between the 20th and 27th he missed 3 10s. He could not tell if it went all at once, but on Sunday morning last, on going to his box, he found one sovereign and five half sovereigns missing. He last saw the money in his box on the 20th August. The prisoner had always slept in the same room, and also the other boy. Later on Sunday the prisoner came into the bedroom, and witness told him he had missed 3 10s. from his box, and asked the prisoner if he knew anything about it. Prisoner replied “No, I haven't been there”. Prisoner took his empty cash box from his own clothes box and showed it to witness and said “There you are, you can see there is nothing in that”. Witness gave information to the police last night. The prisoner had been in Mr. Camburn's service about 18 months. There was 7 0s. 6d. still remaining in the cash box on Sunday morning.

Alfred Maxted, of 54, Fernbank Crescent, said he met the prisoner at the Globe Hotel on Saturday morning, August 26th. Witness had a glass of beer, and prisoner had a glass of ginger beer, which the accused paid for with a ticket from an automatic machine. Later on prisoner asked for change for half a sovereign, which the landlord gave him.

Detective Burniston said: At 11.15 last night, from information I received from the witness Wood, I made enquiries and went to 39, High Street, and saw the prisoner in bed. I said to him “I am going to ask a few questions about 3 10s., which was stolen from a box in this room”. I cautioned him, and said “On Saturday last you changed half a sovereign at the Globe Hotel. Where did you get it?” He said “My brother gave it to me”. I said “I have seen your brother, and he says he has not lent you any money”. Prisoner then said “I did take half a sovereign from Wood's box on Thursday last, but not 3 10s.”. I brought him to the police station, and when charged he said “I admit taking one half sovereign, and changed it at the Globe Hotel”. On being searched no money or keys were found in his possession or in his bedroom.

The prisoner, who pleaded Guilty, said he took the money to pay for some boots.

The Mayor pointed out to the prisoner the serious nature of the charge and the position he had placed himself in. The Bench, however, were going to take a lenient view of the case, and he would be bound over in the sum of 20 to be of good behaviour for 12 months, and hoped it would be a warning to him in future.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 October 1906.

Thursday, October 25th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert and Councillor W.C. Carpenter.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was temporarily transferred from Mr. Allen to Mr. A.P. Fox, of Chesham.

 

Folkestone Express 8 December 1906.

Wednesday, December 5th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Colonels Hamilton and Fynmore, J. Stainer, C.J. Pursey, T. Ames, and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Major Leggett.

The following licence was transferred: The Globe Hotel, to Mr. A.P. Fox.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 December 1906.

Wednesday, December 5th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, and Messrs. T. Ames, J. Stainer, C.J. Pursey, and R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was transferred from Mr. Arthur Octavius Allen to Mr. Peter Fox.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 January 1909.

Felix.

A Folkestone gentleman home from Singapore has asked me the question as to the identity of the cannons which are to be seen outside the Shakespeare and Globe Hotels. There they stand, buried muzzle downwards. How long have they been there? Who placed them there? To what battery did they belong? My attention has often been called to these old cannon, but after all, there are many who pass them by practically unnoticed.


 

Folkestone Herald 6 February 1909.

Felix.

Those Guns.

Under this heading, a week or so back, I made an enquiry in regard to those guns which stand muzzle downwards outside the Shakespeare and Globe Hotels. I asked “Where did they come from? Who placed them there?” Those queries did not escape the eagle eye of our esteemed frien, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, of Sandgate, who writes me on the subject as follows:- “Dear Felix, As to the guns, we want an artillerist's opinion of them, then evidence of old inhabitants as to when they remember them being placed there (if within recollection). I should say that they have been placed where they are since the Crimean War. I have newspaper scraps dated 1881, 1899, and 1905 enquiring about them. What are the dates of the Gun Brewery and Gun Tavern? Of course, they would be named after the gun was put there. The matter should be elucidated. As I said, first we want an expert to say whether they are Waterloo or Crimean guns. If the latter, surely there would be a record in the Corporation books as to when they were given. After all, they may have been discarded from the old battery.” Now it is rather strange. On Sunday morning, during a short stroll over the hills, I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Tite, the respected father in the partner of Tite and Roff. This gentleman mentioned that he had read my note about the guns, and added “I am now seventy eight, but they have stood in their places as long as I can remember”. Mr. Tite's relative, the late Alderman Ham Tite, I believe at one time owned the Gun Brewery, and that was many years ago. Perhaps some of my old Folkestone friends can throw a little light on these old pieces of ordnance.


 

Folkestone Daily News 30 December 1912.

Friday, December 27th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Stainer, Swoffer, Boyd, Harrison, Morrison, and Stace.

Alexander McKenzie, a piper of the 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, was charged with wilfully breaking the glass panel of the door of the Globe Hotel the previous night. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Alfred Peter Fox, the licensee of the Globe, deposed that at about 10.30 the previous evening prisoner came into the hotel. He went into the bar parlour, but had not been there ten minutes when he (witness) heard an altercation. The barman asked prisoner to go outside, and when witness went to se what was going on, he saw the barman take hold of prisoner by the shoulder and put him out. Someone in the bar shouted out “Who wants to fight?”, and prisoner said “I do”. That was the reason he was asked to leave the house. Prisoner did not resist much, but when he got out of the house he turned round and rushed back at the man he was having the altercation with. The man got out of the way, and the prisoner threw himself at the glass, in temper, witness thought, and either his shoulder or elbow went through the glass. Witness then fetched a policeman and gave accused into custody. Prisoner was not the worse for drink at the time. Witness valued the window at 35s. Accused was not a regular customer and he came in alone, but there were two or three men of his regiment in the bar.

The Chief Constable: Is that quite the story you told the police last night?

Witness: As near as I can say, it is.

The Chief Constable: Did you not tell the police that the prisoner deliberately pushed the other man through the glass panel of the door?

Witness: I said he tried to push him through.

Joseph Reynolds, barman at the Globe Hotel, said he was in the bar parlour during the whole of the time that prisoner was there. Someone in the bar said “Who wants to fight?”, and prisoner said “I do”. Witness then went and asked him to go out, as he began to “square about” and had taken his belt off. He refused to leave, and witness put him out. He struggled a bit, but witness got him into the street. The other man showed himself at the door as if he wanted to go out, and prisoner rushed at him. That was how the window got broken. The man stepped back just as prisoner rushed. Witness did not think the window was broken wilfully; he thought it was broken in the rush. He could not see clearly what portion of prisoner's body struck the window.

The Chairman: There is no case whatever against the prisoner; he is discharged.

Addressing Mr. Fox, Mr. Herbert said: We have heard at various times a good many complaints about the noisiness of your house. You had better be careful in future.

Mr. Fox said he had had the house several years, but there had been no disturbance of any description.

The Chairman said there had been complaints about the noise, and in future Mr. Fox had better be careful.

 

Folkestone Express 11 March 1916.

Thursday, March 9th: Before Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. J.J. Giles, and Mr. H. Kirke.

Alfred Peter Fox was charged with permitting drunkenness on the licensed premises of the Globe Hotel. Mr. Rutley Mowll (Dover) defended, pleading Not Guilty.

P.C. H. Johnson said at 7.55 p.m. on February 29th he was near the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, when he saw the defendant with two soldiers ejecting a drunken soldier from the private bar. Outside the soldier fell down in a helplessly drunken condition. He remained there a few minutes, and was then taken away by the two others in the direction of High Street. When standing there he heard a commotion going on inside the private bar facing east. The door was opened by the landlord and two soldiers dragged out another drunken soldier and put him on the pavement. Miss Kirby was standing near so he asked her to go for the picquet. As she was some time gone he went to Rendezvous Street and then down High Street, returning in a few minutes. The house was then closed and the soldier was gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll, witness said he did not go into the house at all before eight o'clock. Two of the soldiers he saw were drunk, two under the influence of drink, and the other two were sober.

Miss Kirby said on February 29th she was opposite the Globe Hotel about 7.45, and she saw the bar door open and three soldiers come out. One of them was very drunk and incapable, and he fell to the ground. She saw P.C. Johnson come up just before eight o'clock. During the time she was opposite the house she saw no soldier enter the bar from the outside. No other soldier left the bar during the time she was there. There was a struggle between the three men before the drunken soldier fell. She went to fetch the picquet. When she returned about four minutes later with the picquet the soldier was lying on the road, and another soldier, very drunk, was staggering about the roadway. She could not say that the men she then saw were the same she had seen come out. The picquet arrested the two men.

Mr. Mowll, at this stage, said he was not going to deny that the men were drunk.

Corporal Bailey, Military Police, said he was in charge of the picquet shortly after eight o'clock. He found one of the men lying in the gutter, and another man stooping over him. Both were drunk, and he arrested them.

P.S. Sales said he went to the Globe Hotel on the following morning and saw the landlord. He told him that two soldiers were seen to leave his premises the previous evening about eight o'clock drunk, and that he should report him for permitting drunkenness. Defendant replied “I am not surprised. They had no drink in here. They were not served. I tried twenty minutes to get them out of the house, but I could not do so. They asked me for a bottle of whisky, but I refused to serve”. Witness asked him if he sent for police assistance to get them removed, and he replied “No, I tried to persuade them myself”.

Mr. Mowll said the soldiers came into the house and were discovered by the barmaid to be under the influence of liquor. He thought there were five soldiers altogether, and two of them were very drunk. The men were refused drink by her, and she called the licensee's attention to them. Mr. Fox tried to persuade them to go out, but he did not succeed in getting them out until ten minutes afterwards. It was upon the licensee to prove that he took all reasonable steps to prevent drunkenness. He suggested that the defendant had done that. The first step he took was to refuse to supply them, and the second step he took was to try to get them to leave.

Kate Thatcher said on Tuesday night, February 29th, she was in charge of the private bar. Between five and twenty minutes and twenty to eight five Canadian soldiers came into the bar. She noticed they had had quite enough and three of them had as much as they wanted. (Laughter) The two remained standing by the mantelpiece. One of the three men asked for two “double-headers” of whisky. She refused to serve any of them, and she advised them to go home. She told Mr. Fox, the licensee, who went to the men and told them that they would not be served, and they had better get away home. The men had no drink in the house.

Defendant said he had been the licensee of the Globe for ten years. On the evening in question he was serving in the public bar, and at about twenty minutes to eight he was called by Miss Thatcher to the private bar. On going there he saw the five soldiers. Two, who were drunk, were standing near the mantelpiece, and the other three were half drunk. He said “Come along, you boys, you have had enough. You had better get home”. One of them said “Give us a bottle of whisky, and we will beat it quick”. He told them he would not let them have anything. He tried to persuade them to go, and he expected they would leave every minute. The men had no drink in his house. He had no-one he could send for assistance.

The Chairman announced that the Magistrates were unanimous against a conviction, and the case would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1916.

Thursday, March 9th: Before Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. J.J. Giles, and Mr. H. Kirke.

Alfred Peter Fox, of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, was summoned for permitting drunkenness. Mr. Rutley Mowll, of Dover, appeared for the defendant and pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Harry Johnson said about 7.55 p.m. on the 29th February he was on duty near the Globe Hotel, when he saw defendant with two soldiers ejecting a drunken soldier from the private bar. Outside the soldier fell down in a helpless condition. He remained there a few minutes, and was then picked up by the other two soldiers. The door was again opened by the defendant, and two more soldiers put out another drunken soldier.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not go into the house at all.

Miss Kirby, of the Women Police, and Corpl. Bailey, of the M.P., also gave evidence.

Sergt. Sales said he went to the Globe Hotel on March 1st and told the landlord he would report him for permitting drunkenness. Defendant replied “I am not surprised. They had no drink in here. They were not served. I tried for twenty minutes to get them out of the house, but I could not do so. They asked me to supply them with a bottle of whisky, and I refused to serve them”. Witness asked him if he tried to get the police to remove them, and he said “No, I tried to persuade them myself”.

Mr. Mowll said the answer to the case was that the two soldiers came in and were discovered by the barmaid to be under the influence of liquor. They were not served. The barmaid called defendant's attention, and they tried to get the men out, but they did not succeed till 7.55 p.m. It was true the police were not sent for. Defendant was in a very awkward situation, as the premises were full at the time.

Mrs. Kate Thatcher said she assisted Mr. Fox at the Globe. February 29th, when she was in charge of the bar, five Canadian soldiers came in about 7.35 p.m.. She noticed that two of the men had quite enough to drink, and the other three had as much as they wanted. (Laughter) One asked for two double headers, but she told them they had had enough, and she could not serve them. She advised them to go home.

Defendant said he had been the licensee of the Globe for ten years. He advised the soldiers to go home. One said “If you let's have a bottle of whisky we will beat it quick”. He said “you cannot have any whisky or anything else”. He thought they were going to leave every minute. They had nothing to drink in his house.

The Chairman said the Bench were unanimous against a conviction, and the case would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 6 December 1919.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court yesterday (Thursday), Alfred Peter Fox, licensee of the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, was summoned for having sold in the public bar, for consumption on the premises, whisky at a price exceeding the maximum price, on the 11th November. There was a second summons for having sold on the same date to Mr. George Eyles (Food Control Inspector) whisky for consumption off the premises at a price exceeding the maximum prices. After hearing the evidence, the Magistrates inflicted a fine of 10 in each case.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald 6 December 1919.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Thursday Alfred Peter Fox, of the "Globe Hotel," was summoned for selling whisky for consumption on the premises at a price exceeding the maximum price, and further for selling whisky for consumption off the premises exceeding the maximum price. The Town Clerk prosecuted and Mr. A. K. Mowll defended. It was stated that for two double whiskeys bought in the public bar 2s. was charged. According to the measure given this worked out at the rate of 3s. 4d. a gill, whereas the price should not exceed 2s. 6d. a gill for proprietary brands or 2s. 1d. for non-proprietary whiskey. Mr. G. Eyles, Food Inspector, stated that he bought a half pint of whiskey, which was sold at 35 degrees under proof. He paid 4s. 2d. for it. On analysis it was found to be 48 degrees under proof. The price for whiskey 48 under proof should be 3s. 4d. a half pint. Mr. Mowll stated that defendant had held a licence for 32 years without a conviction, and that his son-in-law made these mistakes. A fine of 10 in each case was inflicted, with 1 1s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 December 1919.

Thursday, December 4th: Before Col. G.P. Owen and the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson.

Alfred Peter Fox, of the Globe Hotel, was summoned for selling whisky for consumption on the premises at a price exceeding the maximum price, and further for selling whisky for consumption off the premises exceeding the maximum price. The Town Clerk prosecuted and Mr. A.K. Mowll defended.

It was stated that for two double whiskies bought in the public bar 2s. was charged. According to the measure given this worked out at the rate of 3s. 4d. a gill, whereas the price should not exceed 2s. 6d. a gill for proprietary brands, or 2s. 1d. for non-proprietary whisky.

Mr. G. Eyles, Food Inspector, stated that he bought half a pint of whisky, which was sold as 35 degrees under proof. He paid 4s. 2d. for it. On analysis it was found to be 48 degrees under proof. The price for whisky 48 under proof should be 3s. 4d. a half pint.

Mr. Mowll stated that defendant had held a licence for 32 years without a conviction, and that his son-in-law had made these mistakes.

A fine of 10 in each case was inflicted, with 1 1s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 11th: Before The Mayor, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Councillor A. Stace, Col. Owen, Rev. Epworth Thompson, Councillor Hollands, Councillor Morrison, and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

Mr. H. Reeve (the Chief Constable) presented the following report: I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 113 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz.; Full licences 70, beer on 7, beer off 6, beer and spirit dealers 15, grocers, etc. off 6, confectioners wine on 8, confectioners wine off 6, a total of 113. This gives an average, according to the Census of 1911, of one licence to every 296 persons, or one on licence to every 495 persons. During the past year 13 of the licences have been transferred. Since the last annual licensing meeting the licensees of the undermentioned premises have been convicted as follows: Prince of Wales Tavern, fined 10s. on 23rd May, for allowing a child to be in the bar of his licensed premises; East Kent Arms, fined 10s. on 29th August for supplying drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Star and Garter, fined 10s. on 30th November for supplying intoxicating drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Globe Hotel, fined 10 on each of two summonses on 4th December for charging more for whisky than the maximum price allowed under the Order made by the Food Controller. During the year ended 31st December, 46 persons (35 males and 11 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 34 were convicted and 12 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. In the preceding year 26 persons (17 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 14 were convicted and 12 discharged. The regulation of the Liquor Control Board restricting the hours for the sale and consumption of intoxicating liquor remains in force. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. There are 24 premises licensed for music and dancing, 2 for music only, and 2 for public billiard playing. Numerous visits have been made by the police at irregular intervals during the year to the licensed premises and places of entertainment, and I am pleased to report that the houses generally have been conducted in a satisfactory manner.

The Mayor said the Magistrates had considered the report, and they thought it very satisfactory. There had been a little increase in drunkenness, but they hoped that would disappear again. With reference to the licences, the Bench had decided to renew them all, except the Prince of Wales Tavern, East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, and Globe Hotel, in consequence of new legislation that might come on. The licences referred to would come up for consideration at the adjourned meeting.

The adjourned sessions were fixed for the 10th March.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions for Folkestone were held at the Police Court, the Mayor presiding.

Mr. H. Reeve presented his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Mayor said the report was very satisfactory, although there was a little increase in drunkenness. They would renew all the licences to the licensed premises, except the four mentioned in the report, which would be adjourned to a later court.

 

Folkestone Express 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 10th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer and G. Boyd, Col. Owen, and Messrs. A, Stace and G.H. Blamey.

The licence of the Globe, The Bayle, was transferred from Mr. Fox to Mr. R.S. Dawson, Mr. Rutley Mowll (Dover) making the application.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, the Prince of Wales, the Globe, and the Star and Garter were renewed, they having been adjourned from the annual meeting.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 9th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G.P. Owen, Councillor A. Stace, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Mr. J.H. Blamey.

The licence of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, was transferred from Mr. A.P. Fox to Mr. Dawson, who, it was stated, had served in the Royal Engineers for twenty seven years.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, Globe, and Prince of Wales, deferred at the annual sessions, were now renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 14 April 1923.

Local News.

At the transfer sessions held at the Police Court on Wednesday the following licence was transferred: The Globe Inn, to Mr. H.J. Burton (sic), of Hastings.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 April 1923.

Local News.

On Wednesday last the Folkestone Magistrates granted application for the transfer of the licence of the Globe Inn, The Bayle, from Mr. R.E. Dawson to Mr. H.J. Butler, of Hastings.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1924.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday morning, alterations were also sanctioned to the Globe Hotel, The Bayle.

 

Folkestone Express 23 May 1925.

Local News.

The licence of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, was transferred on Wednesday by the Folkestone Magistrates, from Mr. Henry John Butler to Mr. George Chambers, of Marden.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 May 1925.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday (the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson in the chair), the licence of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, was transferred from Henry John Butler to George Chambers.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 February 1926.

Obituary.

We regret to state that Mr. George Chambers, proprietor of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, died on Wednesday. Deceased, who was in his 45th year, had been in possession of the hostelry less than a year, but during that period, owing to his geniality and obliging manner, he made a host of friends. A man of considerable culture, he had been associated in other days with agriculture, and had travelled considerably, both in the United States and Canada. To his widow considerable sympathy is extended.

The funeral will take place today.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1926.

Obituary.

The death took place on Wednesday in last week of Mr. George Chambers, the proprietor of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, Folkestone, in his 45th year. He had been at the hotel for just under a year, but during that time he had made a large number of friends, who deeply regret his death. The funeral took place at Marden Churchyard on Saturday.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 9th: Before Alderman R.J. Wood, Messrs. A.E. Pepper, Swoffer, E.T. Morrison, A. Stace, Owen, J.H. Blamey, W.R. Boughton, W. Hollands, W. Griffin, P. Broome-Giles, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Dr. W.J. Tyson.

The licence of the Railway Tavern was transferred to Mr. H. G. Reed, and that of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, to Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1926.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Col. G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Mr. W. Griffin, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Col. P. Broome-Giles, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

Mrs. E. Chambers applied for a temporary authority to carry on the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, her husband, who was the licensee, having died.

The authority was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 13 March 1926.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Folkestone adjourned licensing sessions were held on Wednesday at the Police Court, when the magistrates on the Bench were Alderman R. G. Wood, Miss Bunt, Col. Owen, Messrs. G. I. Swoffer, A. Stace and J. H. Blamey.

The licence of the Globe Hotel, which had been temporarily transferred to Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers, was renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1926.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. J.H. Blamey, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

The licence of the Globe Hotel was renewed, Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers being the licensee.

 

Folkestone Express 26 April 1930.

Obituary.

The death took place on Monday of Mr. Charles Landey Sparrow, at his residence, Silverwood, Westenhanger, who had been in rather poor health for three years. He was 65 years of age.

The late Mr. Sparrow was a native of Folkestone and some years ago he was a well-known licence holder in the town, retiring about eight years ago. He was popularly known amongst a very large circle of friends as Charlie Sparrow. He held the licences, at various periods, of the Railway Tavern, in Dover Road, the Globe, on The Bayle, and the Shakespeare Hotel, which was the last hotel in which he carried on business. He then went to live at Westenhanger.

He was a well-known sportsman, and took a great interest in racing and shooting. He was one of the promoters and original directors of the Central Picture theatre until it was sold in July last. He was a member of the Folkestone Club for a great number of years. He married late in life and leaves a widow to mourn his loss.

The funeral took place yesterday (Thursday) at the Folkestone Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 April 1930.

Obituary.

It is with very deep regret that we have to record the death of Mr. Charles Landey Sparrow, who was well known to numerous Folkestone people, and who, at the age of 65, passed away at his residence, Silverwood, Westenhanger, on Easter Monday.

Mr Sparrow, who was born at Folkestone, was a gentleman of very unassuming character, but possessed many of the finest traits that ever man could lay claim to. He was always one to study the welfare of a person upon whom fortune had rarely smiled. His good deeds were never broadcast, but it is a fact that many of the older people of Folkestone will recollect with gratitude his beneficent concern at Christmastide, and quite a few will remember, with equal gratitude, the helping hand he extended them when things appeared at their darkest.

Mr. Sparrow was a good-living sportsman, and one who always “played the game”. He had hosts of friends in Folkestone, and there are some at Hythe and Sandgate who will remember him very well. He held the licences of a number of houses in Folkestone at different times, and was the licensee of the Shakespeare when he retired from business in 1913. From there he went to Westenhanger, where Silverwood can be numbered amongst the most charming residences in a delightfully unspoiled little village.

Sport with Mr. Sparrow was almost a fetish, and his prowess with the gun is well remembered. At the time of his death he was a director of the Central Cinema Company.

He never complained, but as the result of a motor accident several years ago, Mr. Sparrow had ever since been in very indifferent health, and at times he suffered very severe pain. His death will be mourned in many quarters, and there will be deep and sincere sympathy felt for his widow, who is left to bear an extremely heavy loss.

The funeral took place at the Folkestone Cemetery, Cheriton Road, Folkestone, on Thursday afternoon.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald 10 December 1932.

OBITUARY. MR. A. P. FOX.

We regret to announce the death, on Friday of last week at 99, Stanley Road, Cheriton, of Mr. Alfred Peter Fox. Mr. Fox, who was 81 years of age, was born in London, subsequently living at Chesham and later at Folkestone, where for some years he was proprietor of the "Globe Hotel," the Bayle. Mr. Fox, who was associated with a well-known family at Sandgate, was accounted a pedestrian of some note, and in this connection had to his credit several prizes. He leaves a widow and one daughter, and towards them much sympathy is expressed.

The funeral took place on Tuesday at St. Martin's, Cheriton, churchyard.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 November 1942.

Local News.

Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted Mrs. Selina A. Hughes a protection order in respect of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle. Mr. G.P. Medlicott made the application on behalf of Messrs. Fremlin, the brewers.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 May 1948.

Local News.

A protection order in respect of the licence of The Globe, The Bayle, from Mrs. S.A. Hughes to Mr. A.C. Jeffree was granted at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday.

 

Folkestone Gazette 17 January 1951.

Local News.

A dart club raffle in a public house for a tame rabbit and a packet of cigarettes led to the licensee and his wife appearing at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court yesterday. Archibald Charles Jeffree, licensee of The Globe Hotel, Folkestone, was summoned for permitting the premises to be used in connection with the promotion of a lottery on December 15th last, and his wife, Minnie Alice, was summoned for selling a chance in the raffle. Both defendants, represented by Mr. Norman Franks, pleaded Guilty.

Dismissing the cases on payment of 2 10/- costs, the Chairman (Ald. W. Hollands) said “It must be generally understood that it is illegal for these raffles to take place”.

Mr. T.J.R. Whitfield, prosecuting, said as the result of certain information received by the police, P.C. Constable at 7.45 p.m. on December 15th went to The Globe Hotel where Mr. Jeftree was licensee; his wife worked with him. The officer went into the bar and kept observation and remained there until 10.05 pm. During that time he saw a raffle being held. He saw Mrs. Jeffree going round the bar asking various customers, including P.C. Constable, if they were interested in a draw at 3d. a time for a tame rabbit. The rabbit was apparently first prize and the second was a packet of 20 cigarettes. Mrs. Jeffree went around amongst the customers with a sheet of paper on which numbers had been written down. On receipt of the money she appended the customer’s name against the number chosen. Later the officer saw Mrs Jeffree produce a tin box from which three tickets bearing numbers were drawn by a customer. “The number of the first ticket turned out to be that held by the landlady herself”, continued Mr. Whitfield. “A second ticket was drawn, she apparently not wishing to take advantage of her good fortune”. A number for the second prize was also drawn, but P.C. Constable did not see the prizes claimed by anybody. At 11 a.m. on December 17th D/Sgt. Bates and P.C. Constable went to The Globe Hotel and saw both defendants. D Sgt. Bates told them that he had reason to believe that on December 15th a lottery had been held on the premises and that a rabbit and cigarettes were given away as prizes. Mr. Jeffree replied “This was for the dart club. The prizes were given by members of the club and all the proceeds go towards the club”.

Mr. Norman Franks, defending, said the Magistrates would have seen that the two offences were offences under the Betting and Lotteries Act, 1934. It was therefore purely incidental that the raffle took place on licensed premises. Had the prosecution chosen, the raffle having taken place on licensed premises, they could have proceeded against the licensee under Section 79 of the Licensing Act, 1910. “In these circumstances I do ask you to completely disregard the fact that this raffle took place in licensed premises”, he said. “It is just as much an offence to have a raffle in other premises – whether they be licensed or not - providing the conditions of the offence are present”. “This is an important matter to Mr. Jeffree,” continued Mr. Franks. “I am not blaming anyone for it. He is described as being of The Globe Hotel and the offence is referred to in the summons as having taken place at The Globe; it could have been referred to as a certain number on The Bayle. Mr. Franks said the offence the wife had committed was in asking someone other thana member of the dart club to buy a chance for 3d. It was not an offence for anyone in the dart club to have a ticket. Satisfied that it was an offence both defendants had pleaded Guilty. “I am sure one thing springs to the minds of your worships”, he continued. “You will appreciate that this sort of thing is going on up and down the country in most public houses. And many of them in Folkestone, and for a long time. That does not in any way detract from the fact that the police officers are doing their duty in dealing with the law when it comes to their notice. This was a raffle for a rabbit. The second prize was a packet of 20 cigarettes, and each chance cost 3d. The total amount which was collected on this Friday night was 1 0/-, and the proceeds were for the general use of the members of the dart club. This matter has naturally been of considerable anxiety to the two defendants”, said Mr. Franks. “Quite apart from the fact that it may not be regarded as anything affecting the licence. You will realise that, and I can assure you it has been a matter of great anxiety to them, however small it may seem to people outside looking on. This was a raffle, a thing so very common. It was illegal in the eyes of the law, but we may consider it was harmless enough, particularly in the fact that it was just before Christmas. I ask you to regard it in the light of exactly what it was rather than what it looks like in black and white on the summons”.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 January 1951.

Local News.

A Folkestone licensee and his wife pleaded Guilty at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday to two summonses arising out of a dart club raffle for a tame rabbit and a packet of cigarettes held at their public house. Summonses against Archibald Charles Jeffree, of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, for permitting the premises to be used in connection with the promotion of a lottery, and against Mrs. Minnie Alice Jeffree for selling a chance in the lottery were dismissed on payment of 2 10/- costs.

The Chairman (Ald. W. Hollands) pointed out that it must be generally understood that it was illegal for such raffles to take place.

Mr. T.J.R. Whitfield, prosecuting, said P.C. Constable at 7.45 p.m. on December 15th went to The Globe Hotel. He remained there until 10.05 p.m. and during that time he saw Mrs. Jeffree going round the bar asking various customers, including himself, if they were interested in a draw at 3d. a time for a tame rabbit. The rabbit was apparently first prize and the second was a packet of cigarettes. Later the officer saw Mrs. Jeffree produce a tin box from which three tickets bearing numbers were drawn by a customer. “The number of the first ticket turned out to be that held by the landlady herself”, continued Mr. Whitfield. “A second ticket was drawn, she apparently not wishing to take advantage of her good fortune”. At 11 a.m. on December 17th D. Sgt. Bates and P.C. Constable went to The Globe Hotel and saw both defendants. Mr. Jeffree said “This was for the dart club. The prizes were given by members of the club and all the proceeds go towards the club”.

Mr. Norman Franks, defending, said the magistrates would have seen that the two offences were offences under the Betting and Lotteries Act, 1934. It was therefore purely incidental that the raffle took place on licensed premises. Had the prosecution chosen, the raffle having taken place on licensed premises, they could have proceeded against the licensee under Section 79 of the Licensing Act. 1910. “In these circumstances I do ask you to completely disregard the fact that this raffle took place in licensed premises”, he said. “This is an important matter to Mr. Jeffree. He is described as being of The Globe Hotel and the offence is referred to in the summons as having taken place at The Globe; it could have been referred to as a certain number on The Bayle”. Mr. Franks said the offence the wife had committed was by asking someone other than a member of the dart club to buy a chance for 3d. “I am sure one thing springs to the minds of your worships”, he continued. “You will appreciate that this sort of thing is going on up and down the country in most public houses, many of them in Folkestone, and for a long time. That does not in any way detract from the fact that the police officers are doing their duty in dealing with the matter when it comes to their notice. The total amount which was collected on this Friday night was 1/0/6, and the proceeds were for the general use of the members of the dart club”. “This matter has naturally been of considerable anxiety to the two defendants”, said Mr. Franks, “quite apart from the fact that it may not be regarded as anything affecting the licence. This was a raffle, a thing so very common. It was illegal in the eyes of the law but you may consider it was harmless enough, particularly in view of the fact that it was just before Christmas”.

Editorial.

You may conduct a raffle at a church bazaar; you may not conduct a raffle in a public house. You may sell a raffle ticket at a sale of work; you may not sell a raffle ticket one step outside the door of the hall in which the sale is being held. You may print tickets for some raffles; you may not print tickets for other raffles. You may inveigle a complete stranger into buying a raffle ticket at a sale of work; you may not persuade your best friend to buy a raffle ticket in the street. And THAT is the law! Some raffles - call them draws, competitions or just plain “swindles” - are right, some are wrong. And the vast majority of raffles organised in Folkestone and Hythe, as elsewhere in England, are wrong. Sooner or later someone somewhere is unfortunate enough to be summoned for an offence which is committed almost every day in almost every town and most villages in the Kingdom. At Christmastime it is part of the festivities of the season to organise raffles and to sell and buy tickets; scarcely one of us can turn out his wallet or pockets without finding old raffle tickets. Usually prizes are small, sometimes they run up to 5 in value, in a few cases raffles are organised on a wider scale with prizes of much greater value. Almost all are illegal, the organisers being liable to penalties up to a fine of 100: on conviction for a second offence they are liable to three months imprisonment AND a fine of 100!

Most of us think the “small time’’raffle is harmless enough; indeed in most cases they raise money for very useful social and sporting purposes. You may not think there is much harm in selling tickets at 3d. or 6d. each to raise money to keep a working lads’ cricket club going or to help a workmate who through sickness has fallen on hard times. You may not feel that, say, a tame rabbit, is likely to cause any man to spend more than he can afford on the off chance that he may win it. But the law says that, with certain exceptions, any competition (and “competition” is really an elegant name for some of the very small draws that are held in clubs and pubs throughout the land) which has no element of skill in it is illegal. If it is held at a church bazaar or some such event it is different; the law does rot frown upon it. We wonder what moral danger there is in these small, domestic affairs that give so much pleasure, not only to those who sell and buy tickets but to those who, perhaps through the proceeds of the raffles paid to sports or recreational clubs, derive benefit from them. And we wonder too, why a raffle at a church bazaar, in which the prize is perhaps a dressed doll, should be so much more agreeable to our lawmakers than a raffle in a public house with a tame rabbit as the prize. If, one is morally right, so is the other; if one is morally wrong, no doubt the tame rabbit is also but the victim of man's rapacity.

The Betting and Lottery Act, 1934, lays down (in general terms) that any rattle except a small “bazaar” lottery or a private lottery is illegal. A raffle may be held at a bazaar, sale of work, fete, or similar event provided no tickets are issued or sold outside the hall and the tickets are drawn in the hall itself before the conclusion of the event. Furthermore all the proceeds, after deducting expenses and prizes (10 limit), must be devoted to purposes other than private gain, and none of the prizes must be of money. We have seen all sorts of attempts to overcome the terms of the law in regard to raffles, such for instance as making members of an organisation all who buy tickets, or giving a numbered ticket (which may win a prize) in the form of a receipt for a subscription to a club or society, or selling the ticket as an entry into some form of competition. Unless there is some element of skill in the competition none of these devices makes the raffle legal. A private lottery is one in which the sale of tickets is confined either to the members of a club or society, or to people who all work or live in the same place. But no tickets may be sold outside the premises or place of employment and it must not be advertised outside. “The law is a ass – a idiot”, said Mr. Bumble. It may be, but it is the law nevertheless, and “ignorance of the law excuses no man”.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 July 1951.

Local News.

Seven Folkestone public houses were granted an extension of licence on weekdays until 11 p.m. and on Sundays to 10.30 p.m. until September 30th at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court yesterday.

Mr. W.J. Mason, appearing for the applicants, said a similar application had been granted to a number of hotels for the summer season and Festival of Britain. At Eastbourne 44 applications of the same kind had been granted and 115 at Hastings. The extension had been granted to all those who desired it in the other two towns.

The application was granted in respect of the Star Inn, Bouverie Hotel, Shakespeare Hotel, Guildhall Hotel, Prince Albert Hotel, Globe Inn, and George Inn.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 April 1956.

Local News.

A protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, Folkestone, was granted to Mr. H.O. Betts, former licensee of the Hare and Hounds, Deal, at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Tuesday. The previous licensee of the Globe, Mr. A.C. Jeffree, is moving to Maidstone.

 

Folkestone Gazette 19 August 1959.

Local News.

A sergeant, 13 years in the Army, was fined 5 and ordered to pay one guinea damages at Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Friday, for wilful damage.

Sgt. John Henry Dawson, 26th Field Regiment, R.A., Shorncliffe Camp, represented by Mr. W.J. Coley, pleaded Not Guilty to wilfully damaging a glass panel in a door at the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, Folkestone.

Inspector Mead said at 10.15 p.m. on July 9th Dawson walked into the saloon bar of the Globe Hotel and ordered a quarter bottle of whisky from Mrs. Barbara Letts. She gave him the whisky but he did not want to pay for it. She called her husband, Mr. Ronald John Letts, and he asked defendant for the money or the whisky; he eventually got the whisky. At about 10.30 p.m. Dawson left the premises but on two occasions attempted to return. He knocked at the door, which had two glass panels. The second time he broke one of the panels. Mr. Letts detained defendant and telephoned for the police. At 10.48 p.m. P.C. Hartridge and P. Sgt. Ayres arrived. Defendant was standing in the bar with Mr. and Mrs. Letts. Asked for his name and address, Dawson answered evasively and the officers were unable to establish his identity. At 11.30 p.m. he was taken to the police station, where his identity was established. He was asked if he broke the glass and replied “Yes. I will get busted for this”. He offered to pay for the damage.

Dawson, giving evidence, said he went back to the hotel because he thought he had left a bathing costume, cardigan and towel there. Actually he had left the articles at another public house nearby and collected them the following day. Defendant, denying that he knocked violently on the door, said when nobody answered he rapped harder and the glass smashed. He had no intention of breaking the glass. He had been drinking but was not drunk. He told Mr. Letts that he would pay for the damage.

Inspector Mead told the Magistrates that Dawson had two previous convictions for being drunk in charge of a bicycle.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 December 1959.

Local News.

With a terrific crash a vast number of pennies, in fact, 8,456 of them, weighing nearly 180 pounds, fell in the saloon bar of the Globe Hotel, Folkestone, on Monday evening.

They had been subscribed by customers, and had been piled on a counter in the bar by Mr. and Mrs. R. Letts, the proprietor and his wife. When counted the pennies were found to total 35 4/8, all to be donated to the Archer Road Occupational Centre. Two scooters and a bicycle were purchased for the children of the Centre, and the balance, amounting to 7 7/2, was also handed to the Matron, Miss J.G. Kidd, for additional Christmas comforts for them.

The pile was demolished by Mr. F.G. Wilson, Messrs. Fremlin’s area manager, and the scooters and cycle were formally handed over to Miss Kidd by Mrs. Matthews, wife of the manager of Messrs. Plummer’s.

When a similar pile of pennies was started for the same cause last year it grew until a total value of 16 10/10 was reached, a sum more than doubled this year. And at the close of Monday evening’s happy ceremony, 30/- was collected to start the 1960 pile.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1965.

Local News.

Police statements about the responsibility of publicans towards drunken drivers have brought protests from local landlords. Superintendent Frederick Coatsworth said at Seabrook last week that licensees exerted a tremendous influence on their customers and had a vital role to play in the prevention of offences involving drink, especially where motorists were concerned.

Reaction from Mr. Reg. Gard, landlord of the George Inn in George Lane, Folkestone, was “It just doesn’t make sense. We’re supposed to be mind- readers now, asking customers their age to see if they are over 18. The only thing we can do is to refuse to serve drinks to anyone who has obviously had too much. And, of course, thirsty motorists could always wear a ticket around their necks saying “I’m a driver. Please can I have a drink?””

Mr. Ron Letts, licensee of the Globe on The Bayle, said “It’s ludicrous. Our job is to sell drinks. A fair proportion of my customers are drivers, and in the nine years I have been here I have found they are generally responsible people. On the odd occasion, when you know your customer, it’s O.K. to say “Give me your keys—you’d better take a taxi home”. But how can you say that to a perfect stranger?”

Mr. Alec Wales, of the London and Paris, near the Harbour, who is chairman of Folkestone, Hythe and District Licensed Victuallers’ Association, put most of the blame on restaurants. “You cannot hold a publican responsible for what customers drink”, he declared. “I don’t allow anyone who is obviously drunk in my house, but when they can get served at a restaurant, what can you do? I certainly don't think the majority of drunks come from pubs”.

At Folkestone Brewster Sessions on Wednesday Supt. Coats worth reiterated his opinion. “Licensees, particularly those whose premises attract what is known as the motor car trade, have a vital contribution to pay in regard to safety on the roads”, he said. The police are the first to realise in a town such as Folkestone that all persons do not obtain their liquor in licensed premises. But, as responsible citizens, licensees can exert a great influence on their customers by always bearing in mind the effect which alcohol taken in excess might have on drivers of a motor vehicle”.

The last word came from Mrs. Maud Lewis, licensee of the Guildhall Hotel, chairman of the Women’s Auxiliary of the local L.V.A. After Brewster Sessions she told the Herald “We all try to do our stuff. If we think customers have had enough we tell them so. Irrespective of whether they're driving or not, I'm firm with them on the question of drink”.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 July 1965.

Local News.

Some three years ago Mr. Ronnie Letts, of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, Folkestone, revealed an unexpected flair for organisation. It was suggested that an annual darts competition should be arranged for Cancer Relief (as apart from research) and he undertook the task of running it. It proved an instantaneous success, and in each of the last two years a very useful sum has been realised through the co-operation of other licensed houses within the area.

Next Thursday, commencing at 7.30 p.m., the semi-finals and final of this year's competition will take place at St. George's Hall at the rear of the Roman Catholic Church. A fitting venue, because the project has the interest and active support of Father C.J. Walmsley, priest-in-charge at the church.

The semi-finalists are Plough Inn A (holders of the loving cup held annually by the winners), Cherrypickers Inn B, Star and Garter Inn A (holders of the runners-up shield) and Richmond Inn A. There should be some excellent sport, and, still more important, a generous addition to the funds of the very worthy cause for which the competition is held.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 May 1971.

Local News.

When 1,400 continentals visit Folkestone next Thursday the doors of local pubs will be open to them all afternoon. On Tuesday local Magistrates decided in favour of a second application to allow 17 pubs to remain open especially for the visitors. They had vetoed a previous application. The second made by publicans was amended to allow for a half-hour break at 5.30 p.m. before their premises opened for the evening session.

Mr. J. Medlicott, for the publicans, told the Magistrates that the visitors were delegates attending a conference in Bruges. One of its highlights was to be a visit to England. He referred to a letter received by Folkestone Corporation from the British Tourist Authority supporting the publicans' application. The visit – by Dutch, Swiss, Belgians and Germans – was a special occasion, not just a shopping expedition, said Mr. Medlicott. It had been arranged by a Bruges tourist organisation which had particularly asked that pubs should be open in the afternoon.

Police Inspector R. Sanders made no formal objection to the application – but doubted whether the visit was a special occasion.

The Chairman of Folkestone Chamber of Trade, Mr. Alan Stephenson, said later “The cross-Channel visitors' committee of this Chamber is very pleased that this has been seen as a special occasion by the Justices. When one is reminded that this extension is no more than happens in many market towns every week of the year, it seems a fair request, especially as Folkestone’s image abroad could be much influenced by the original decision not to allow the pubs to open”.

The pubs which will stay open are; Jubilee, Ship, Oddfellows, Royal George, London and Paris, True Briton, Harbour Inn, Princess Royal, Clarendon, Brewery Tap, Earl Grey, Prince Albert, George, Globe, East Kent Arms, Guildhall and Shakespeare.

 

South Kent Gazette 8 February 1978.

Local News.

Two former barmaids were committed to stand trial at Grown Court on Friday.

They are Julie Dianne Willis, aged 20, of The Deerings, Lydd, and 19-year-old Vicky Anne Edwards, 19, of Coronation Street, Blackpool, formerly of Pilgrim Springs, Folkestone, who appeared at Folkestone magistrates court. Both girls are alleged to have stolen from the landlord of the Globe, public house, Mr. Ronald Letts, on five different occasions between June 25 and July 22. The sums of money involved are; 217.13, between June 26 and July 22; 3.46, on July 18; 16.92 on July 19; 36.46 on July 20, and 11.39 on July 21.

Bail of 100 in her own recognisance was extended for Willis.

 

South Kent Gazette 5 April 1978.

Local News.

Angry publicans are threatening to boycott an organisation which raises thousands of pounds for charity. Matters came to a head at the weekend with Folkestone's first beer festival. Jointly organised by the charity fundraising Lions Club and local members of the Campaign for Real Ale, the event was staged at the Leas Cliff Hall.

Now landlords are working themselves into a ferment because, they claim, customers deserted their pubs in favour of the cask conditioned collection. Licensee of The Globe, in The Bayle, Mr. Ron Letts, said “As far as I'm concerned that's the last time I'm having a Lions collection box in my pub. The festival was bound to take trade away from pubs. I know many landlords are angry about it. There's no difference between so-called real ale and the beer in here”.

Organiser Robin Mitchell, a past president of the Lions, said “I heard there had been complaints. The chap is entitled to his opinion, but while some publicans objected to the festival I doubt if the majority would be particularly bothered”. Mr. Mitchell said he was “a bit disappointed” more people hadn't turned up. “We have set out to raise 6,000 this year for a mini-bus”, he said. “The Little and Large concert we organised raised 1,900, but at best I doubt if we'll get more than a couple of hundred pounds from the beer”.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 March 1980.

Canterbury Crown Court.

Two barmaids accused of stealing from the till of the Folkestone pub where they worked, were found Not Guilty when a judge stopped their trial on Tuesday. Julie Willis, 22, from The Deerlngs, Lydd, and Vicky Edwards, 21, formerly of Pilgrim Spring, Folkestone and now living at Coronation Street, Blackpool, had denied stealing 217 from the Globe in The Bayle.

The trial, at Canterbury Crown Court, had started with the Globe's landlord, Mr. Ronald Letts, giving evidence of how he found deficiencies in his bar takings. Mr. Letts said he kept a daily record of his takings and at the end of the week transferred the figures into an account book.

But after he had been giving evidence for some time, the landlord told the court that his son, then aged 15, sometimes helped with the bookwork and entered figures into the account book. It was then that Judge Margaret Cosgrave stopped the trial and directed the jury to find Willis and Edwards Not Guilty.

She explained to the jury “The case against these defendants must depend upon the accuracy with which figures were taken down from the till roll into the day cash book and from that into the accounts. And in view of the evidence which you heard to the effect that the son had made all the entries into the day book, there is no safe evidence on which I can ask you as a jury to convict either defendant. I am therefore going to direct you to enter verdicts of Not Guilty on all counts against each defendant”, she said.

After the jury had returned the Not Guilty verdicts, Judge Cosgrave discharged Willis and Edwards. The charges had alleged that the defendants jointly stole 217 belonging to Mr. Letts, between June 25 and July 26, 1977. Then, separately, Willis and Edwards were each charged with four thefts of unspecified sums of money from Mr. Letts during the same period. These were alternative charges to the joint allegation, Mr David Voelcker, prosecuting, had explained to the jury, and the total amount involved was 217.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 June 1981.

Local News.

About 1,000 is believed to have been stolen from the Globe public house during a break-in on Tuesday night. Thieves broke into the building in The Bayle, Folkestone, and forced open a safe, taking the contents. Landlord, Mr. Ron Letts, refused to comment on the raid.

 

South Kent Gazette 5 August 1981.

Local News.

A youth who stole 1,107 in three burglaries in Folkestone may be sent to Borstal.

A 15-year-old admitted three accusations of burglary at Folkestone Juvenile Court last Monday and was sent to Crown Court for sentence, with a recommendation for Borstal training. A fourth accusation, of burglary at the Ambassador Hotel on The Leas, was denied, and this was adjourned.

Inspector Ron Young said the boy broke into The Globe pub, in The Bayle, took the keys from the pocket of the publican, Mr. Ron Letts, while he was sleeping, and opened a safe containing 1,000. Other people were implicated in the burglary, but so far no-one else has been apprehended. The Folkestone boy stole another 17 from chartered accountants in Westcliffe Gardens and broke into a hut on the site of the new Sainsbury's supermarket in Wellington Gardens. With additional claims for stolen cigarettes, a gold watch and chain from Mr. Letts, there is a total compensation claim of 2,676, said Mr. Young. The boy has previous findings of guilt for offences earlier this year.

Defending, Mrs Susan Watler said that six weeks in a detention centre and a supervision order had failed to stop the boy committing further offences. He is beyond his parents’ control and magistrates should consider putting him under a care order in a secure home. Because he is easily influenced by older people, it might have a bad effect if he was sent to Borstal, she said.

Magistrates ordered the boy to be held in custody until his Crown Court sentencing to prevent him committing further offences.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 August 1981.

Local News.

While publican Ron Letts slept a 15-year-old burglar took the key to his safe from his trousers pocket. The young villain netted 1,000, coins and jewellery in the raid on the Globe pub in The Bayle, Folkestone. But on Monday the youth was sent to borstal for breaking into the Globe and two other crimes.

Sentencing him, Judge Thomas Edie said “I am sorry to say that at the age of 15 you have become an accomplished burglar and you are in need of discipline and training”.

The youth had been sent to Maidstone Crown Court after admitting the pub break-in, burgling a chartered accountant's, stealing 17, and entering a building hut, intending to steal.

Prosecuting, Miss Gill Hammerton said he broke into the accountant’s on May 31, taking money from a desk and a collection box for the blind.

Later the same evening police saw him climb over a wall of the Sainsbury’s building site in Folkestone. Questioned later that night he admitted both offences. He was bailed, but on June 9 broke into the pub during the middle of the night. Arrested on June 30, he told police older youths had also been involved in the raids at the pub and the building site.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 September 1983.

Local News.

A modern pizza restaurant could replace Folkestone's Guildhall pub. Pizza Hut (U.K.) Limited have submitted a planning application to Shepway District Council. A spokesman said if the company gets the go-ahead it will preserve the character of the pub when installing oak booths and tables. The company has 26 Pizza Huts in London and is searching for new sites all over the country. It is not a fast food chain but a full service restaurant which caters for 20-year-olds to families with young children, said the spokesman.

But the plans mean that landlady Mrs. Maude Lewis and her daughter Eileen will have to leave the Guildhall's bar and move to the nearby Globe in The Bayle, Folkestone. The pair were told about a month ago that after 31 years they would have to move. The pub's brewery is Whitbread, of which Pizza Hut (U.K.) Limited is a subsidiary. “It was quite a shock”, said Eileen, but added “If it had to happen at least we are lucky enough to go to The Globe”.

The Globe's present landlord, Mr. Ron Letts, is retiring in September.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 September 1983.

Local News.

After 27 years as landlords of the Globe pub, Ron and Barbara Letts are set to enjoy life on the other side of the bar. The couple bade farewell to their regulars at a retirement party on Monday but said they would more than likely pop back now and then. It was a hectic day as Ron and Barbara prepared to move out and new landladies Miss Eileen Lewis and her mother Mrs. Maude Lewis, of the Guildhall Hotel, Folkestone, took over. Neither Ron nor Barbara were sorry to leave the pub in The Bayle, Folkestone, and said they were looking forward to doing nothing. The couple moved to a flat in Guildhall Street. A decanter and six glasses was presented by Mr. John Norton, area manager with Whitbread Fremlins.

The Guildhall Hotel is closing, but a company called Pizza Hut (U.K.) Limited has submitted a planning application to Shepway District Council for permission to turn the pub into a modern pizza house.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 February 1984.

Local News.

The towels have gone up over a century of pub history as regulars supped their last pint and turned their eyes to watering holes anew. After more years than the most devout regular cares to remember the proprietors of the Guildhall in Folkestone have sounded the final bell on the old pub, and what was once the delight of the drinking classes is to be turned into a licensed pizzeria.

Pubs may come and fads may go, but British landladies live on forever and although it's time at the Guildhall the licensee Mrs. Maud Lewis will continue serving pints at The Globe in The Bayle, assisting her daughter Eileen, who is licensee there. “I have been here 32 yeras and there have been some good times. It's sad the old place will not be as it was but I shall be helping my daughter at The Globe and I expect to see many old friends there”, said Maud who is now 73.

On Friday Mr. John Kidson, managing director of Whitbread Fremlins, presented Maud with a cut glass decanter and glasses to mark her long service at the Guildhall. During the lunchtime ceremony she was also presented with a colour television, given as a mark of appreciation by Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association and Ladies' Auxiliary. Mr. Kidson praised the 50 years of service Maud had given to the licensed trade and in particular to her 32 years behind the bar of the Guildhall.

But the highest praise of all came from locals who thronged the bar on Friday and also attended a wake on Sunday evening. "I have been coming in here ever since Maud took over. Now Maud is going to help out over at The Globe I shall be going over there”, said Mrs. Audrey Brandon. who works at a nearby furniture store. “It’s another landmark gone but at least we shall be able to preserve some of the pub’s atmosphere. It is the people that make that”.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 February 1984.

Local News.

Non, nein, or however you want to put it, Shepway drinkers have given the thumbs-down to Common Market tinkering with the price of a pint. Brussels bureaucrats have said that Britain discriminates against wine in favour of beer and have asked for a harmonisation of prices. But with one eye on the budget, drinkers and licensees alike suspect that is 1984 doublespeak for a thumping increase in the price of a pint.

First into the counter-attack against whatever Whitehall and Brussels have in mind is Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association, which says the price of a pint is already too high, and if any adjustment is to be made, wine costs should be cut. “I've been here 15 years, and in that time I have seen the price of a pint of beer double inside five years and the number of customers fall off” said Vic Batten, Chairman of the association, and innkeeper at the Jubilee on The Stade, Folkestone. “In January, 1979, mild was 30p a pint, and out two bitters 34p and 38p. A pint of mild now costs 66p and the bitters 72p and 74p respectively. You can go into any pub in the area and they will tell you the same thing, and it amounts to this – the higher the price of a pint, the more the average person is put off from visiting their local. The ridiculous thing is that in this country we aret axed more heavily on drink than in any other country in the Common Market with the exception of the Irish Republic”.

As the lounge bar of the Jubilee cleared at the end of the lunchtime session Mr. Batten's grandson, three-and-a-half months old Thomas came down with his mum to see what was going on. Rapid calculations revealed that, assuming prices rise on the current scale, Thomas will be tipping back pints at more than 12 a time – if there are any pubs open by the time he is 20.

One of the last customers to leave was fellow-publican and ex-journalist, Brian Potter, now licensee at the Clarendon in Tontine Street, Folkestone. Said Brian between mouthfuls of ale “If nobody says or does anything then I reckon they'll get away with pegging wine at the price it is and harmonising the prices by jacking up the price of a pint. What Vic says is dead right. The average bloke is beginning to realise the cost of a pint of beer has already been increased out of all proportion. I mean, have your wages doubled in the last five years?”

Opinions of the same sort were voiced by Mr. Danny McNeill, late of Balloch, Scotland, and now not-unacquainted with the bar of the Globe in Folkestone's Bayle. “If the people who fixed the prices could stand in here and listen to what people are saying, their ears would burn”, he said. “There’s definitely something wrong with the pricing when you can get a super strong lager in Scotland for less than 70p. It seems to me that the brewers and the government are pricing themselves out of a good thing”.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 September 1986.

Local News.

The funeral service of Folkestone’s most famous former pub landlady, Maud Lewis, took place on Wednesday. Maud - who died last week aged 75 - was landlady at the old Guildhall pub, until it closed in 1984, for 32 years. For much of the last two years of her life she helped her daughter Eileen at the Globe on The Bayle. In all, she gave over 50 years' service to the licensed trade. When she retired from the Guildhall, Maud received many gifts and presentations from grateful regulars and friends. Members of the Guildhall Street Traders’ Association gave her an inscribed powder compact and the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers Association presented a colour television. She built up a solid following during her time at the pub. As one regular said when the Guildhall closed “I have been coming here ever since Maud took over. Now she is going to the Globe I shall be going over there. It is people that make a pub’s atmosphere”. Maud was buried at Herne Bay following a funeral service at Folkestone Parish Church.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 July 1987.

Local News.

Folkestone now has two Guildhalls. One, the historic former Town Hall – the other, the town's newest pub. The Globe public house in The Bayle has been renamed The Guildhall. In a brief and very damp xceremony the Mayor, Kelland Bowden, unveiled the new Guildhall sign to the cheers of revellers and a trumpeter, before going upstairs to make a closer inspection of the sign.

The mother of landlady Eileen Lewis, Maud, used to run the old Guildhall pub, in Guildhall Street, which is now a Pizza Hut restaurant.

Mr. Bowden said “I think it is appropriate that the name of the old pub should follow Eileen. I used to use the old pub when I was young”.

Landlady Eileen said “It's a dream come true to have the Guildhall back. I'm just pleased the opening went without a hitch. I was sure that the curtain was going to get stuck on the sign”.

Local News.

An application has been put forward for a restaurant licence by the management of the Victoria Hotel, in Middelburg Square.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 August 1987.

Letter.

I was most interested to read your report on the renaming of the Globe, and in particular reference to “the town's newest pub”.

Whilst I appreciate Eileen Lewis' nostalgia for the old Guildhall which she and her mother ran admirably for many years, I do feel that the end result is wrong. I, like many others, regret the passing of the Guildhall, but cannot help but feel that it would be better to have put the Globe on the map, so to speak, which I am sure Eileen was capable of. Call it what you will, it will always be the Globe, a much older “house” than the Guildhall was, and can never be the Guildhall.

The earliest reference to the Guildhall is in August, 1870, when the then occupant Mr. Andrews applied for a spirit licence, and it was quoted in evidence that he had occupied the house for two years without complaint, thus giving us 1868 as the earliest known date for the Guildhall. The Globe, however, could boast a much older history. The earliest reference to it is in 1855, and two years later there is reference to the licence being transferred to Sarah Hambrook from Thomas Maycock. This Mr. Maycock ran the Globe as a wine and spirit merchant, but had a room referred to as the public room, where drink could be consumed on the premises (this can be verified), and there is evidence that he had done so since 1848, when the premises were erected. Incidentally, there are still descendants of Mr. Maycock living in Folkestone today. Indeed, Dr. C.H. Bishop states that the Globe is probably built on the site of a much older inn.

So, to quote a reference elsewhere, it was felt by Eileen’s “locals” that “a slice of history” had been lost with the closure of the Guildhall, a much older “slice of history” has been lost with the passing of the name of the Globe.

E. D. Rooney,

Mead Road,

Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 August 1987.

Local News.

The recent renaming of the Globe public house in Folkestone has roused a host of fond memories for one woman – she was born there. Joan Mann, of Stanley Road, Cheriton, came kicking and screaming into the world shortly after the First World War.

Her grandfather, Alfred Fox, was the licensee of the 19th Century pub, now named the Guildhall, shortly after the turn of the century, and remained the pub’s landlord through the First World War. Mrs. Mann said “I remember my grandfather as a jolly old man, and very popular in the pub. He was a teetotaller and it was only after his retirement in the early 20’s that he touched a drop or two of brandy. Mrs. Mann supplied us with the photograph showing regulars and staff outside the old pub and what a smart lot they are. Eagle-eyed readers might spot the little white dog in the background.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

MAYCOCK Thomas 1849-57 Bastions

CLARK Susannah Oct/1857 Folkestone Chronicle

HAMBROOK Sarah 1857-58 Bastions

Last pub licensee had HAMBROOK Richard 1858-76 (age 52 in 1861Census) BastionsPost Office Directory 1862Post Office Directory 1874

HAMBROOK Miss Emily 1876-83 (age 39 in 1881Census) BastionsPost Office Directory 1882

DOWNING Charles 1883-86 Next pub licensee had Bastions

HARRIS Joseph 1886-88 Bastions

CRIPPS George Fuller 1887-88 Bastions

TRITTON Frederick 1888-90 Bastions

Last pub licensee had HALL Thomas 1890-92 Next pub licensee had BastionsPost Office Directory 1891

RICKETTS Matthew 1892-95 Bastions

SPARROW Charles 1895-97 Next pub licensee had Bastions

PETTIFER Joseph 1897-99 Bastions

FABER Louis 1899-04 Bastions

FABER Charles 1903 Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

HARDY Jack 1904-05 Bastions

ALLEN Arthur 1905-06 Bastions

FOX Alfred Peter 1906-20 BastionsPost Office Directory 1913

DAWSON Robert Ernest 1920-23 BastionsPost Office Directory 1922

BUTLER Henry John 1923-May/25 Bastions

CHAMBERS George May/1925-Feb/26 Bastions

CHAMBERS Elizabeth (later DORRELL) Feb/1926-42 Bastions

CHAMBERS Mrs Elizabeth 1934+ Kelly's 1934

DURRELL Mrs Eliz 1938 Post Office Directory 1938

HUGHES Selina 1942-48 (also "Earl Gray") Bastions

JEFFREE Archibald 1948-56 Bastions

LETTS Harendo 1956-59 Bastions

LETTS Ronald 1959-83 Bastions

LEWIS Eileen 1983-87 Bastions

Renamed "Guildhall."

 

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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