DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 13 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1808

(Name from)

Folkestone Lugger

Latest 1885

(Name to)

1 Sandgate Road

Folkestone

 

1858 to 1882, the address was given as 19 Sandgate Street. Post Office Directory 1874

One time known as the "White Horse" eventually changed name in 1885 to the "East Kent Arms." 1965 saw the name shortened to "Kent Arms."

This page is still to be updated.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 31 May 1808.

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), John Castle, Joseph Sladen and John Bateman.

Thomas Dangerfield appeared and requested to have an ale licence granted to Francis Poskett, which was agreed to.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 28 June 1808.

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), John Minter and James Bateman.

Thomas Dangerfield appeared and asked to have an ale licence granted to Francis Poskett, which was agreed to.

 

Kentish Gazette 29 May 1812.

Advertisement (Part).

To Brewers and others; To be sold by Auction, by Ayerst and Reeve, at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Monday, the 22nd day of June, 1812, at four o'clock in the afternoon:

Lot 1: All that freehold, well-accustomed public house and premises called the Folkestone Lugger, with a large piece of ground adjoining, situate in Cowgate Street, in the Town of Folkestone, in the occupation of Francis Poskett, who has had notice to quit at Michaelmas next.

Note: Date is at Variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 9 November 1878.

Tuesday, November 5th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

John Lyon and Charles Pritchett were charged with being drunk and disorderly in the Sandgate Road on Monday.

Superintendent Wilshere said he was sent for about one o'clock to eject the two prisoners from the Lugger Inn. They were drunk. When they got outside they commenced to shout, and therefore were taken into custody.

They were both discharged with a caution.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 August 1885.

Editorial.

Mr. Pledge will be one of the retiring members of the Corporation next November, but such bold outspoken remarks as he has made this week respecting claims made on the Corporation for compensation deserve to be appreciated by his constituents, who should send him back to repeat his protest whenever necessary. The Lugger, a hostelry in the Sandgate Road, is about to be pulled down, and another house will be built on the site. The owners are compelled to set back, giving up about sixty feet, which, most likely, if there were no law to compel them to set back, they would themselves do to improve the property. For this little slice of land the owners coolly ask 300. This called forth the fury of Mr. Pledge, who complained of the Corporation being looked upon as an inexhaustible milch cow by those who have property coming within the prescribed line. The Corporation, we are glad to say, having bought their experience, has put its foot down, and have declined to treat on such terms, a resolution they are resolved to adhere to. If they remain firm, and snap their fingers at the threats of lawyers and agents, they will be setting an example which must have a salutary effect on others who have land to sell.

In another case a builder offered a slip of land in the Black Bull Road for exactly the same sum he gave for it. A fairer offer could not have been made or expected. Amongst a small minority of the Council, however, a disposition was evinced to haggle and to wait, the idea being expressed that if they tarried until the owner built upon his land, he would be glad enough to give it up for nothing. Why should he be expected to do so, more than the owner of property in Sandgate Road? When a ratepayer makes a fair offer like this, we think it should receive liberal consideration and that no invidious distinction should be drawn between individuals, localities, or the prestige of position. Mr. Holden at once seized the opportunity to do a just act, which was seconded by Mr. Penfold, and urged that the 20 asked, and which was recommended by the General Purposes Committee, should be given. We are pleased to learn that the Corporation accepted the proposal. In both cases the Corporation on Wednesday acted in a spirit of justice, and so long as they do this, and rise above all personal considerations, they will command, as they deserve to do, the confidence of the town.

Corporation Meeting Extract.

A letter was read from Messrs. Ash and Co., offering to sell the land required by the Corporation, should they set back, for 300.

Ald. Sherwood said they could not entertain the offer of that sum, as it was a great deal too much.

Mr. Willis thought it would be advisable to pass a resolution stating that whilst they were willing to negotiate, they could not give anything like that price. He would move that as a resolution.

Ald. Hoad seconded. He thought it would be ridiculous for them to entertain anything like the offer of the land for 5 a foot, as looked upon in any light it was not worth anything like that.

Mr. Pledge said he should advise them to let Messrs. Ash pull down the premises before in any way entertaining that offer. Indeed, considering the improvement that would be made to the property, he thought, if anything, they should come to them for compensation. It was, to him, so absurd to see the effort to pitch upon the Corporation for compensation whenever they can, and to dip into their pockets. He would suggest that they should at once put their foot down and make an offer of 50, which was quite as much as the land was worth. If it came into their hands it was not worth twopence to the town. It was a little nook, or corner, which its owners would be glad to remove for the benefit of the property.

The Mayor said there had not been, as Mr. Pledge seemed to suggest, any beating about the bush. In fact, if he would support Mr. Willis's motion, Mr. Pledge's views on the question would be met with.

Mr. Willis's motion was then put and carried.

Ald. Sherwood asked whether they could not now make the offer of 50. This sum coincided with his estimate of what it was worth.

Ald. Hoad said that, having passed the resolution, they could hardly re-open the question.

Mr. Wedderburn believed the new tenant would take possession in a few weeks, so Messrs. Ash would wish to commence the alterations. It was desirable for both parties that the matter should be settled as speedily as possible.

Mr. Pledge said he believed he had suggested a fair price. If there was any member of the Council who thought that more should be offered, let him now speak out.

 

Folkestone Express 22 August 1885.

Folkestone Chronicle 22 August 1885

Editorial.

Mr. Pledge will be one of the retiring members of the Corporation next November, but such bold outspoken remarks as he has made this week respecting claims made on the Corporation for compensation deserve to be appreciated by his constituents, who should send him back to repeat his protest whenever necessary. The Lugger, a hostelry in the Sandgate Road, is about to be pulled down, and another house will be built on the site. The owners are compelled to set back, giving up about sixty feet, which, most likely, if there were no law to compel them to set back, they would themselves do to improve the property. For this little slice of land the owners coolly ask 300. This called forth the fury of Mr. Pledge, who complained of the Corporation being looked upon as an inexhaustible milch cow by those who have property coming within the prescribed line. The Corporation, we are glad to say, having bought their experience, has put its foot down, and have declined to treat on such terms, a resolution they are resolved to adhere to. If they remain firm, and snap their fingers at the threats of lawyers and agents, they will be setting an example which must have a salutary effect on others who have land to sell.

In another case a builder offered a slip of land in the Black Bull Road for exactly the same sum he gave for it. A fairer offer could not have been made or expected. Amongst a small minority of the Council, however, a disposition was evinced to haggle and to wait, the idea being expressed that if they tarried until the owner built upon his land, he would be glad enough to give it up for nothing. Why should he be expected to do so, more than the owner of property in Sandgate Road? When a ratepayer makes a fair offer like this, we think it should receive liberal consideration and that no invidious distinction should be drawn between individuals, localities, or the prestige of position. Mr. Holden at once seized the opportunity to do a just act, which was seconded by Mr. Penfold, and urged that the 20 asked, and which was recommended by the General Purposes Committee, should be given. We are pleased to learn that the Corporation accepted the proposal. In both cases the Corporation on Wednesday acted in a spirit of justice, and so long as they do this, and rise above all personal considerations, they will command, as they deserve to do, the confidence of the town.

Corporation Meeting Extract.

A letter was read from Messrs. Ash, owners of the Lugger Inn, received since the last meeting, in which the writers stated that they were about to make considerable alteration in the premises, and thought it would be an excellent opportunity for the Corporation to get the house set back in a line with the adjoining property, as no doubt as it at present stood it was a great eyesore. If the Corporation was content to give them 300, they would be willing to set back and put up a new front to the building. (Laughter)

The Mayor thought they could not for a moment entertain the offer of Messrs. Ash.

Councillor Willis said it seemed to him that the new front was conditional on their giving that sum of money. He did not know, as an East Ward member, that he ought to say much about it. But he would not close up all negotiations, because they might revert to it at some time and make a counter-offer – certainly not so high as that asked.

Councillor Holden agreed that the Corporation could not accept that offer.

Alderman Sherwood said it was a question whether they could build on the same foundations again. They would be overlapping both Mr. Simpson and the house below. Even if they could build on the old foundation, its condition would not allow them to put a heavy building on top of it. There was no doubt it was desirable to set the property back to the line, but not at such a cost as that. If a fair and reasonable sum was asked he should suggest its being accepted, but the price asked was out of all question. It was at the rate of 5 per square foot. Land in Sandgate Road was valuable no doubt, but he had not heard of its having fetched that price yet. He thought the matter might be referred to the General Purposes Committee, and for that Committee to take the matter up when it was desirable to do so.

Councillor Willis said what he meant was that they should write a letter to Messrs. Ash, stating that however desirable it would be to carry out the improvement, those terms were far higher than they could entertain. He would leave it open to them to make another offer. He would move to that effect.

Alderman Hoad thought it was a fair and reasonable resolution. He did not think they ought to pay anything like 5 a foot, but if a letter of that sort was written to them, it would show the folly of asking so much. He would second the resolution.

Councillor Pledge supposed if the property was pulled down they could not build out to the line where they were now, but would have to conform to the bye-laws. They asked the Corporation to buy it. Why didn't they ask for some little compensation, and not ask the town to buy it? It must eventually fall into their hands, and therefore it seemed to him absurd to ask 300 for it. Everybody who had got any building going on pitched on the poor Corporation and wanted to get their hands into the Corporation purse. It was getting to such a pitch that it was time it was knocked on the head. He should like to have seen the Corporation offer them 50, and intimate that it would be final. If it came into their hands it was not worth twopence. There was a little nook there, but their own common sense would not allow them to build out and leave it as it is now.

The resolution was then put and carried.

Subsequently Alderman Sherwood suggested that an offer of 50 should be made, but it was not deemed advisable to do anything further at that moment.

 

Folkestone News 24 October 1885.

Wednesday, October 21st: Before Capt. Carter, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs.

The licence of the Lugger was transferred from Mr. Taylor to Mr. J. P. Scott.

 

LICENSEE LIST

POSKETT Frances 1808-15+ Next pub licensee had Bastions

Last pub licensee had RICHARDSON John 1815-23 Pigot's Directory 1823Bastions

COURT Thomas 1825-28+ Pigot's Directory 1828-29Bastions

RICHARDSON John 1823-39+ Pigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1839Bastions

Last pub licensee had EARL Joseph 1837-Aug/45 Pigot's Directory 1840BastionsSouth Eastern Gazette

Last pub licensee had FOWLE Richard Aug/1845-60 (age 46 in 1851Census) South Eastern GazetteBagshaw's Directory 1847Melville's 1858Bastions

TAYLOR George Frederick 1860-85 (age 27 in 1861Census) Post Office Directory 1862Post Office Directory 1874Post Office Directory 1882Bastions

SCOTT John Paul Oct/1885+ Next pub licensee had

Renamed "East Kent Arms"

 

Pigot's Directory 1823From the Pigot's Directory 1823

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

South Eastern GazetteSouth Eastern Gazette

 

 

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