DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, March, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 10 March, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1863

Railway Tavern

Closed 1971

119 Dover Road

145 Dover Road Post Office Directory 1874

Folkestone

Railway Tavern 1903

Above photo circa 1903 showing licensee Thomas Southall.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 11 June, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

NEW LICENSEE

Monday June 6th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt, Esq.

Mrs. Smith applied for protection in carrying on at the Railway Tavern, which has been transferred to her.

 

Note: Smith is at variance with More Bastions. Jan Pedersen.

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 18 May, 1867. Price 1d.

FATAL ACCIDENT TO A RAILWAY PORTER

An inquest was held on Thursday last, at the “Railway Tavern,” before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, and a respectable jury, on the body of Charles Wood, a goods porter in the employ of the South-Eastern Railway Company, who had met with his death an the previous day by being knocked down by in engine. It appeared front the evidence that on Wednesday, shortly after noon, the pick-up goods train, from Dover, was standing on the up line of rails; and Wood (who was starting on the space between the two lines of railway) stepped back upon the down line of rails, not observing the approach of the train which is due at Dover at 12.40, which was slowly drawing into the station and then close upon him.

The unfortunate man was knocked down, the guard-iron striking him so as to nearly sever his head from his body—the ash-pans completing the work of the destruction by crashing him as they passed over. The spectacle to the passengers who were waiting on the platform was of a very appalling description. Deceased had been many years in the Company's service at Folkestone, and was much and deservedly respected. He was an unmarried man. Mr. Minter, in summing up the case, said, as far as the evidence went, it did not appear that blame was attachable to anyone.

A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned.

 

From the Folkestone Express 7 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

At the annual sessions the granting of five licences was adjourned; The "Railway Tavern," the "Eagle Tavern" and the "Bricklayers Arms" on the ground of redundancy, the "Railway Hotel," Coolinge, because a conviction had been recorded against it, and the "Packet Boat," so that plans for alterations could be submitted to the Justices.

 

Dover Express, Friday 25 December 1925.

On Monday morning, at 7:10, the landlord of the "Railway Tavern," Dover Road, Folkestone, Thomas Southall, was found dead in the bar with a tube from the gas main in his mouth.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 13 February 1926.

TRANSFER OF LICENSE.

Mrs. E. Chambers applied for a temporary authority to carry on the "Globe Hotel," The Bayle, her husband, who was the licensee, having died.

The authority was granted.
 

Dover Express 2nd July 1948.

Wingham Petty Sessions were held at Dover on Thursday before Mr. T. G. Elphinston, presiding.

TILMANSTONE COLLISION SEQUEL.

Albert Edward Jennings, aged 41, licensee of the "Railway Tavern," Folkestone, pleaded not guilty to driving without due care and attention at Tilmanstone on June 7th.

Harry Huntley, Richborough Farm, Richborough, said he was driving towards Dover, along the main Sandwich road, at about 35 mph, when, without warning, defendant’s car came out of Chalkpit Lane at about 20-25 mph and collided with him. Defendant’s car turned over.

Mrs. Rose Huntley, a passenger in her husband’s car, said defendant’s car swished out of the lane and never gave them any chance.

PC Cameron said defendant told him “I want to be quite honest about it. My view was obscured by the high bank and growing corn and I did not enter the main road at more than 15 mph”. Later, in a statement, defendant said he was positive nothing was coming before entering the main road and was almost across when the other car struck him.

Defendant, in evidence, said coming down the lane he passed a crossroad sign, looked across and saw nothing coming. He slackened his speed to 15-20 mph and was half way across when, suddenly, the other car hit his, turning it right over.

Cross-examined by Mr. Eric Weale, prosecuting, defendant said he did not realise he was on the minor road.

Defendant was fined 5 and 2. 2s costs and his licence was endorsed. The Chairman said that they felt it desirable for a “Major road ahead” sign to be placed both in Chalkpit lane and in the next lane to it.

 

Any further information or indeed photographs would be appreciated. Please email me at the address below.

This page is still to be updated.

 

LICENSEE LIST

COX George 1863-64

SMITH Mrs June/1864+ Folkestone Observer

CLARKE Robert 1865-70

GILFIN John 1870-83 Post Office Directory 1874Post Office Directory 1882

FOX Louis 1883-84

ELLIS Francis Mrs 1884-95 (widow age 65 in 1891Census) Post Office Directory 1891

CASTLE Annie (Miss) 1895-99+ Kelly's 1899

SOUTHALL Thomas 1899-25/Dec/1925 dec'd Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903Post Office Directory 1913Post Office Directory 1922

READ Harry Godfrey Feb/1926-41 Kelly's 1934Post Office Directory 1938

FULLAGER Arthur 1941-1943

GREEN Jack 1943-45

GARLAND Ernest 1944-46

JENNINGS Albert Edward 1946-51

JENNINGS Emily 1951-52

HACKNEY Ronald 1952-56

WEST Norman 1956-57

WARNER Ernest 1957-59

DENNIS Harold 1959-61

ARMSTRONG John 1961-66

GARDNER Frederick 1966-71

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Folkestone ObserverFrom the Folkestone Observer

CensusCensus

 

The following has kindly been researched and sent by Jan Pedersen and is still to be formatted.

 

Railway Tavern, Dover Road c1863 – 1971

Licensees

George Cox c1863 1864
Mrs. Smith 1864 c1865
Robert Clarke c1865 1870
John Gilfin 1870 1883
Louis Fox 1883 1884
Frances Ellis 1884 1895
Annie Castle 1895 1899
Thomas Southall 1899 1926
Harold Southall 1926 1926
Harry Read 1926 1941
Arthur Fullagar 1941 1943 Holding Manager
Jack Green 1943 1945
Ernest Garland 1944 1946
Albert Jennings 1946 1951
Emily Jennings 1951 1952
Ronald Hackney 1952 1956
Norman West 1956 1957
Ernest Warner 1957 1959
Harold Dennis 1959 1961
John Armstrong 1961 1966
Frederick Gardner 1966 1971

Folkestone Observer 11 June 1864

Monday June 6th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

Mrs. Smith applied for protection in carrying on at the Railway Tavern, which has been transferred to her.

Note: This transfer is at variance with More Bastions

Folkestone Observer 20 April 1866

Friday April 13th:- Before R.W. Boarer and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Robert Clarke of the Railway Tavern pleaded guilty to having his house open at unlawful hours on Sunday last.

Fined 5s. and 8s costs.

Southeastern Gazette 14 May 1867

Inquest

An inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Railway Tavern, before J. Minter, Esq., coroner, and a respectable jury, on the body of Charles Woods, a goods porter in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, who bad met with his death on the previous day, by being knocked down by an engine.

It appeared from the evidence that on Wednesday, shortly after noon, the pick-up goods train, from Dover, was standing on the up line of rails; and Wood (who was standing on the space between the two lines of railway) stepped back upon the down line of rails, not observing the approach of the train which is due at Dover at 12.40, which was slowly drawing into the station and then close upon him. The unfortunate man was knocked down, the guard-iron striking him so as to nearly sever his head from his body - the ash-pans completing the work of his destruction by crushing him as they passed over. The spectacle to the passengers who were waiting on the platform was of a very appalling description. Deceased had been many years in the company’s service at Folkestone, and was much and deservedly respected. He was an unmarried man. Mr. Minter, in summing up the case, said, as far as the evidence went, it did not appear that blame was attachable to anyone.

A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned.

Folkestone Chronicle 20 November 1869

Thursday, November 18th: Before R.W. Boarer and John Clark Esqs.

John Howe, better known as “Lord Howe” was charged with feloniously stealing on the 17th instant a 2s. piece, the property of Robert Clark, of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road.

Ann Clarke, wife of Robert Clarke, said: I live at the Railway Tavern. I saw prisoner at my house yesterday between 10 and 11 o'clock in the forenoon. He was in the bar and had half pint of beer, for which he paid a penny. He drank the beer and went out and stood on the door step. I had occasion then to leave the bar, but was not gone more than two minutes. Hearing the money rattle, I ran back into the bar. Prisoner was close to the till, with his hand on the edge of it. I said “What have you been doing?” and he replied “Nothing”. I said to him “You have been robbing my till”, and to my husband “Come and see what you have lost”. I had half a crown, a 2s. piece, 1s. and 6d. in the till. The 2s. piece was gone. My husband said “You have got it, then”. Prisoner denied it. I refused to allow him to leave until he gave it up, and my husband threatened to send for a policeman. On moving a little box, close to prisoner's hand on the counter, the 2s. piece was found. I did not see him touch the box. My husband said “Here's the 2s. piece where you put it”. Prisoner made no reply till he got outside, then he used very bad language. I took the 2s, piece about twenty minutes before, and no-one came in the bar after, except prisoner. I had not left the bar after taking the 2s. piece until the prisoner came in. The till was not locked, and the counter is very narrow. I afterwards gave the 2s. piece to P.C. Hills.

Cross-examined: I did not say I saw you take any money.

P.C. Hills deposed that he apprehended the prisoner in St. John's Road yesterday afternoon, and charged him with stealing a 2s. piece from the till of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road. Prisoner said “No, no, I did not take it”.

Remanded for the attendance of Mr. Clarke.

Yesterday he was again brought up, and after hearing the evidence of Mr. Clarke, the Bench committed the prisoner for trial at the ensuing Quarter Sessions for the borough.

Folkestone Express 20 November 1869

Thursday, November 18th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Clark Esqs.

John Howe was charged with stealing 2s. at the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, on the previous day.

Mrs. Ann Clark deposed that the prisoner came to their house for a half pint of beer, for which he paid a penny. After drinking it he went to the door and stood on the step. She went into the parlour to speak to her husband. While talking to him, she heard the money in the till rattling, and she at once returned to the bar. “Lord Howe” was standing close to the bar in front of the till. The till was not locked, and it contained half a crown, a two shilling piece, and 1s. 6d. in silver. She returned and asked her husband to examine the till, as she had her suspicions that all was not right. Her husband came into the bar and missed the two shilling piece. He charged prisoner with taking it, which he denied. The coin was afterwards discovered under a small box on the counter, which was used to hold pipe lights. No-one had been in the bar before or at the time he was there. The bar was only two feet wide.

P.C. Hills said he apprehended the prisoner at his house in John's Road. He charged the prisoner at that time, and aftwerwards at the police station with the robbery and he replied “No, no, I have not taken it”.

As Mr. Clark, the landlord of the house, was unable to attend owing to illness, the case was remanded till Friday.

Friday, November 19th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Clark Esqs.

John Howe was brought up on remand.

Mr. Robert Clark deposed that prisoner was standing opposite the till. Witness said to him “You have opened the till”; prisoner replied “I have not”. Witness then said “You have taken a two shilling piece”; this accusation was also denied by the prisoner. The prisoner had his hand on the bar, and on lifting up a box near his hand, the two shilling piece was found underneath. Witness did not see his hand move. He did not give information to the police. A man who had heard the altercation and was standing outside did that.

The prisoner was then cautioned in the usual manner, and asked if he had anything to say in answer to the charge.

Prisoner: I have nothing to say, sir. I am innocent.

He was then committed for trial, and witness bound over to prosecute, at the Quarter Sessions.

Folkestone Observer 6 January 1870

Wednesday, January 5th: Before R.W. Boarer, C. Doridant, C. Dashwood, J. Clark and J. Gambrill sqs.

Transfer of License

Mr. John Gilfin applied for the transfer of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, from Mr. Robert Clark. The applicant stated he had served the notices on Supt. Martin and Mr. Birch, the overseer.

Mr. Bradley: There is no overseer named Birch.

Mr. Gilfin: He lives in a big house at the top of the steps in Tontine Street.

Mr. Bradley: You have been serving it on the relieving officer instead of the overseer.

Mr. Gilfin: I asked some persons who the overseer was, and they told me Mr. Birch.

Mr. Bradley: You should have asked Supt. Martin. He could have told you.

The Bench granted temporary authority to sell until the next licensing day.

Folkestone Chronicle 8 January 1870

Wednesday, January 5th: Before C. Doridant, R.W. Boarer, J. Gambrill, C.H. dashwood and J. Clark esqs.

John Gilfin applied for a transfer of the certificate granted to the Railway Tavern, but having served the notice to the relieving officer instead of the overseer the application fell through. Temporary authority was however granted.

Folkestone Express 8 January 1870

Wednesday, January 5th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer, C. Dashwood, J. Clarke, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Granting Licenses

Mr. John Gilpin applied for a transfer of the license of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road. It appeared, however, that the applicant by mistake had served the notice on Mr. Birch, the Registrar, instead of the Overseer. The application could not therefore be granted. The Magistrates, however, granted him temporary authority to sell excisable liquors until the next meeting.

Folkestone Observer 27 January 1870

Quarter Sessions

Tuesday, January 25th: Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq.

John Howe, 62, labourer, was indicted for stealing two shillings in money, the property of Robert Clark, at Folkestone, on the 17th November last.

Ann Clark, wife of Robert Clark, said: I recollect the 17th November last. My husband at that time kept the Railway Tavern, Dover Road. I saw the prisoner in the bar that day between 10 and 11 o'clock. He came for some refreshment, and I gave him half a pint of beer, for which he gave me a penny. After the prisoner had paid for the beer he stopped in the bar and drank it. There was no-one else in the bar at the time. As I was about to leave the bar to go into the parlour I saw the prisoner holding the door as if he intended to leave, and I then went into the parlour. The prisoner did not then go out of the house. When in the back room speaking to my husband I heard some money rattle. This was about two or three minutes after I left the bar. I ran back to the bar directly, and said to the prisoner, who was standing there, “You have been robbing my till”. Prisoner said “No, I have not”. The drawer was shut when I entered. The drawer was underneath the counter, and the counter was about fifteen inches in width, and quite easily reached from the bar. My husband came into the bar, and I said to him “Look and see what money there is in the till”. He said there was 2s. 6d., 1s., 6d., and a 3d. piece. I said “There ought to be a 2s. piece”. I took the two shilling piece from Mr. Lepper about twenty minutes previous to the prisoner's coming in. Mr. Lepper had a glass of gin. I am quite sure I put the 2s. piece in the till. Mr. Lepper at one time kept the Raglan Tavern. No-one came in from the time Mr. Lepper left until the prisoner came in. Did not look and see if the two shilling piece was there previous to the prisoner's coming in. I charged the prisoner with taking the money, and he said he did not take it. I said “It is gone, and you must have taken it; it is not here, and no-one else has been here”. Prisoner then began to turn his pockets out, and I asked my husband if he could find the money, and upon his moving a little box which was standing on the counter the two shilling piece was found. The prisoner was close to the counter. When I went into the bar the prisoner was standing perfectly still. I did not make much noise when I went into the bar; I went in quietly on purpose. I took the two shilling piece and put it in the till. A policeman afterwards took it away.

By the prisoner: I did not see you take any money from the till, neither did I find any money on you. I did not see you put any money on the table, or take any off.

Robert Clark was then called. He said: On the 17th November last I kept the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, and was in the back parlour with my wife when I heard the till shut, and the money jingle. Would sweat I heard the till shut. I heard my wife say that the prisoner had taken some money, and the prisoner said he had not. I looked in the till and saw 2s. 6d., 1s., a 6d., and a 3d. or 4d. piece. My wife said there ought to be a 2s. piece. I looked under the box which had been used for keeping cigar lights, and found the 2s. piece. Prisoner said he had not taken it, and afterwards went away.The prisoner was standing behind the bar, quite quiet. (This witness gave his evidence in so loose a manner that the Recorder had occasion to caution him as to the statements he made)

By the prisoner: I did not see you put your hand in the till. You were close to the counter.

P.C. Herny Hills said: On the 17th November last I apprehended the prisoner on the charge of stealing a two shilling piece, and in answer to the charge he said “No, no”. At the police station prisoner said he was not guilty. I found no money on him.

On the Recorder asking the prisoner whether he had any defence to make, he said he hoped the jury would have mercy on him.

The Recorder then proceeded to sum up the evidence. He said the prisoner entered the bar after the two shillings had been taken from Lepper, and no-one had been in the bar from the time of Lepper's leaving until the prisoner went in; neither had the money been taken out. Mrs. Clark did not remember looking in to see if the money was there, but she was positive she put the money in the till. The evidence of Mrs. Clark was the only testimony that could be taken, as her husband's evidence was very loose, and he seemed to jump at conclusions rather than to give a clear version of his knowledge of the affair, so that his evidence was worth very little. The police constable had stated that the prisoner denied the charge, and Mrs. Clark said that on entering the bar the prisoner was standing perfectly still, doing nothing. Of course the imputation was that the prisoner had opened the drawer and shut it again, and upon being disturbed had hid the money. The money was put on the counter, and it might have been that it was covered by the article found upon it. It was a nice point for the jury to decide, but the statement of the husband, as he had before noticed, could not be taken as direct evidence against the prisoner. The wife, however, heard the money jingle, and swore that she had closed the till. If, as he had remarked to the Grand Jury, a person should move another person's property ever so little, it was sufficient to constitute a charge of theft. The point for the jury to consider was whether the money was put under the box by the prisoner or not.

After a short consultation the jury pronounced a verdict of Not Guilty.

The prisoner then left the dock, but, being recalled, the Recorder, addressing him, told him he had had a very narrow escape from severe punishment. He had hoped that the prisoner had mended his ways, and would not have to appear before him. The jury did not hear the statement made by the prisoner, or they would not, he thought, have come to the conclusion they had. Had he (the prisoner) been convicted of the offence, he would have been placed under the supervision of the police for two years – which meant that should the police satisfactorily prove that he was getting a living by dishonest means, he would be convicted by a magistrate, and sentenced to a year's imprisonment. If he came there again he would be dealt with under the Habitual Criminal Act.

The prisoner then quickly made his way out of court.

Folkestone Chronicle 29 January 1870

Quarter Sessions

Tuesday, January 25th: Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq.

The Recorder said the calendar that day was not a heavy one, and the duties of the Grand Jury would be light............. The first case on the list was for stealing by a servant, the other one of larceny. As to the latter the property which he was charged with stealing was not removed from the premises, nor was it found on his person. This, however, was not necessary, for the intention to steal was the crime, and an open or overt act showing the intention, as, for instance, the removal of the property to any distance, however infinitesimal, was sufficient to convict of larceny. If the Grand Jury thought the prisoner touched the money for the purpose of stealing it, that constituted a theft. With these remarks the Grand Jury were dismissed to their labours, and after a short time returned with true bills against both prisoners and they were discharged with the thanks of the borough for their attendance.

John Howe, indicted for stealing a two shilling piece, the property of Robert Clarke, of the Railway Tavern, on the 17th of November, pleaded Not Guilty, and a jury was empanelled to try the case.

Ann, wife of Robert Clarke, of the Railway Tavern, said: On the 17th of November prisoner came into the bar of the house between ten and eleven o'clock. He had half a pint of beer, for which he paid a penny. After drinking his beer he took hold of the door to go out, and I went into my back parlour. In the course of a minute or so I heard the sound of money rattling, and on returning to the bar I found the prisoner standing close to the counter, near the till, which was closed. The counter is a very narrow one. I said “You've been robbing my till”, and he replied that he had not. My husband had come into the bar, and I asked him to look what money was in the till. He said there was a halfcrown, a 1s. a 6d. and a 3d piece. I said there ought to be a 2s. piece, because I had taken one from Mr. Lepper about twenty minutes before and had placed it in the till. I had not taken any money from the till then, nor had anyone else been in the bar. I charged prisoner with taking a 2s. piece, but he denied it, and on making a search the 2s. piece was found on the counter under a little box standing near where the prisoner was. When I came into the bar, prisoner was standing perfectly still. The prisoner left the house after the money was found.

Cross-examined: I did not see you take any money from the till. None was found on you, nor did I see you handle any.

Robert Clarke deposed that he was in the back room with his wife, and hear the money jingle in a cup. The silver was kept in a cup, which jingled when the till was shut. He corroborated the evidence of the last witness after she went out to prisoner.

This witness provoked the displeasure of the Recorder by his manner in giving evidence.

P.C. Hills deposed to apprehending prisoner.

In answer to the Recorder, prisoner said he was not guilty, and he hoped the court would have mercy.

The Recorder then carefully summed up. Mrs. Clarke's evidence was all that the jury could rely on, for her husband's was not worth much, as he evidently jumped at conclusions. He heard money jingle in a cup, and said it was because the till was shut then. The evidence of Mrs. Clarke was, that she put the 2s. piece in the till about twenty minutes before the prisoner came in, and while he was there she looked in the till and missed the money, which was afterwards found on the counter near the prisoner. It was, however, possible that she may have been mistaken, and that she did not put it into the till. This was a very nice point for the jury to decide. If Mr. Clarke did hear the money jingle, it was a very strong corroboration. The principal thing in prisoner's favour was that when Mrs. Clark quietly entered the bar he was standing quite still, and that he had all along denied it. The question for the jury to decide was whether Mrs. Clarke did or did not put the money in the till, bearing in mind what he had told the Grand Jury, that removal of the property to an incalculably short distance constituted a theft. Of course, if there was any doubt in the matter they would give prisoner the benefit, and in deciding the case they would take into consideration the previous character of the prisoner – they were all doubtless aware of it.

The jury, almost without consideration, returned a verdict of Not Guilty, and the learned Recorder in discharging the prisoner told him he had had a narrow escape. He had not seen him there for many years, and had hoped he never should have again, because he had turned over a new leaf. As a caution to him, and without mentioning the sentence that would have been inflicted on him had he been convicted, he (the learned Recorder) would tell him that in addition to any other punishment, he would have been ordered to remain under the surveillance of the police for two years as an habitual criminal, and this would enable the police to bring him before two justices at any time, who. If they found he was not earning his livelihood in an honest way, might order him to be kept to imprisonment with hard labour for twelve months. The jury had acted not unreasonably in finding him Not Guilty, but he himself knew whether he was guilty or not.

Folkestone Express 29 January 1870

Quarter Sessions

Before J.J. Lonsdale Esq.

John Howe, 62, was charged that he, on the 17th of November last, stole two shillings in money, the property of Robert Clarke, the landlord of the Railway Tavern. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Ann Clarke, wife of Robert Clarke, now landlord of the Cutter, Dover Street, said: I recollect the 17th Nov. last. I was at the Railway Tavern; it was my husband's house then; I was in the bar. I saw prisoner on that day in the bar; this was between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning. He came there for some refreshment. He asked for half-pint of beer, for which he paid 1d. He stood at the bar; no-one else was present then. I had occasion to leave the bar for a few minutes; he took hold of the door to go out. I went into the back parlour. I left the parlour door open. He stood at the door. While speaking to my husband I heard money rattling; that was not more than two or three minutes after. I did not hear him opening the till. I said to my husband “I hear money rattling”. I ran back to the bar and said to prisoner “You have been robbing my till”. He said “No, I have not”. The till was shut the same as before I went in. The counter is not 2 ft. wide, and the till is easily accessible to a person the other side. My husband came in and I said “Look and see what money there is in the till”. He said “There is a half crown, shilling, sixpence, and a three-penny piece”. I said “There ought to be a two shilling piece”. The prisoner could hear all this. He said “There is not”. I had taken one about twenty minutes before from Mr. Lepper, for a glass of gin. I am quite sure I put it in the till. I did not have occasion to take any money out after. No-one else came in till near twelve o'clock. I never looked in the till after I gave the change because no-one else came in. I charged the prisoner with taking it; he said he had not. I said “It's gone, and you must have taken it” as there was no-one else there. He began to turn his pockets out. My husband moved a little box that stood on the counter, and there was a two shilling piece under the box. The prisoner then left. The box was almost close to him. I did not notice where it was before I went into the back room. The prisoner was standing perfectly still. I came into the bar very quietly; I am sure he was standing quite still. I said to him “This is the two shilling piece you have taken out of my till”. He said “No”. He then left my house. I put the two shilling piece back in the till.

By Prisoner: Did you see me take any money? – No. Did you find any money on me? – No, I did not. Did you see me put any money on the counter, or take any off? - No, I did not.

Robert Clarke was then called and said: I kept the Railway Tavern. On the 17th of November last me and my wife were in the next room and I heard the till shut. I am positive I heard it shut because we kept the silver in a tea cup, and I heard it “jingle”. (The learned Recorder severly examined the witness on this point, but he still adhered to the statement of hearing the till shut.) At the request of my wife I looked in the till and saw the coins mentioned. Was not sure whether the smaller coin was a threepenny or a fourpenny piece. After some searching I found the money under a thing for holding cigar lights, which was on the counter. Prisoner said he did not take the money, and he then went away. The prisoner was standing opposite the bar; he was standing quite quiet.

The prisoner then put the same questions as the last witness, and received the same answers.

P.C. Henry Hills deposed to taking the prisoner into custody and charging him with the robbery, when he replied “No, no, I did not take it”. At the police station, when charged, he also denied the charge. Witness searched him, but did not find the money.

The prisoner said: I am not guilty, and I hope you will have mercy on me.

The Recorder then summed up the evidence. He said the principal facts were that this man was in the bar after Mrs. Clarke had put the two shilling piece in the till. No-one else had been in, and she had no occasion to take the money out. She is also quite positive that she heard the money rattle while she was out of the bar, and she returned quietly to detect what was going on. The man was standing at the bar quite quiet, apparently doing nothing. There did not appear to be anything to prevent him putting the money in his pocket. The money may have been left on the counter when the change was given, and the box placed on it accidentally. If you believe Mrs. Clarke's evidence that she put the money in the till, you cannot do anything else but find a verdict against the prisoner. The principal thing in his favour is that he was standing quite sill and upright in front of the bar when Mrs. Clarke came out. He concluded by reiterating a portion of his charge to the Grand Jury.

The jury at once returned a verdict of Not Guilty.

The Recorder, addressing the prisoner, said: You have had a narrow escape this time. I have not seen you before me for many years, and I had some hopes that you had mended your ways. Had the jury heard what you said to them, no doubt they would have returned a different verdict. Let this be a caution to you for your future conduct. I do not say what sentence I should have passed, but after that had expired I should have placed you under the supervision of the police for two years – that is, if they had any suspicion that you were getting your living dishonestly they could have brought you before two justices who could sentence you to a term of imprisonment not exceeding twelve months. You are now discharged.

Note: No mention of Clarke at the Cutter in More Bastions.

Southeastern Gazette 31 January 1870

Quarter, Sessions

The Epiphany session was held on Tuesday morning, before the learned Recorder, J. J. Lonsdale, Esq.

John Howe, labourer, 62, was indicted for larceny.

Ann Clarke, wife of Robert Clarke, of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, said that the prisoner came into the house on the 17th November last for half a pint of beer, and while she was in the back room she heard money rattle, and on going back to the bar she missed a two-shilling piece which was placed in the till a few minutes before. She charged him with stealing the money, but he denied it, and, on looking about, the money was found on the counter near prisoner’s hand.

The jury acquitted the prisoner.

Folkestone Observer 24 February 1870

Wednesday, February 23rd: Before The Mayor, W. Bateman, R.W. Boarer, J. Gambrill and J. Clark Esqs.

Transfer of License

John Gilpin was granted a transfer of the license granted to Robert Clark to sell at the Railway Tavern.

Folkestone Chronicle 26 February 1870

Wednesday February 22nd: Before the Mayor, R.W. Boarer, John Clark, and John Gambrill Esqs.

This was a special sessions for the transfer of licenses, and for other business.

John Gilfin applied for a transfer of the license of the Railway Tavern from Robert Clark to himself. Applicant at the last special sessions attended, but having served notice on the relieving officer for the overseer, the license could not be transferred. It was transferred on this occasion.

Folkestone Express 26 February 1870

Wednesday, February 23rd: Before The Mayor, W. Bateman, R.W. Boarer, J. Gambrill and J. Clark Esqs.

Special Licensing Meeting

The Railway Tavern: John Gilpin applied for the transfer of the license from Robert Clark. The application was granted.

Folkestone Express 22 November 1873

Inquest

On Thursday afternoon an inquest was held at the Martello Hotel, before J. Minter Esq., Coroner and a jury on the body of Susannah Hams.

William Hams, husband of the deceased, said she was 66 years of age, and although she was at times she was a little “flighty”, she was in a fit state to be left by herself. On the morning of the 4th instant he left the house about half past eight to go to work in a meadow, and whilst there saw a man running towards the house. Thinking something was amiss he went home and found his wife severely burnt. Two or three potatoes and a knife were lying in front of the fire, and he had no doubt that while deceased was preparing the potatoes for dinner her dress caught fire.

Mr. John Gilfin, Railway Arms (sic), Dover Road, deposed to being near the Cement Works on the morning in question, and as he was coming home he saw a woman coming out of Folly Cottages with her arms thrown up, and crying out “Oh, dear”. He at once rant to her assistance, seeing that her clothes were in flames from top to bottom. He pulled his coat off as quickly as he could and wrapped it round her, and with the assistance of a man named Nash, who was coming by, the flames were extinguished, but not before deceased had been very severely burnt. She was taken into the house and a doctor sent for.

W. Bateman Esq., M.R.C.S., said he was called to deceased and found her suffering from very severe burns on the upper part of the person. He had hopes at first that she would recover, but she gradually sank from the shock caused to the system by the irritation, and died on Wednesday.

Verdict “Accidental Death”.

Southeastern Gazette 22 November 1873

Local News

An inquest was held on Thursday last, before J. Minter, Esq., coroner, on the body of Susannah Hams, who was burnt to death.

Deceased, aged 66, was engaged in paring potatoes in front of the fire, when her dress ignited, and she ran out of doors.

Mr. Gilfin, of the Railway Arms (sic), who was passing at the time, took off his coat and wrapped it round the poor woman, who was enveloped in flames. The injuries she received were such that she gradually sank, and died on Wednesday.

Verdict, “Accidental death.”

Folkestone Express 8 March 1879

Tuesday, March 4th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, Alderman Hoad, R.W. Boarer, and M. Bell Esqs.

John Shee and John Lockwood, privates in the 84 Regiment, stationed at Dover, were charged with stealing a piece of bacon and a piece of German sausage, the property of Henry Andrews.

Prosecutor said he was a grocer and greengrocer, residing at 109, Dover Road. On Monday evening, about ten minutes to seven, the two prisoners went to his shop. They asked the price of some cheese, which he told them was 8d. per pound. Lockwood said that was too much, and they would rather have bacon. Shee said they would have cheese, and asked him to cut twopennyworth. They paid for it, giving prosecutor sixpence and receiving fourpence in change. They then wanted the sixpence back, Lockwood saying he had twopence, but prosecutor would not give the sixpence back, as he suspected something wrong. Shee then asked for twopennyworth of bread. Prosecutor cut them half a loaf. While the prosecutor was giving change for a 3d. and a 4d. piece, he saw Lockwood reach over to the marble slab where some German sausage was lying. His wife and son came into the shop at that moment, and the prisoners, bidding them good evening, walked away. A few minutes after prosecutor missed a piece of bacon and then went to look after the prisoners, and also reported the theft to the police. The value of the goods he estimated at about 18d.

Richard Swift, sergeant in the 3rd Batt. Grenadier Guards, who was in charge of the picquet on Monday evening, said he was called by a police constable to the Railway Tavern to assist in taking the two prisoners. When in the street Lockwood took a piece of bacon out of his coat pocket and threw it down into the road.

P.C. Knowles said he went to the Railway Tavern about nine o'clock on Monday evening. He saw the prisoners in front of the bar. He told them he should take them into custody on suspicion of having stolen a piece of bacon. One of them said “Where did we steal it from?” and he replied “In the Dover Road”. He called the sergeant of the picquet to assist in taking the prisoners to the station. The sergeant handed witness a piece of bacon and a piece of German sausage which Lockwood had thrown away, and at the police station another piece of sausage fell from inside Shee's greatcoat while he was being searched. When charged they made no reply.

Prisoners pleaded Guilty. Lockwood said he was under the influence of liquor. They were sentenced to three months' hard labour in Canterbury gaol.

Southeastern Gazette 8 March 1879

Local News

At the Police Court on Tuesday, John Shea and John Lockwood, privates belonging to the 84th Regiment, stationed at Dover, were charged with stealing a piece of bacon and a German sausage, valued at 1s. 6d., the property of Henry Andrews.

It appeared from the evidence of the prosecutor, who carries on business as a grocer and greengrocer in the Dover-road, that the prisoners went into his shop on Monday evening, and purchased a piece of cheese and half a loaf, and after they were gone the articles mentioned in the charge were missed. Information was given to the police, and the prisoners were apprehended at the Railway Bell Tavern (sic) with the articles in their possession.

The Bench sentenced them to three months’ hard labour.

Folkestone Chronicle 28 August 1880

Monday, August 23rd:

Charles Bishop was charged with stealing 5 lbs. of bacon, the property of Charles Gains.

It appeared that the prosecutor went into the Railway Tavern on Saturday night with the bacon in a basket. Somehow or other he left the basket and all on the seat and went away. The next he saw of his bacon was in the possession of the prisoner the following day, when he gave him into custody. Prisoner was in the bar at the time that prosecutor was there. At closing time the landlord found the basket on the seat, and asked some men outside whether it belonged to any of them. They replied that it did not. Presently a man named Bean came to the door and said it belonged to the prisoner, who had sent him for it. The landlord thereupon gave it to him.

Prisoner now pleaded Guilty and was sent to jail for a month.

Folkestone Express 28 August 1880

Monday, August 23rd: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, J. Clark and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs, and General anon.

Charles Gains was charged with stealing five pounds of bacon, value 3s., the property of Charles Gains.

Prosecutor, a bricklayer, living at St. James Street, said he was at the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, on Saturday night. He had a bag with him containing some bacon and other articles of grocery. Prisoner was in front of the bar. Prosecutor left the house about two minutes past eleven without his bag, which he forgot. It was standing on a seat in front of the bar. On Sunday morning about a quarter past eight he saw prisoner near the Royal George, with Mr. Gilfin, landlord of the Railway Tavern. Prisoner had a piece of bacon wrapped up in a handkerchief, which prosecutor identified as his. He then gave prisoner into the custody of P.C. Hills. Prisoner was quite sober when he saw him on Saturday evening.

In reply to prisoner, prosecutor said he knew he (prisoner) was turned out of the bar for being very noisy, but he was not drunk.

John Gilfin said on Saturday night, after his customers had left, he found a basket in the bar. A man named Bean came and said it belonged to prisoner, and he therefore gave it to him. On Sunday morning about eight o'clock he saw the prisoner near the Tramway with a parcel under his arm. He asked him where the bacon was he “collared” the previous night. At first he said he hadn't got it. Witness took hold of the parcel he was carrying, and knew it was the bacon which was in the basket belonging to prosecutor. Prisoner then said he found it lying by the side of him when he woke up that morning. He advised him to go and give it up to Gains. He made no objection, but went with witness, and found Gains in front of the Royal George Hotel. Witness said to him “Here's the man that stole your bacon”, and then walked away.

George Bean, a labourer, residing in St. James Street, said he was at the Railway Tavern with his wife. They were the last to leave the house and the landlord asked him if the bag belonged to him. He replied that it did not. He saw the prisoner a few yards away from the house. He asked him if he left a bag at Mr. Gilfin's, and he said “Yes”. He then asked him if he should go back and fetch it for him. He said he should be very much obliged if he would. Witness then went back and got it.

P.C. Hills, who took the prisoner into custody, stated that he said in answer to the charge “I didn't take it. Some man gave it to me”.

Prisoner, who elected to be dealt with summarily, pleaded Guilty, and said he had been drinking all day, was sentenced to a month's hard labour.

Folkestone Chronicle 22 March 1884

Wednesday, March 19th: Before Capt. Crowe and Capt. Fletcher

Louis Fox, landlord of the Railway Tavern public house, was charged with brutally assaulting his wife on Saturday last, and with using threatening language towards her on Sunday night.

The complainant showed that she was a widow with two children before she married defendant. Her husband was in the habit of ill-using her, and on several occasions had drawn blood from her. On Saturday he struck her violently on the side of the head.

The magistrates fined defendant 10s. for the assault, with 10s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour. For using threatening language he was bound over in one surety of 20, and himself in 20, or one month's hard labour.

Mr. Minter asked on behalf of the wife for a separation order, but the Bench said that they could not grant it.

Holbein's Visitors' List 18 March 1891

Saturday, March 14th: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, Alderman Banks, Surgeon General Gilbourne, J. Brooke, H.W. Poole and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Samuel Baker pleaded Not Guilty to a charge of having committed wilful damage to an amount not exceeding 5. Mr. F. Hall appeared for the defence.

Charles Sparrow said he was manager at the Railway Tavern in Dover Road. On the previous Saturday evening defendant came in and asked for a glass of stout, with which he was served. He then went out, but came in again with a tin of meat in his hand and asked for another glass of stout, which was also served. Instead of drinking it, however, he dashed the stout and the glass on the floor, and then dashed the tin of meat on the counter, which was mahogany, denting and cutting it. Could not say whether defendant was drunk, but didn't think he was. He would not have served him at all, but two men had been in for a pint of beer each and said Mr. Baker would pay, and he thought if he did not serve the stout he would not get the money for the beer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hall, witness said defendant came in twice; the first time he paid fivepence halfpenny for the beer and the stout. The reason he charged twopence for the second glass of stout was that it was the best; defendant had complained of the first glass. He did not know the man well enough to say positively whether he was sober, but he shouldn't think he was drunk. He had paid 5s. to have the counter repaired.

John Gosby said he was in the house on the on Saturday night and heard an altercation about twopence being charged for a glass of stout. The defendant broke the glass on the floor, thumped the counter with a tin of potted meat which he had in his hand, made use of very bad language and threatened to smash everything in the bar. Should think the defendant was sober.

Michael Hannon said he heard blows on the counter but did not see if they were given with the fist or with a tin of meat.

In cross-examination witness said he didn't believe there would have been any row if the halfpenny had been returned. He did not think the counter looked as id it had been recently planed.

For the defence Mr. Hall called Charles Claringbould and Thos. Nash, whose version of the affair was very different from that of the plaintiff's witnesses. The latter thought that what took place on the night in question was ordinary wear and tear of the bar; people began to get noisy between half past ten and eleven. (Laughter) Had been in the house each day from the Saturday to Wednesday, but had heard nothing of any summoning and was very much surprised to find it was to be made “a Court job”.

The Mayor said the Bench considered the case proved and defendant would have to pay 5s. the damage, 10s. fine, and 13s. costs.

Defendant: How much is that altogether?

The Mayor: 28s.

Defendant: Thank you kindly. Good morning, gentlemen.

Folkestone Chronicle 21 March 1891

Saturday, March 14th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Major H.W. Poole, Colonel De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, W.G. Herbert and J. Brooke Esqs.

Samuel Baker was summoned for doing wilful damage at the Railway Tavern on the 7th inst., and pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Hall appeared for the defendant and remarked that the whole matter had arisen about a halfpenny.

Charles Sparrow said he managed the business for Mrs. Ellis. The defendant went to his house between half past ten and eleven on Saturday night and had a glass of stout. He afterwards asked to be served again, and witness served him. Instead of drinking it he threw it across the counter. The glass smashed into a thousand atoms, to the danger of others present in the bar. He had a tin of meat in his hand and banged it on the counter several times as hard as he could. It cut the counter in several places, and it had cost five shillings to repair. Defendant had been in his house on several previous occasions, but had always been a nuisance.

By Mr. Hall: The defendant came in twice on the night in question. On the first occasion he had a glass of stout and paid for two pints of beer which he had given to two other men. He paid 5d. for it. He then went out and shortly afterwards came back and called for another glass of stout, for which he charged him twopence. He said the other was not good, and, at his request, witness gave him the best stout he had in the house, and the price of that was twopence. Witness was of opinion that the defendant was sober. He would not serve a man who was helplessly drunk. The damage was caused by the tin of tongue.

John Gosby, a carpenter, said he went into the Railway Tavern on Saturday night. Defendant came in soon after he got there and paid for some beer which some men had had and called for a glass of stout for himself. He went out and then came back again, bringing a tin of meat with him. He asked for another glass of stout. Mr. Sparrow charged him twopence for it. There was some altercation about it, and defendant threw the glass down on to the ground and smashed it, and then knocked the tin on the counter, saying he would smash everything in the bar. So far as he knew the man, he should think he was sober.

By Mr. Hall: On the second occasion the defendant asked for a glass of the best stout. He should think the damage done to the counter would be about five or six shillings. That was what he would have charged to repair it.

Michael Hannen, a naval pensioner, said he was in the Railway Tavern on Saturday night when the defendant came in. He brought two men into the bar with him and treated them to some beer. He had a glass of stout himself and went out. He came in again and called for another glass of stout. He did not know what he paid, but he heard him object to pay the extra halfpenny, and he knocked the counter about with a tin which he had in his hand.

By Mr. Hall: He did not believe there would have been a row if Mr. Sparrow had handed back the halfpenny. The defendant said “I shall not pay it” and slammed the glass down on to the ground between him and another man. He was in the house on Monday and there were no signs of the counter having been repaired then.

Mr. Hall, in defence, said it was untrue that the defendant struck the counter. When he found that he could not get his halfpenny back he thought he would take it out on the glass. (Laughter)

Chas. Claringbould, a hawker, was then called, and said he went into the Railway Tavern with the defendant on Saturday night. He paid twopence for a glass of stout and asked for a halfpenny change. The landlord would not give it to him and he threw the glass on the ground. He did not strike the counter. There was no mistake about that. He and Baker both went out together.

By Mr. Bradley: Defendant had a whip in one had and a tin of meat in the other. If he had hit the counter, surely he must have had three hands. (Laughter)

Thomas Nash stated that he was in the Railway Tavern from half past ten till quarter to eleven on the night in question. During that time the defendant came in. He asked for a glass of stout, and after some words as to the price, he turned to witness and said “What's the price of stout?” Witness answered “I don't come here to value people's goods and commodities”. “But you have been in the trade and you know”, said the defendant. Witness then said “Well, it's generally three halfpence”. Defendant said “There!” and threw the glass on the ground. When he demanded the halfpenny change, Sparrow said “I have got it and mean to stick to it”.

By Mr. Bradley: Did not see the defendant strike the counter, but he would not undertake to swear that he did not.

The Mayor said the Magistrates were convinced that the offence had been committed, and he would be fined 10s. and 18s. costs, also the damage 5s., or 14 days' hard labour.

The money was paid.

Folkestone Express 21 March 1891

Saturday, March 14th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Surgeon General Gilbourne, Col. De Crespigny, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Samuel Baker was charged with damaging a counter at the Railway Tavern, the property of Frances Ellis.

Charles Sparrow, complainant's manager, said the defendant went to the house on Saturday night and had a glass of stout. He asked to be served again and was served. Instead of drinking it he threw it on the counter and smashed it into a thousand pieces. He had a tin of meat in his hand and he struck the top of the counter with it and damaged it. It had had to be planed and polished at a cost of 5s. He did not know much about the defendant, but whenever he entered the house he was a nuisance. He went in to pay for two pints of beer some men had had.

Mr. F. Hall, who represented the defendant, cross-examined the witness, who said he did not think defendant was drunk. If a man went into the bar drunk, he would not be served.

John Gosby corroborated the evidence of Sparrow, and said he thought the defendant was sober.

Michael Hannon said the cause of the disturbance was that the defendant objected to pay an extra halfpenny for a glass of stout.

In answer to Mr. Hall he said if Sparrow had handed back the halfpenny there would have been no row.

Charles Claringbould said Baker did not hit the counter at all. He broke a glass. He had a whip in one hand and a glass of stout in the other, and he must have had three hands to hit the counter with a tin of meat. (Laughter)

Charles Nash also said that he saw Baker throw the glass down or let it fall – he could not say which. He did not see him damage the counter. There was not much noise – “just the wear and tear of a public bar”. When it came near the closing time people got a little bit noisy. He had not noticed that the counter had been planed, but he would not swear that Baker did not strike the counter with the tin.

The Bench ordered the defendant to pay 5s. damage, 10s. fine, and 13s. costs.

Defendant: Thank you kindly.

Folkestone Express 2 March 1895

Friday, February 21st: Before J. Fitness Esq., and Aldermen Sherwood and Pledge.

John Thomson Riddell, a discharged soldier, was charged with stealing about three shillings from a till at the Clarence Hotel, Dover Road, on Thursday afternoon.

Mary Ann Pickerdike, housekeeper to Mr. Gower, landlord of the Clarence Inn, said she saw the prisoner in the bar about half past four on Thursday afternoon. He asked for half a pint of beer, and was served. He said he wanted the beer to “put him straight”. He drank half of the beer, and then laid down on a seat in the bar, and said he had a bad headache. She left the bar and went into the room behind, and while there she heard a chink of money, and in consequence went into the bar and saw prisoner with his right hand in the till. He had passed round from the outside to the inside of the counter. He put his hand up as if to hit her, and she called to Mr. Gower. Prisoner turned to get out of the bar. She tried to prevent him by catching hold of his coat. He got away and shut her arm in the door. She followed him into the street and cried “Stop thief”, but in Peter Street she lost sight of him. She was sure he was the man.

Prisoner: I am almost certain you have made a mistake. I don't remember being in your house yesterday.

Henry Gower, landlord of the Clarence Inn, said he heard his housekeeper call out and ran into the bar, where he saw prisoner trying to get out of the bar. As he went out, witness had a good view of his face. In the evening witness went with Sergeant Dawson to the Railway Tavern in Dover Road, and there saw prisoner sitting with his head in his hands, and he gave prisoner into custody. After prisoner had left the bar he examined the till, and missed about three shillings worth of coppers. He had seen prisoner in the bar on three or four days recently.

Prisoner said he jad only been in Folkestone two days.

Sergeant Dawson said when he took prisoner into custody he replied “Sure, you've made a mistake, man”. When charged at the police station, he said “Can the gentleman prove it?” When searched 9d. in bronze was found on him, some army discharge papers, a pawn ticket, and an empty purse. The pawn ticket was dated February, 1895.

Prisoner elected to be dealt with summarily, and after hesitation said “I am Guilty according to the evidence”. He said he was a pensioner, and if convicted it would have a very detrimental effect upon him. He had had sunstroke in India, and had served 18 years. At Margate he was instructor in a college.

The letters were examined by the Magistrates, and after long consideration they said they would be sorry if prisoner were to lose his pension. They therefore fined him 10s. and in default seven days'.

Prisoner said he was very thankful, and that he could get the money.

Folkestone Up To Date 1 July 1899

Tuesday, June 27th: Before The Mayor, J. Banks, J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton

The Railway Tavern, Dover Road, was transferred to Mr. Thomas Southall.

Folkestone Herald 29 July 1899

Folkestone Police Court

Boaz Padley, a man of disreputable appearance, pleaded Guilty to committing wilful damage at the Railway Tavern on the afternoon of the 25th inst.

Thomas Southall, the landlord, said he had been out, but on returning home he found prisoner, who was in a most excited state, using obscene language in the bar. Witness tried to pacify the man, but he took off his coat. In order to let him cool down, the landlord allowed prisoner to sit down for a while, but he repeated his conduct, and then witness bundled prisoner out of the premises. He then made a dash for witness, and smashed in three panes of glass, valued at 3.

In defence, prisoner said he was under the influence of drink, and had never been in trouble before.

Fined 11s. 6d., and 3 damage, or one month's hard labour.

The prisoner, who had no means, accepted the latter alternative.

Folkestone Up To Date 29 July 1899

Local News

Boaz Padley was charged with wilful damage to the amount of 3 at the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, and pleaded Guilty. He was fined 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, and 3 damages, in default 14 days'.

Folkestone Herald 5 August 1899

Wednesday, August 2nd:

The following transfer of licence was allowed: Mr. James Southall, Railway Inn (sic), Dover Road.

Folkestone Chronicle 15 June 1901

Wednesday, June 12th: Before Messrs. Hoad, Pursey, Wightwick, and Pledge, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

Mr. Thomas Southall, of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, applied to the Bench to pass certain structural alterations.

The Chief Constable said he had no objection. There were no new entrances, and the alteration was an improvement.

Granted.

Folkestone Express 13 February 1904

Annual Licensing Meeting

Wednesday, February 10th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and W.G. Herbert, E.T. Ward, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following was the report of Supt. Reeve: Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 10th February, 1904. To the Chairman and Members of the Licensing Committee of the Borough of Folkestone. Gentlemen, I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 139 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, namely: Full licences 87; Beer on 11; Beer off 6; Beer and Spirits (dealers) 16; Grocers 12; Confectioners 3; Chemists 4; Total 139 – an average of one licence to every 220 persons, or one “on” licence to every 313. This is a decrease of one full licence as compared with last year's return, the licence of the Marquis Of Lorne having been refused at the adjourned meeting in March. Twenty of the licences have been transferred during the year, namely, 14 full licences, two beer on, two beer off, and two grocers. One beer off licence was transferred twice during the year. One licence holder has been convicted since the last annual meeting of committing drunkenness on his licensed premises. He has since transferred his licence and left the house. The alterations which the Justices at the adjourned meeting last year directed to be made to the Packet Boat, Castle, Tramway, Bricklayers' Arms, Granville, and Star Inns have all been carried out in a satisfactory manner, and none of the licensed houses are now used as common lodging houses. Ten occasional licences, and extensions of hours on 21 occasions, have been granted to licence holders during the year. There are 14 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold are registered in accordance with the Licensing Act of 1902. For the year ending 31st December last year, 154 persons (131 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 131 were convicted and 23 discharged. This is an increase of 65 persons proceeded against, and 51 convicted, as compared with 1902. The increase is chiefly due to the additional powers given to the police under the Licensing Act, 1902. Up to the present time no person within the Borough has been convicted the necessary number of times within the 12 months to be placed on the “black list” as provided by Section 6 of the Act of 1902. With very few exceptions the whole of the licensed houses have been conducted in a satisfactory manner. The only objection I have to make to the renewal of any of the present licences is that of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and I would ask that the renewal of this licence be deferred until the adjourned meeting. I have the honour to be, gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve (Chief Constable).

The Chairman: I think, gentlemen, you will agree that the report of the Superintendent is a satisfactory one – in fact, I may say very satisfactory – for the whole year. With your permission I well read the report we now make to you. At the adjournment of the last general licensing meeting we stated that in our opinion the number of licences for the sale of intoxicating liquor then existing in the borough of Folkestone, especially in the part of the immediate neighbourhood of the Harbour, was out of all proportion to the population, and that we proposed between then and the general annual licensing meeting of this year to obtain information on various matters, to enable us to determine what reduction would be made in the number of licences. We invited the owners of licensed houses in the meantime to meet and agree among themselves for the voluntary surrender at this general meeting of a substantial number of licences in the borough, and to submit the result of their united action to the Licensing Justices for acceptance. Failing any satisfactory proposal for reduction by the owners, the Licensing Justices last year intimated that in the exercise of their discretionary powers they would at this year's meeting decide in a fair and equitable spirit what reduction should be made. But at the opening of Parliament last week it was announced in the King's speech that the Government intended to introduce in the House of Commons during the present session a Bill to amend the Licensing Laws. In view of this legislation we are of opinion we ought not, pending the passage of this Bill through Parliament, exercise the discretionary powers vested in us, and take measures for effecting a further reduction in the number of licences within the borough on the ground that certain licensed premises are not required for the public accommodation. We have recently inspected certain houses known as the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, East Cliff Tavern, Victoria, Lifeboat, Duke Of Edinburgh, Railway Tavern, and Channel Inn.

With regard to the Railway Tavern, Dover Street (sic), and the Channel Inn, High Street, we direct that the holders of the licences shall, within seven days, prepare and deposit with the Clerk a plan of the licensed premises.

Folkestone Chronicle 12 March 1904

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, March 9th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonels Westropp and Hamilton, Messrs. E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, and C.J. Pursey.

Mr. Moule applied on behalf of the proprietors of the Railway Tavern to an order which had been made to block up the back entrance to the bar. He remarked that in this case there was no difficulty of police observation, since a constable stationed in Dover Road could watch both entrances at once.

The Bench ordered that the door should be bricked up, but gave the applicants to understand that if a trellis work was erected the order might be revoked.

Folkestone Express 12 March 1904

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, March 9th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Westropp, W.G. Herbert, E.T. Ward, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The Railway Tavern

Mr. Rutley Mowll, of Dover, who appeared on behalf of the tenant (Mr. Southall), and the brewers (Messrs. Leney and Co.), applied for the renewal of the licence. Plans of the alterations asked to be carried out had been deposited with the Bench, but he rather fancied there was some suggestion that the side entrance to Abbott's Road should be closed.

The Chairman: You mean the back entrance.

Mr. Mowll: Well, I call it a side entrance, as the persons who come along it are unable to get at the back of the Railway Tavern. It is essentially a side entrance because you can only approach it from the side. What I want to pint out is that there is really no difficulty with this case of police observation, which I take it is the usual thought in the Magisterial mind when an order is made for a back entrance to be closed. Any policeman standing in Dover Road can perfectly well see the entrance to the premises in Dover Road, and in Abbott's Road at the side. In June, 1901, plans of these premises were brought before this Bench, and ....

The Chairman: We would like to stop this way altogether.

Mr. Mowll said the Magistrates would observe from the plan that the only approach from the other side was through a window, which was strongly barred, and he believed they were satisfied that nothing had transpired in reference to that which would be in any way improper. The brewers were unable to carry out the plans in their entirety because the baker next door said they were blocking his light.

The Chairman: The Bench have made an order to stop the premises at a point beyond the urinal, but if you can come to an arrangement to put up a fence, we will be pleased to revoke the order.

Mr. Mowll: But you are shutting us out of our own yard. (Laughter)

The Chairman: The Magistrates are determined to make the order.

Mr. Mowll: Thank you, sir. I may have the pleasure of coming before you again.

The Chairman: Well, I shall be glad to see you.

Folkestone Herald 12 March 1904

Wednesday, March 9th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, E.T. Ward, C.J. Pursey, W.G. Herbert, and Lieut. Colonels Fynmore and Westropp.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Railway Tavern

In the case of the Railway Tavern the licence was renewed, the Bench insisting, however, on some slight alteration to a side way.

Folkestone Chronicle 16 April 1904

Wednesday, April 13th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Cols. Westropp and Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. J. Stainer.

Mr. Mowll appeared for the lessees of the Railway Tavern to submit certain plans to the Licensing Magistrates which would obviate the necessity of blocking up the back entrance to the house. The plans met with the approval of the Bench.


Folkestone Express 16 April 1904

Wednesday, April 13th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Westropp, G.I. Swoffer and J. Stainer Esqs.

The Magistrates agreed to slight alterations at the Railway Tavern being made.

Folkestone Herald 16 April 1904

Wednesday, April 13th: Before Ald. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Permission was granted for alterations to be carried out on the following premises:- The Railway Inn (sic).

Folkestone Express 25 July 1908

Monday, July 20th: Before Alderman Banks and Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

John Riley, described as a printer, of no home, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Dover Road on Saturday night. Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

P.C. H. Johnson said at 8.30 on Saturday evening he saw prisoner outside the Railway Tavern, in Dover Road, drunk. He was shouting and making use of most filthy language. He picked up a basket of vegetables, which was standing outside the house, and deliberately threw it at the window, which was, however, not broken. On the way to the police station Riley used filthy language. He (witness) had since ascertained that the prisoner had been ejected from the public house and had not been served with drink in it at all.

Riley, who had nothing to say, was fined 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' hard labour. He decided to do the time.

Folkestone Herald 25 July 1908

Monday, July 20th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Messrs. R.J. Linton, W.G. Herbert, G. Boyd, and J. Stainer.

John Riley was charged with being drunk and disorderly.

P.C. H. Johnson stated that at 9.30 on Saturday evening he was outside the Railway Tavern, where he saw the prisoner, who was shouting and using most filthy language. He was shouting “Come out, you ----. You kicked me out”. Accused picked up a basket of vegetables and deliberately threw them at a window. He arrested prisoner, who continued to use bad language. Witness made inquiries, and was informed that defendant went into the public house, but he was ejected without being served.

A fine of 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs was imposed, or 14 days'. Prisoner went below.

Folkestone Express 26 December 1925

Inquest

On Monday evening Mr. G.W. Haines (Borough Coroner) held an inquest at the Town Hall, concerning the death of Mr. Thomas Southall, the licensee of the Railway tavern, Dover Road.

Albert Edward Philpott, 128, Dover Road, handyman, said he assisted in the morning at the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, and had done so for the past seven years. That (Monday) morning he went to the Railway Tavern about ten minutes past seven. His house was immediately opposite. He saw Miss Cook, who also daily assisted, who came out of the Tavern and ran across to him. She said “Go in the bar. I believe he has made off with himself”. He went through the private entrance door, which was unlocked, and on looking into the front public bar he saw Mr. Southall lying on the floor on his side. The electric light was burning. He could not smell any gas. Miss Cook followed behind him, and there was no-one else in the bar. An India-rubber tube was attached to the nozzle where the gas tap was, and the other end of the tube was in deceased's mouth. The tap was still turned on, and he took the tube out of deceased's mouth and put it on the floor. The hands were warm. He moved deceased to see if he was alive, and he made no sound or movement. Deceased seemed to snore once whilst he was trying to revive him. Deceased's head was lying on a cushion, and his cap was close by. He (witness) cleared the bar out on Sunday night, and left the bar at 10.05. He knew deceased had been ill in bed for the past week, and he (witness) had not seen him. Deceased was fully dressed, with the exception of his collar and tie.

Miss Cook, 11, Folly Road, Folkestone, said she had helped in the bar at the Railway Tavern for the past eighteen years. The deceased had been confined to his bedroom for the past seven days, and had been attended by Dr. Roker Evans. Deceased was suffering from nerves. She saw deceased the previous night in his room at 8.15, when she took him some biscuits and cheese. She asked him how he felt, and he said he felt much better. Deceased had been worrying of late. That (Monday) morning, about seven o'clock, she found the front door open, and directly she got into the bar she smelt a very strong smell of glass. The electric light was on. There was a gas radiator in the bar, and there was a tube from the partition connected to the radiator. She left on Sunday night at 10.40. The tube was still fixed to the radiator then. She went into the front bar that morning and saw Mr. Southall lying on the floor, and she went at once for Mr. Philpott.

P.C. Little said that morning, at 7.20, he was called by Miss Cook to the Railway Tavern. On arrival there was a strong smell of gas, and in the public bar he saw the body of deceased lying on the floor, his head being about three feet from the radiator, with his head resting on a cushion. He saw a rubber tube connected to a tap nozzle, the gas having been turned off. The end of the tube was on the floor. The body was warm, and he commenced artificial respiration, without avail. Dr. Anness was sent for, and on arrival pronounced life extinct. When called by Miss Cook, she said “Will you come to the Railway Tavern, as I think there is something wrong?”

Philpott, re-called, said he turned the gas off at the meter.

Mr. H. Southall said the deceased was his father, aged 63 years, and the licensee of the Railway Tavern. He last saw his father alkive on Thursday last. Deceased had been confined to his bed for seven days, suffering from nerves and a general breakdown. He believed his father had been worried lately, as Mrs. Southall's health had given rise to considerable anxiety. Miss Cook went for him that morning, and he arrived about 8.30. The cushion on which deceased's head rested came from the drawing room upstairs. His mother said deceased had got up early, and said he would get her a cup of tea.

P.C. Little said a letter (produced) marked “Private” was found in the bar on the counter.

Mr. Southall said it was in his father's handwriting. His father had not previously had fits of depression, and had never suggested he would take his life.

Mr. E.J. Chadwick (Coroner's Officer) said he went to the Railway Tavern about 9.20, and saw deceased lying on the floor of the public bar, and he was dead. He had all the appearances of gas poisoning.

The Coroner said there was very little doubt from the appearance of the body, and how things were found, that deceased died from gas poisoning, and that he administered that gas to himself with the intention of taking his life. He had to consider what was the state of the poor fellow's mind before doing it, and there was a letter addressed to his son in which he said “I regret the step which I am taking. This year has been the most worrying year of my life. Ma has some trouble which has worried me lately. I cannot see to write any more. Have me taken to the mortuary, and from there to the grave. Have no carriages and no black. Just put me below, come away, and forget. God bless you”. Continuing, the Coroner said he had no doubt after this letter that deceased intended to take his life. As to the state of his mind, no-one knew, except those who went through it. He found that deceased committed suicide whilst temporarily insane.

Folkestone Herald 26 December 1925

Obituary

We regret to record the death on Monday, at 119, Dover Road, of Mr. Thomas Southall, at the age of 63. The details of his death are given in our report of the inquest.

The deceased, who had been proprietor of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, for over a quarter of a century was widely known. Of a quiet, unassuming nature, he was the personification of geniality and goodwill towards his fellows. It can be said of “tommy”, as he was popularly known, that his heart was never closed to those who really deserved practical help. The manner in which he conducted his own particular calling was regarded as a model.

It is not generally known that the late Mr. Southall was a very able musician, having been bandmaster of that distinguished regiment the Carabineers (6th Dragoon Regiment). In that capacity he served with his regiment not only in all the principal garrisons of the British Isles, but also in India. He was regarded by his fellow bandmasters as a very able representative of his own branch of the musical profession. Sincere sympathy is extended to the widow and his two children.

Inquest

An inquest touching the death of Mr. Thomas Southall was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines) at the Town hall on Monday evening.

Edward Philpott, of 128, Dover Road, said he assisted in the morning at the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, and had done so for the past seven years or more. That morning he went to the Railway Tavern at about ten minutes past seven o'clock. He lived immediately opposite. Miss Cook, who also assisted daily, ran across to his house, and said “Go in the bar. I believe he's made off with himself”. On going across witness found the private entrance door was unlocked, and on looking into the front public bar he saw deceased lying on the floor on his side. The electric light was burning. Witness did not smell any gas. Miss Cook followed behind him. There was nobody else in the bar. Witness noticed an Indiarubber tube attached to the nozzle where the gas tap was. The other end of the tube was in deceased's mouth. The tap was turned on, and gas was coming from the tube. Witness took the tube from Mr. Southall's mouth, and turned the gas off. He attempted to revive deceased, whose hands were warm. Deceased made no sign, but seemed to snore once. Witness did not otherwise move deceased, whose head was lying on a cushion. Witness left the bar about five minutes past ten the previous night. Deceased had been ill in bed for the past week, and witness had not seen him. When he found him Mr. Southall was fully dressed, with the exception of his collar and tie. His boots were also off. It was deceased's habit to let witness in in the morning.

Miss Cook, of 11, Folly Road, said that for nearly eighteen years she had assisted in the bar at the Railway Tavern. Deceased, the licensee, had been ill and confined to his bedroom for the past seven days. He had been attended by Dr. Baker Evans, who saw him on Thursday. Deceased was suffering from nerves. Witness saw deceased in his room at half past eight the previous night, when she took him some biscuits and cheese. He said he felt much better then. He had been worrying of late. Witness usually got to the Tavern about seven in the morning, and that morning at about seven she found the front door open. When she got in she noticed a strong smell of gas. The electric light was on. The gas was used for a radiator in the bar. There was a tube from a nozzle on a partition connected with the radiator. When witness left about twenty to eleven the previous night the tube was still connected to the radiator. Witness went into the front bar and saw deceased on the floor. She went at once for Mr. Philpott.

P.C. Simpson deposed that that morning, at 7.30, the last witness called him in the Railway Tavern. He was near there at that time. On arrival he smelt gas strongly, and in the front bar he saw the body of deceased, whom he knew well, lying on the floor close to the radiator, with his face about three feet from it. His head was resting on a cushion. Witness saw a rubber tube connected to the radiator. The tap was turned off. The other end of the tube was on the floor close to the radiator. The body was warm, and deceased's face was very red, but only his usual colour. Witness trued artificial respiration without avail, and in the meantime sent for Dr. Evans, who on arrival pronounced Mr. Southall dead. When Miss Cook called him she said “Will you come in the Railway Tavern? I think there is something wrong”.

Edward Philpott (re-called) said he turned the gas off.

Mr. Harold Southall said deceased was his father, who was 63 last October. He was licensee of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road. Witness did not live at the Railway Tavern. He last saw deceased alive on the previous Wednesday. During the last seven days deceased had been confined to his bed and under the doctor, suffering from nerves and general breakdown. Witness did not notice that he was depressed, but he had been worried lately. His wife's health had given him some worry. That morning Miss Cook came for witness, and he arrived at the Tavern about 8.30. The cushion on which deceased's head was resting came from the drawing room upstairs. Witness's mother said that morning deceased got up early and said he would get her a cup of tea.

P.C. Simpson (re-called) said that he found a letter (produced) in the bar in which he found deceased.

Mr. Southall said the letter was in deceased's handwriting. Deceased had never suggested that he would take his life.

Mr. R.J. Chadwick (Coroner's Officer) said that morning at 9.20, from information received from the Police Office, he went to the Railway Tavern. He there saw deceased, whom he had known for many years, on the bar floor. His colour was very pink. Deceased had a florid complexion, but at the time it was an unusual redness. He was dead, and had all the appearances of gas poisoning.

The Coroner said that he did not doubt from the appearance of the body and the things found that deceased died from gas poisoning, and that he administered that gas to himself with the intention of taking his life. He (the speaker) had to consider the state of his mind before doing it. There was a letter addressed to his son, in which deceased said “I regret the step that I am taking. This has been the most worrying year of my life. Ma has some trouble which has worried me lately. I cannot see to write any more. Have me taken to the mortuary, and from there to the grave. Have no carriages and no black. Just put me below, come away, and forget. God bless you”. Proceeding, the Coroner said he had no doubt after reading that letter that deceased intended to take his life. As to the state of his mind, nobody knew except those who went through it. He found that deceased committed suicide whilst temporarily insane.

Folkestone Express 9 January 1926

Local News

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday Mr. Harold Southall applied for a protection certificate in respect of the Railway Tavern. The application was granted.

Note: Not in More Bastions as only a protection order.

Folkestone Herald 9 January 1926

Local News

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday (Mr. G. Boyd in the chair), Mr. Harold Southall applied for a protection certificate in respect of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road. Mr. G.W. Haines, who appeared for the applicant, said that Mr. Southall was in possession of the premises, and intended to carry on the business until the general annual licensing meeting of the 10th, when an application would be made for the transfer. The application was granted.

Note: No record of Harold Southall in More Bastions.

Folkestone Express 13 February 1926

Notice

Thomas Southall, Deceased.

All persons having claims against the estate of Thomas Southall, late of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, Folkestone, licensed victualler (who died on the 21st December, 1925) are requested to send written particulars thereof to me, the undersigned Solicitor for the Administrator, before the 1st March next, after which date the said Administrator will distribute the deceased's assets having regard only to claims then notified.

Dated this 10th day of February, 1926.

Geo. W. Haines, Solicitor,
18 – 20. Church Street,
Folkestone.

Folkestone Express 13 February 1926

Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 9th: Before Alderman R.J. Wood, Messrs. A.E. Pepper, Swoffer, E.T. Morrison, A. Stace, Owen, J.H. Blamey, W.R. Boughton, W. Hollands, W. Griffin, P. Broome-Giles, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Dr. W.J. Tyson.

The licence of the Railway Tavern was transferred to Mr. H. G. Reed, and that of the Globe Hotel, The Bayle, to Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers.

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1926

Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Col. G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Mr. W. Griffin, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Col. P. Broome-Giles, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

Mr. G.W. Haines, on behalf of the administrators of the late Mr. Thomas Southall, applied for the transfer of the Railway Tavern to Mr. H. Reed.

The Magistrates sanctioned the transfer.

Folkestone Herald 19 January 1929

Local News

Mr. Harry Read, the licensee of the Railway Tavern, a well-known Folkestone man, had a thrilling adventure on a car journey from Folkestone to Dover on Tuesday night.

“It was a clear and starlight night.”, Mr. Read told a Herald reporter. “The road was like glass. At Dr. Norton's corner the car skidded. No-one was hurt, and only minor damage was done, but within a few yards was the cliff edge, with a drop of about 300 feet. If it had not been for God's providence, we should have all gone over the cliff”.

Folkestone Express 26 April 1930

Obituary

The death took place on Monday of Mr. Charles Landey Sparrow, at his residence, Silverwood, Westenhanger, who had been in rather poor health for three years. He was 65 years of age.

The late Mr. Sparrow was a native of Folkestone and some years ago he was a well-known licence holder in the town, retiring about eight years ago. He was popularly known amongst a very large circle of friends as Charlie Sparrow. He held the licences, at various periods, of the Railway Tavern, in Dover Road, the Globe, on The Bayle, and the Shakespeare Hotel, which was the last hotel in which he carried on business. He then went to live at Westenhanger.

He was a well-known sportsman, and took a great interest in racing and shooting. He was one of the promoters and original directors of the Central Picture theatre until it was sold in July last. He was a member of the Folkestone Club for a great number of years. He married late in life and leaves a widow to mourn his loss.

The funeral took place yesterday (Thursday) at the Folkestone Cemetery.

Folkestone Herald 26 April 1930

Obituary

It is with very deep regret that we have to record the death of Mr. Charles Landey Sparrow, who was well known to numerous Folkestone people, and who, at the age of 65, passed away at his residence, Silverwood, Westenhanger, on Easter Monday.

Mr Sparrow, who was born at Folkestone, was a gentleman of very unassuming character, but possessed many of the finest traits that ever man could lay claim to. He was always one to study the welfare of a person upon whom fortune had rarely smiled. His good deeds were never broadcast, but it is a fact that many of the older people of Folkestone will recollect with gratitude his beneficent concern at Christmastide, and quite a few will remember, with equal gratitude, the helping hand he extended them when things appeared at their darkest.

Mr. Sparrow was a good-living sportsman, and one who always “played the game”. He had hosts of friends in Folkestone, and there are some at Hythe and Sandgate who will remember him very well. He held the licences of a number of houses in Folkestone at different times, and was the licensee of the Shakespeare when he retired from business in 1913. From there he went to Westenhanger, where Silverwood can be numbered amongst the most charming residences in a delightfully unspoiled little village.

Sport with Mr. Sparrow was almost a fetish, and his prowess with the gun is well remembered. At the time of his death he was a director of the Central Cinema Company.

He never complained, but as the result of a motor accident several years ago, Mr. Sparrow had ever since been in very indifferent health, and at times he suffered very severe pain. His death will be mourned in many quarters, and there will be deep and sincere sympathy felt for his widow, who is left to bear an extremely heavy loss.

The funeral took place at the Folkestone Cemetery, Cheriton Road, Folkestone, on Thursday afternoon.

Folkestone Express 5 September 1931

Wednesday, September 2nd: Before Mr. J.H. Blamey and Mr. S.B. Corser.

Percy George Savage, a fruiterer, of Dover Road, Folkestone, appeared in the dock on five charges of obtaining five sums of 6 each by false pretences with intent to defraud. Mr. B.H. Bonniface appeared to defend.

Harry Franklin, a grocer, of 103, Dover Road, Folkestone, said that defendant, whom he knew, called on him on the 22nd August at about six o'clock. He said “I was late for the bank. Could you cash a cheque for me?” Defendant then produced a cheque for 6, payable to “Self”, and signed P.G. Savage. It was already endorsed. Witness cashed it, and gave defendant 6 for it. He quite thought the cheque would be met. He paid it into the bank on August 24th, and it was returned to him the next morning marked “Refer to drawer”.

Mr. Banniface reserved his cross-examination in the case of each witness.

Thomas William Andrews, of 65 Tontine Street, Folkestone, a boot and shoe dealer, said he knew the defendant quite well. On 22nd August, at about 6.15 p.m., defendant called on him at the shop. He asked him if he would change him a cheque. He produced a cheque, already drawn, signed P.G. Savage, and payable to “Self”. Witness cashed the cheque and gave defendant 6. He paid the cheque into his bank on the following morning, and it was returned the next day marked “Refer to drawer”. He had never changed cheques for the defendant before.

Miss Doris Minnie Martin, bookkeeper to Mr. E.C. Hann, butcher, of 104, Dover Road, Folkestone, said she knew the defendant. He came to the shop at about 8.30 p.m. on the 22nd August and asked her if she would cash a cheque for him as the bank was closed and he wanted some change. He produced a cheque, already drawn, for 6, payable to “Self”, and signed P.G. Savage. She cashed the cheque and handed the defendant 6. The cheque was paid into Mr. Hann's bank on the following Monday and returned the next day marked “Refer to drawer”.

Harry Edward Carey, tobacconist, of 135, Dover Road, Folkestone, said he knew the defendant by sight. Defendant called at his shop at about 8.45 p.m. on the 22nd August, where he produced a cheque for 6. It was already drawn and endorsed. Defendant said “Would you mind cashing a little cheque for me? I have bought a wireless set and have not enough ready cash to pay for it”. He cashed the cheque and gave the defendant the money. At about 8.15a.m. on the following morning, defendant came with a cheque to the shop, marked 6, payable to “Self”. It was endorsed P.G. Savage. He said “Could you cash another little cheque for me? I am going to London for the day and will be leaving before the bank is open”. He cashed the cheque, expecting it to be met by the bank. He paid the cheques into his bank on Wednesday, August 26th, and they were both returned marked “Refer to drawer” on the 27th August.

Harry Godfrey Read, licensee of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, said he had known defendant casually for about six years. At about 9 p.m. on the 22nd August defendant came to him and produced a cheque, asking him if he would change it for him as he was short of cash. It was marked payable to “Self” and endorsed P.G. Savage. He gave defendant 6 and received the cheque in exchange. He paid in the cheque on the following Monday at the bank and it was returned the next day marked “Refer to drawer”.

Police Sergeant Lawrence said at 3 p.m. the previous day he saw the defendant detained at Gillingham Police Station, Dorsetshire. He informed him that he was a police officer from Folkestone and held a warrant for his arrest. He read the warrant over to him and cautioned him, and he replied “I have nothing to say”. He brought him to the Folkestone Police Station, where he was charged and cautioned. Defendant replied “There is nothing for me to say. I thought there was enough security for me at the bank”. On being searched, in his possession he had 125 5s. 8d. in Treasury notes and silver, and three cheque books of the National Provincial Bank, Folkestone.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said that that was as far as he could take that case that day. There were enquiries to be made and further evidence to bring before the Court.

The Chairman said that the case would be adjourned until today (Friday) and bail granted, the defendant in 50, and two sureties of 25 or one of 50.

Folkestone Herald 5 September 1931

Local News

At the Folkestone Police Court yesterday, Percy George Savage, a local trader carrying on business in Dover Road, was bound over for two years following the hearing of a number of indictments charging him with having obtained various sums of money by false pretences.

Savage was first brought before the Magistrates on Tuesday, when he was charged with having by false pretences and with intent to defraud obtained 6 from Mr. Henry Franklyn on August 22nd. Four separate charges of having on the same day (August 22nd) obtained by false pretences the sum of 6 from each of the following: Thomas William Andrews, Doris Minnie Martin, Harry Edward Carey and Henry Godfrey Reed were also preferred. Mr. B.H. Bonniface appeared for Savage.

Evidence was given by Henry Franklyn, a grocer, of 103, Dover Road; Thomas William Andrews, a boot and shoe dealer, of 96, Tontine Street; Doris Minnie Martin, cashier to E.C. Hann, a butcher, of Dover Road; Harry Edward Carey, a tobacconist, of 137, Dover Road; and Harry Godfrey Reed, licensee of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, that on August 22nd they had cashed cheques for 6 each for defendant and that the cheques had later been returned marked “R.D.”. Mr. Carey stated that he had also cashed a further cheque for 6 for Savage on August 24th and it had been returned.

Detective Sergeant Lawrence said at 3 p.m. the previous day (September 1st) he saw prisoner detained at Gillingham Police Station, Dorsetshire. He told him he had a warrant for his arrest and cautioned him and he replied “I have nothing to say. I thought there was enough security at the bank”. He brought him to the Folkestone Police Station, where he was again charged and cautioned. He replied “There is nothing for me to say. I thought there was enough security at the bank”. Defendant had in his possession 125 in Treasury notes and some silver, and three cheque books of the National Provincial Bank, Folkestone (produced).

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) asked for an adjournment of one week.

The Bench adjourned the hearing until Friday, bail being granted.

When savage was again before the Magistrates yesterday (Friday), four further charges of obtaining by false pretences with intent to defraud four sums amounting together to 28, were preferred against him. Mr. Bonniface again appeared for Savage.

Robert Oliver Wiltshire, a motor cycle engineer, of 51, Dover Street, Folkestone, said that he knew Savage, who called upon him on August 23rd at about 5.30 p.m. He had a cheque with him (produced), endorsed P.G. Savage, for 6. He asked if witness could cash the cheque for him, and deduct 13s. 6d. he owed witness. This witness did. The cheque was returned marked “R.D.”.

Sidney Charles Windsor Herbert, licensee of the Swan Hotel, Dover Road, said Savage called at witness's bar on August 22nd, and at his request he changed a cheque for 6 for him. It was returned marked “R.D.”.

Albert Edward Palmer, an outfitter, of 69, Tontine Street, Folkestone, said Savage called upon him on August 22nd. He said he wanted to pay for a wireless set, and asked witness to cash a cheque for 10. It was signed and endorsed P.G. Savage. He cashed the cheque, which was later returned marked “R.D.”.

William Edward Miles, of 129, Dover Road, Folkestone, a butcher, gave evidence of changing a cheque for 6 for Savage. It was not honoured by the bank.

Alexander Eustace Roberts, manager of the National Provincial Bank, said Savage was a customer at his bank. He produced a certificate copy of Savage's account. The account went on from June 30th, 1930, till August 24th, 1931. On August 24th it showed debits of 25, 25, and 10, the total debit balance on that date being 565 2s. 6d. Witness was in his office on August 24th and saw Savage at about 10.20 a.m. He had not seen Savage for 12 months, but he had written him a letter. Witness was not expecting a visit from him. Savage produced a cheque for 25, payable to self, and asked if witness would cash it. Witness agreed to do so, and the cheque was met by his bank. Savage did not mention any other cheque; he did not say he had drawn other cheques which were unpresented.

Witness examined ten cheques which the Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) produced, all drawn on the National Provincial Bank, and signed by Savage. They were all presented at witness's bank for payment, and were returned marked “R.D.” in each case. Savage had no reason to expect that these cheques would be met by the bank from anything he had said to witness, or from anything witness had said to him. He had not told Savage he could cash another cheque for 25, or a cheque for 10.

By Mr. Bonniface: Witness could not tell which of the cheques for 25 was authorised by him. A cheque for 35 was cashed by Savage before he came to interview witness. The bank had securities deposited with them. The bank had a security upon Savage, being a conveyance for a shop and premises which were bought for 800. There was no reason for Savage to tell him during their interview that he had cashed other cheques. Savage's account was a perfectly open one until 3 o'clock on August 24th. Witness would certainly have tried to help Savage if he had disclosed the fact that he had drawn the other cheques. He thought the security his bank held would be ample to secure the overdraft as shown in the account in addition to the cheques mentioned in the charge, providing the property was of the same value.

In reply to the Clerk, witness said that Savage had been given a limit of overdraft of 500 over a year ago. If he had known that Savage had cashed a cheque for 25 he would not have cashed another cheque for 25. He was not aware that Savage was going away that day.

Further, in reply to Mr. Bonniface, witness admitted that in July last, Savage had been allowed to exceed the limit of his overdraft.

Mr. W. Chard, a cashier and acting manager at the National Provincial Bank on August 25th, produced a letter in Savage's handwriting which was received at the bank on August 25th. It was addressed to Mr. Roberts.

The Clerk read the letter to the Magistrates, but at the request of Mr. Bonniface he did not read it aloud.

In reply to Mr. Bonniface, witness said Savage had in the letter asked him to sell the property, and to reimburse the bank.

The Chief Constable put in a letter from Savage received by him on August 24th. This the Clerk also read to the Magistrates. A day or so afterwards, he (the Chief Constable) received two 1 notes in an envelope from Savage.

Mr. Bonniface here submitted that there was no case in law of obtaining those sums of money by false pretences.

After a short retirement, the Bench decided that the case should proceed, and Savage elected to be tried summarily, and pleaded Not Guilty.

In addressing the Bench, Mr. Bonniface said that he was not anxious to give pain to anybody, and so he had decided to rely entirely upon the statements contained in the letters which were before the Bench, and to say that, had his client gone into the box, he would have substantiated on oath those statements which were contained in those letters. He would have given an explanation of what was undoubtedly, to say the least, a most foolish action on his part on Saturday, August 22nd, when he asked those various tradespeople to cash the cheques.

Mr. Bonniface, continuing, said that he had received instructions that morning, even if the case were dismissed, as he confidently anticipated it would be, to pay each of the tradesmen from the money which was in Savage's possession the amounts of the cheques which they had cashed for him. Savage never had any intention of obtaining money from them in a fraudulent manner; he had every intention and hope and anticipation that those cheques would be met, more especially having regard to the instruction he gave in his letter to the bank to sell his property. He was honest enough even after that to send to the Chief Constable within two or three days the amount he had written saying he would send. They had before them a man who had never been in any trouble before, a man who had carried on a business in Folkestone for some years. He was upright and had never overdrawn his account during the time he had operated it at the National Provincial Bank. If a good character could not stand a man in that position in his stead, then a good character was not worth having. He asked the Bench to say that that was a case where they could rightly discharge defendant under the Probation of Offenders' Act.

Without retiring the Bench arrived at their decision, and asked the Chief Constable if there were any previous convictions against Savage.

The Chief Constable said there were not.

The Chairman said that, taking into consideration the circumstances of his case, they were going to bind Savage over for two years under the Probation of Offenders' Act. An order would be made for the full restitution of the money in respect of the charges, and for the payment of the costs (6) of the prosecution. They hoped that that would be an end of his trouble.

On hearing this decision, Savage went across to the solicitors' table and shook Mr. Bonniface heartily by the hand.

Folkestone Express 12 September 1931

Friday, September 4th: Before Mr. J.H. Blamey and Mr. S.B. Corser.

Percy George Savage, a fruiterer, of Dover Road, Folkestone, appeared on remand on five charges of obtaining, by false pretences, with intent to defraud, five separate sums of 6 each. There were four further charges brought against the prisoner of obtaining three further sums of 6 each and also a sum of 10 by false pretences with intent to defraud. Mr. B.H. Bonniface appeared to defend.

P.S. Lawrence, cross-examined, said that he had found a Southern Railway cloakroom ticket in his possession.

Roland Oliver Wiltshire, a cycle dealer, of 51, Dover Street, Folkestone, said prisoner called upon him on August 23rd at 5.30 p.m. Prisoner had a cheque with him, signed .G. Savage, payable to “Self”, and it was for 6. He asked if he could cash the cheque for him and take out the 13s. 6d. he owed him. He cashed the cheque, deducted 13s. 6d., and gave prisoner the balance. He paid in the cheque on Tuesday, August 25th, and it was returned on the following Thursday marked “Refer to drawer”.

Sidney Charles W. Herbert, licensee of the Swan, Dover Road, Folkestone, said he had known the prisoner for a number of years. He called at the bar on Saturday, August 22nd, at about seven o'clock, and asked him if he could change a cheque for him as he wanted to get away on business, and he had not been able to get to a bank as he had been too busy. Prisoner had a new cheque book in his hand, and he wrote out a cheque for 6 in the bar. It was marked payable to “Self”, and signed P.G. Savage. Witness gave prisoner six 1 notes. He presented the cheque on the following Monday morning at the National Provincial bank, Sandgate Road, and it was returned to him “R.D.” on August 25th.

Albert Edward Palmer, an outfitter, of 69, Tontine Street, Folkestone, said he knew prisoner quite well. He called at eight o'clock on Saturday, August 22nd, and said he wanted to pay for a wireless set. He gave him a cheque made out for 10, payable to “Self” and endorsed P.G. Savage, and asked him to cash it. He paid it into his bank on August 29th, and on August 31st it was returned marked “Refer to drawer”.

William Edward Miles, a butcher, of 129, Dover Road, said he knew the prisoner and had had business dealings with him. He came into his shop in the evening on August 22nd at about eight o'clock, and asked him if he would oblige by changing a cheque as he was too late for the bank. He produced a cheque fro 6, payable to “Self” and signed P.G. Savage. He gave prisoner 6 in Treasury notes. He paid the cheque into his bank in Tontine Street on August 24th, and it was returned to him marked “Refer to drawer”.

Mr. H.A.E. Roberts, manager of the National Provincial Bank, Folkestone, on sub-poena, produced a copy of the prisoner's account. The copy went back to the 30th June, 1930, and carried on to August 24th, 1931. It showed on the 24th August debits of 25, 25, and 10, making a total debit balance on that day of 565 2s. 6d. He saw prisoner on August 24th at about 10.20 a.m. Prisoner had asked to see him, but he had not been expecting to see him from anything that had transpired before. He did not think he had seen prisoner for twelve months, but he could not be certain of the date. He had written him a letter. Prisoner produced a cheque for 25, payable to “Self”, and asked him if he would cash it. He agreed to do so, and the cheque was met by the bank. He did not mention any other cheques and did not tell him that he had drawn cheques which were unpresented. The ten cheques produced were drawn on the National Provincial Bank and were signed by the prisoner. In each case they were returned marked “R.D.” Prisoner had no reason to expect those cheques to be met from anything he had said to him (witness) or from anything witness had said to him. He did not tell prisoner at the interview that he would cash another cheque for 25 or for 10.

By Mr. Bonniface, witness said that he could not say which of the 25 he had cashed marked in the account. It was a fact that the first 25 was cashed before prisoner came to witness with the second cheque. He could not say definitely when the cheque for 10 was cashed. The bank had security upon the prisoner, being the conveyance of a shop and premises bought for 800. There was no reason for prisoner to tell him that the other cheques had been drawn. His account was a perfectly open one until three o'clock on the 24th August. He very possibly might have tried to help the defendant if he had disclosed his true position and that he had drawn the other cheques mentioned. He would think the bank held ample security to meet the overdraft in addition to cheques mentioned in the charge, subject to the property being of the same value.

In reply to the magistrates' Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes), witness said that prisoner had been given a limit of overdraft. This was 500, and had been given him over a year ago. If he had been aware of the prisoner cashing 25 at the bank, he would not have cashed the other 25. Prisoner did not tell him that he was going away that day.

Mr. Bonniface: As a matter of fact, this account shows that the defendant has been allowed to draw over the 500?

Witness: That is so.

Mr. Bonniface: That was in July last?

Witness: Yes.

Mr. Chard, a cashier at the National Provincial Bank Ltd., said he was acting manager at the bank on the 24th August. A letter was received at the bank on August 25th, addressed to last witness, in the prisoner's handwriting.

The Magistrates' Clerk read the letter over to the Magistrates, but upon the instructions of Mr. Bonniface, did not do this aloud.

Mr. Bonniface, cross-examining, said that in the letter the prisoner asked him to sell the property and to reimburse the bank. He also stated that he had taken certain monies.

Witness said that was so.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley), on oath, said that he also received a letter from the prisoner on the morning of the 25th August. It contained similar phrases to those in the previous letter produced.

The Magistrates' Clerk read this letter over to the Bench, but it was inaudible to the public.

Cross-examined, the Chief Constable said that he received 2 by letter from the prisoner two days later, as stated in the letter.

Mr. Bonniface said that, in law, he submitted that there was no case of obtaining the sum by false pretences at all. If the defendant had a reasonable belief at the time he gave the cheque that it would be met, then the crime of false pretences went. The bank manager told them that it was still an open account until three o'clock of the afternoon of the 24th August, so that on the 22nd and 23rd the account was an open account, and on the morning of the 24th it was an open account. So open was it that the bank over the counter paid 25 after ten o'clock, and also 10 over the counter after ten o'clock. There was no doubt about it that the bank paid over 25. They knew it was an open account. If the bank met the cheque, could they say that on the 22nd these other cheques would not be met? 800 was the price given for that property. They read a letter in which the man told the bank to sell the property. He anticipated that that would be met. It was for the prosecution to show that he knew from the bank manager beforehand that these cheques would not be met. The bank manager told them that he did not expect him to call. He submitted that on the evidence they had before them they could not commit that man for trial. He submitted to them that the prosecution had fallen short of what in law they were bound to prove.

The Bench retired.

The Magistrates' Clerk, on their return, said they had decided that the case must proceed.

Mr. Bonniface said the prisoner would elect to go for trial.

The Magistrates' Clerk asked Mr. Bonniface to discuss this with the prisoner. This was done, and prisoner then pleaded Not Guilty and elected to be dealt with by the Bench.

Mr. Bonniface, addressing the Magistrates, said that he had decided to rely solely upon the statements in the letters. Had prisoner gone into the box, he would have submitted on oath those statements contained in those letters. He aws most anxious in that submission not to hurt anybody's feelings, because there were rights and wrongs in every case, and there might be rights and wrongs in the case of that particular trouble. He was sure they would appreciate that he must refer to the fact that undoubtedly at that time there was family trouble between the wife and the husband, and je did not ant to enlarge upon that, but it apparently came to such a pass that on that particular occasion the defendant felt that he could not live with his wife any longer. That was the position, and undoubtedly foolishly – though he still contended not criminally – that man obtained that money by those cheques. He was entitled to say that he received instructions that morning that even if the case was dismissed, as he confidently anticipated it would be, he was to pay each of those tradesmen from the money which was in that man's possession the amounts of the cheques which were cashed for him. He had never had any intention of obtaining money from them that they should lose. He had every intention and every hope and every anticipation that those cheques would be met, more especially having regard to the instructions he gave to the bank to sell his property. He suggested that the Bench should discharge the prisoner under the Probation of Offenders Act.

The Chief Constable said there were no previous convictions against prisoner.

The Chairman said that taking into consideration the circumstances of the case, they were going to bind the prisoner over for two years under the Probation Act, and an order would be made for the restitution of the money to the people concerned. Prisoner would also pay the costs of the prosecution, which would amount to 6. The Bench had taken a very lenient view of the case, and hoped that would end his troubles.

Before leaving the Court, Savage shook hands with Mr. Bonniface.

Folkestone Herald 8 January 1944

Local News

At Folkestone Transfer Sessions on Wednesday the licence of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, was transferred from Mr. J. Green to Mr. William Ernest Garland, a former N.A.A.F.I. manager in the district.

Folkestone Gazette 21 March 1951

Local News

Mr. A.E. Jennings, licensee of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, Folkestone, collapsed in a cafe near the Savoy Cinema on Monday night. He was taken to Folkestone Hospital and his wife was called. He died about half an hour after reaching hospital. Mr. Jennings was a Folkestonian. Before 1939, he was the proprietor of the Harbour Garage Cafe, but when war came he joined the R.A.F. He was invalided out with rheumatoid arthritis. He was a member of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association. He leaves a wife and a daughter with whom much sympathy will be extended.

Folkestone Herald 24 March 1951

Obituary

Mr. A.E. Jennings, licensee of the Railway Tavern, Dover Road, Folkestone, collapsed in a cafe in Rendezvous Street on Monday night. He was taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital, and his wife, Mrs. E.C. Jennings, was called. He died before regaining consciousness.
Aged 43, Mr. Jennings was a Folkestonian. Before the war he was proprietor of the Harbour Garage Cafe. He joined the R.A.F. but was invalided out with rheumatoid arthritis. He was a member of Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers’ Association. Mr. Jennings leaves a wife and a daughter of 18.

Folkestone Gazette 13 February 1963

Local News

Permits under the Betting and Gaming Act for amusements with prizes have been granted to the Martello Hotel, True Briton, Ship Inn, East Cliff Tavern, Raglan Hotel, Royal Pavilion Bars, Railway Tavern, and Royal Standard.

Folkestone Herald 17 February 1973

Annual Licensing Sessions

In his annual report, Superintendent Snelling said there were 18 cases of drunkenness during the year – two fewer than in 1971, but the 43 cases of unfitness to drive through drink was three more than in 1971. During the year the Shakespeare Hotel was placed in suspense and the Railway Tavern, which was in suspense, was not renewed. One licensee was cautioned for permitting persons under age to consume alcohol and another for allowing drinking after hours. As a general rule, licensees in the Folkestone area had conducted their premises in a proper manner.

Mr. Bristow said he sympathised with licensees who had to determine the age of young customers. He said “People of 13 look like 23, and I advise all licensees to take care". Renewing all licences, he congratulated the landlords on the way they had conducted their businesses during 1972.


Folkestone Herald 16 June 1973

Local News

Residents in an east Folkestone shopping area can sleep a little easier in their beds. Something is, at last, being done about the blot on their environment – 115-119, Dover Road.

The site includes the old Railway Tavern which closed two years ago and has since fallen into disrepair. Broken windows and open doors act as welcome signs for adventurous children and shelter-seeking vagrants. Until Thursday shop owners and nearby residents had no idea how long they would have to put up with the nuisance. The Herald was asked to investigate, and a reporter found people living near the site both angry and frightened. Within seven hours he was able to assure them that positive steps were being taken to remove the eyesore. The property had been acquired by local builders, J. Hyham and Sons, who have detailed planning permission to erect seven two-bedroom flats. A spokesman for the firm said work was expected to start inside six months.

It cannot begin soon enough for people like Mr. Fred Groom, the shoe repairer whose shop stands next to the tavern. “We have had all sorts of trouble there”, he said, “with tramps using it as a doss-house and kids endangering themselves by playing there”.

Mr. Harry Thatcher, who runs Jackson's hardware and gift shop, has forbidden his two sons to go anywhere near the site. He said “It is not only a terrible eyesore, but it is no exaggeration to call it a death trap”. Told there were ashes in what was once the public bar fireplace, Mr. Thatcher said “I am not surprised. We all know that tramps have been living there”.

This was one of the biggest bones of contention put forward by newsagent Mr. Alan Stephenson, who said “The place is an obvious fire risk. If ever the tramps, or anybody else, set it alight, the whole terraced block would go up, and seven shops would be in danger. Apart from the fire hazard, there must be a danger to health”.

Photographer Mike Scott, who said he found a child on the pub roof only last week, said the building should be boarded up to prevent anyone entering.

When a Herald reporter put this point to the spokesman for J. Hyham and Sons, he said “We shall take steps to fence off the area properly and to board up the windows of the pub”.

Folkestone Herald 23 June 1973

Local News

Demolition of the old Railway Tavern in Dover Road, Folkestone, was ordered this week.

On Saturday, the Herald reported that residents and traders in the area were angry at the derelict condition of the building, which closed two years ago. They claimed it was an eyesore and a danger.

Mr. Jim Hyham, the boss of a local building firm that acquired the property only two weeks ago, returned from holiday on Monday – and almost immediately asked a demolition company to start work on the site. He was expecting scaffolding to go up on Thursday. Said Mr. Hyham, “The property became our responsibility only two weeks ago when we obtained planning permission. We have boarded up the premises several times”. He added that when the demolition work was completed, materials would be moved away and the site kept tidy until such time as redevelopment starts. Seven two-bedroom flats will go up there.

One of the traders, who claimed that the site was a fire risk, was newsagent Mr. Alan Stephenson. He said on Thursday “This is very good news. Obviously everyone in this area will be delighted. We hope now for an early start on redevelopment. It will be the first time people have lived on the site for about 10 years”.

 

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