DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 12 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1843

Pavilion Shades

Latest 1944

Tram Road (Seagate/London Road 1851Census)

Folkestone

Pavillion Shades

Above photo kindly sent by Matt Minch dated 1912, showing an outing outside the "Wonder Tavern."

Pavilion Shades, Tram Road

Above photo showing Tram Road where the Pavilion Shades used to be, the location is now covered with flats.

 

Connected with the "Pavilion Hotel" later to become the  "Royal Pavilion Hotel" this was erected in 1843 by the South Eastern Railway about 100 yards away from the hotel and adjoining the hotels stables.

War damaged the building and it closed for business in 1944 and unfortunately the building was demolished in the early 1950s for new flats.

Bagshaw's directory of 1847 states that the "Pavilion Shades" was also operating livery stables.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 August 1857.

Wednesday August 5th: - Before R.W. Boarer esq., (Mayor), W. Major, G. Kennicott, J. Tolputt, J. Kelcey and W. Bateman esqs.

The licence of The Pavilion Shades was transferred from Mr. W, Kelsey to Mr. C. Doridant.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 October 1857.

Wednesday September 30th:- Before the Mayor, and T. Golder, W. Major, J. Tolputt, G. Kennicott, and J. Kelcey esqs.

This being the adjourned general annual licencing meeting, the following licence was renewed, viz.:- Charles Doridant, Pavilion Hotel and Pavilion Shades.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 21 November 1857.

CORONER'S INQUEST

During the past week, by a singular fatality, two inquests have been holden here, before the Coroner, S. Eastes, Esq. The first on Monday the 16th inst., at the "Pavilion Shades", Tram Road, on the body of Benjamin Turner, who lost his life in the circumstances as detailed in the evidence below:-

John Machin deposed he was silversmith at the "Pavilion Hotel". On Sunday night witness and the deceased (who was sculleryman at the Pavilion) were on the Pier Head near the lighthouse, they were sitting on the seat there; witness moved out of the wind, to the seat to the westward, called to deceased to come also, who called out “all right”, and immediately afterwards witness observed deceased falling over the low chain, which is reeved through the eyes of the iron supports fixed round the Pier Head. The weather was quite dark, witness called for assistance, when a boatman named Pope came – threw a rope, and also a life buoy to deceased, who was floating on the water – deceased took no notice of it, but appeared stunned; deceased was quite sober - was about 23 years of age. Boats were afterwards brought to the spot, but the body could not then be found; there was too much sea to allow him to be saved from the Pier Head.

Thomas Mullett proved finding the body of deceased, on Monday morning. The body was wedged in the rocks near the old Horn, about 60 or 70 feet southward from where the deceased had fallen over; witness and another person conveyed it to the "Pavilion Shades".

This being the whole of the evidence, the jury requested the room to be cleared, and after a short consultation returned the following verdict – Accidental Death. At the same time the jury begged to append to their verdict the following recommendation to the Directors of the South Eastern Railway Company, “that in future the chain round the South Pier Head be kept tightened, and that a boat be always kept at the lower landing, which may be used in case of a similar accident”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 24 November 1857.

Inquest.

An inquest was held on Monday, before the borough coroner, at the Shades Inn, on the body of Benjamin Turner, sculleryman at the Pavilion Hotel, who was drowned on Sunday evening, as stated in our last.

It appeared that the deceased leaned over the chains at the pier-head, or sat on them, and they slackened suddenly, throwing him on to the rocks into the sea. Evidence was given to show that had there been assistance rendered, the man’s life would have been saved.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death,” coupled with a recommendation to the directors of the South Eastern Railway Company that in future the chain round the south pier-head be kept tightened, and that a boat be always kept at the lower landing, which may be used in case of a similar accident.

We have been requested to make the following statement, which we believe to be correct. Edward Pape, a boatman, was on the look-out at the pierhead on Sunday evening for vessels coming into the harbour, and heard an alarm that a man had fallen over the pier; he immediately got a rope, and threw it over to the drowning man, who did not appear to have seen it. The wind was blowing hard, and a heavy sea running, but in less than five minutes a boat was got out and manned by Henry Hart, Edward Pope, Henry Jefferey, and Edward Marshall, who at the great risk of their lives rowed round to the spot. When they arrived there the deceased had sunk. They say that had there been grappling irons and boat-hooks handy, they could have caught the deceased before he sank. Pope, it appears, had directed the attention of Captain Boxer, the harbour-master, a few days previously, to the want of such, and the danger persons would be liable to by leaning over the chains. The reply received was that the company had lost some rope and would not do anything. These boatmen, the next morning searched for the body, and found it near the rocks, where it is supposed he fell, became stunned, and unable to catch hold of the rope thrown to him by Pope. For the praiseworthy exertions those men made, at the risk of their own lives, no remuneration has been given, although there has been a liberal subscription by the servants of the hotel to bury their fellow servant. We trust, however, that this matter will not rest where it is, and that the parties we have named will yet receive some reward.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1864.

General Annual Licencing Meeting – Special Sessions.

Wednesday 24th August:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, and A.M. Leith Esqs.

The licence of the Pavilion Shades Inn was transferred from John Dyason to John Wallis Jr. The session was adjourned till the 7th September next.

Note: This is at odds with More Bastions. Also, could Wallis actually be the son of the John Wallis previously at North Foreland, and not the same person?

 

Folkestone Observer 15 July 1865.

Monday July 10th:- Before the Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

James Kinnenburg, a cabman, was charged with embezzling the sum of 8s., the money of John Dyason, on December 1st, 1863.

The prisoner absconded after he had embezzled the money and a warrant was taken out for his apprehension, but till yesterday he kept out of the way of the police.

John Dyason said he was in business as a fly proprietor at the Pavilion Shades in 1863, at which time he employed the prisoner as a fly driver. He produced his job-book, by which it appeared that on December 1st, 1863 the prisoner charged 6s. for fly hire to a Captain Fawcett, of Sandgate. Witness sent in his bill for this amount a few days after when Captain Fawcett said that he had never employed the prisoner at all, but that he (prisoner) brought a gentleman to his house to dine, and was paid 8s. for it. He did not know the name of the gentleman, neither did he know where Captain Fawcett was at this time. On November 15th 1864 the prisoner took (according to the book) 7s., on the 16th, 4s., on the 17th, 4s., on the 20th, 4s., on the 21st, 4s., on the 27th, 5s., on the 28th, 5s., on December 4th, 4s., the whole of which he had not paid to prosecutor, who said he could not at present bring forth the party by whom the prisoner had been paid the money.

The magistrates discharged the prisoner, telling him he was liable to be re-arrested.

 

Folkestone Observer 16 March 1867.

Monday, March 11th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., and A,M, Leith Esqs.

Temporary authority was granted to Henry Augustus Herwigg for sale of liquors at the Pavilion Shades under the license to John Wallis.

Note: Herwigg does not appear in the list of licensees in More Bastions. Leaving date for Wallis is also different to info listed there.

 

Southeastern Gazette 14 May 1872.

Local News.

A man professing to be a surveyor of contracts, has been recently lodging at the “Pavilion Shades.” After stopping with Mr. Peden for a week, that gentleman was induced to lend him his pony and trap, of the value of 40, and he has seen neither his animal nor conveyance since. The police were put on the track of this swindler, but have failed to find him, although he was known to have offered the pony and trap for sale at Buckland, near Dover.

 

Hastings and St Leonards Observer - Saturday 18 May 1872.

A man professing to be a surveyor of contracts, has been recently lodging at the "Pavilion Shades," Folkestone. After stopping with Mr. Peden for a week, that gentleman was induced to lend him his pony and trap, of the value of 40, and he has seen neither his animal or conveyance since. The police were put on the track of the swindler, but have failed to find him, although he was known to have offered the pony and trap for sale at Buckland near Dover.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 September 1873.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Pavilion Shades on Wednesday afternoon, before Mr. Till (who acted for the Coroner, Mr. Minter), and a jury, of whom Mr. Vaughan was chosen foremen, on the body of John Binfield, who was f

ound dead in a sawpit belonging to Mr. William Redman, shipwright. James Crumby, carman, stated that he saw deceased just before 4 o'clock on that morning, and he was sober then. The evening before, about 7 o'clock, he had a glass of beer with him. Joseph George Colley, shipwright, in the employ of Mr. Redman, stated that about half past 5 he went into Mr. Redman's sawpit, when he saw someone there lying down, and after he had examined the body he found it was that of deceased. He was lying with his face down. He had a tanned frock over his head, and his feet towards the door of the pit. He was stiff and dead. Dr. Bateman said there were no marks of injury on the body, except a little discolouring of the nose, probably from a fall, and it was his opinion that deceased died from suffocation. The jury returned a verdict to that effect.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1873.

Inquest.

On Wednesday morning a man named John Binfield was found dead in a sawpit in a shed belonging to Mr. Redman, boat builder, on the Tram Road. An inquest was held at the Pavilion Shades on the afternoon of the same day before Mr. F.J. Till and a jury.

Mr. Ayllefe Binfield, deceased's brother, identified the body and said his age was 56 and he had no settled place of abode.

James Crumby, carman, said deceased helped him to put his horse in the cart in front of the North Foreland Inn about ten minutes to four on Wednesday morning and then went away. Deceased appeared to be sober; did not know whether he had been in bed. Had a pint of beer with him the night before in the Providence Inn, where he left him about half past nine.

Joseph George Colley, Seaview Terrace, said he went to put his garden tools in the sawpit about half past five on Wednesday morning, when he saw a man lying at the bottom with his frock over his head. Got a stick and tried to arouse him, and finding he did not move, got down into the pit and found he was lying face downwards. Called Mr. Redman up, who sent witness for a policeman. Sergt. Reynolds came, and went for Dr. Bateman. Deceased was stiff and cold and foaming at the mouth. Had seen him in the stables near the sawpit several times. The sawpit was about two feet from the door of the shed.

Mr. Redman corroborated, and said he saw the shed door closed the night before, and a piece of wood placed against it, the key having been lost.

W. Bateman Esq., M.R.C.S., said he was called to see deceased in the sawpit between six and seven on Wednesday morning. Found no marks of violence; there was a scratch or two on the face; clothes not disordered and no appearance of a struggle having taken place. The hands were open. From the livid appearance of the face, was of opinion that deceased died from suffocation. There was no fracture of the vertebrae or any other part of the body, The probability was that deceased was stunned by falling into the pit, and his face being buried in the sawdust, suffocation ensued.

Verdict: Accidental Death from suffocation.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 January 1875.

An Old Offender.

At the Leeds Assizes, Frederick Furness has recently been sentenced to ten years' penal servitude for stealing 22 and an overcoat, at Settle, Yorkshire, in 1872. In April of the same year he paid a visit to Folkestone, after he had made the above theft. On leaving Folkestone he hired a pony and chaise of Mr. Peden, of the Shades Inn, and sold them at Maidstone. Mr. Superintendent Wilshere, in consequence of a description of the convict he received, identified him, and thus helped to put an end to his fraudulent career.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 January 1875.

Local News.

In April, 1872, a pony belonging to Mr. Peden, of the Pavilion Shades, was stolen, and the fact being communicated to Supt. Wilshere, a warrant for the apprehension of a man named Robert Furness was obtained, but until recently his whereabouts was not known. It would appear that the delinquent had thought fit to obtain his livelihood by preying upon the public, for, prior to his visit to Folkestone, he had left his mark at Settle, in Yorkshire. Here he stole 38 in money, and for the offence was, during the past week, committed at the Leeds Assizes for ten years’ penal servitude and three years’ police supervision.

 

Folkestone Express 7 August 1880.

Monday, August 2nd:

Mary James was charged by P.C. Hogben with being drunk and disorderly in the Tramway. The constable stated that the defendant created a disturbance outside the Pavilion Shades. He tried to induce her to go home, but she refused and used obscene language. She was so violent that he had to get another constable to assist in conveying her to the police station. She was fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'. A charge of using obscene language was not proceeded with.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 October 1888.

Wednesday, October 24th: Before Major H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick Esq., and Surgeon general Gilbourne.

Mary Ann Philpott was summoned for assaulting William Langham on the 16th instant.

Mr. Minter appeared for the prosecutor.

William Langham stated that he was an accountant. He appeared against the defendant at the County Court on the 16th instant. On the next day he was walking up the Tram Road when the defendant came out of Radnor Street and used very obscene language to witness. He took no notice of her. There was another man there, named Ralph Hopper, and by his advice they both went into Mr. Peden's house. The defendant came in and used most filthy language. She struck witness twice in the face and threatened to thrash him, and witness was afraid she would annoy him in the streets. Witness escaped out into the yard.

By the defendant: Did not see her under the arches, nor did witness speak to her in the bar of Mr. Peden's.

A South Eastern Railway policeman named Cole deposed to witnessing the assault in the bar. The plaintiff did not attempt to retaliate or give any provocation for the assault. He did not kick the defendant in witness's presence.

Defendant denied the charge, stating that the plaintiff kicked her on the leg, and that all she did was to push him away.

Fined 10s. and 13s. costs, or 14 days'.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 June 1892.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Tuesday before Councillor J. Holden, J. Pledge, J. Dunk, and Mr. J. Fitness, a man named Thomas Smith was charged with breaking 2 glass tumblers, the property of George Burgess, landlord of the Folkestone Cutter.

The prosecutor stated that the man was in his house on Monday evening. He missed two glasses, and believing defendant to have them followed him down the street and saw him take the glasses out of his pocket and throw them against the wall of the Pavilion Shades. He asked the prisoner what he did it for, and he was very abusive. He was not sober, but he spent no money in prosecutor's house. The value of the glasses was 4d.

Prisoner said he did not know he had the glasses in his pocket He had been drinking all day. When he felt the glasses, he pulled them out and threw them on the pavement.

Prosecutor said the defendant went into the house with 10 or 12 militiamen.

Prisoner was fined 2s. 6d., damage 4d., and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days.

 

Folkestone Express 11 June 1892.

Tuesday, June 7th: Before J. Holden, J. Pledge, J. Dunk and J. Fitness Esqs.

Thomas Smith was charged with breaking two glass tumblers, the property of George Burgess, landlord of the Folkestone Cutter.

Prosecutor said the man was in his house on Monday evening. He missed two glasses and followed the defendant down the street, and saw him take the glasses out of his pocket and throw them against the wall of the Pavilion Shades. He asked prisoner what he did it for, and he was very abusive. He was not sober, but he spent no money in prosecutor's house. The value of the glasses was 4d.

Prisoner said he did not know he had the glasses in his pocket. He had been drinking all day. When he felt the glasses, he pulled them out and threw them on the pavement.

Prosecutor said the defendant went into the house with 10 or 12 militiamen.

Prisoner was fined 2s. 6d., damage 4d., and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 5 February 1898.

Wednesday, February 2nd: Before The Mayor and Messrs. J. Fitness, W. Wightwick, and W.G. Herbert.

Mr. Thomas Ladd was granted temporary authority to sell at the Pavilion Shades.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1898.

Felix.

One of Folkestone's most respected tradesmen had just sought a well-earned retirement. I refer to Mr. James Peden, of the Pavilion Shades. This estimable gentleman has served his fellow men in many ways, both in the Council Chamber and out of it. As Chairman of the Licensed Victuallers' Society and The Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Mineral Water Company, he has always commanded the esteem and confidence of a body of keen businessmen. For many years, too, Mr. Peden has been entrusted with the shipping of horses at the Harbour and in this capacity he has had charge on many occasions of Her Majesty's property, besides most of the famous race horses of the age. And now that he is lying aside the cares and anxieties of his varied occupations I sincerely wish him, on behalf of his many friends, both in Folkestone and out of it, the best of health and happiness in the years before him. He goes into his retirement with the good will of all who have ever had the pleasure and privilege of his acquaintance. Mr. Laird, of Tunbridge Wells, is Mr. Peden's successor.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1898.

Felix.

How easy it is to make a mistake, and here is a proof of it. “Pavilion Stables, Folkestone, February 10th, 1898. Dear Felix, Your comments re. myself in last week's issue, though flattering, were not correct as I am not retiring, but have let the house to Mr. Laird, so that I may give the whole of my time to the yard. Yours truly, J.S. Peden”.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 December 1902.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Messrs. Wightwick, Swoffer, and Herbert, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The following transfer of wine, beer, and spirit licences was granted: The Pavilion Shades to William Edward Neal (sic)

 

Folkestone Express 20 December 1902.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

A transfer of licence was granted to William Edward Nash for the Pavilion Shades.

 

Folkestone Daily News 8 October 1910.

Saturday, October 8th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Stainer, Linton, Hamilton, and Boyd.

A man named Champion pleaded Guilty to assaulting Mr. Nash, of the Pavilion Shades.

Mr. G.W. Haines appeared to prosecute on behalf of the Licensed Victuallers Association.

Mr. Nash deposed to defendant coming in the Shades in company with some other men, who he would not serve. Defendant struck him over the bar, and also assaulted another customer. Witness went round the bar and was knocked down, There was a general fracas.

Defendant was fined 40s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 15 October 1910.

Saturday, October 8th: Before W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Walter Champion was summoned for assaulting Edward Nash, the landlord of the Pavilion Shades. Defendant pleaded Guilty.

Mr. G.W. Haines, solicitor, supported the summons and also appeared on behalf of the Licensed Victuallers' Trade Protection Society. Having outlined the assault, he said licence holders had very considerable restrictions. They had to comply with the law, and Nash was endeavouring to conduct his house in a proper manner and do what was right. What, to an extent, made the case worse was that the defendant himself was a barman in the trade, and he knew as much as anybody the difficulties there were in conducting a public house. Therefore it was felt that under the circumstances that the case should be brought before the Magistrates.

Edward Nash said he had been eight years at the Pavilion Shades. On Monday evening at 8.15 defendant went into the house in company with three other men. Witness took exception to one of the three other men and refused to serve him. Because he told them they could not remain, an altercation ensued between witness and defendant. A customer then came in and asked for a glass of beer, and whilst he (witness) was drawing the beer defendant struck him in the mouth with his fist, and witness subsequently saw Champion strike another customer in the bar. Witness went round the bar for the purpose of ejecting the defendant, and there was a general disturbance.

Mr. Haines said he did not press for anything heavy.

The Chairman, in fining defendant 40s. and 9s. costs, or one month, said it was a most unprovoked assault.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 October 1910.

Saturday, 8th October: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, W.G. Boyd, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer.

Walter Champion was summoned for assaulting Edward Nash, landlord of the Pavilion Shades, on the 3rd October. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared on behalf of the prosecution.

Mr. Haines stated that he was instructed to prosecute in that case by the complainant and by the Licensed Victuallers' Trade Protection Society. After briefly outlining his case, Mr. Haines stated that landlords had got very considerable restrictions as to conducting their houses, and they tried to do so to the very best of their ability. The complainant was endeavouring to do what was right, and the defendant assaulted him. What made it worse was that the defendant was a barman in the trade, and knew as much as anyone the difficulties there were in conducting a house. It was felt under those circumstances that that summons should be brought before them.

Edward Nash stated that he was landlord of the Pavilion Shades. He had been landlord for eight years. On the previous Monday evening, 3rd October, the defendant came into his house in company with three other men. Witness took objection to one of the three men – not the defendant – and refused to serve them. That led to an altercation between witness and the defendant. Whilst he was serving another customer the defendant struck him on the mouth. Witness was on his own side of the counter, and defendant struck him over the counter. Witness subsequently saw him strike another customer in the bar. He went round for the purpose of ejecting the four defendants, and a general disturbance then took place in the bar.

Defendant stated that he was very sorry. He had just commenced his holiday, and had had a couple of drinks.

Fined 40s. with 9s. costs, or one month's imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 September 1912.

Tuesday, September 17th: Before Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore and Councillor R.G. Wood.

The licence of the Pavilion Shades was temporarily transferred from Mr. Nash to Mr. E. Bishopp.

Mr. Nash asked to be excused from attending the next Licensing Sessions, but the request was refused.

 

Folkestone Daily News 21 September 1912.

Tuesday, September 17th: Before Messrs. Fynmore and Wood.

The temporary transfer of the licence of the Pavilion Shades was granted to Mr. E. Bishop from the former landlord, Mr. B. Nash.

 

Folkestone Express 5 October 1912.

Local News.

At the police court on Wednesday the following transfer of licences was sanctioned by the Magistrates: Pavilion Shades, Tram Road, from Mr. H. Nash to Mr. E. Bishopp.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 October 1912.

Wednesday, October 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The Bench granted the temporary transfer of licence as follows: Pavilion Shades, from Mr. William Edward Nash to Mr. Edward Bishop.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 October 1912.

Wednesday, October 2nd: Before Messrs. Ward, Herbert, Swoffer, and Linton.

The following licence was transferred upon change of tenants: The Pavilion Shades, from H. Nash to E. Bishopp.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 January 1916.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates yesterday sentenced Leonidas Parent, a French Canadian, to four months' hard labour for buying a bottle of whisky for a Canadian soldier.

Mr. J. Stainer was in the Chair, the other Magistrates present being Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Alderman W. Dunk, Councillor E. Edward Mumford, and the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson.

A private in the 23rd Canadian Battalion said he saw the defendant on Thursday evening in Folkestone, and gave him a 10s. note to get a bottle of whisky. Accused purchased the whisky and brought it to witness. After defendant had given him the whisky a policeman and a Corporal of the Military Police came up and took it away. The defendant went into a public house to purchase the whisky.

P.C. Whitehead said at 7.15 he was in Harbour Street, when Corpl. Price, of the C.M.P., gave prisoner into his charge for buying a bottle of whisky for a soldier. The last witness took the bottle of whisky from his own pocket.

Mr. Ed. Bishopp, the landlord of the Pavilion Shades, said he recognised the accused as the man who came in for a bottle of whisky. He asked him if it was for a soldier, and accused said “No”.

Prisoner said he did not remember anything. If he did it, he was very sorry. He had not done such a thing before.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said the prisoner was there earlier in the week charged with being found in possession of military clothing, and was then fined 1.

The Chairman said there was no doubt in their minds that defendant got the whisky. They did not believe his statement that he was drunk. They had a similar case a little while ago, and they said then that they would deal severely with the next offence. Accused would be sentenced to four months' imprisonment.

Addressing Mr. Bishopp, Mr. Stainer said the Bench were of opinion that he did not exercise sufficient care. He must have known from the appearance and character of the man that he was not buying the whisky for himself. The Magistrates wished to state through him that they would be severe in the future with any licence holder who sold liquor to a man whom they could see was not buying it for himself.

 

Folkestone Express 8 January 1916.

Local News.

As everyone should know, it is a serious offence under the Defence of the Realm Regulations to purchase whisky for a soldier.

Another case came before the Folkestone Magistrates (Mr. J. Stainer in the chair) on Friday, the prisoner being Leonidas Parent, a French Canadian, who was fined by the Bench a few days previously for another breach of the law.

Prisoner, in reply to the Chairman, said he “did not remember anything”.

A French Canadian, a private in the 23rd Battalion C.E.F., said on the previous evening he saw the prisoner in Folkestone, and gave him 10s. to buy a bottle of whisky. The accused bought him a bottle of whisky similar to that produced. Then a military policeman and a civil policeman came up, and witness handed them the bottle. Witness was in uniform, and he called to the prisoner, whom he asked to purchase a bottle of whisky for him.

P.C. Whitehead said he was in Harbour Street when one of the Canadian Military Police brought prisoner to him. In consequence of a communication, witness charged him with purchasing the whisky for a soldier from the Pavilion Shades, a fully licensed house.

Edward Bishop, landlord of the Pavilion Shades, in the Tram Road, said on the previous evening the accused came into his house, and after treating one or two asked for a bottle of whisky. Witness said “Is it for a soldier?”, and he said “No”. Witness therefore sold him the bottle of whisky now produced. He paid 4s. 3d. for it, giving witness a 10s. note.

Prisoner said he had had a few drinks and did not remember anything about it. If he did as was said, he was very sorry. It had never happened before.

The Clerk asked Mr, Bishop what was the condition of the man.

Mr. Bishop: Well, he was all right, or I should not have served him.

Was he sober? – He was sober.

P.C. Whitehead also declared that the prisoner was perfectly sober.

Prisoner, however, asserted to the contrary.

The Chief Constable said the man was fined 1 last week for being found in the possession of military clothing.

The Chairman pointed out that the Bench had a similar case before them last week, when they threatened if the like happened again they would inflict more severe punishment. The accused would now be sentenced to four months' hard labour.

Calling Mr. Bishop, the licensee, forward, Mr. Stainer addressed him as follows: We are of opinion that you did not exercise sufficient care in this case. You must have known from the character of the man that he was not buying for himself.

Mr. Bishop: But he had used my house before.

Mr. Stainer: That does not improve his case. The man was living in a lodging house, and had been fined for being in possession of military articles. We warn the publicans through you that we shall be severe on licence holders who sell to men who, it is evident, are not buying for themselves. In our judgement, it was apparent in this case that the man was not buying for himself.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1916.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death of Mr. J. Spence Peden, who passed away in his 84th year in his residence, Claremont House, Cheriton Road, on Wednesday evening, after a very brief illness. The deceased, who was very well-known and highly esteemed by his fellow townspeople, came to Folkestone in his early days. For many years he carried on business at the Royal Pavilion Livery Stables, being principally engaged as a horse shipper. Under the care of himself and his son many of the most famous horses on the Turf have been conveyed to and from the Continent. Although he took no great part in local public affairs, for two years he was a member of the Folkestone Town Council, sitting for the East Ward. He was Chairman for some years of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Mineral Water and General Supply Co. Ltd. In spite of his advanced age he was often to be seen out enjoying the fresh air. He leaves an only son to mourn his loss.

The funeral will take place today (Saturday) at the Folkestone Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Express 19 February 1916.

Obituary.

The funeral of Mr. James Spence Peden, who passed away at his residence, 86, Cheriton Road, last week, in his 84th year, took place at Folkestone Cemetery on Saturday. The deceased was a well-known resident of Folkestone, and was for two years a member of the Town Council. He was an exporter of horses in a very large way of business, and was at one time the licensee of the Pavilion Shades. One son is left to mourn his loss.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 December 1916.

Friday, December 1st: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J.J. Giles, and Councillor W.J. Harrison.

Edward Bishopp and Alice Bishopp were summoned for supplying intoxicating liquor at the Pavilion Shades without the same being duly ordered and paid for by the person consuming them. Mr. H.J. Myers appeared for them, and pleaded Not Guilty for the male defendant and Guilty for the female defendant.

Wm. Third and Evelyn Rogers were summoned for consuming liquor at the same time and place without having paid for it.

P.C. Piddock stated that on the night of the 25th November he and another constable entered the bar of the Pavilion Shades and called for drinks. There were several soldiers in the bar, and a man. Who afterwards gave the name of Sergt. Anderson, looking towards Third, asked for a Guinness, which Miss Bishopp put in a glass and handed to Third. Anderson then said to Miss Bishopp “See what the young lady over there wants”, indicating the defendant Rogers. Miss Bishopp spoke to Rogers, and served her with a glass of ale. Anderson had a whisky, and received a shilling, two pennies and some other coins as change for half a crown. Witness then told Anderson he was a police officer and should report him, to which he replied “I didn't think I was doing anything wrong”.

By Mr. Myers: The landlord must have been engaged serving other customers at the time.

P.C. Whittaker corroborated, saying Anderson received a shilling and twopence, or threepence, in coppers as change for his half crown.

By Mr. Myers: Mr. Bishopp was behind the counter most of the time.

Mr. Edward Bishopp, sworn, said he had had the house for four years, and had no convictions against him. His only assistant in the bar was his daughter, to whom he had given strict instructions as to treating. He also had notices in the bar that no treating was to be allowed. He did not see the transactions which were the basis of this summons.

Miss Alice Bishopp said she had been instructed by her father not to allow treating. On the night in question they were very busy, and both were serving behind the counter, her father serving the customers in the other bar. Miss Rogers, who was in the private bar, called for her drink, but said the soldier was paying for it.

Miss Rogers said Miss Bishopp brought her a glass of beer, and said the soldier had paid for it. She did not drink the beer.

Third said no-one paid for any drink for him.

After retirement, the Bench announced that Edward Bishopp would be fined 5, Alice Bishopp 2, and Rogers and Third 10s. each.

 

Folkestone Express 9 December 1916.

Friday, 1st December: Before Mr. J. Stainer and other Magistrates.

Edwin Bishopp and his daughter Alice Bishopp, of the Pavilion Shades public house, were summoned for supplying to persons drink which had not been paid for by themselves, and Private William Third and Evelyn Rogers were summoned for consuming drink which had been paid for by another person. Mr. H.J. Myers appeared for the Bishopps, pleading Not Guilty in respect of Mr. Bishopp and Guilty as to Miss Bishopp.

The Chief Constable said the drinks in this case were purchased by a man who gave the name of Sergt. Anderson, but this was a false name, and the man could not be traced.

P.C. Pittock said he visited the Pavilion Shades public house on November 25th with P.C. Whittaker, both being in plain clothes. Witness called for a glass of ale and a small lemon. There were a number of soldiers in the bar, and after about five minutes a man who afterwards gave the name of Sergt. Anderson came up to the counter and, looking towards where the defendant Third was standing, said “Guinness?” and Third replied “Yes”. Anderson then spoke to Miss Bishopp, who poured a bottle of stout into a glass and handed it to Third. Anderson then said “See what the young lady over there wants”, indicating the defendant Rogers, who was in a private bar. After some conversation she was served with a glass of ale. Anderson then said “Give me a whisky”, and placed a half crown on the counter. Miss Bishopp served him, and as change she gave him a shilling, two pennies and two other coins. Mr. Bishopp was in a position quite well to hear and see what was going on. Witness told Anderson they would report him under the “No Treating” Order, and Anderson replied “I did not know I was doing anything wrong”. The defendant Rogers, when told she would be reported, said “All right; I hope you get tripped up next time”. When Mr. Bishopp was informed that he would be reported for allowing treating to take place on his premises he said “All right; thank you very much”.

Cross-examined: He saw the Liquor Control notice pasted up in the bar, but saw no special reference to treating.

P.C. Whittaker corroborated.

Mr. Bishopp, called for the defence, said he had held the licence for the Pavilion Shades for four years, and during that time there had been no complaint. On the night in question there were a lot of people in the bars, it being a busy night. His only assistance in the bar was his daughter, whom he had instructed not to permit treating. There were “No Treating” notices up in the bar. He did not hear his daughter take an order from Sergt. Anderson, and knew nothing about the matter until he was spoken to by P.C. Pittock. Had he heard the order given he would have stopped it.

Questioned by the Clerk, defendant said he served the police officers, but he did not know they were policemen.

Miss Bishopp, also giving evidence, said she had been instructed not to permit treating in the house. She heard Miss Rogers call for a drink, and when she was served she said a soldier was paying for it, and witness unfortunately took the money.

Mr. Myers, in addressing the Bench, said although Mr. Bishopp might be legally responsible he certainly was not morally responsible, and he (Mr. Myers) ventured to think that the defence had shown extenuating circumstances. The Bench would appreciate how difficult it was to prevent treating. Englishmen, when they met a friend, would say “What are you going to have, old man?”, and all the legislation in England would never alter it.

Miss Rogers said she had 1d. in her hand to pay for her glass of ale, but Miss Bishopp said the drink was paid for. She did not touch the ale, which was not “consumed”.

Private Third declared that he didn't have a drink with the soldier.

The Chairman pointed out that this was emergency legislation, and was intended for the good of the community. Mr. Bishopp would be fined 5, Miss Bishopp 2, and the other two defendants 10s. each.

 

Folkestone Express 10 February 1917.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before E.T. Ward, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, H. Kirke, and J.J. Giles Esqs., and the Rev. Epworth Thompson.

Mr. H. Reeve read his annual report as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are within your jurisdiction 115 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz; Full licences 71, Beer on 7. Beer off 5, Beer and spirit dealers 15, Grocers etc., off 7, Confectioners, wine, on 3. Chemists, wine, off 6, Total 115. This gives an average, according to the census of 1911, of one licence to every 291 persons, or one on licence to every 429 persons. This is the same number of licensed premises as were in existence last year.

At the adjourned licensing meeting, held on 6th March last, the licence of the Clarence Inn, Dover Road, was referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy, and at the principal meeting of that Committee held at Canterbury on 21st June, the renewal of the licence was refused. The question as to the amount of compensation to be paid was referred to the Inland Revenue Authorities, and has not at present been determined, consequently a provisional renewal of the licence will be applied for. During the past year five of the licences have been transferred.

For the year ended 31st December last 55 persons (28 males and 27 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness, of whom 32 were convicted and 23 discharged without conviction. Of the persons proceeded against 17 were residents of the Borough, 9 members of the Naval and Military Forces, 13 persons of no fixed abode and 16 residents of other districts. In the preceding year 174 persons (109 males and 65 females) were proceeded against, of whom 129 were convicted and 45 discharged.

Proceedings have been taken during the year against 14 of the licence holders for various offences, 7 of whom were convicted and 7 dismissed. The following are the cases in which convictions have been recorded, viz; 9th March, the licensee of the Guildhall Hotel was fined 1 for a breach of the “No Treating” Order; 24th March, the licensee of the Mechanics Arms Inn was fined 1 for allowing a child under 14 years to be in the bar of his licensed premises; 23rd June, the licensee of the Chequers Inn was fined 1 for dispatching intoxicating liquor from his licensed premises without a licence; 30th June, the licensee of the Morehall Wine Stores was fined 1 for dispatching intoxicating liquor from his licensed premises without the same having been previously paid for; 30th June, the licensee of 27 Rendezvous Street (off licence) was fined 1 for a similar offence; 1st December, the licensee of the London and Paris Hotel was fined 5 for a breach of the No Treating Order; 1st December, the licensee of the Pavilion Shades was fined 5 for a similar offence.

Nine clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, 7 for music only, and 1 for public billiard playing.

The Order of the Liquor Control Board which came into operation on 10th January last year, restricting the hours of sale and supply of intoxicating liquor to 4 hours each weekday and 4 hours on Sunday remains in force, and in my opinion is mainly the cause of the decrease in the cases of drunkenness recorded.

Under Regulation 10 of the Defence of the Realm Regulations, Orders have been made by the Competent Military Authority, and are still in force, closing 3 of the licensed houses to all members of H.M. Forces. The houses are the Jubilee Inn, Radnor Street, the Wonder Tavern, Beach Street, and the True Briton, Harbour Street.

The Chairman said with regard to the report the number of convictions was very satisfactory. Mr. Reeve said in his opinion that was due to the restricted hours. He (Mr. Ward) was sorry to see so many convictions of publicans – seven – which was a greater number than he remembered in any year. There was no doubt that publicans were faced with very great difficulties with so many restrictions placed upon them. He urged upon them the necessity of being very careful not to serve any wounded soldiers, or any soldiers waiting embarkation. There were very heavy penalties laid down for offences of such a nature – imprisonment for six weeks or 100 fine. He hoped all of them would be very careful. All the licences would be renewed with the exception of the seven against which convictions had been recorded, but those seven licences would be granted until the adjourned sessions in a month's time.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said with regard to the premises licensed for music and dancing the Magistrates had made new regulations. In future no structural alterations should be made in the licensed premises, and no alterations should be made in the stage, gangways, passageway or exits without the previous approval of the justices, and such gangways should be kept free from chairs or other obstruction during the hours of public entertainment, and all performances should be of an unobjectionable character, and good order and decent behaviour should be kept and maintained on the premises during the hours of licence.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 February 1917.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. J.J. Giles, Mr. H. Kirke, and the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson.

The Chief Constable read his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said he was sorry to see so many convictions of publicans, the greatest number he had seen for years. No doubt the difficulties of publicans were great owing to abnormal times. He would advise them to be very careful not to serve wounded soldiers or those who were soldiers about to embark. In regard to the licences, they would all be renewed, with the exception of seven, which would be considered at the adjourned sessions on March 7th.

 

Folkestone Express 10 March 1917.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Folkestone adjourned licensing sessions were held on Wednesday, Mr. E.T. Ward presiding on the Bench, when the licences of the Guildhall, the Mechanics Arms, the London and Paris Hotel, the Chequers, the Pavilion Shades, the Morehall Wine Stores, and Finn's Store, Rendezvous Street, were renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1917.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. H. Kirke.

The licences of the Pavilion Shades (Mr. E. Bishopp), the Mechanics Arms (Mr. J. Lawrence), Paris Hotel (Mr. G. Gray), Guildhall Vaults (Mr. Cousins), and those of Mr. J. Kent (Morehall), and Messrs. Finn and Co. Ltd. (Rendezvous Street) were renewed.

The Chairman, addressing the licensees, impressed upon them the great necessity of taking the greatest care in the conduct of their businesses, whilst at the same time acknowledging their difficulties.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 December 1917.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death, at the age of 48, of Mr. W.E. Nash, of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street. He had been in indifferent health for some time. For many years he was in the employ of the late Mr. James Peden, and was formerly landlord of the Pavilion Shades. Whilst living at Wootton he met with a severe accident, from the effects of which he never properly recovered. Possessed of a genial manner, he had a host of friends. The funeral took place at the Cemetery on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 February 1922.

Local News.

At the Elwick Auction Rooms on Tuesday, Messrs. Knight, Frank and Rutley, in conjunction with Messrs. Wickenden and Sons, of Tunbridge Wells, sold the Tenterden Brewery, with its ten tied houses, for 28,700. Included in the ten houses was the Pavilion Shades, Tram Road, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 24 December 1927.

Monday, December 19th: Before Alderman Spurgen and other Magistrates.

Frederick John Baines, of Dover, a corporal in the Territorial K.A., was charged with having, while being bailee of a handbag containing 7s. 4d., converted the same to his own use, thereby feloniously stealing the same.

Constance Mildred Horton, a housemaid at 7, Terlingham Gardens, said she first met Baines casually one evening at the Town Hall. She met him several times up to the 11th December. She met him on the 11th December, and she had her handbag, containing a purse and 7s. 4d. She was with him until about 10 p.m. When she left him she forgot to ask defendant for her handbag. She met him the following Tuesday about 9.15 p.m., and asked him for the handbag. He said he would give it to her on the Friday evening. She met him on the Friday evening at 5.15, and she was with him until ten o'clock. She again asked him for the handbag, and he said he had forgotten it, and that he would send it on Saturday by post. She did not receive the handbag on Saturday. On Saturday evening she went out, and passed him in Sandgate Road about 9.15. Defendant was standing talking to someone else. She saw him again about 9.40, outside a public house near the fishmarket. She said she wanted the handbag and the money back, and he said he had not got it. He said “I will give you the money on Monday”. She walked off, and he went into the public house. She saw a member of the Military Police Force in Tontine Street, and made a complaint to him. He went with her to the public house, and defendant was just leaving. Lance Corpl. Cox questioned him, and a policeman came along. She then noticed her handbag lying on the ground. She pointed it out to the police, and they then proceeded to the police station. The bag was opened at the police station, and the purse was inside, but there was no money in it. The value of the bag would be about 2s. 6d.

L. Cpl. Cox, Military Foot Police, said he was on duty in Tontine Street on Saturday about 9.50 when she made a complaint to him, and he accompanied her to the Pavilion Shades public house. He there saw the defendant leaving the public house. He stopped him, and told him that the young lady had complained that he was in possession of her handbag, and refused to give it up. He said “Yes, that's right. I will send it to her”. He asked defendant for his particulars, and he replied “Pte. Green”. Seeing he had two stripes on his arm he told him not to play about, and he then said “Gunner Baines”. He asked defendant if he was in possession of a permanent pass, and he said “No, I am a Territorial”. He told defendant to accompany him to P.C. Simpson. They went to where P.C. Simpson was standing, and then returned to the Pavilion Shades. He walked across to the young lady, who was six or seven yards away, and she pointed out the handbag lying on the ground just outside the gate of the Pavilion Shades. He picked the bag up and handed it to P.C. Simpson, and he then accompanied the others to the police station.

P.C. Simpson said at 9.15 p.m. on Saturday he was on duty in Beach Street when defendant was taken to him by the last witness. L. Cpl. Cox requested him to obtain his particulars, as he had been accused by a young lady of stealing her handbag. Miss Horton also complained to him that defendant was in possession of her handbag. He asked him for his particulars, and he said “I am a Territorial”. Miss Horton stated she gave her handbag to prisoner to mind, and that on leaving him she forgot to ask for it. She said she saw him again on Tuesday, and he refused to give it to her. On seeing him again that evening he said he had not got it, but would post it on to her. L. Cpl. Cox then produced a handbag, and Miss Horton identified the bag. He looked into the bag, and saw it contained an empty purse. He took Haines to the police station. He wa charged by Det. Con. Bugden with stealing the handbag, purse, and 7s. 4d. He replied “I did not steal the money. I had no intention of stealing it”.

Defendant pleaded Not Guilty, and said about a month ago, while standing under the Town Hall, he had a conversation with the girl. He asked her if he could see her home, and she said he could. A great friendship sprang up, and after going together for a fortnight she told him she was rather unhappy where she was working, and longed to see him every evening. On the 11th December he arranged to meet her at 5.15, and he was there. After walking a little way, she said “My hands are cold. Will you kindly put my handbag in your pocket?”, and he did. He forgot about it when leaving her, and arranged to see her on Tuesday, and left the handbag at home. On Friday he found he had not got any money, but he had promised to see the girl, and he spent some of the money to travel to see the girl. He had no intention of stealing the money, and if he was given a chance he would repay it. He wanted to apologise for doing a mean action.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said defendant had justly described it as a mean action, and it was not the first time he had committed this mean action. On the 3rd October, 1927, under similar circumstances, he took a purse containing two 10s. notes and 15s. in silver, and was fined 3. He was then in camp at Felixstowe. He was born at Southampton in 1906, and went to Dover in 1917. He was first employed as a plumber's mate, and then on the switchboard at the electric light works. Since July, 1927, he had been out of employment. He resided at Biggin Street, Dover, and was attached to the Territorials in Dover, and had attained the rank of full corporal.

The Magistrates sent defendant for one month's imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 April 1937.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death recently of Mrs. Annie Geraldine Bishopp at the age of 65. The wife of Mr. “Ted” Bishopp, the well-known licensee of the Pavilion Shades, Tram Road, Folkestone, Mrs. Bishopp has resided at the Shades for nearly 25 years.

The funeral took place at Hawkinge Cemetery on Wednesday last week.

 

Folkestone Express 9 October 1937.

Obituary.

The death occurred on Saturday of one of the best known licensees in Folkestone, Mr. Edward Bishopp, of the Pavilion Shades, Tram Road, at the age of 68 years.

Mr. Bishopp has held the licence for exactly twenty five years and is one of the oldest licensees in the town. He was a member of the Licensed Victuallers’ Association and for many years held the office of Hon. treasurer. He was also a member of the Druids Club in Dover Street.His wife predeceased him by exactly six months, passing away on April 2nd.

He leaves four sons and two daughters, to whom the deepest sympathy will be extended in their sad bereavement.

The funeral was held on Tuesday, the Rev. W.H. Pickburn officiating at a service at St. Peter’s Church and later at the graveside at the Folkestone Cemetery at Hawkinge.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 October 1937.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death on Saturday of Mr. Edward Bishopp, of the Pavilion Shades, Tram Road, Folkestone, at the age of 68. Born in Hythe, Mr. Bishop came to Folkestone at the age of 19. He was proprietor of the Pavilion Shades for 25 years. Mrs. Bishopp died in April last. Four sons and two daughters are left to mourn their loss.

The funeral, on Tuesday, was preceded by a memorial service in St. Peter’s Church, at which the Rev. W. Pickburn officiated. The interment was at Hawkinge Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 February 1959.

Local News.

One of Folkestone's oldest public houses ceased to exist this week – the war-damaged Pavilion Shades, in Tram Road.

At the Brewster Sessions on Wednesday, the Justices made an order for the removal of the full licence to the Honest Lawyer, in Bellevue Street, which hitherto had only a beer and wine licence. The licence was transferred from Mr. D.D. Casball, Secretary of Fremlins and Co., to Mr. George S. Rayner, licensee of the Honest Lawyer. The beer and wine licence of the Honest Lawyer was surrendered.

Mr. J.W. Girling, appearing for Flint and Co. and Fremlins and Co., said the Pavilion Shades was unfit for use as the result of enemy action during the last war. At the Honest Lawyer there was a beer and wine licence which, if an order was made for the removal, would be surrendered. It had been agreed that no monopoly value should be payable so there would be no pecuniary gain either way. The up-grading of the Honest Lawyer to a fully licensed house would reduce the number of licences in the area by one. The Licensing Planning Committee had no objections and had issued a certificate. “It has been suggested”, went on Mr. Girling, “that in view of the proposed improvements, the name Honest Lawyer should be changed to Improved Lawyer. I might add that all good lawyers are honest, although I would not like to say that all honest lawyers are good lawyers. In any event the beer will be good – it is Fremlins”, he added.

“I thought all beer was good”, commented the Chairman (Ald. N.O. Baker).

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

FOORD William 1847 Next pub licensee had Bagshaw's Directory 1847 (Seagate Road)

WILLIAMS William 1847-52 Bastions

DAVIS William C 1851+ (age 21 in 1851Census)

HAMBROOK Richard 1852-56 Next pub licensee had Bastions

KELSEY William 1856-Aug/57 Folkestone ChronicleMelville's 1858

DORIDANT Charles Mr Aug/1857-58 Folkestone Chronicle

PATTERSON Adam 1858-61

DYASON John 1862-Aug/64 Post Office Directory 1862Folkestone Chronicle

Last pub licensee had WALLIS John Jn Aug/1864 Next pub licensee had Folkestone Chronicle

HERWIGG Henry Augustus 1867-68

CARPENTER Daniel 1868-71

PEDEN James 1871-82 (also fly-proprietor age 48 in 1881Census) Post Office Directory 1874Post Office Directory 1882

PEDEN James & Son 1898 Post Office Directory 1891

LAIRD Thomas 1899-1902 (age 64 in 1891Census) Kelly's 1899Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

NASH William 1902-12

BISHOP Edward 1912-37 Post Office Directory 1913Post Office Directory 1922Kelly's 1934 (Bishopp Kelly's 1934)

BISHOP John Edward 1937-44 Post Office Directory 1938

 

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

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