DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Monday, 18 November, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1850s

Bell Inn

Open 2019+

Church Street

Shepherdswell

https://whatpub.com/bell-inn

Bell at Shepherdswell date unknown

Above photo by kind permission of Dover Library, date unknown although thought to be for the planting of trees in Queen Victoria's Jubilee.

Bell Inn, licensee

Above photograph showing who I believe to be licensees Samuel Upton, circa 1920.

Bell, Shepherdswell Bell, Shepherdswell

Apologies for quality of above photo. Taken from picture inside pub.

Dover Express 21st September 1900.

SHEPHERDSWELL.

Mrs. Drew obtained an hour’s extension for a supper on September 29th at the "Bell Inn."

 

From the Dover Express, Friday 16 October, 1903.

SHEPHERDPWELL.

An application was granted to George Drew, of the "Bell Inn," Shepherdswell, allowing him an hour’s extension on October 17th on the occasion of the harvest supper.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 16 Sept, 1904. Price 1d.

An hour's extension was allowed to Mr. G. Drew, at the " Bell," Shepherdswell, on September 24th was granted, on the occasion of a harvest supper.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, 19 February, 1915.

LICENSING

The licence of the "Bell," Shepherdswell was transferred from Mr. G. Drew to Mr. W. Hopton, who is a miner working at Snowdown.

Objection was raised that the new licensee would continue at work, and Mr. Edward Chitty said that he ought to give an undertaking not to work during the evening. he thought that houses which would not support a man entirely should be closed.

Mr. Hopton said that his brother would always be at home when he was away.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, 2 February, 1934.

Motorist Convicted for Drunkenness.

George Henry Walker was summoned for being in charge of a motor car in Coldred Street whilst under the influence of drink, and Ernest Rowland Hills was summoned for aiding and abetting the same.

Defendants pleaded not guilty.

P.S. Hills. Eythome, said that at 10.30 p.m. On January 21st, he was with P.C Thomas, when he saw a motor car standing outside the "Bell Inn," Shepherdswell. P.C. Thomas shone the torch inside the car and witness saw Walker sitting on the near side seat. He was helplessly drunk. Witness sent P.C. Thomas to find the driver and he brought Hills, who said that he was the driver. Hills said, "I know he is drunk, but I am in charge of the car." Witness asked him how he could be in charge when he was inside a public house. Hills drove P.C. Thomas and Walker to Sandwich Police Station and witness followed on a motor cycle.

In reply to Mr. A. K. Mowll (for the defendants) witness said that there was a division between the driver's seat and the passengers'.

Mr. Mowll said that he did not dispute the facts but submitted that Walker could only be summoned for being in charge of the car if he had been in the driver’s seat, and made definite motions of being in charge. Walker was only in occupation as a passenger.

Supt. Webb contended that if an adult person was sitting in a car he or she was during that time in charge of the car.

The Chairman said that the Bench found the defendants guilty of a technical offence and would be fined 16s. each with no disqualification.

 

Shepherdswell Public House Raid.

Frederick Charles Earl, licensee of the "Bell Inn," Shepherdswell, was summoned for (1) permitting drunkenness to take place on his premises; (2), unlawfully supplying liquor to James Edward Hewitt, James Gregory, and John Pemble in other than the hours permitted, on January 22nd.

Hewitt and Pemble were summoned for being drunk on the "Bell Inn" premises and further for consuming liquor during prohibited hours, and Gregory was summoned for consuming liquor during prohibited hours.

P. C. Thomas. Shepherdswell, said that at 10.40 p.m. on the 21st January, on instructions from P.S. Hills, he entered the "Bell Inn" to find the driver of the car in the previous case. The front door was latched, but not locked. In the cellar, Pemble was filling a pint glass full of beer from a barrel, and this he handed to Gregory, who was filling a pint glass full of beer from a barrel, and this he handed to Gregory, who was standing on the top of the stairs. Witness saw Gregory drink some of the beer. Earl was standing in the passage, and witness could see several pint glasses filled with beer on a table in the back room. Witness saw Hewitt, who was sitting in a chair, pick up a pint glass and drink some beer. Pemble took a pint glass of beer into the passage and drank it. Witness drew the licensee’s attention to the beer that was being drawn and drunk on his premises, and he said, "That’s all right!" Witness went to Sandwich and returned to the "Bell Inn" at 12.45 a.m. with P. S. Hills, and again the door was latched, but not locked. The back room was in a state of disorder, and Pemble was lolling in a chair, and was positively drunk. Gregory was sitting in a chair by the fire with a pint glass containing beer opposite him on the table. He was under the influence of drink, but not drunk. At this point the licensee, Earl, came into the room, apparently from the direction of the cellar, and was very much under the influence of drink, and took up an aggressive attitude. The room reeked of beer, and the tables and floors were littered with broken glass, playing cards, cigarette ends, matches and beer. There was a large puddle on the floor, so that it was impossible to walk without getting wet shoes.

P.S. Hills, Eythome, corroborated. He found Hewitt drunk in a bedroom at the "Bell Inn." The licensee said that he was lodging there, but said that he did not keep a lodging book.

Supt. H. Webb said that at about 1.30 a.m. on 22nd January he received Pemble at Sandwich Police Station, and Pemble was charged with being drunk. In witness’ opinion Pemble was drunk and incapable of realising the charge.

Frederick Charles Earl, licensee of the "Bell Inn," Shepherdswell, said that he had been there nearly four years, and this was his first summons. On the night in question witness, with Hewitt, Gregory and Walker, had been out, and returned at 10.25. Walker was left in the car, and the driver (Hills) came in to be paid off. Gregory got stranded through the car being taken away on account of Walker. Witness invited them to have supper, and gave them drinks with it. No money was paid. The reason for Pemble being there was that he looked after the house while witness was away. In witness’ opinion Pemble was far from being drunk, and Hewitt had only been drinking shandies and was sober when he went to bed.

In reply to Supt. Webb, witness said that he left the "Bell" at about 7.30 p.m., and went to the "White Horse," Eythorne, staying there for about half-an-hour. During that time he had two brown ales. Then he went to the "Butcher’s Arms," Ashley, where he stayed until 10 p.m., and drank three brown ales. There were no playing cards on the table at the "Bell Inn."

James Gregory, Bell View. East Studdale, said that he was picked up at Ashley on the 21st January, and was one of the party to return to the "Bell Inn." He had no supper or drinks in the "Bell."

James Edward Hewitt, Yewcroft, Shepherdswell, said that he often stayed with Earl at the "Bell" because they had been friends since 1915. He had no drinks at the "Bell."

In reply to Supt. Webb, witness said that he only lived about one hundred yards from the "Bell Inn," but denied being too drunk to go home.

John Pemble, a milkman, of Shepherdswell said that he was minding the public house for Earl. He was not drunk, and remembered the events of the evening perfectly.

Mr. Mowll said that those men were the guests of the licensee, and he was entitled to provide them with drinks at his own expense.

The Chairman said that the Justices found accused guilty on all counts. Earl would be fined 3 on each case of supplying liquor and 7 for drunkenness on the premises. 16 in all, or in default 14 days’ imprisonment for each case: Pemble, Hewitt and Gregory would be fined 1 each for consuming, or in default 14 days imprisonment: and Pemble and Hewitt would be fined 5s. each for drunkenness. Earl was allowed a month to pay, and the others a fortnight.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News. 24 June, 1938. Price 1d.

LICENCE TRANSFERS

The licence of the “Bell Inn,” Shepherdswell, was granted an extension from 2.30 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, 25th, for sports in aid of the Hospital.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News. 8 October, 1942.

Plans approval.

Plans for alterations at "The Bell" Inn, Shepherdswell were approved by the Bench.

 

Dover Express 2nd May 1947.

Only one candidate was nominated on Monday for the vacancy on the Dover Rural Council caused by the resignation of Col. C. M. Stephen, the Shepherdswell representative. Consequently, an election will be unnecessary, the nominated candidate, Mr. George Frederick Hurley of the “Bell” Inn, Shepherdswell, being returned unopposed.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News. 26 April, 1963.

Funeral of Mr. E. L. Copley.

Mineworker and Licensee.

Employed at Tilmanstone Colliery for thirty-one years, for over ten years landlord of the "Walmer Castle," Market Square, and for the last four years at the "Bell Inn," Shepherdswell, Mr. Ernest Leo Copley died on Thursday last week aged 58 years.

In his younger days a keen local footballer, he was a Special Constable during the war, and the founder of the Copley Rangers Skittles Team.

The Rec. C. J. H. Martin, Vicar of Shepherdswell, conducted the service at Barham Crematorium on Tuesday.

The family mourners were; Mrs. V. C. Copley (widow), Mr. and Mrs. C. Copley (son and daughter-in-law), Mr. and Mrs. H. Copley (brother and sister-in-law), Mrs. M. Webb (cousin), and Mr. John Cocking.

Floral tributes included those from the Directors of Fremlins, the L.V.A., Copley Rangers, Dover Football Club and Supporters' Association, friends at the "Bell," the O.A.P. Club, and Dover Skittles Association.

The arrangements were by E. Wooldridge, of Shepherdswell.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News. 7 June, 1963.

Bell darts team 1963

The new Fremlins Knock-Out Darts Cup was won for the first time by the "Bell," Shepherdswell, on Thursday last week when they best the "Criterion" by three straight legs in the final at the "Falcon" Hotel. "Bell" team skipper Sammy Hall received the trophy from Mr. John Coomber, Fremlins Area Manager, Holding the runners-up cup is Ron Bishop, skipper of the "Criterion" team, and Ken Brown, the competition secretary looks on.

Bell at Lydden 1987

Above picture by kind permission of Dover Library. 1987. People to date unknown.

Bell Inn 1980s

Above photo kindly sent and taken by John Fagg in the 1980s.

Bell 1890s

Above photo circa 1980s.

From the East Kent Mercury, 8 December, 1988.

Couple, enjoying their first taste of pub trade.

bell licensees 1988

Richard and Janet Toptalo, mine hosts at The Bell, Shepherdswell.

 

THE focal point of any village is its village green. The village green at Shepherdswell is much admired. It is bounded by the parish church and The Bell public house.

The Bell, with its fine flint exterior, dates from the early 1600s, while the parish church was rebuilt as late as 1863. The Bell, a Whitbread house, is one of more than 800 public houses in this country with the word Bell in its name. Many of them are to be found - as at Shepherdswell - close to the village church.

HOSTS

Mine hosts at The Bell are Richard and Janet Toptalo, who took over the licence in August. It is their first incursion into the trade and they are enjoying every minute of it.

Richard was at sea with Townsend Thoresen for 15 years, the last 10 as an assistant purser.

Since being at The Bell they have completely redecorated the interior of the historic hostelry and installed a new heating system.

Richard and Janet told me: "Our regulars came up with the ideas for the renovation. So the pub is very much just how they wanted it."

The Bell offers pool and darts and has its own social club which meets on Friday nights. The club has its own outings, and is happy to help charity. It raised 115 for the Children in Need appeal, and on Saturday, December 17, a carol singing group will be out and about in the village to raise money for the Wishing Well Appeal for Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital.

There will be a restaurant at The Bell early next year. This will be open only for lunches and will specialise in grills, with Richard as chef. And next summer there will be a spacious garden for the children.

The Bell, incidentally, is the meeting place of the local branch of the Royal British Legion.

 

From the Dover Express, 11 March 1999, by Terry Sutton.

Bell at Shepherdswell 1999

Help me track down the ghosts.

JENNY Bushell, landlady at The Bell, Inn at Shepherdswell, is busy researching the history of the pub and the village.

And she has appealed to Dover Express readers to help out with old photographs of the four pubs that once existed in Shepherdswell.

Jenny, 43, who moved into The Bell last August, believes the pub maybe haunted because some strange things happen there. A gallows tree, she said, once stood outside the pub.

She wants any old pictures of the village to copy.

She will then hang them on the walls for visitors to study.

Jenny Bushell landlady 1999Jenny said the four pubs once in the - village were The "Leather Bottle", which many remembered, but no one seemed to have a picture; The "Whitehall" that gained national publicity as the home of a range of death masks; The "Bricklayers Arms" (of which she has a picture dated around 1969) and The Bell of which she has a 1920 photo.

"The village green outside our pub, used to be a pond. We've not managed to discover any pictures of that, although we have one of it dried up before it was planted with trees for Queen Victoria's jubilee," said Jenny.

She said locals had told her about two ghosts said to haunt the pub. One is supposed to be the ghost of a young girl who seems to hang around the fireplace and the other is of a young man.

"Strange things happen. Sometimes the dog won't settle down and then starts barking like mad. But he is 17, years old!

"And our two cats race up and down the stairs. And pictures mysteriously fall off the wall," said Jenny, who believes The Bell goes back as a pub 300 years or more. Before that. she said, it was a house.

 

From the East Kent Murcury, 23 September, 1999.

TAVENERS GO TO BELL

The former licensees of the "Cliffe Tavern" at St Margaret's have taken over the "Bell Inn" at Shepherdswell.

Calvin Stothart and Claire Hobson were granted a protection order by the licensing justice on Friday.

Mr Stothart said he had 10 years experience in the licensing trade and Miss Hobson had been involved in the hotel and catering trade in London.

They had run the "Cliffe Tavern" from February last year until July this year.

 

Bell 2002

Above photo 2002.

From the Dover Mercury, 29 June 2006.

EMPTY SHELL: Fire ripped through 200-year-old building.

Bell in Shepherdswell after fire

Villagers want pub restored after blaze.

VILLAGERS are hopeful that the Bell Inn at Shepherdswell, which has been destroyed by fire, will be restored to its former glory.

The pub's four walls are all that is left of the Grade II listed building after fire broke out in the roof last Wednesday.

Some 40 firefighters from six fire stations fought the blaze from about 10.30pm until 3.45am the following morning.

Regular Keith Roberts was in the pub's back room playing cards when the landlady, Bobbie Byrne, came in and told everyone to get out.

"Her daughter discovered the fire after she was woken by what she thought was animals in the roof," he said. "Slates were already falling from the roof and the fire took hold very quickly.

Two gerbils were the only casualties." Mrs Byrne, her husband Roy, and their daughter were given clothes by neighbours.

The family is thought to be living in a house they own in Folkestone Road.

"It's very sad for the community," said Mr Roberts. "There's 1,783 adults and now only one small pub, which isn't enough.

"The Bell was like a community centre and the village cricket team's meeting place."

Mr Roberts, a member of Shepherdswell and Coldred History Group, said the 200-year-old building had been a pub for about 150 years.

"The good news is that the walls are still standing and we are confident a rebuild will be possible," he said, "but it will take time to restore it to its former glory."

A Kent Fire and Rescue Service spokesman said: "An investigation into the cause of the fire is under way, but it's not being treated as suspicious."

A spokesman from Punch Taverns, which owns the Bell Inn, said: "The pub was trading when the fire was discovered but fortunately everyone was safely evacuated with no injuries.

"We have secured the site and are awaiting the fire officer report before knowing our options going forward.

"This is obviously a huge blow for the licensees, but thankfully they live in separate accommodation and we will be sitting down together to discuss the future."

 

From the Dover Express, 29 June 2006.

PUB DESTROYED: Fire starts in roof before closing time.

Bell Inn Shepherdswell after fire

FOUR walls are all that remain of The Bell Inn in Shepherdswell after a fire broke out in Its roof just before last orders.

About 40 fire-fighters spent the night getting the blaze under control, but everything was destroyed by the fire, smoke and water.

Yet villagers are optimistic that the historic pub in the heart of the community can be restored to its former glory.

A PAIR of pub owners saw their livelihood go up in smoke last week as a blaze broke out in Shepherdswell.

The fire started at the Bell Inn pub in Church Hill at around 10.10pm last Wednesday.

Customers got their first indication something was wrong when they smelt what they believed to be burning rubber coming from outside.

Tony Dannunzio, 28, of Mill Lane, said: ''I'd only been in the pub for about five minutes. I went to the machine to get some cigarettes.

"I smelt what seemed like tar burning as if someone was laying a new road surface and when the landlady went out to check, the roof was on fire."

A team from Dover fire station was called, and arrived around 20 minutes later.

Despite their best efforts, all that remained of the building's roof was its chimney stacks.

Landlady Roberta Byrne, who took over the site with husband Roy in 2002, said customers had been safely evacuated, but her daughter's gerbil had perished during the incident.

She said: "We are all in a fair amount of shock."

The family, who had been living at the pub, have moved to their house in Folkestone Road, Dover while an investigation into the cause of the blaze continues.

It was believed to have started in the loft.

Andrea Crawford, 38, who worked as a bartender at the pub, said residents were planning to put on a series of fundraising events to help contribute to the cost of the repairs.

She said: "The pub will be deeply missed. It had such a nice atmosphere for the young and the elderly. Everyone was made welcome."

From the Dover Express, 29 June 2006.

Village pub destroyed by blaze in roof.

Bell fire 2006

A PAIR of pub owners saw their livelihood go up in smoke last week as a blaze broke out in Shepherdswell.

The fire started at the Bell Inn pub in Church Hill at around 10.10pm last Wednesday.

Customers got their first indication something was wrong when they smelt what they believed to be burning rubber coming from outside.

Tony Dannunzio, 28, of Mill Lane, said: “I’d only been in the pub for about five minutes. I went to the machine to get some cigarettes.

“I smelt what seemed like tar burning as if someone was laying a new road surface and when the landlady went out to check, the roof was on fire.”

A team from Dover fire station was called, and arrived around 20 minutes later.

Despite their best efforts, all that remained of the building’s roof was its chimney stacks.

Landlady Roberta Byran, who took over the site with husband Roy in 2002, said customers had been safely evacuated, but her daughter’s gerbil had perished during the incident.

She said: “We are all in a fair amount of shock.”

The family, who had been living at the pub, have moved to their house in Folkestone Road, Dover while an investigation into the cause of the blaze continues.

It was believed to have started in the loft.

Andrea Crawford, 38, who worked as a bartender at the pub, said residents were planning to put on a series of fundraising events to help contribute to the cost of the repairs.

She said: “The pub will be deeply missed. It had such a nice atmosphere for the young and the elderly. Everyone was made welcome.”

From the Dover Express, 6 July 2006.

Pub fire facts.

I WOULD like to clarify some of facts in your recent article about a fire in a pub in Shepherdswell.

The article was rather misleading as it stated "A team from Dover fire station was called, and arrived 20 minutes later." This is incorrect. In addition, it reads: "The fire started at the Bell Inn pub in Church Hill at around 10.10pm."

In fact, 999 control centre operators received a call from a member of the public at 10.26pm on June 21. Following this, three fire appliances from Aylesham, Eastry and Whitfield were sent, the first of which arrived at the scene within 12 minutes. The crews quickly assessed the situation and called for further assistance. Three appliances from Dover, Ashford and St Margaret's were then sent to the scene and all arrived by 10.53pm.

The damage to the building was substantial, but no one was injured despite fire-fighters discovering a smoke alarm that was not working. I would like to take this opportunity to remind people to test their smoke alarms regularly.

Sadly, Kent Fire and Rescue Service has received a number of calls from the public asking why it took so long for our fire crews to arrive as a result of the misleading information published in the Express. I hope this letter will clarify the facts.

Steve Demetriou,

Chief Executive of Kent Fire & Rescue.

 

Bell Inn Shepherdswell

Bell Inn, Shepherdswell after being rebuilt following the fire. Photo by Paul Skelton 27/Oct/2007.

Bell Inn signBell Inn sign 2015

Above sign left, October 2007, sign right May 2015.

Bell Shepherdswell Advert

Above shows an advert that appeared in the Dover Mercury 29 November 2007.

 

After being burnt down on Wednesday 21st June 2006, the Bell reopened on 12th September 2007. Owned by Punch Taverns, this pub is a listed building.

On visiting the pub on 27 October 2007 the first thing I noticed on entering was the still rather pungent smell of smokiness about the place, although not unpleasant it was definitely evident that the fire had left its mark, however, it was certainly not obvious from looking at the place that a fire of such huge proportions had ever happened at this establishment.

 

From the Dover Express, 24 July 2008.

VILLAGERS SAY: WE LOVE LIVING HERE

Bricklayers 2008

The village boasts a busy parish council - which also covers neighbouring Coldred - active cricket and football teams for youngsters and adults and the East Kent Railway, which welcomes visitors aboard its engines travelling the short distance from Shepherdswell to Eythorne at the weekends.

The line was built in 1911 to run to the coal mines in east Kent, and while the main line was shut down in 1987, a section was saved by the East Kent Railway volunteers who have transformed the station and created a charitable trust.

At the heart of the village is the green, where fetes are often held. The green is overlooked by The "Bell Inn," which helps quench the thirst of busy volunteers and visitors to summer fairs and sporting events.

Villagers are in the process of raising cash for a new hall on the recreation ground to provide a youth centre and a base for the village's guiding and scouting groups.

Resident Keith Roberts, 42, said: “We have raised 20,000 so far, so there's just another 330,000 to go!”

Keith, who has lived in the village most of his life can trace his Shepherdswell roots through several generations. He and his wife Chris say the sense of community is the best part of living in the village.

Chris said  "Keith was in a head-in crash on the Jubilee Way in 2003. He was in hospital for 16 weeks and everyone pulled together to help.

“I was never short of a lift and people always wanted to help.

“I can't imagine living anywhere else.”

Keith had to leave his job with Hoverspeed after the crash but now enjoys spending time coaching village kids in cricket and football. He is also a history buff and has researched the village's past.

He said: “I love it here because my roots are here. I once came across an article about my grandfather taking all the cricket players to fixtures in his horse and cart. Now, I do the same thing in my car.”

Another enthusiastic Shepherdswell resident is Carol White.

The mum-of-two, 61, is originally from Cornwall, but ended up in Shepherdswell in 1975 when her husband took up an insurance post.

Carol, who is a member of everything from Age Concern to the WI, and even the scout group, said: “I have never felt like an outsider because it is so friendly here.”

Among the groups she helps with is the Wednesday Club. The former secretarial worker said: “We meet in the village hall. It started 11 years ago with about 15 members and now we have about 60.

“It was set up for men because there was not much for them to do but we have lots of women, too, now.

“I started helping at the scouts when my son was there. I was asked to help and it was the best thing I ever did.

 

From the Dover Mercury, Thursday 15 April, 2010.

PUB'S FUN RUN DAY RAISES 3,000 FOR HEROES FUND.

Bell runners

Soldiers from the 1st Battalion Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment at the charity run with Liberal Democrat Parliamentary candidate, John Brigden, who supported the event.

A CHARITY fun run organised by The "Bell," Shepherdswell, is expected to have raised more than 3,000 for Help for Heroes.

As well as sponsorship, the event raised money with a hog roast and a man in the stocks.

A number of soldiers from the 1st Battalion Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment gave up some of their leave to take part in the run.

The soldiers included Wayne Reed, a veteran of Afghanistan who, despite being wounded, is returning to active duty.

 

Bell Inn 2015

Above photo, May 2015, kindly sent by Tony Wells.

 

UK spirits owned the pub from between February 2009 and October 2009.

In May 2018 the owners changed from Punch Taverns to Patron Capital.

I was informed in August 2013 that the pub was currently closed for refurbishment.

Open again in 2015, glad to say.

 

LICENSEE LIST

DREW G 1900-Feb/15 Post Office Directory 1903Dover Express

HOPTON Mr W Feb/1915+ Dover Express (Miner working at Snowdown.)

UPTON Samuel 1918-Feb/27 dec'd Pikes 1924Dover Express beer retailer

UPTON Sarah (widow) Feb/1927-Feb/29 Dover Express

Last pub licensee had WILLIAMS Thomas Feb/1929+ Dover Express

EARL Frederick Charles 1930-34+ Pikes 1932-33

HURLEY George F 1938-56+ (age 46 in 1939) Pikes 1938-39Kelly's Directory 1950Kelly's Directory 1953Kelly's Directory 1956

Last pub licensee had COPLEY Ernest Leo 1959-63 dec'd Dover Express

BARKER George 1974+ Library archives 1974 Fremlins

TOPTALO Richard & Janet Aug/1988+

BUSHELL Jenny August 1998+

Last pub licensee had STOTHART Calvin & HOBSON Claire Sept/1999+

WALKDEN Richard & Karen Aug/2001-Aug/02 (Pubmaster)

BYRNE Roy Aug/2002-07

LARFI Jack & Diane 2007-Jan/09

BESSANT Tony Apr/2009+

WEST Koogie 2015-Oct/17

WHITE Jo Oct/2017+

 

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1901

Pikes 1924From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1924

Pikes 1932-33From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1932-33

Pikes 1938-39From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1938-39

Kelly's Directory 1950From the Kelly's Directory 1950

Kelly's Directory 1953From the Kelly's Directory 1953

Kelly's Directory 1956From the Kelly's Directory 1956

Library archives 1974Library archives 1974

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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