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Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 29 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1861

Lifeboat Inn

Open 2019+

42 North Street

Folkestone

Lifeboat 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Lifeboat Inn, Folkestone 2009 Lifeboat sign 1977Lifeboat Inn Sign, Folkestone 2009

Above photos and sign right by Paul Skelton, 27 June 2009.

Sign left 1977.

With thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com.

Lifeboat watercolour

Above watercolour by Stuart Gresswell, once licensee of "Guildhall" and "Raglan" kindly sent by Jan Pedersen.

Lifeboat inside 2012

Photo taken 10 November 2012 from http://www.flickr.com by Jelltex.

Royal Oak/Lifeboat painting by Elijah Albert Cox

Above shows a painting by Elijah Albert Cox R.B.A. (1876-1955) showing the "Lifeboat" at the top right of the street. The "Royal Oak" sign can just be seen opposite.

 

The house is reported to have been there in 1750 and belonged to a mariner called Richard Kennet. The census of 1861 shows Thomas Taylor living there with an occupation of schoolmaster, not sure if he taught chemistry and brewed his own beer, but in 1865 he was said to be a beer retailer.

Brewers George Ash bought the house in 1866 but was later taken over by Mackeson and Co.

Just before the first world war in 1913 the pub was recommended for closure due to redundancy, but survived this turbulent period.

The bar area was reputed to be one of the smallest for any of the pubs in Folkestone, with low ceilings of only seven feet high but in 1956 the floor area was increased by adding part of the house next door. This in turn allowed the pub to gain one of the last full licenses in the town to do so.

The longest serving licensee to date, Harry May, had a hobby of writing to the 132 lifeboat stations in the country asking for pictures of their lifeboats which were displayed on the walls. I believe the pictures are still there today.

The house closed for two years in 1980 but opened again in 1982 as a free-house.

 

During the Covid 19 crisis of 2020, this pub was able to offer a take away service in June, possibly earlier.

 

Folkestone Express 8 July 1871.

Transfer Of License.

At the Petty Sessions on Wednesday morning the license of the Lifeboat was transferred from Richard Taylor to John Haiste.

Note: According to More Bastions Taylor had left before Haiste came, Frederick Graves being the landlord.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 May 1873.

Thursday, May 1st: Before The Mayor, J. Kelcey, R.W. Boarer and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Eliza Stewart was brought up in custody charged with having between the 19th and 29th of April last feloniously stolen 5 yards of alpaca, 2 night gowns, 2 chemises, 3 pieces of stuff, 1 white child's frock, 1 piece of linen, 1 waistband, 1 white jacket, 1 apron, 1 scarf, 1 sheet, and 1 pillow case from the dwelling house of Henry Hills, in North Street.

Jane Hills deposed that prisoner came to lodge at her husband's house, the Lifeboat Inn, on the 16th of April last. She went to a chest of drawers in a bedroom, when she found the things prisoner was charged with stealing missing.

Annie Dennard, a servant living with Daniel Hall, at the Queen's Head public house, in Queen's Square, Folkestone, stated that she purchased the 5 yards of alpaca, two chemises and scarf from prisoner for 4s. 6d.

Sophia Huckstepp said that she purchased a pawn ticket for the night gowns and a child's jacket from prisoner for 1s. 6d.

Sarah Aldridge, wife of a fisherman, living in Radnor Street, deposed to selling a child's frock she received from prisoner to a Mrs. Fagg, and obtaining 1s. for it.

P.C. Keeler having stated the facts connected with the apprehension of prisoner, who pleaded guilty to the charge, she was sentenced to three calendar months imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 3 May 1873.

Thursday, May 1st: Before The Mayor, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Eliza Stewart was charged with stealing the articles named in the evidence given below, the property of Henry Hills, Lifeboat Inn, North Street. The goods were valued at 15.

Jane Hills deposed: I am the wife of Henry Hills, Lifeboat Inn, North Street. Prisoner came to lodge at my house on the 15th April and stayed there up to yesterday. I went to a chest of drawers in one of my rooms yesterday for a pinafore for my child, when I missed five yards of alpaca, two nightgowns, two chemises, three pieces of calico, a little embroidered frock, a small piece of linen, a waistcoat, a white jacket, an apron, a sheet, and a pillow case. The articles produced I identify as my property. I last saw the articles the day after prisoner came to my house. The Superintendent showed them to me last night.

Ann Dennard deposed: I am servant to prosecutrix. I bought five yard of alpaca, two chemises, and a scarf of prisoner on the 22nd and 29th April. I gave her 1s. each for the chemises and 2s. 6d. for the alpaca. P.C. Keeler came to me yesterday and I told him I had bought the goods of prisoner.

Sophia Huxley deposed: I am housekeeper at the Queen's Head Inn. I bought a pawn ticket of prisoner referring to two nightgowns and a child's jacket on the 28th. On Tuesday morning she came to the Queen's Head for a glass of beer and I gave her 1s. 6d. to get the articles out of pledge, which she did and gave them to me. On Tuesday she brought three pieces of stuff, a child's bead belt, and a piece of linen, and said she was going back to Derby and would give them to me. I gave the goods to a policeman last night.

Sarah Aldridge said: I am wife of Henry Aldridge, fisherman, Radnor Street. I was in the Queen's Head on Monday evening when prisoner came in and said she had a child's frock to sell, which I took to Mrs. Fagg, a neighbour, for her and brought one shilling back. The frock produced is the same. I gave the frock to P.C. Keeler after fetching it back from Mrs. Fagg.

Superintendent Wilshire deposed: I received the alpaca now produced from the witness Dennard yesterday afternoon.

P.C. Keeler deposed: I apprehended prisoner about half past six last evening in Harbour Street and charged her with stealing three yards of alpaca from Mr. Hills. I then went to the Queen's Head and the witness Dennard gave me two chemises which she said she had bought of a woman. She went upstairs and gave me two nightgowns, three pieces of stuff, a pianoforte, a piece of linen, a belt, and a child's jacket. She said she bought the pawn ticket referring to the two nightgowns and jacket of prisoner. She said the pieces of stuff were given to her by prisoner. Mrs. Aldridge gave me the child's dress and said she took it of prisoner and sold it to Mrs. Fagg.

This was the case for the prosecution.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty, and said her husband was at the School of Musketry, Hythe, and was married February 16th, at Derby.

Superintendent Wilshire said a soldier of the 60th Rifles had sent money from Derby to pay her fare to that place.

Prisoner was sentenced to three months' hard labour.

The Mayor cautioned the witnesses to be careful purchasing goods in future.

 

Southeastern Gazette 6 May 1873.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Thursday, Eliza Stewart, who described herself as the wife of a soldier, was charged with stealing a quantity of wearing apparel, the property of Henry Hills, of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street. She pleaded guilty to the charge.

It appears that the prisoner had adopted quite a systematic course of proceeding, and the robberies had extended over a considerable period.

She was sentenced to three months’ hard labour in Dover Gaol.

 

Folkestone Express 30 January 1875.

Wednesday, January 27th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq. and Col. De Crespigny.

George Sherwood applied to have the license of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street transferred to him from Henry Hills. Formal proof having been given, the application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 29 January 1876.

Wednesday, January 26th: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, R.W. Boarer and T. Caister Esqs.

The license of the Lifeboat was transferred from William Sherwood to Mrs. Borland.

Note: Date differs from information in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 11 November 1882.

Tuesday, November 7th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, Capt. Crowe, and M.J. Bell Esq.

Annie Young, a hawker, was charged with stealing a gilt chain and locket, and various other articles, the property of Elizabeth Gomez.

Prosecutrix said she met the prisoner at the Lifeboat Inn, and as she could not obtain lodgings, and appeared to be a respectable woman, she took her to her room at the Granville Inn, Dover Street. She stayed a few days, and after she had left, prosecutrix missed several things, among them being a gilt chain and locket, a pocket knife, a pair of earrings, a pocket handkerchief, a piece of carpet, and two lace falls. On Friday she saw the prisoner at a public house and asked her if she had the things. She denied having taken them, and said she had not got them. On the following day she went to a bedroom occupied by the prisoner, and there found the piece of carpet, which she identified as her property. The value of the whole of the things stolen would be 5s.

Prisoner was remanded until Wednesday.

Wednesday, November 8th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, Captain Crowe, and M.J. Bell Esq.

The woman Young was brought up on remand charged with stealing articles belonging to Elizabeth Gomez. No further evidence was offered.

Mr. Minter said the locket and chain could not be traced, and the only article found belonging to prosecutrix was the piece of carpet, which was of very trifling value.

It transpired that there had been a disturbance between the prosecutrix and the prisoner, and after the prosecutrix had been questioned on the point the Bench dismissed the charge.

 

Folkestone Express 1 November 1884.

Transfer Of Licence.

Wednesday, October 29th: Before Captain Crowe, F. Boykett and A.M. Watkin Esqs.

The licence of the Lifeboat was transferred to John Salvatore.

 

Folkestone Express 2 May 1885.

Wednesday, April 29th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, Captain Fletcher, J. Fitness, J. Clark, W.J. Jeffreason and J. Holden Esqs.

The licence of the Lifeboat was transferred to Mr. L. Smith.

 

Folkestone News 2 May 1885.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Monday, before The Mayor, Captain Carter, J. Fitness, T. Caister, J. Clark, W.J. Jeffreason, J. Sherwood and J. Holden Esqs., the Lifeboat was transferred to Lewis Smith.

 

Folkestone Express 23 June 1888.

Advertisement:

To Let:

The Granville Public House, Dover Street, and the Lifeboat beerhouse, North Street, Folkestone. Particulars of Mr. Loftus Banks, Hotel valuer, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 15 December 1888.

Transfer of License.

Wednesday, December 12th: Before H.W. Poole and W. Wightwick Esqs.

The licence of the Lifeboat was transferred to Charles Thompsett.

 

Folkestone Express 9 March 1889.

Wednesday, March 6th: Before F. Boykett and H.W. Poole Esqs.

The licence of the Lifeboat was transferred to Thomas Hall.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 July 1898.

Wednesday, July 13th: Before The Mayor and Messrs. J. Holden, T.J. Vaughan, J. Pledge and G. Spurgen.

Sarah Morford was charged with assaulting Elizabeth Harris on the 7th July.

Complainant said she lived at 5, Bates Alley. On Thursday night she went to the Lifeboat Inn, North Street. Defendant was there, and threw a glass of porter over her, and “slipped into her” until the landlord took her away. Witness gave her no provocation.

Henry Setterfield, the landlord, said he was called by his wife to separate the women. He did so, and told them to go home.

Elizabeth Harris was then charged with assaulting Sarah Morford at the same time and place.

Mrs. Harris said defendant made use of a disgusting expression in the street, and repeated it later in the Lifeboat Inn. Witness then threw a glass of beer over her, and defendant pulled her hair.

The Bench decided it was a case of “six of one and half a dozen of the other” and dismissed both summonses.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 July 1898.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday – the Mayor presiding – Sarah Morford was summoned for assaulting Elizabeth Harris on the 7th July. There was a cross-summons.

Complainant deposed that she lived in North Street. She went to the Lifeboat public house on Thursday night. Defendant sat drinking a glass of porter. Witness went in for a drink. Defendant took up the glass and threw the beer all over her. She went down the street drenched. She took hold of witness's face and scratched it. The landlord put her out of the door. Witness had said nothing to her, and she did not return the blow. She could not, because Mr. Suddesfield (sic) took her away. She did not go out any more that evening.

Mr. Suddesfield, of the Lifeboat, was called as a witness. He separated the women.

On hearing of the cross-summons, the complainant, Elizabeth Morford, deposed that previously the defendant called her a foul name. Afterwards, at the Lifeboat, while telling someone about it, defendant said “And so you are”. Witness threw beer at her, and pulled her hair.

The Bench dismissed the case, each defendant having to pay costs.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 16 July 1898.

Wednesday, July 13th: Before The Mayor, J. Pledge, G. Spurgen, J. Holden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

Sarah Morford, a young woman, was summoned for assaulting another young woman named Sarah Harris, and there was a cross-summons in which the parties met vice versa.

Sarah Harris said: I went to the Lifeboat in North Street on Sunday evening, and Sarah Morford was sitting in the window. When she saw me she took a glass and threw the porter all over me, and struck me and scratched my face. She was not sober. I never returned a blow. I went home, and never went out again that night.

Henry Settersfield was called as a witness, but could throw very little light upon the matter.

The parties to the case directly afterwards changed places, Sarah Harris being charged on summons with assaulting the former defendant.

The Mayor said the Bench thought there were faults on both sides, that it was a case of six of one and half a dozen of the other, and both cases were dismissed on payment of costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 August 1902.

Wednesday, August 2th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, G.J. Swoffer, Alderman Salter, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Detective Sergeant Burniston only boarded the Folkestone Lifeboat once, and on that occasion ran her ashore on the rocks of the Folkestone Police Court. This is how it happened.

On Wednesday morning Alice Ann Setterfield, the landlady of the Lifeboat public house, North Street, was summoned for permitting her house to remain open during prohibited hours, viz., between the hours of 11 and 12 on Sunday morning, the 15th inst.

Detective Sergeant Burniston, in proving the case, said that about 11.15 on Sunday morning, the 17th, in company with P.C. Sharpe, he saw the door of the Lifeboat wide open, and a woman in the act of leaving the premises with something under her apron. He stopped her and found the “something” to be a bottle of stout. She also had 3d. in her hand. He then went inside the house and found several men drinking. He took their names and addresses and told the landlady that he should report the occurrence.

Mrs. Setterfied said in defence that four out of the six men were lodgers, and the other two, who had been working on the harbour, had been staying at the house all night.

Fined 5 and 9s. costs. This being the first offence, the licence was not endorsed.

 

Folkestone Express 30 August 1902.

Wednesday, August 2th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, G.J. Swoffer, Alderman Salter, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Alice Ann Setterfield was summoned for opening her house during prohibited hours.

Detective Sergt. Burniston said about 11.15 a.m. on Sunday, 17th inst., in company with P.C. Sharp, he was walking by the beerhouse known as the Lifeboat Inn. The bar door was open and a woman was in the act of leaving. Witness stopped her and found she had a bottle of stout in one hand and threepence in the other. Witness went inside and saw a man leaning against the counter with a pint of beer by his side. Defendant was in the act of giving him ninepence. There were also two half pint glasses standing on the counter. Witness then went into a room at the back of the bar and found four men. There were five pint and two half pint glasses. Another man came in, but when he saw the witness he made a bolt, but was stopped. Witness told defendant she would be reported.

The defence was that some of the men were lodgers and the others had stayed at the house that night.

A fine of 5 and 9s. costs was imposed, but the licence was not endorsed.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 August 1902.

Wednesday, August 27th: Before Mr. W.G. Wightwick, Aldermen Salter and Herbert, Councillor Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Alice Ann Setterfield was summoned for opening her house, the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, during prohibited hours.

Detective Sergt. Burniston stated that at 11.15 a.m. on Sunday, the 17th inst., he was on duty in company with P.C. Sharpe, and they saw the Lifeboat door open. A woman was in the act of leaving. Witness noticed that she had something under her apron, and found a bottle of stout there and 3d. in her hand. Witness went inside the bar and saw a man there. Defendant was behind the bar and giving the man some money. When she saw witness she withdrew her hand. Witness said he would report her. She replied “I am very sorry”. In a room behind the bar there were other men, and there were glasses and bottles about. Another man came in, and when he saw witness he was about to leave, but was stopped. The door was wide open, and witness thought it was fastened open.

Defendant stated that four of the men there were lodgers, and the others slept there that night after coming home late.

Fined 5 and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 September 1902.

Saturday, August 30th: Before Alderman Banks and other Magistrates.

Susannah Tumber, Joseph Sutton, John Williams, and Robert McKay were summoned for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours.

This case was a sequel to a prosecution last week when the landlady of the Lifeboat was fined 5 for allowing her house to remain open during prohibited hours on Sunday, the 17th of August.

All the defendants pleaded Guilty, and Detective Sergt. Burniston repeated the evidence by him when the landlady was convicted.

Each of the defendants was fined 10s. and 9s. costs, or 14 days'. All the fines were paid.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1902.

Saturday, August 30th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut Col. Hamilton,W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and G. Swoffer Esqs.

Susannah Lumber, Joseph Sutton, Robert McKay and John Williams were summoned for drinking on licensed premises during prohibited hours.

Detective Burniston said about 11.15 a.m. on the 17th inst. he was passing the Lifeboat Inn in North Street when he saw the defendant Lumber leaving the premises with something concealed under her apron. He found it was the bottle of stout produced. On entering the premises he found McKay leaning against the counter with a pint of beer by his side. Williams was in a room at the rear of the bar; he also had a pint of beer. Sutton entered the door, and was detained by witness.

A fine of 10s. and 9s. costs was imposed in each instance.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 September 1902.

Saturday, August 30th: Before Alderman Banks, Colonel Hamilton, and Messrs. Herbert, Wightwick, and Swoffer.

Susan Lumber, Joseph Sutton, Robert McKay and John William were summoned for drinking on licensed premises (the Lifeboat) during prohibited hours.

Detective Burniston gave evidence.

Fined 10s. and 9s. costs in each instance.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1903.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held in the Town hall on Wednesday. In view of the opposition by the police to a number of the existing licences extraordinary interest was evinced in the meeting, and when the proceedings commenced at eleven o'clock in the morning there was a very large attendance, the “trade” being numerously represented. Representatives of the Folkestone Temperance Council and religious bodies in the town were also present, prominent amongst them being Mr. J. Lynn, Mrs. Stuart, and the Rev. J.C. Carlile. Prior to the commencement of business the Licensing Justices held a private meeting amongst themselves. When the doors were thrown open to the public there was a tremendous rush for seats. The Justices present were the following:- Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Mr. J. Pledge, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

Before proceeding with the business, the Chairman announced that at the Annual Licensing Meeting the Justices adjourned the renewal of 23 full licences and five on beer licences, and directed the Chief Constable to give notice of objection to the owners of the licences of the following nine houses:- Providence (Arthur F. East); Marquis Of Lorne (William R. Heritage); Granville (Charles Partridge); Victoria (Alfred Skinner); Tramway (Frederick Skinner); Hope (Stephen J. Smith); Star (Ernest Tearall); Bricklayers Arms (Joseph A. Whiting); and Blue Anchor (Walter Whiting). Since the former sessions the Justices had inspected all the houses objected to, and considered the course which they ought to pursue with respect to the same, with the result that they had directed the Chief Constable to withdraw the notices of objection served by him with respect of the Victoria, Hope, and Blue Anchor, and to persist in the opposition to the following:- Providence, Marquis Of Lorne, Granville, Tramway, Star, and Bricklayers Arms. As regarded the remaining 15 full licences and five beer licences they would renew the same this year, and deal with them next year according to the circumstances.

The five beerhouses on licences were granted before the 1st May, 1869, and had been continuously renewed since that date, therefore they could not refuse to renew the licences, except upon one of the four grounds set out in Section 8 of the Wine and Beerhouses Act, 1869. They, however, cautioned the landlord of the Lifeboat, who was convicted on the 27th of August last for selling beer during prohibited hours, not to commit any further breach of the Licensing Laws.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 February 1904.

Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Cols. Fynmore, Westropp, and Hamilton, Messrs. C.J. Pursey and E.T. Ward.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) read his annual report, which contained interesting figures with regard to drunkenness, etc. No person in Folkestone had yet been convicted a sufficient number of times to be placed on the “black list”. The Chief Constable objected to the renewal of the licence of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and asked that the consideration of this licence might be deferred until the adjourned sessions.

The Chairman then read the Justices' Report, which stated that the number of licensed houses in Folkestone, and especially around the harbour, was out of all proportion to the population. The number of licences had not been reduced, owing to the fact that a Bill amending the Licensing Laws was shortly to be introduced in Parliament. Certain public houses – the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, the East Cliff Tavern, the Victoria, the Lifeboat Inn, the Duke Of Edinburgh, and the Channel Inn had been inspected by the Justices, and recommendations with regard to their sanitary improvement and closing of back entries were made.

Mr. John Minter said that water had been laid on at the Channel Inn since the report on the bad state of the sanitary arrangements. Mr. Minter also suggested with regard to the Imperial Brewery Tap that a public bar should be made with an entrance from Mill Bay.

The Bench decided, however, that the orders made in the report should be adhered to.

Licences were then granted to the lessees of public houses and licensed premises.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1904.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and W.G. Herbert, E.T. Ward, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following was the report of Supt. Reeve: Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 10th February, 1904. To the Chairman and Members of the Licensing Committee of the Borough of Folkestone. Gentlemen, I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 139 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, namely: Full licences 87; Beer on 11; Beer off 6; Beer and Spirits (dealers) 16; Grocers 12; Confectioners 3; Chemists 4; Total 139 – an average of one licence to every 220 persons, or one “on” licence to every 313. This is a decrease of one full licence as compared with last year's return, the licence of the Marquis Of Lorne having been refused at the adjourned meeting in March. Twenty of the licences have been transferred during the year, namely, 14 full licences, two beer on, two beer off, and two grocers. One beer off licence was transferred twice during the year. One licence holder has been convicted since the last annual meeting of committing drunkenness on his licensed premises. He has since transferred his licence and left the house. The alterations which the Justices at the adjourned meeting last year directed to be made to the Packet Boat, Castle, Tramway, Bricklayers' Arms, Granville, and Star Inns have all been carried out in a satisfactory manner, and none of the licensed houses are now used as common lodging houses. Ten occasional licences, and extensions of hours on 21 occasions, have been granted to licence holders during the year. There are 14 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold are registered in accordance with the Licensing Act of 1902. For the year ending 31st December last year, 154 persons (131 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 131 were convicted and 23 discharged. This is an increase of 65 persons proceeded against, and 51 convicted, as compared with 1902. The increase is chiefly due to the additional powers given to the police under the Licensing Act, 1902. Up to the present time no person within the Borough has been convicted the necessary number of times within the 12 months to be placed on the “black list” as provided by Section 6 of the Act of 1902. With very few exceptions the whole of the licensed houses have been conducted in a satisfactory manner. The only objection I have to make to the renewal of any of the present licences is that of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and I would ask that the renewal of this licence be deferred until the adjourned meeting. I have the honour to be, gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve (Chief Constable).

The Chairman: I think, gentlemen, you will agree that the report of the Superintendent is a satisfactory one – in fact, I may say very satisfactory – for the whole year. With your permission I well read the report we now make to you. At the adjournment of the last general licensing meeting we stated that in our opinion the number of licences for the sale of intoxicating liquor then existing in the borough of Folkestone, especially in the part of the immediate neighbourhood of the Harbour, was out of all proportion to the population, and that we proposed between then and the general annual licensing meeting of this year to obtain information on various matters, to enable us to determine what reduction would be made in the number of licences. We invited the owners of licensed houses in the meantime to meet and agree among themselves for the voluntary surrender at this general meeting of a substantial number of licences in the borough, and to submit the result of their united action to the Licensing Justices for acceptance. Failing any satisfactory proposal for reduction by the owners, the Licensing Justices last year intimated that in the exercise of their discretionary powers they would at this year's meeting decide in a fair and equitable spirit what reduction should be made. But at the opening of Parliament last week it was announced in the King's speech that the Government intended to introduce in the House of Commons during the present session a Bill to amend the Licensing Laws. In view of this legislation we are of opinion we ought not, pending the passage of this Bill through Parliament, exercise the discretionary powers vested in us, and take measures for effecting a further reduction in the number of licences within the borough on the ground that certain licensed premises are not required for the public accommodation. We have recently inspected certain houses known as the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, East Cliff Tavern, Victoria, Lifeboat, Duke Of Edinburgh, Railway Tavern, and Channel Inn.

As to the Lifeboat, we direct the holder of the licence of this house, within fourteen days from this date, to properly fence in the back of the licensed premises, without a door or gate leading from such back premises to The Durlocks, so that the police may exercise proper supervision over the licensed premises.

 

Folkestone Daily News 13 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, R. Ames, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Major Leggett.

Mrs. Beaton was granted the transfer of the licence of the Lifeboat beerhouse.

Note: Date at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, Alderman Herbert, Liuet. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggatt, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. Linton, and Mr. C. Ames.

The licence of the Lifeboat was transferred from Mr. Harrison to Eliza Beeton.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 16 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, Major Leggatt, J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, T. Ames, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

Temporary authority was given to Mrs. Beeton to sell at the Lifeboat Inn.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 December 1905.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Mr. T. Ames, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. J. Stainer, and Major Leggatt.

The licence of the Lifeboat Inn was transferred from Wm. Harris to Mrs. Beaton.

Note: This is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Daily News 24 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. E.T. Ward, R.J. Linton, T.J. Vaughan, W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, and Major Leggett.

Mrs. Beeton was granted the transfer of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor Carpenter, Aldermen T.J. Vaughan and W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggatt and Mr. Linton.

The following licensed premises were transferred:- The Lifeboat, to Mrs. Beaton.

 

Folkestone Express 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, E.T. Ward, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

The following licences were transferred by the Magistrates: The Lifeboat Inn, from Mr. William Hallis (sic) to Mrs. Eliza Beeton.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1906.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Major Leggett, Mr. E.T. Ward, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Lifeboat Inn was transferred from Wm. Harris to Eliza Beeton.

 

Folkestone Express 1 September 1906.

Saturday, August 25th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and T. Ames, C.J. Pursey, W.G. Herbert, G.I. Swoffer, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

Ernest Hall, a soldier, and Martin Gefkins were summoned for inciting a prisoner to resist the police, and also for obstructing the police in the execution of their duty on August 18th. Both defendants pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Haines, who was instructed by the Watch Committee to appear on behalf of the police, said the summons arose out of a case the previous Saturday night, when the police had great difficulty in taking a man into custody. There was a crowd of some 200 or 300 people present, and the police had actually to draw their truncheons to keep them off. Most prominent among the crowd were the two defendants, who incited, by language both to the mob and also to the prisoner to resist arrest, and the mob did make one or two rushes, and the whole of the constables present were engaged in a melee. Some were thrown to the ground and had their clothes torn. One felt, under the circumstances, that some severe measures should be taken in future to prevent the police being so obstructed.

P.S. Laurence said he was in Dover Street about five minutes past eleven the previous Saturday night, in company with P.C. Laurence, when he heard a police whistle blown several times in Tontine Street. They proceeded to the spot, and, round Mr. Major's shop, he saw a large crowd of people, numbering about 200. It was a howling mob. They had some difficulty in getting through the mob into the shop, where they saw P.C.s Butler and Allen with a man named Richardson in custody. They were holding him down on the floor and handcuffing him. He (witness) assisted in getting the prisoner into the street, when the crowd at once commenced to shout “Mob them. Down with them”. They rushed upon the constables and himself and knocked them down, and the two defendants, who appeared to be the ringleaders of the gang, began to pull and hustle them on the ground. In the struggle his trousers were torn. He had no doubt about the defendants' identity. After the crowd had hustled them for a minute or two, P.C. Chaney came to their assistance. The whole mob became so rough that he was compelled to draw his truncheon and threaten to use it, especially on the two defendants, if they did not keep back. All along the street the prisoner was very violent, and Hall and Gefkins were shouting “Don't let them take you, Tom. Down with them”, and similar expressions. The soldier got his belt off and said to witness “I will use this on you”. The two defendants and several others appeared to be taking the lead. Four or five times along Tontine Street he had to push Gefkins back. At eight o'clock on the following evening he went to the Lifeboat public house, in North Street, in company with P.C. Allen. He there saw Hall and called him outside. He told him he should report him for obstructing the police, and further with inciting a mob to rescue the prisoner. He replied “I do not remember anything about it. My mother said this morning that I looked like getting into trouble for being mixed up in an affair in Tontine Street last night”. Later he went to 39, Broadmead Road, where he saw Gefkins, and informed him he would be reported. He replied “You have made a mistake. I was there but I did not do or say anything”. It was one of the most disorderly mobs he had seen in the town.

Alfred Davis, a grocer, of 41, Tontine Street, said on Saturday night, August 18th, at about ten minutes past eleven, he saw the police arrest a prisoner and take him into Mr. Major's shop. A large crowd of about 200 persons were round the shop. The prisoner was very obstinate, and witness assisted the police, who had difficulty in putting the handcuffs on the prisoner. The crowd became very disorderly when the officers with the prisoner got into the street, and they shouted “Mob them. Down with them”. He saw the soldier obstruct the police, and he deliberately stood in front of the police in order to prevent them getting by with their prisoner.

P.C. Allen said he had cause to arrest a man named Richardson for being drunk and disorderly. He was very violent, and they had to handcuff him and take him into Mr. Major's shop on account of the crowd rushing upon them. With assistance he got the man into the street, and the two defendants came on immediately and pushed the officers. They shouted “Mob them. Don't let them take you, Tom”. They continued all the way up the street, and the soldier took his belt off and threatened P.S. Laurence with it.

P.C. Butler, in corroboration, said the soldier attempted to strike him, and also threatened to punch his ---- nose.

Hall said he was very sorry. He had just come home on furlough before going to India. He thought it was the last thing he would do to try and stop the police in their duty.

Gefkins said he saw a crowd near Messrs. Stokes's, so he went there, and got hustled about. He did not interfere with the police, and he did not know the prisoner.

The Mayor said the Bench considered that was a very bad case, for it was the duty of everyone to protect the police. Each defendant would be fined 40s. and 10s. costs, or in default one month's imprisonment with hard labour.

Richard Carpenter was also summoned for inciting the crowd in Rendezvous Street. He pleaded Guilty.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said he was in Rendezvous Street, in company with P.C.s Simpson and Sharpe, when he saw the man Richardson being taken to the police station. The police were surrounded by a large crowd, and he saw the defendant amongst them. He was shouting at the top of his voice “Down with them. Don't go with him. Down with Allen”. His conduct was likely to incite the crowd.

The defendant said the remarks he passed were against “Mr.” Tom Allen because he was ill-using his prisoner.

A fine of 20s. and 9s. costs was inflicted in this case, the defendant paying the money down.

 

Folkestone Daily News 13 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Licensing Bench on Wednesday, February 12th, was constituted as follows: Messrs. Ward, Boyd, Leggett, Swoffer, Stainer, Herbert, Fynmore, Hamilton, and Linton.

The Chief Constable read his report (for which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said the report of the Chief Constable was very satisfactory, but the Bench were still of opinion that there were too many licensed houses in a certain portion of the town. Therefore a number would have their licences withheld until the adjourned sessions on the ground of redundancy. Formal opposition to the renewals would be served so that full enquiries could be made into the trade of these houses, with a view of referring some of them to the Compensation Authority.

The following were the licences which were held over: The Raglan, Dover Street; Oddfellows, Dover Street; Royal Oak, North Street; Isle of Cyprus, Bayle; Lord Nelson, Radnor Street; Lifeboat, North Street; Wellington, Beach Street.

 

Folkestone Express 15 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Brewster Sessions were held on Wednesday morning. The Justices present were E.T. Ward Esq., Major Leggett, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, G. Boyd, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer Esqs. Mr. Boyd and Mr. Stainer did not take part in the licensing business, not being on the committee.

The Chief Constable read his report as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 119 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz., Full Licences 73, Beer On 7, Beer Off 6, Beer and Spirit Dealers Off 15, Grocers, etc. Off 9, Confectioners' Wine On 3, Chemists Wine Off 5. This gives an average, according to the Census of 1911, of one licence to every 281 persons, or one on licence to every 418 persons. As compared with the return submitted last year this is a decrease of two licences. At the general annual licensing meeting last year a new licence was granted for the sale of beer off the premises at Morehall, and two other off licences were discontinued.

At the last adjourned general annual licensing meeting the renewal of the licence of the Rendezvous Hotel was referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy, and at the meeting of that Committee on the 7th August, 1912, the licence was refused, and after payment of compensation the house was closed for the sale of drink on the 28th December last.

During the past year fifteen of the licences have been transferred; one licence was transferred twice.

Six occasional licences have been granted for the sale of drink on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 34 extensions of the usual time of closing have been granted to licence holders on special occasions.

During the year ended 31st December last 85 persons (62 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 64 were convicted and 21 discharged.

In the preceding year 54 males and 31 females were proceeded against, of whom 66 were convicted and 19 discharged.

The number convicted of drunkenness last year, viz., 46 males and 18 females, is, I find, the smallest number convicted in any year since 1896.

Of those proceeded against, 31 were residents of the Borough, 34 were persons of no fixed abode, 13 residents of other districts and seven were soldiers.

No conviction has been recorded against any licence holder during the past year. Proceedings were taken against the holder of an off licence for a breach of the closing regulations, but the case was dismissed.

Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902.

There are 17 places licensed for music and dancing, eight for music only, and two for public billiard playing.

I have no complaint to make as to the conduct of any of the licensed houses, and offer no opposition to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct.

The Chairman said it was a very satisfactory report indeed, but they felt that there were still too many licensed houses, particularly in certain portions of the Borough, and the Justices would direct that a certain number of the applications for renewal should be deferred till the Adjourned Sessions, so that they might have evidence as to the trade those houses were doing, and decide whether any of them ought to be referred to the Compensation Authority.

The houses to be dealt with were seven in number, namely; the Raglan Tavern, the Oddfellows, the Royal Oak, the Isle of Cyprus, the Lord Nelson, the Lifeboat, and the Wellington.

With those exceptions the existing licences were granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 12th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggett, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. G. Boyd.

The Chief Constable presented his annual report (for which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman remarked that the report was a very satisfactory one, but, in the opinion of the Bench, there were still too many public houses in certain portions of the town, and they would defer the renewal of certain of the licences to the adjourned sessions, so that they might have evidence as to what trade they were doing, and see if any of them were to be referred to the compensation authority.

The licensees of the Raglan Tavern, the Oddfellows, Dover Street, the Royal Oak, North Street, the Isle of Cyprus, the Lord Nelson, the Lifeboat, and the Wellington were called forward.

The Chairman said the renewal of the licences of those public houses would be deferred until the adjourned licensing sessions, and notice of opposition would be served in the meantime on the ground of redundancy. The Chief Constable would be directed to serve the notices.

The licences of all the other houses were then renewed.

 

Folkestone Daily News 10 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 10th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Stainer, Herbert, Harrison, Morrison, Linton, Boyd, Stace, Jenner, and Giles.

There was again a large crowd in Court on Monday morning, when the fate of 7 licensed houses (referred for redundancy) hung in the balance.

At the commencement of the proceedings the Chief Constable said the Bench had to consider the seven licences adjourned from the annual sessions on the ground of redundancy. He invited the Bench to hear the evidence in regard to such houses separately and give a decision after hearing all the evidence.

The Lifeboat.

An ante-1869 beerhouse, situate in North Street, (Messrs. Ash & Co); rateable value of the house 16.

The Chief Constable said the premises were very clean and well-kept; the only objection was that of redundancy.

By Mr. Arrowsmith: The Chief Constable said the present tenant had been in the house 7 years and there had been no complaint. As far as he knew the tenant made a comfortable little living.

Mrs. Eliza Beeton, the tenant, said she did a very good trade, and in the summer lunches and teas. She had a connection with the people who came down to see their relatives at the Convalescent Home, for whom she supplied light refreshments.

Mr. C. Moxon gave the trade of the house as 112 barrels over a period of five years average. The Lifeboat was acquired by his firm in 1866.

Mr. J. Jones repeated the evidence as given in the last case as to the requirements of the neighbourhood, and opposed the opposition to the renewal of the licence.

The Bench retired at 4 p.m., and returned at 4.10, the Chairman announcing that the Lord Nelson and the Isle of Cyprus would be referred to Canterbury and the other five licences would be renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 15 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

At the annual licensing sessions seven licences were deferred to the adjourned sessions, which were held at the Town Hall on Monday. The Magistrates on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Alderman Jenner, and W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, W.J. Harrison, J.J. Giles, E.T. Morrison and A. Stace Esqs.

The Lifeboat.

Mr. Reeve said in that case the house was an ante-1869, situate in North Street. The present licensee was Mrs. Beeton, who obtained the transfer in 1906. The registered owners were Messrs. Ash and Co., and the rateable value was 16. That house had a frontage of 16ft. 4in., and it had only one entrance in the front, which opened into a front bar and to a lobby directly in front. There was also a small room in the rear which opened from the lobby. It was about 9ft. 4in. by 7ft. 7in. There was no other accommodation for the public. The place was very low-pitched, the rooms being only about 7ft. high. The small living room of the licensee behind the bar was very dark. There was an enclosed yard at the back, which was divided from the next premises by a wall 5ft. 9in. in height. The nearest licensed house was the Royal Oak, in North Street, 60 yards away, and the rateable value of that was 16. There were eleven other on-licensed premises within a radius of 150 yards. The premises at the present time were very clean, well-kept, and the trade was small.

Cross-examined, the Chief Constable said the Royal Oak was not required in his opinion. Neither was the Lord Nelson, which was the next nearest house. For its size, the accommodation was very compact and well arranged. It was a small house, and he would not expect it to do a big trade. He had no doubt the present tenant was making a living. There had been no complaints lately about the house, but in 1902 there was a fine of 5 and costs.

In reply to the Chairman, Mr. Reeve said the trade came chiefly from the neighbourhood of the house. It was a small trade, but very quiet.

Mrs. Beeton said she was the tenant, and had been there seven years and three months. She did a good trade in beer, and also did a fair trade in lunches and teas, especially amongst friends of the inmates of the convalescent home. She did a good mineral trade. She had all classes of trade. In the summer people came from the Warren to get hot water in order to make their tea.

Mr. Moxon said the house was acquired in 1868. The trade in beer for an average of five years was 112 barrels. They had recently re-drained the house at a cost of 25, and the rent was 14. It was a beerhouse. The house was in a good state of repair and was nicely kept.

Mr. J. Jones said he had known the house for fifty years. He lived about eighty yards from the house. The fishermen used the house, and had a club there. There was not another suitable house in the neighbourhood.

Mr. Arrowsmith, in his address to the Justices, said the trade of the Lifeboat was two barrels a week. The place was in splendid condition, and the tenant made a living out of the house, without any other business. It was, in fact, practically a club house for the more respectable members of the district, where they could meet and discuss local politics.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return the Chairman announced that the licences of the Lord Nelson and the Isle of Cyprus would be referred to the Quarter Sessions. For those there would be provisional licences. The five other licences would be renewed, but they thought that the owners of the Wellington and the Raglan should consider the question of the urinals.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned Annual Folkestone Licensing Sessions were held at the Police Court on Monday, when the licences of the seven houses deferred at the Annual General Sessions came up for hearing. Mr. E.T. Ward was in the chair, and he was supported by Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel C.J. Hamilton, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman C. Jenner, Captain Chamier, Mr. J.J. Giles, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison and Councillor A. Stace.

The Lifeboat.

Mr. Arrowsmith appeared on behalf of Messrs. Ash, brewers, of Canterbury, in respect of the Lifeboat.

The Chief Constable, giving evidence, said that the Lifeboat was situated in North Street, and the present licensee was Mrs. Beeton. The licence was transferred on January 24th, 1906. The registered owners were Messrs. Ash and Co., of Canterbury The rateable value of the house was 16. The house had a frontage to the street of 16ft. 4 ins. There was one entrance to the house from the street, which opened into the front bar and to a lobby directly in front. There was also a small room at the rear, opening from the lobby, about 9ft. 4 ins. by 7ft. 7ins. There was no other accommodation for the public. The place was very low-pitched, the ceiling only being about 7ft. high. The small living room of the licensee behind the bar was very dark. There was no outside light. There was an enclosed yard at the back, divided from the next premises by a wall about 5ft. 9ins. high. The nearest licensed house was the Royal Oak, in North Street, 60 yards away, and the rateable value of that was 16. There were eleven other licensed houses within a radius of 150 yards. The premises at the present time were very clean and well-kept. The trade was small.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arrowsmith, witness stated that the house was not required, and the next house, the Lord Nelson, was not required either. The house was very compact and well-kept. It was not doing a big trade. The last complaint was in 1902, eleven years ago.

Mrs. Elizabeth Beeton stated that she was the tenant of the Lifeboat, and she had held the licence for seven years three months. She was doing a very good trade. In addition to the trade in beer she did a trade in lunches and teas, and she had a connection with the St. Andrew's Convalescent Home, where the wives of patients saw their husbands, and the husbands saw their wives who came down to see them. She provide biscuits and teas to people going to the Warren in the summer. She did a middle trade, principally amongst the fishermen and S.E. men, and round the neighbourhood.

Mr. Moxon said that the Lifeboat was acquired by his firm in 1866. The trade in beer for the last five years had been on average 112 barrels. It had been very regular, and had not varied by one or two barrels per year during that time. They had recently repaired the drainage, and re-drained it at a cost of 25. The rent was 14. The house structurally was in a very good state of repair, and it was very nicely kept.

Mr. John Jones said that he had known the Lifeboat for fifty years, and it was another house he visited. He was a teetotaller, and did not go there to drink; he went for business. It was a very well arranged house, and the structural accommodation was good.

Mr. Arrowsmith, in his address to the Justices, said the trade of the Lifeboat was two barrels a week. The place was in splendid condition, and the tenant made a living out of the house, without any other business. It was, as Mr. Jones had said, a house where the more respectable members of the district met quietly and discussed local politics. He characterised the size of the trade as the worst possible argument for closing it. They went there to discuss business, and were not forced to drink beer. Turning to the Lord Nelson, he said that that was doing an exceedingly good trade. According to the landlord, he catered for lunches and let bedrooms. A great argument in its favour was the Fishmarket. He pointed out to the Justices that they had a duty to the brewer as well as to the public, and they had to licence to the requirements of the public, and it might even be to increase the number of licences. He imagined that in the future, with so many houses being taken away, it would be a question of how many new houses there would be. During the last few years Messrs. Ash had lost six out of eight houses in this district. Six had gone, and only two were left, and those two houses were now being threatened. He alluded to the detriment to the trade of the firm, and said if these two houses were closed, eight houses would be taken away in one district belonging to the same firm, and the proportion, to him, seemed to be too large. He asked that both should be renewed.

The Magistrates retired for a period to consider their decisions. On their return the Chairman said that the Lifeboat licence was renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 28 July 1928.

Obituary.

The death took place, suddenly, of Mr. Frederick William Newman, the licensee of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, and his demise will be regretted by a large circle of friends, who will extend their sympathy to Mrs. Newman, the widow, in her bereavement.

The late Mr. Newman was 49 years of age, and had resided at the Lifeboat for about five years. He was formerly in the employ of the Folkestone Waterworks Company.

The funeral will take place tomorrow (Saturday) at the Folkestone Cemetery.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 29 September 1928.

Local News.

On Tuesday at the Police Court the licence of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, was temporarily transferred from Mrs. Florence May Newman to Mr. William H. Rolfe, who has formerly held a licence at Dover.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions. No mention of Mrs. Newman.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 October 1928.

Local News.

At Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday morning the licence of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, (from Mrs. F.M. Newman to Mr. W.H. Rolfe) was transferred.

Note: This is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 11 January 1930.

Local News.

Considerable amusement was caused at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday morning, when Mr. H. Rolfe, of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, applied for an hour's extension that evening on the occasion of a “stand up” supper.

The Chairman (Alderman T.S. Franks) asked what a “stand up” supper was.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said it was not a “sit down” supper. It was the first application of its kind in Folkestone that he had known.

The applicant said it was for the members of the Penny Thrift Club.

The Chairman: If they stand up, they will probably know sooner when to sit down.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 January 1930.

Local News.

When an application for a licence extension was made at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, Alderman T.S. Franks being in the chair, the licensee said he was asking for the privilege in connection with a stand-up supper.

The Clerk: A supper to whom?

The Licensee: Members of a Penny Club.

The Chairman: What kind of supper?

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley): A stand-up supper. It is not the sit down supper. It is a very small affair.

The Chairman said he was afraid he had never been to one, but his colleagues appeared to know what it was. “If they stand up, I suppose they will know sooner when they have had enough” added the Chairman.

The Magistrates granted the extension.

The other Justices were Mr. W. Smith and Mr. F. Seager.

 

Folkestone Express 1 October 1932.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a protection order when an application was made for the transfer of the licence of the Lifeboat Inn, 42, North Street, from Mr. P.L. Stringer to Mr. H.S. Jordan, who is retiring on pension from his position as an inspector on the Southern Railway. He has lived in Folkestone for the past 21 years. It was stated that Mr. Stringer is taking up important duties on the Water Board in London.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 October 1932.

Local News.

The licence of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, was transferred from Mr. Stringer to Mr. Harry Smith Jordan, who is retiring as an inspector of the Southern Railway, Folkestone Harbour, at the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 January 1933.

Felix.

I was walking up North Street a morning or so since, when my attention was directed to an old house built of rock and heavy timbers, which has stood there, according to the deeds of the property, since “Good King Charles's days”. Next to this is the old Lifeboat Inn, which, similarly to the Packet Boat Inn and the one-time Cutter, were named and linked up with the seafaring industry of years ago. I noted, too, at the same time that our old friend, Inspector H. Jordan, after serving 47 years in the railway service, which include 27 years as inspector, has just launched The Lifeboat, in North Street. In plain language, he has become proprietor. This is a curious old place, and probably has served its purpose for close on 300 years. It is mentioned in the deeds of the before-mentioned house as “Ye Old Lifeboat Inn”. There are not a few in Folkestone who will wish the ex-Inspector success in his new venture. The “Old Lifeboat” is a curious old-time place, and is well worth a visit.

 

Folkestone Express 19 September 1936.

Local News.

The Folkestone magistrates on Tuesday grafted a protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the Lifeboat public-house, North Street, from Mr. Jordan, who has held the licence for four years, to Mr. G.H. Hayes, of Brighton.

 

Folkestone Express 29 May 1937.

Local News.

The Folkestone Transfer Sessions were held at the Police Court, on Wednesday, when Mr. R.G. Wood, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Alderman Mrs. E. Gore, Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, Mr. R.J. Stokes and Alderman G.A. Gurr were the Justices on the Bench.

An application was also made for sanction to plans for alterations at the Lifeboat public house, North Street. It was stated that a staircase would be removed and an alteration would be made to the bar, which would give better supervision. An entrance at the back of the premises would also be closed to make room for the staircase being placed in another position, therefore there would only be the one entrance at the front of the louse.

The Magistrates also agreed to the plans for the alterations.

 

Folkestone Express 22 June 1940.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday, an application was made for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, from Mr. H.S. Spencer, the licence holder, to Mr. R.J. Rawlings, the Managing Director of Messrs. Mackeson and Son, the owners. It was stated that Mr. Spencer was joining the Services, and that Mr. Chapman, the licensee of another house of the same brewers, would supervise the management of the house for the time being.

The Magistrates granted the temporary transfer.

Note: No mention of this in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 June 1940.

Local News.

A protection order was granted by the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday in respect of the Lifeboat Inn. North Street. The temporary transfer of the licence from Mr. H.J.S. Spencer, the tenant, to Mr. R.P. Rawlings, Managing Director of Messrs. Mackeson and Company, Ltd., was agreed.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 July 1940.

Local News.

A considerable amount of licensing business was transacted at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday.

The licence of the Lifeboat Inn, a beerhouse in North Street, was transferred from Mr. Henry Spencer to Mr R. Price Rawlings, managing director of Messrs. Mackeson's Ltd.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 November 1941.

Local News.

The licence of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, was transferred to Mrs. Spencer at the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 March 1942.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

An application by Mrs. Spencer, licensee of the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, for a music licence to enable her to use a radio set on the premises was granted.

Alderman W. Hollands presided with Mr. S.B. Corser and Alderman J.W. Stainer.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 April 1954.

Local News.

Sir Harry Mackeson has been asked to help persuade the Ministry of Transport to give a decision about the provision for a car park in the Harbour area. (Yesterday afternoon Sir Harry visited the area with officials of the Ministry and British Railways.)

Delay in obtaining approval from the Ministry is delaying the completion of the scheme for the redevelopment of the area, the Borough Engineer, Mr. E. L. Allman, told members of Folkestone Chamber of Trade on Monday evening.

Mr. Allman said in redeveloping the area they had not only to contend with natural difficulties but man-made difficulties. In the area they had no less than 13 public-houses, of which six were to remain. They had agreed with the brewers that a site adjacent to the Harbour Hotel should be made available to improve their premises. The existence of the railway line to the Harbour, and trunk sewers, which had to remain, added to the difficulties of planning the area. Then there were awkward levels. It seemed that some type of housing was required and also a car park. The Tram Road would be brought into Harbour Street to keep traffic away from the railway arches, leaving a space free for pedestrians using the arches. Seagate Street and a small length of Beach Street would be disposed of, and Dover Street would be brought round in a bold curve into the Tram Road above the arch. The Borough Engineer said he thought the scheme for South Street would be pleasing, reproducing as far as possible the conditions that existed before the shops were built 300 or 400 years ago.

The Royal George public house would remain in an altered form, but there was difficulty about the site adjoining the Ark Cafe. The Ministry seemed to think that a cafe would do well there. During the scheme they had moved some 10,000 cubic yards of earth, quite an achievement on a restricted site.

He said the units of accommodation being built would accommodate 120 - 130 people. The Lifeboat public house would remain but the corner from North Street into the Durlocks would be improved by utilising a site adjoining the public house.

Mr. G. Balfour asked whether the new development would blend with the houses built before the war.

Mr. Allman said he was afraid the present-day restriction on money made it impossible to follow the type of building in Radnor Street, but as far as their limited resources allowed they would select tiles and bricks to blend. Referring to Dover Street, he said there were still some substandard houses there which should come down. In future, when the street was widened, there would be no necessity to interfere with the Quakers’ Meeting House, an old building which was set well back.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 February 1956.

Notice.

In the County of Kent, Broough of Folkestone.

To: The Clerk to the Rating Authority for the Borough of Folkestone in the County of Kent,

The Clerk to the Licensing Justices for the Borough of Folkestone in the County of Kent,

The Chief Constable of Kent,

And to all whom it may concern.

I, Harry Frederick May, now residing at The Lifeboat Inn Folkestone in the County of Kent, Beerhouse Keeper, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the second session of the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the said Borough, to be holden at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Wednesday the 29th day of February 1956 for the grant to me of a Justices Licence authorising me to apply for and hold an Excise Licence to sell by retail any intoxicating liquor which may be sold under a Spirit Retailers (or Publican's) Licence for consumption either on or off the premises situate at The Lifeboat Inn, North Street, Folkestone aforesaid of which premises Messrs. Mackeson & Company Limited of Brewery, Hythe, in the said County, are the owners of whom I rent them and it is my intention at the hearing of the application for the new licence to offer to surrender the following licences:-

(a) The licence now in suspense relating to the premises known as “The Wellington”, Beach Street, Folkestone, of which premises Messrs. Bushell Watkins & Smith Limited of The Black Eagle Brewery, Westerham is the registered owner.

(b) The licence now in suspense relating to the premises known as “The Wonder Tavern”, Beach Street, Folkestone, of which premises Messrs. Flint & Co. of 58, Castle Street, Dover is the registered owner.

Given under my hand this 2nd day of February, 1956.

H. F. May.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 March 1956.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The grant of a full licence to the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, and the surrender of the suspended licences of the Wonder Tavern and the Wellington, Beach Street, were agreed at the adjourned Folkestone Licensing Sessions on Wednesday.

Mr. P. Bracher, making the applications, said there appeared to be no objection. There was a beer licence at the Lifeboat Inn, but facilities were wanted to supply all types of alcohol. He said there was a definite demand for it because there were more people living in the area, and because of the summer trade. The matter had been before the Licensing Planning Committee, and no objection was raised by them to the application. Mr. Bracher said the present premises of the Lifeboat Inn were not what the brewers desired. The cottage next door was coming down, and it was the brewers' immediate intention to improve the Lifeboat Inn. Arrangements were made with the Corporation for the acquisition of the property and for the setting back of the road. Plans for the improvement of the premises would come before the Justices for approval in the very near future. He said the premises on the sea side, only partially protected from the weather, were going to be temporarily rebuilt at once. When the cottage came down a wall, with windows in it, would be erected. It would be a comparatively temporary arrangement while plans for the better siting of the house were being prepared. Something had to be done for the comfort of the tenant and the customers as soon as the adjoining cottage was demolished. Mr. Bracher went on to explain that it was proposed that two other licences in suspense should be surrendered. Arrangements and discussions had gone on with the Customs and Excise that the value of the licences should not be paid to the owners of the premises, but be taken by the Customs and Excise in consideration of the additional monopoly value which would be payable in respect of the Lifeboat Inn. The two licences which it was proposed to surrender were in respect of the Wellington and the Wonder Tavern, in Beach Street. Dealing with the figure, Mr. Bracher said if no surrender had been made of any other licence, it was agreed with the Customs and Excise that it should be 600, the additional monopoly value payable on the grant of a full licence in respect of the Lifeboat Inn. After that had been settled the value of the two other licences was agreed at 250 and 350, a total of 600. There was no alteration in the monopoly value payable on the Lifeboat Inn simply because the two other licences were being surrendered to satisfy the payment. He said the owners and holders of the other two licences had authorised him to say they had consented to the surrender.

Harry Frederick May, the licensee of the Lifeboat Inn for eight years, said there was a demand for wines and spirits. Nearby was the W.T.A. Hostel, where there were 140 visitors in the summer. In addition a block of flats had been built in North Street and many visitors used the area in the summer. He said ladies' darts matches were held at the Lifeboat Inn, and the secretary of the team told him there was difficulty in arranging matches with other houses because wines and spirits were not obtainable.

 

Folkestone Gazette 4 November 1959.

Townsman's Diary.

Three local inn signs will be displayed in Brussels shortly. Perhaps you may have noticed that the colourful sign of your favourite hostelry has disappeared recently and been replaced with a notice such as is pictured on this page. What's behind their disappearance? Well, the enterprising House of Whitbread are taking part in an exhibition one of the big stores in the Belgian capital is staging from November 19th to January 1st. The accent will be on the British way of life and many British goods will be on sale. Included in the exhibition are signs from Kent inns. Whitbreads are displaying the signs at their prefabricated public house. From Folkestone the brewers have taken the signs of the British Lion on Folkestone's old Bayle, the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, and The Star, Newington. The signs were on their way to Brussels yesterday.

 

Folkestone Gazette 22 November 1961.

Local News.

Further help for the British Empire Cancer Campaign has come from two Folkestone public houses during the past week. Piles of pennies were toppled over at The Red Cow and The Lifeboat, North Street. Total for the Red Cow was 10 14/11 and for the Lifeboat 22 4/1. The local committee of the British Empire Cancer Campaign thank all who contributed to such excellent results.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 December 1964.

Local News.

Mr. Harry May, landlord of the Lifeboat Inn, in North Street, has an unusual hobby, in which his customers also join.

Naturally enough, as a fisherman and seaman for more than 30 years, Mr. May's interest is the sea. And when a member of a lifeboat crew sent him a picture of their boat it was enough to start him off on his hobby. He has written to every one of the 152 lifeboat stations in Britain asking for pictures of their boats. So far more than 100 have been sent to him, and the photographs now decorate the walls of his bars. Not only does it give an interest to his customers, but most of them support the lifeboat collecting boxes, too. Last summer, said Mr. May, they collected quite a reasonable sum for the lifeboats.

 

Folkestone Gazette 16 December 1964.

Local News.

Mr. Harry May, landlord of the Lifeboat Inn, in North Street, Folkestone, has an unusual hobby, in which his customers also join. Naturally enough, as a fisherman and seaman for more than 30 years, Mr. May’s interest is the sea. And when a member of a lifeboat crew sent him a picture of their boat it was enough to start him off on his hobby. He has written to every one of the 152 lifeboat stations in Britain asking for pictures of their boats. So far more than 100 have been sent to him, and the photographs now decorate the walls of his bars. Not only does it give an interest to his customers, but most of them support the lifeboat collecting boxes, too. Last summer, said Mr. May, they collected quite a reasonable sum for the lifeboats.

 

South Kent Gazette 21 January 1981.

Local News.

The oldest and longest-serving publican in Folkestone, Mr. Harry May, retired on Sunday after 32 years as landlord of the Lifeboat, in North Street. It's also the end for the pub. The brewers, Whitbread Fremlins, are closing it down and will probably sell it as a private house.

Mr. May, 79, became landlord of the Lifeboat in 1948 after 30 years as a fisherman in Folkestone. On Friday he was given a royal send-off by friends from the Folkestone Licensed Victuallers' Association and by representatives of the brewers. Mr. Joe Cornwell, tied trade regional manager of Whitbread Fremlins, presented him with a pewter tankard. His wife, Dorothy, received a bunch of flowers. Mr. John Mees, chairman of Folkestone Licensed Victuallers' Association, presented the couple with an engraved silver tray and a set of wine glasses. Harry and Dorothy will soon be moving to nearby St. Gabriel's Court. Harry will keep himself busy by helping to mend the nets at the town's fish market. The big loves in his life have been fishing and his pub. He started work as a fisherman on the family boat, The Three Brothers, in August, 1918. “It was a poor life, except for the Second World War, when we made a bit more money”, he said.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 July 1981.

Local News.

A youth claimed he broke a pub window by accident, then deliberately put his elbow through another because he was angry he had hurt himself, a Crown Court heard on Tuesday.

Stephen Laws, 18, of Victoria Grove, Folkestone, claimed he tripped as he left the pub's outside toilet and fell against a window, grazing his forearm. “I got mad and put my elbow through a pane in the front door”, he told Gravesend Crown Court. Laws denied attempted burglary and damaging a wall window at the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, in February last year, but was found Guilty. He had earlier admitted damaging a window in the pub door. He was ordered to carry out 120 hours' community service and ordered to pay 7.62 compensation with 50 prosecution costs.

Mrs Dorothy May, of St Gabriel’s Court, Dover Road, formerly of the Lifeboat Inn, told the court she was woken by a bang in the early hours of February 1. She looked out of the window but could see nothing and went back to bed. Later she heard the sound of a sash window opening downstairs and saw a youth running away across the road. She found a window in the bar had been opened and the glass cracked around the lock. A window in the ladies' toilet had been opened and its lever bent, and a small pane of glass in the front door just above the lock was smashed.

P.C. Andrew Walker said he arrested Laws in Tram Road. There were fragments of glass in the mud on the soles of his shoes and a small cut on his finger. He had been drinking but was not drunk, he added.

In evidence Laws said he had been to a disco at the East Cliff Pavilion and had drunk a large amount of lager. On the way home he stopped at the Lifeboat to use the outside toilet. He claimed he fell over something and broke a window by accident. Then, as he was “pretty mad”, he put his elbow through a pane in the front door. Laws denied trying to get into the premises and claimed he had not tampered with catches on the door or windows.

He was said to have previous findings of Guilty for burglary, theft and handling.

 

South Kent Gazette 9 June 1982.

Local News.

A new-look lifeboat has been launched in Folkestone - on dry land! But it is not a place where staying dry is the order of the day. For The Lifeboat at The Durlocks, Folkestone, is a pub.

Mr. Geoff Gosford and his wife Marion have bought it as a free house. Closed for the last three years (sic), Mr Gosford has given the pub a new lease of life by taking over the helm. The bar has been redesigned and the whole place renovated and redecorated. The coxswain of Dungeness lifeboat Mr. Willie Richardson, accompanied by his crew, officially reopened the pub. Last October Mr. Gosford packed in his job as a services’ representative for the Ford Motor Company, for which he worked in Southern Europe but was based in Basildon, Essex. He wanted a more settled life to be with his family instead of travelling and living out of a suitcase.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1987.

Local News.

Beer drinkers in Folkestone have passed a bitter milestone in pint prices. This week the Good Pub Guide book was frothed up over Kent regulars digging deeper into their pockets than most of Britain's pub-goers. The guide criticises a one third increase in Surrey, Sussex and Kent during the year “pressing towards the 1-a-pint barrier which London has passed”. But some pubs in Folkestone broke the barrier up to two years ago and finding a brew in the area for less is a problem.

Folkestone landlords this week criticised the guide for being out of touch and blamed high rates plus brewery increases for the pricey cost of their pints.

Geoff Gosford, landlord of the Lifeboat in The Durlocks, said “Prices are quite high, but so are the overheads. Folkestone rates are the same as some London boroughs. Our beers can be expensive, but it is all real ale. We recently had the legendary Conqueror here as a guest ale. It was 1.28 a pint but three pints of that beer was worth nine of any other. I haven't had one complaint about my prices”.

Eileen Lewis, landlady of the Guildhall on The Bayle (1 a pint) said “Some pubs may take advantage and raise prices higher. But the majority are very conscious of the cost of beer to their customers. It is not publicans clamouring for expensive beer, it is breweries”.

Ken Holletts, landlord of the British Lion (1 a pint) said “I have not raised the price of beer since becoming the landlord. All increases have been imposed by the brewery. Our prices are reasonable, and as cheap as you'll find in the town centre”.

Black Bull landlady Maureen Coles in Canterbury Road (prices again in the 1 range) said “Rates and electricity and so on are all expensive and brewery increases take their toll”.

A spokesman for Whitbread, a major brewery supplying Folkestone, said “Beer prices are cheaper in other parts of the country, but Folkestone is no different, really, to most other parts of the South East”.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1988.

Inquest.

Detectives and a Home Office pathologist were called in to investigate a suspected murder after a man died in hospital of multiple head injuries. Father-of-three Kenneth Huntley was so badly injured he could not speak or communicate with his son or doctors. At his inquest, a coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death after he heard it was more likely Mr. Huntley was injured from falling downstairs drunk. Some 34 witnesses, including several pub landlords in Folkestone, were questioned by police and were called to give evidence. The hearing was told that Mr. Huntley was a regular in at least three pubs in the town and often drunk to excess.

Landlord of the British Lion, The Bayle, Folkestone, Kenneth Hollett, said “Mr. Huntley would come into the bar in the early morning and mid-evenings about three or four times a week”.

Another landlord, Geoffrey Gosford, of The Lifeboat Inn, said “Mr. Huntley was not the most popular of customers. He drank very heavily and occasionally I saw him the worse for drink, but he never caused any trouble”.

Neighbours of Mr. Huntley’s at Bradstone Road, Folkestone, said they often heard him screaming to himself, and several had seen him drunk or slumped outside his house. They claimed he had become worse since his wife left him.

One of the last people to see Mr. Huntley before he was injured last September was a customer at the British Lion, Carol Edge, of Connaught Road, Folkestone. She told the inquest “I was driving along and I saw Mr. Huntley coming down Grace Hill. He appeared very drunk and was staggering. That was about 10.30 p.m.”

The same night a neighbour of Mr. Huntley, Mrs. Beryl Davies, said she heard a scuffling noise coming from the basement of his house, but she was frightened and did not want to get involved.

When Huntley’s son, Alan, went to check on his father the next morning, he found him lying in bed in pain with a black eye and marks on his face. Hours later his speech was “unintelligible” and the doctor was called. Tests in hospital showed Mr. Huntley had suffered a fractured skull and collarbone, fractured all his ribs except one, and had severe bruising. “He never explained how he got his injuries”, said Alan Huntley.

Kenneth Huntley, a former chief warden at Hythe Rangers, died of a heart attack the next morning. Despite the circumstances surrounding his death police were not called in until the following Tuesday.

At the inquest Home Office pathologist, Doctor Peter Venezis, who carried out tests on the body, said “The injuries on Mr. Huntley are consistent with a heavy fell. If he was drunk, he would have fallen heavier, and this might explain why his injuries were such”.

 

From an email received 16 February, 2013

Hi, I thought you may like the attached. I was a regular at the Lifeboat when Geoff Gosford and then Barry Wilkins owned it. This letter and some history of the Lifeboat was given to me by Barry. My father did most of the renovation work on the Lifeboat when Geoff bought it.

Regards Helen Lawson.

 

23rd March 1991

Dear Barry,

Enclosed is the history of your public house, but I have researched other sources and these have thrown much light on the earlier history of your premises.

The list of occupiers does not continue after c1870 only in that it would take some time to research and I want to get this to you without further delay. Thank you for letting me see your old deeds.

Yours sincerely

Eamon Rooney.

LIFEBOAT INN

In 1695 Jacob Des Bouverie purchased the Manor of Folkestone at that time North Street, formerly New Island had not yet come into existence.

Sometime between 1695 and the mid 18th century, Jacob Des Bouverie sold a parcel of land "at or near a certain street or place called Durlocks in Folkestone...." to one John Elgar. There may already have been a building of some description on the plot of land. The nearest building however probably dates from c1750 or not long after. The first known occupier was a Richard Kennet, who is described as a "mariner". When Richard kennet died the property passed to his daughters, Sarah, Mary and Margaret. The earliest known document is dated 26th May, 1772, and under the terms of this indenture, these three and Daniel Dangerfield (husband of Mary) agreed to sell their shares in the property to one Francis Chalk, mariner. On 28th May, 1772, Francis Chalk arranged a mortgage with one Robert Marsh, also a mariner.

With the death of Francis Chalk, the property passed to his wife, Eva. Under the terms of his will, dated 11th June, 1772, and on her decease to their daughter Rebecca. By this time the mortgage had been transferred from Robert Marsh to Richard Elgar, Carpenter. It was further provided that after the decease of Rebecca and her husband Phineas Jacob the property was left in trust to one Margaret Saffrey to be sold. However, Margaret Saffrey and her husband agreed with Rebecca Jacob (widow) that the property could be sold whilst Rebecca was still alive. Therefore by an enrolment dated 10th April, 1818, the house was sold to John Selden who remained until his death in 1826, whereupon it passed to his wife Mary, who died in October 1831.]

On 2nd December, 1831, Richard Elgar, Brewer; Edward Selden and Thomas Caister the younger, a grocer, leased the property to Thomas Caister the elder, also a grocer. Not far away from North Street this mr. Elgar also owned another property which was in use around this time as a "school house" probably for Quaker children. The Elgar's were for many years a prominent Quaker family. The "Lifeboat" was at this time occupied by one Richard Eaton. Mr. Eaton's occupation is not known, but that of his wife, Mary is - she was a school mistress. The "school house" was later (by 1858) turned into a brewhouse.

The history of the property between 1831 and 1861 is not clear, although Col Fynmore the 19th local historian who lived at Sandgate says that it was taken by one Thomas Taylor in the 1850s. This is borne out by the 1861 Census which shows that the then occupier is Thomas Taylor, School Master. However, by 1865 Mr. Taylor is being referred to as a "beer retailer". In 1866 the house was taken by George Ash, Brewer at Canterbury at which time some re-building may have taken place. The rating valuation Lists for that year show that the rates on the property were re-assessed and increased considerable.

c1870 the licence passed to Tom Taylor's son, Richard, who appears to have put his brother, David into the house. In 1871 however, the licence was transferred from Richard Taylor to one John Haiste.

Occupiers

c1750 - c 1772 Richard KENNETT

c1772 - c1818 Thomas and Margaret MUNNS (Margaret was one of Richard KENNET's daughters)

c1818 - c1831 John and Mary SELDEN

c1831 - ? Richard and Mary EATON

? - c mid 1850s ?

c mid 1850s - c1870 Thomas TAYLOR

c1870 -c1871 David TAYLOR (Richard TAYLOR Licensee)

c1871 John HAISTE?

 

1948 -1981 Harry MAY

1982 - 1990 Geoff GOSFORD]

1990 Barry WILKINS

 

LICENSEE LIST

TAYLOR Thomas 1861-70 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

TAYLOR David & Richard (sons of above) 1870 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

GRAVES Frederick 1870-71 Bastions

HAISTE John 1871-72 Bastions

Last pub licensee had GRAVES Frederick 1872- 73 Bastions

HILLS Henry 1873-75 Bastions

SHERWOOD William 1875 Bastions

BORLAND James 1875-84 Bastions

SALVATION John 1884-85 Bastions

SMITH Lewis 1885-88 Bastions

TOMSETT Charles 1888-89 Bastions

HALL Thomas 1889-92 Next pub licensee had Bastions

HALL Alice 1892-96 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

SETTERFIELD Alice 1896-1904 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

HARRIS William 1904-06 Bastions

Last pub licensee had BEATON Elizabeth 1906-23 beer retailer (widow age 57 in 1911Census) Bastions

NEWMAN Frederick 1923-25 Bastions

ROLFE William 1925-30+ beer retailer Post Office Directory 1930Bastions

STRINGER Percival 1930-32 Bastions

JORDAN Harold S 1932-36 Kelly's 1934Bastions

HAYES George 1936-39 (Post Office Directory 1938 Haynes)Bastions

RAWLINGS R J 1940-41

SPENCER Harry 1941-48 Next pub licensee had Bastions

MAY Harry 1848-81 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

NORTON John 1981-82

GOSFORD Geoff & Marion 1982-90 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

WILKINS Barry & Teresa 1990-97 Bastions

BROOKER Michael 1997-99 Bastions

O'REILLY, Peter, Pauline and ELLIS Anthony 1999-2003 Bastions

ELLIS Anthony and WOOTTEN Charles & Muriel 2003-04 Bastions

ELLIS Anthony 2004+ More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

EDSON Mike & Laura to 2010+

SOUTAR Rebecca July/2018+

https://www.whatpub.com/lifeboat

 

Post Office Directory 1930From the Post Office Directory 1930

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyMore Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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