DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, January, 2023.

Page Updated:- Monday, 09 January, 2023.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1731

Fleur de Lis

Latest 1856

(Name to)

108 Dover Road

Folkestone

From this inn, a coach service operated c.1800, taking passengers to Dover, Deal and Canterbury. The name was changed to commemorate the series of small forts, the Martello Towers, between Folkestone and Romney Marsh, built to defend the coast in the event of invasion by Napoleon.

Changed name to the "Martello Hotel" in about 1856 after it was rebuilt.

 

Kentish Gazette 6 August 1771.

Advertisement.

To be sold by auction, on Tuesday, the 13th day of August inst., at the house of John Wells, known by the sign of the Flower de Luce, in Folkestone, at two o'clock in the afternoon; a messuage or tenement in three dwellings, with the backsides or gardens, ground and appurtenances thereto belonging, situate near the Flower de Luce in Folkestone aforesaid, and in the occupation of John Cook, William Stockwell, and John Sacore.

For further particulars, enquire of Mr. Farbrace, attorney, at Dover.

 

Kentish Gazette 18 January 1772.

Advertisement.

Stolen or strayed, on Monday night, the 13th of this instant, out of a stable belonging to Mr. John Wells, at the sign of the Flower de Luce, Folkestone.

A grey mare, full aged, about fourteen hands and an inch high, lately taken from grass and fresh barbered.

If information can be given of the above mare, or if she is brought to Mr. Henry Pepper, Butcher, at Deal, the person, or persons, so assisting shall receive a suitable reward.

 

Kentish Gazette 10 March 1773.

Advertisement.

By Auction. To be sold on Monday, the 22nd of March, 1773, at two o'clock in the afternoon, at the house of William Miller, known by the sign of the Flower de Luce, in Folkestone.

A freehold messuage or tenement, with the outhouses, and about eight acres of land thereunto belonging, situate in the parish of Folkestone, near to a certain place called Hawkinge Mill, now in the occupation of John Steddall or his assigns.

Inquire for further particulars of Mr. Farbrace, at Dover.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 4 March 1801.

Before John Minter (Mayor), Joseph Sladen, Thomas Baker and John Castle.

John Bayly attended, when he agreed to take ten pounds for the loss of his fences destroyed by the Camp in 1794.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 9 December 1806.

Before John Gill (Mayor), John Bateman, Edward Andrews and Joseph Sladen.

The licence of the Fleur de Lis was transferred to William Brann.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 25 April 1808.

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), Joseph William Knight, John Castle, John Gill, John Bateman and James Major.

The following person was fined for having short measures in their possession, viz.:

Wm. Brann 1 quart, 2 pints 3/-

 

Kentish Weekly Post or Canterbury Journal, 21 August 1818.

August 17, at Folkestone, Mr. W. Brann, landlord of the "Fleur-de-Lis" public-house, aged 84 years.

 

From the Kentish Weekly Post or Canterbury Journal 7 September 1819.

Valuable Brewery free public houses and other Estates to be sold by auction by Mrs White without reserve.

Lot 33. A Messuage called the "Fleur de Lis," with the stable, yard, garden, and appurtenances, situate at or near a certain place called Botolph’s Wharf, in Folkestone aforesaid, and now in the occupation of the Widow Brand.

N.B. This lot is held by lease under the said Earl of Radnor, for 31 years, from Michaelmas 1814, at 12. 10s per annum.

 

Dover Chronicle 12 November 1842.

An unfortunate Frenchman, who was employed to buy herrings here, was on Wednesday night, the 9th instant, robbed by a girl of 40 in sovereigns. He had foolishly exhibited them in the Fleur de Lis public house, in the tap room. The girl, who was a stranger to Folkestone, immediately decamped, and has not since been heard of.

 

Dover Chronicle 23 September 1843.

Yesterday week the Coast Guard stationed here were inspected by their commanding officer. After the inspection, the party that were stationed in the Warren, on their way home, repaired to the Fleur de Lis tavern, where they got intoxicated, and a row commenced between two preventive men named Spencer and Watts, who adjourned to a field to fight. They had several rounds, where poor Spencer received such injuries as to cause his death next day. An inquest has been held on the body, which was adjourned till yesterday. The two men who fought were very steady men, and much respected, and when sober were like brothers. Each have families to deplore the event. Watts is in a state of mind bordering on distraction. Great blame is attached to the seconds, as several persons endeavoured to part them.

 

Dover Telegraph 23 September 1843.

Yesterday week a fight took place between two of the Coast Guardsmen, named Spencer and Watts, which, shocking to state, terminated fatally to the former, who received such severe injuries as to cause his death on the following day. It appears that both Spencer and Watts were very steady men, and upon the most brotherly terms; that after having been inspected by the commanding officer they had repaired to the Fleur de Lis Tavern with the rest of their comrades, who are stationed at the Warren, and there, unfortunately, getting intoxicated, a dispute commenced between them and a fight ensued, which, much to the horror of Watts, ended in the death of his friend.

 

Maidstone Journal 26 September 1843.

On Friday se'nnight the coast guard here were inspected by their commanding officer, after which the party that were stationed in the Warren, on their way home, repaired to the Fleur de Lis Tavern, where they got intoxicated, and a row commenced between two of the men, named Spencer and Watts, who adjourned to a field to fight; they had several rounds, when poor Spencer received such injuries as to cause his death next day. An inquest has been held on the body, which is adjourned to Friday. The two men who fought were very steady men, and much respected, and when sober were like brothers. Each have families to deplore the event. Watts is in a state of mind bordering on distraction. Great blame is attached to the seconds, as several persons endeavoured to part them.

 

West Kent Guardian 30 September 1843.

On Friday last the coast guard here were inspected by their commanding officer, after which the party that were stationed in the Warren, on their way home, repaired to the Fleur de Lis Tavern, where they got intoxicated, and a row commenced between two of the men, named Spencer and Watts, who adjourned to a field to fight; they had several rounds, when poor Spencer received such injuries as to cause his death next day. An inquest has been held on the body, which is adjourned to Friday. The two men who fought were very steady men, and much respected, and when sober were like brothers. Each have families to deplore the event. Watts is in a state of mind bordering on distraction. Great blame is attached to the seconds, as several persons endeavoured to part them.

Kent Herald.

 

Dover Chronicle 23 December 1843.

Assizes, Friday, Dec. 15th, before Mr. Justice Erskine.

George Watts and John Miller, two of the Coast Blockade stationed at Folkestone, surrendered in Court to take their trial upon an indictment charging them with the manslaughter of Robert Spencer, one of their comrades; the first prisoner being charged as principal, and the latter as accessory.

Mr. Horton stated the case for the prosecution, and Mr. Bodkin and Mr. Deedes appeared for the prisoners.

Horatio Brummage, a lad about 17, deposed that he knew the prisoners and also the deceased; and that they all belonged to the Coast Guard. On the 15th of September there had been an inspection of the men on Sandgate Plain, and after it had concluded the prisoners, deceased, another man belonging to the Coast Guard, and witness, met at a public house in Folkestone, where the prisoners and deceased drank a good deal of beer, and were the worse for liquor when they left the house. They afterwards went to another public house in Folkestone, called the Fleur de Lis, where they had more beer; and while Spencer was out of the room, Watts took up his musket, and upon examining it found it to be loaded, and he opened the window and discharged it. Spencer was very angry at this and threatened to strike Watts, and a squabble took place between them, and Watts offered to fight Spencer, and the latter said he was not particular. After this Watts was got out of the house and went a short distance, and there waited till Spencer, Miller and the others came up. Witness at this time was carrying all three muskets, and at this time they were all pretty well drunk. When they got up to Watts the prisoner Miller said to him “Com on, old George, we will have it out now”, and they began to fight. At this time Lord Radnor, to whom the field belonged, came up and insisted that they should leave off fighting, and said if they did not he would have them thrown into custody. This stopped the fight between Watts and Miller, and Spencer and Watts walked away arm in arm. When they had got a short distance, and out of sight of Lord Radnor, they began to fight, and both of them fell down several times. Miller stood by and helped them up, but he did not persuade them to fight. Spencer was afterwards taken home, and on the way he complained of a pain in his stomach, and wanted to be allowed to lie on the ground. He did not see him any more until he was dead.

In cross-examination the witness said that Spencer appeared to be undermost in every fall, and once he saw the prisoner Watts fall with his knee upon his belly. All the parties concerned belonged to the Coast Blockade, and they were very friendly when they went to the public house.

Sarah Austin, the landlady of the Fleur de Lis, proved that all the men were drunk when they came to her house, and that after the scuffle had taken place in the tap room the deceased offered to fight Watts, and said he knew he was as good a man as he was; to which Watts replied that he would not fight any more, and he wished to shake hands with his comrades.

Some other witnesses were called, from whose testimony it appeared that all the parties were too drunk to strike direct blows at each other, and that the transaction had more the character of a drunken struggle than a fight. It appeared pretty clearly made out, however, that the unfortunate deceased received a mortal injury when the prisoner Watts fell with his knee upon his stomach.

Mr. S. East, a surgeon at Folkestone, proved that he found the deceased at his residence, No. 1, Martello Tower, after the occurrence. He complained of excruciating pain in the bowels, which continued until his death. Upon a post-mortem examination he discovered that a portion of the lower bowel was completely severed and this, no doubt, had been occasioned by some great external violence upon that part of the body.

Mr. Bodkin addressed the jury for Watts, and contended that he was not amenable to the charge of manslaughter, inasmuch as the evidence clearly showed that the prisoner had not the slightest intention to injure his comrade, but that upon a sudden fray, arising from the drunken state in which they all were at the time, it appeared that the deceased might accidentally have received some injury which caused his death. The learned counsel added that he felt some anxiety on behalf of his client, because, as he was instructed, he had for a great many years behaved exceedingly well in his capacity of a member of the Coast Blockade, and would very shortly be entitled to a pension, of which a conviction upon the present occasion would probably deprive him.

Mr. Deedes, on behalf of Miller, submitted that it would be impossible for the jury to convict him of aiding and assisting in killing the deceased, when it appeared he was merely present on his way home, and that when the fight took place he merely picked up his comrades.

Mr. Justice Erskine having summed up, the jury, after a short deliberation, found the prisoner Watts Guilty and acquitted Miller. Sentence was deferred.

This case did not terminate until near 8 o'clock in the evening.

 

Dover Chronicles 21 February 1846.

Inquest.

An inquest was held before J. J. Barnes, Esq., at the "Fleur-de-Lis," on the 11th instant, on the body of Mr. John Elger, age 41 years, who met with his death by falling down stairs while intoxicated.

The jury, after hearing the evidence of the niece of the deceased, and Mr. Silverstone East, surgeon, brought in a verdict of "Accidental death, caused by falling down stairs head foremost against a wooden partition at the bottom, and dislocating the upper vertebrae of the neck."

 

Canterbury Journal 21 February 1846.

On the 11th instant an inquest was held before Mr. J. Bond, Coroner, at the "Fleur de Lis," on the body of Mr. John Elgar, aged 41 years, who met with his death by falling downstairs while intoxicated. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of the niece of the deceased, and Mr. Silvester East, surgeon, brought in a verdict of “Accidental death, caused by falling downstairs head foremost against a wooden partition at the bottom and dislocating the upper vertebrae of the neck”.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday, 21 August, 1847. Price 5d.

FOLKESTONE CORONER'S INQUEST

An inquest was held on Friday sennight, at the Town Hall, on the body of Elizabeth Jeffereys, the wife of a fisherman, who committed suicide by hanging herself at her residence in Saffron Row. A relation of the deceased being absent, whose evidence was material, the inquiry was adjourned.

Another inquest was held at the same place upon the body of Sarah Norris, aged 78 years, residing in Fancy Street. It appeared fro m the evidence adduced that the deceased was in the habit of taking a nap after dinner, and fell on to the fire, burning her face and neck in a shocking manner. She was promptly attended by Mr. Peck, surgeon, who, although unremitting in his attention, was unable to save her, the injuries causing congestion of the brain.

Verdict, “Accidental death.”

A third inquest was held on Saturday last, before the same Coroner, at the “Fleur de Lis,” on the body of Jesse Lydon, aged 38 years, a mason, who committed suicide by hanging himself in a hay loft. Mercy Blatcher, mother-in-law to the deceased, stated that about a year since the deceased appeared strange in his manner, and his spirits were much depressed. The family anticipated that he would destroy himself one day.

Verdict, “Temporary insanity.” The deceased is left a wife and three children totally unprovided for.

 

Canterbury Journal 28 August 1847.

An inquest was held on Saturday last at the "Fleur de Lis" on the body of Jesse Lordon, aged thirty eight years, a mason, who committed suicide by hanging himself in a hay loft. His spirits were usually much depressed and his family anticipated that he would destroy himself some day. Verdict “Temporary insanity”.

 

Dover Chronicles 28 August 1847.

A third inquest was held on Saturday last, at the "Fleur-de-Lis on the body of Jessie Lordon, age 38 years, a mason, who committed suicide by hanging himself in a hay loft.

Verdict, "Temporary insanity."

 

South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 29 April 1851.

Folkestone. Monday. (Before R. Hart, Esq., Mayor, and J. Bateman, Esq.)

Richard Lowering, a young man, age 18, was brought up in custody of J. H. Smith, for an assault, with intent, etc., on Sarah Ann Dunk, a girl age 12 years, who deposed as follows:- I know the prisoner by sight. Last Saturday night he interrupted me coming out of a baker's shop in Dover Road; he drove me into a field up above the "Fleur-de-lis," and when he got me there, he pulled me down and put my clothes over my ears. (Witness then further described the assault.) He hurt me on my back. I called out to my father, and then I called out "Murder," because no one came. I never said anything to the prisoner in my life.

William Underdown, labourer, deposed:- Between 8 and 9 o'clock last Saturday evening, I was in a field near the Folly; when I got near to London street, I heard a child crying, "Oh my back;" I will tell my father," and then the child cried "Murder." I then ran up the tram-road to see what it was, and when I got there I saw a man lying in the field; I then got over the fence into the field, when the man got up and ran away, and when he got up I saw the girl there. I ran after him, but could not catch him. I cannot swear to the prisoner being the man.

Eliza, wife of Stephen Godfrey, deposed:- Between 8 and 9 o'clock on Saturday evening last I was coming up the tram-road with my husband, when we heard a child cry "Murder." I then saw a man get over the fence and run after another man, who had just got up from a child. We then went to the child and I took her home to her mother.

John Hart Smith, police constable, deposed:- About 11 o'clock yesterday morning the child, Sarah Anne Dunk, and her mother came to me, and told me that she have been assaulted by a man of the name of Lowering. The child went with me and identified the prisoner; he said nothing, but began to cry, when I took him into custody.

The prisoner was committed to take his trial at the next quarter sessions, and admitted to bail on giving security for 100.

 

Southeastern Gazette 19 September 1854.

Annual Licensing Day.

Monday: Before the Mayor, S. Mackie, W. Major, T. Golder, G. Kennicott, and T.Kingsriorth, Esqs.

Before renewing the licenses, the Mayor addressed the publicans, informing them that a new law was passed, explaining to them the particular features of the Act, and hoped they would adhere to it. The whole of the licenses were renewed, with the exception of the Radnor Inn, Oddfellow's Arms, and the Engine Inn. Applications for new licenses were made for the George, Gun, and Belle Vue Tavern; the first only was granted, on the ground that it was a new house in the room of one pulled down. The sign of the Fleur-de-lis was changed to the Martello Tavern.

Note: This gives earlier date for name change.

 

LICENSEE LIST

WELLS John c1765-71 Bastions

MILLER William 1771-76 Bastions

MILLER Elizabeth 1776-88 Bastions

BAYLEY John 1788-97 Bastions

BARKER Richard 1797-1806 Bastions

Last pub licensee had BRANN William 1806-21/Aug/18 dec'd Bastions (age 84 at death)

BRANN Mrs (widow in 1819) 21/Aug/1818-21 Bastions

GODDEN Thomas 1821-25 Pigot's Directory 1823Bastions

MERCER James 1825-32 BastionsPigot's Directory 1828-29

POWEY Charles Clark 1832-33 BastionsPigot's Directory 1832-34(Pigot's Directory 18391839)

MARSH Richard 1833-36 Bastions

CHITTENDEN Edward 1836-40 Pigot's Directory 1840Bastions

AUSTEN Sarah 1840-46 Bastions

TIDMARSH James 1846-48 Bagshaw's Directory 1847Bastions

TIDMARSH Sarah 1848-57 Next pub licensee had (age 54 in 1851Census) Bastions

Renamed "Martello" 1856

 

Pigot's Directory 1823From the Pigot's Directory 1823

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS

 

LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room