DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 13 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1856

Belle Vue Inn

Latest 1925

3 St. John's Street

Folkestone

Belle View Hotel 1908

Above showing the "Belle View Hotel" circa 1908.

Belle View Hotel site 2009

Above picture taken from Google Maps 2009, shows the site of the Belle View Hotel, roughly where the phone box is.

 

Addressed as Belle Vue Fields in 1858, which is obviously where it gained its name from.

 

Southeastern Gazette 19 September 1854.

Annual Licensing Day.

Monday: Before the Mayor, S. Mackie, W. Major, T. Golder, G. Kennicott, and T. Kingsriorth, Esqs.

Before renewing the licenses, the Mayor addressed the publicans, informing them that anew law was passed, explaining to them the particular features of the Act, and hoped they would adhere to it. The whole of the licenses were renewed, with the exception of the Radnor Inn, Oddfellow's Arms, and the Engine Inn. Applications for new licenses were made for the George, Gun, and Belle Vue Tavern; the first only was granted, on the ground that it was a new house in the room of one pulled down. The sign of the Fleur-de-lis was changed to the Martello Tavern.

 

Southeastern Gazette 17 October 1854.

Monday, October 9th: Before the Mayor, J. Kelcey and G. Kennicott, Esqs.

The adjourned meeting for the granting of licenses was held.

Spencer Hayward, of Belle Vue Tavern, again appeared before the magistrates, and produced a memorial, signed by a number of respectable persons, seeking to have a license granted for his house, but the magistrates declined to alter their former decision.

 

Southeastern Gazette 21 August 1855.

Local News.

Friday: Before J. Kelcey and W. Maior, Esqs.

Charles Wapsher and James Gorham, plasterers, were charged with highway robbery.

The prosecutor, Henry Anderson, a servant at Shorncliffe camp, said that on the night of the review by her Majesty, while returning home between 10 and 11 o clock, he was met in St. Peter’s Street by the prisoners (whom he knew by sight,) who asked him to stand a pot of beer, to which he consented, if the Belle Vue Tavern was open. On proceeding thither they found the house closed. The prisoners then requested him to go with them into the town, and on his refusing Wapsher tripped him up and fell on him. Witness called out for assistance, when Gorham caught him round the neck with one arm, and stopped his mouth with the other, while Wapsher rifled his pockets, taking a purse containing 18s. and a tobacco-box.

The prisoners were committed, for trial at the assizes, but admitted to bail in 80 and 2 sureties in 40 each.

Note: Folkestone Chronicle gives Gun Tavern.

 

Kentish Gazette 28 August 1855.

Charles Wapsher and James Gorham, plasterers, were charged before the magistrates on the 17th inst., with highway robbery. The prosecutor, Henry Anderson, a servant at Shorncliffe camp, said that on the night of the review by her Majesty, while returning home between ten and eleven o'clock he was met in St. Peter's-street by the prisoners (whom he knew by sight,) who asked him to stand a pot of beer, to which lie consented if the Belle Vue Tavern was open. On proceeding thither they found the house closed. The prisoners then requested him to go with them into the town, and on his refusing Wapsher tripped him up and fell on him. Witness called out for assistance, when Gorham caught him round the neck with one arm, and stopped his mouth with the other, while Wapsher rifled his pockets, taking a purse containing 18s. and a tobacco-box. The prisoners were committed for trial at the assizes, but admitted to bail in 80, and two sureties in 40 each.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 September 1855.

Monday September 10th :- Present S. Mackie Esq., Mayor, T. Golder Esq., W. Major Esq., G. Kennicott Esq., and W. Bateman Esq.

The General Annual Licensing meeting was held this day, when 46 Licences were renewed in the township of Folkestone, and 3 in Sandgate. Spencer Hayward, Bellevue Field, made an application for a new licence, but was refused.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 September 1855.

Local News. Annual Licensing Day.

Monday: Before the Mayor and a full bench.

New licenses were applied for the Belle Vue Tavern, Mechanics’ Arms, and Wheatsheaf, all of which were refused, the magistrates considering that there were sufficient licensed houses already in the town.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 September 1856.

Monday September 8th: - Special sessions were holden for the purpose of renewing licences, and granting new ones. Present, the Mayor, and G. Kennicott, S. Godden, W. Major, J. Kelcey, W. Bateman, S. Mackie, and J. Kinsford esqs.

The licences of 45 houses were renewed. Mr. John Minter made an application on the part of Mr. Spencer Hayward for a licence for his house, in Bellevue Fields. This being the third application the magistrates granted it.

 

Southeastern Gazette 16 September 1856.

Special Sessions, Monday: Before the Mayor, T Golder, W. Major, W. Bateman, G. Kennicott, J. Kingsnorth, J. Kelcey, and S. Mackie, Esqs.

This being licensing day, 55 licenses were renewed, and one refused.

Mr. John Minter, solicitor, applied for a spirit license for Mr. Spencer Hayward, of Belle Vue Tavern, who had twice previously applied to the magistrates. Mr. Minter showed that the applicant was a respectable man, and had conducted his house properly, and that since the last license was granted in that neighbourhood, 102 houses had been built. License granted.

Note: This seems to indicate that the Bellevue WAS licensed before 1856.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 June 1857.

Wednesday June 3rd: - Before R.W. Boarer esq., Mayor, and J. Kelcey, J. Tolputt, W. Bateman esqs., and Capt. Kennicott.

The following licence was transferred: Belle Vue Tavern, from Spencer Hayward to William Hills.

Note: More Bastions lists this as George Hills.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 November 1857.

Inquest.

During the past week, by a singular fatality, two inquests have been holden here, before the Coroner, S. Eastes, Esq. The second was holden before the Coroner, on Wednesday the 18th inst., at the Mechanics Arms, Bellevue Fields, on the body of Peter Mahoney, a private of the 4th King's Own Regiment of Foot, the depot of which Regt. is now stationed at Shorncliffe.

From the evidence of Hugh Evans, a soldier in the same regiment, it appears that the deceased, witness, and five more soldiers left the camp on the evening of Tuesday, about 6 o'clock, and directly they arrived in Folkestone they went to the Bellevue Tavern, where they remained drinking till about 10 p.m. Deceased drank freely, as well as the other soldiers, and became noisy and quarrelsome; the landlord and a sergeant of the 98th endeavoured to put deceased and the others out, which they had some trouble in doing. When they got into the street four of the men, including deceased, then began breaking the windows – witness then left, and presently deceased and one of the other soldiers passed witness running, witness followed them, and upon arriving opposite the Mechanics Arms witness asked deceased what was the matter with him, he called out “I am bleeding to death”, when he fell on his back, and never spoke afterwards: witness asked for some water, and then assisted by another comrade carried deceased into the Mechanics Arms, took off his coat and found he was wounded on the right wrist, which was then bleeding slightly – witness then bound the wound up and sent for a doctor.

William Hills deposed, he was landlord of the Bellevue Tavern. On Tuesday night, about 8 o'clock, a party of soldiers, one of whom was deceased, came into his house and remained drinking until 9 p.m., they then wanted witness to let them have a gallon of beer on trust, which witness declined, they continued in the house till 10, when they pulled down the gas pendant, and came downstairs: witness with assistance then put them out of the house and closed the door – immediately afterwards six squares of glass were broken – witness then sent for the police. Deceased had been in the house often, and always behaved himself well; deceased was a little the worse for drink when he left the house.

Charles Egerton Fitzgerald deposed, he was a surgeon, residing at Folkestone. About half past 10 on Tuesday evening witness was sent for, to a soldier, who was wounded in the arm. Witness went to the Mechanics Arms, and found deceased sitting in front of the bar, supported by two other soldiers. There was a large pool of blood on the floor, nearly all coagulated; deceased was in a state of collapse, and could not speak, the pulsation of the heart was feeble and fluttering, his extremities were cold, and witness found two wounds on the right wrist, one superficial and the other deep. Witness had deceased moved to another room, laid him on his back, and gave him stimulants, but he never spoke and lived about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after witness' arrival. Witness examined the wound but found nothing in it, the radial artery was wounded, four of the extensor tendons of the hand were separated, and the joint was laid quite open. Witness attributed his death to haemorrhage from a laceration of the radial artery. The artery was extensively lacerated for about three quarters of it's diameter, there was no haemorrhage after the witness arrived. The wound was such as would be caused by glass, it was not a clean cut but a lacerated one.

This being the whole of the evidence, the jury returned the following verdict. “The deceased, Peter Mahoney, came by his death from a wound received by breaking a square of glass at the Bellevue Tavern”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 24 November 1857.

Inquest.

On Wednesday an inquest was held before Silvester Eastes, Esq., coroner, at the Mechanics’ Arms, on the body of Peter Mahoney, aged 26, a soldier in the 4th Foot, stationed at Shorncliffe.

From the evidence of private Hugh Evans, of the same regiment, it appeared that on Tuesday evening himself and six other soldiers left the camp at about half-past 5, and proceeded to the Bellevue Tavern, where they had sundry quarts of beer. Deceased, Carroll, and Priest became intoxicated. A quarrel took place, on the landlord refusing to supply them with drink on credit. One of them pulled down the gas pendant, and they all came downstairs, Priest and Carroll striking the landlord. The men were afterwards turned out, and he stood opposite and saw the men smash the window; deceased was amongst them ; he afterwards saw deceased run away, and on overtaking him he told witness that he was bleeding to death. Having procured assistance he took deceased to the Mechanics’ Arms, and a doctor was sent for, but he shortly after expired.

William Hills, landlord of the Bellevue Tavern, corroborated the last witness, but said the deceased was a quiet, inoffensive man generally.

Mr. Charles Egerton Fitzgerald, surgeon, deposed that he was called to attend the deceased; found him sitting upright on a form with two soldiers ; he could not speak, and his heart was acting feebly; administered stimulants, but he never railed. Had examined the body after death, and found that there were two superficial wounds on the wrist, and one deep one; four of the extenso tendons were cut through, and the radial artery two-thirds through; the wrist joint also cut through, evidently by glass and not by a knife.

Verdict, “That the deceased fame by his death from a wound received by breaking a square of glass at the Bellevue Tavern”.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 January 1858.

Quarter Sessions.

Richard Harris, a soldier in the East Kent Militia Artillery was placed at the bar, indicted for stealing a silver watch, valued at 4 10s., the property of William Hills, of Folkestone, on the 28th December. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mary Hills (the first witness called) having been sworn said I am the wife of William Hills, the landlord of the Bellevue Tavern. I recollect the 28th December. On that day I lost a small silver watch. It was my son's watch – he is at sea – he left it in my care when he went away. (The watch produced by Mr. Hart was identified by witness) I will swear to the watch, having had it in my possession more than five years. I left it in a tumbler on my drawers in my own bedroom. I have always been in the habit of wearing it – only left it off that morning, having a blister on my neck. I missed it about 5 o'clock in the evening when I went upstairs to change my dress. I went up without a light. I called to my little girl to ask her if she had removed it – on her replying in the negative, I told her to call the servant and bring a light. I asked her if she had removed it. She said she had not seen it since two o'clock in the afternoon when she finished dusting the room.

Mary Streeter, sworn, said I am servant to the last witness. About nine o'clock in the morning on the 28th December, I went up to my mistress's room and found prisoner there. I asked him what he was doing there. He said he wanted his stock. I went to his room where he had slept and got his stock and fastened it on. I saw the watch in a tumbler on the drawers while prisoner was in the room. I had never seen him in there before. His room was the next to it. When I told him his stock was not in that room, he went out and went downstairs after I had given it to him. I then locked the door and put the key under the mat. I am in the habit of doing this – prisoner did not see me. There was no other lodger in the house. I went downstairs and told mistress I had seen prisoner in her room – did not go up again until about two in the afternoon, when the watch was there. I locked the door, and put the key in the same place. Prisoner came to the house on Saturday. This took place on Monday. I will swear to prisoner being the same man – he had been up and down stairs all day. I had seen him in the club room. When mistress called me up about five o'clock, the watch was gone.

Mordecai Hart (having been sworn in the Hebrew manner), said, I am a pawnbroker, living in High Street, Folkestone. I remember prisoner coming to my shop about 5 p.m. on Monday, 28th December. He offered the watch (produced) in pawn – prisoner said the watch belonged to him – he had given 2 15s for it – he wanted 30s upon it. I offered him 20s. He then took it up and went away – came again in a few minutes, and took the 1, observing there would be less to pay when he wanted it. About a quarter of an hour later, a constable and prosecutor came and asked if I had taken a watch in. I said I had – they were just too late – the man had only just gone.

Samuel Solomons stated that he was assistant to Mr. M. Hart, recollected seeing prisoner in the shop on Monday, 28th December, about five o'clock in the evening. The shop was lighted with gas. I usually light it about four. I am certain prisoner is the man. He wanted to pledge the watch for 30s. Mr. Hart offered him 20s. I was not present when Mr. Hills and the constable came in. Mr. Hart and I immediately went to Sandgate in search of the prisoner – did not find him. When we came back I went with the sergeant of police to search the public houses in Folkestone – found prisoner in the Marquis of Granby, High Street. I told him the watch he had pledged was stolen. The constable at once took him into custody – did not deny the charge. He seemed to be drunk. Could not walk steady when he came to the shop.

The Recorder here made some strong remarks about pawnbrokers being incautious from whom they took property, and especially in this case, from a man in liquor. He observed he had before had to remark on Mr. Hart, and he advised him now to be more particular.

P.C. Newman, sergeant of police, having been sworn, corroborated the latter part of the evidence of the previous witness Solomon, adding that when he searched prisoner he had but 6d and 2d in money, a knife, and a pouch. The 6d he immediately threw in his mouth, and witness believed swallowed it.

Mr. Hart having been recalled, stated that the money he had given prisoner for the watch consisted of a half sovereign, two half crowns, two florins, six pence and four pence.

The jury after a few moments consultation returned a verdict of “Guilty”, and prisoner was sentenced to six months hard labour.

William Grimes, a soldier of the 4th Regiment, was placed at the bar, charged with stealing a railway wrapper, value 7s, the property of Mordecai Hart, of Folkestone, on the 7th November.

Israel Hart, having been sworn, said I am the son of Mr. M. Hart, outfitter and pawnbroker, of Tontine Street and High Street. On the 11th November about eight o'clock in the evening, police constable Woodland brought the wrapper to me. I identified it by the particular manner it was hung up by a cord – the ticket had been taken off. I had not sold one.

P.C. Woodland, sworn, said, on the 11th November I went to the Bellevue Tavern in search of a soldier. I found prisoner upstairs lying on a sofa, and the wrapper about three yards from him on a table. There were several other soldiers in the room. From information received from the landlord, I took prisoner into custody. He was very drunk at the time. Did not state the charge to him until I got him to the station. He then said he had come by it somehow, he did not know how.

William Hills said I am the landlord of the Bellevue Tavern. About half past seven on 11th November, prisoner came in and went upstairs with a parcel under his arm. It was a square parcel – could not see what it was – it looked like a brown paper parcel. I was six or seven yards off when he passed me. Thinking it suspicious to see a soldier come in with a large parcel I gave information to police constable Woodland who came in just afterwards.

The jury retired and returned in about ten minutes with a verdict of “Acquittal”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 5 January 1858.

Quarter Sessions.

These sessions were held on Thursday, before J. J. Lonsdale, Esq.,

Richard Harris, 23, a soldier, was indicted for stealing a watch, value 4 10s., the property of William Hills, at Folkestone, on the 28th December.

Mary Hills, wife of William Hills, landlord of the Bellevue Tavern, deposed that on the day named she missed the watch from a tumbler where she had placed it on her dressing table. The watch belonged to her son, who was at sea. Prisoner slept in an adjoining room.

Mary Ann Streeter, servant to the last witness, said she saw the prisoner in her mistress’s bedroom in the morning. She asked him what he did there, and he said he was looking for his stock. Witness found the stock in the prisoner’s own bedroom. She saw him up and down the stairs several times during the day. When she cleaned her mistress’s room she put the key under the mat.

Mordecai Hart, pawnbroker, deposed to the prisoner pawning the watch at his shop for 20s.

P C. Thomas Newman apprehended the prisoner at the Marquis of Granby public-house; he was much intoxicated.

Six months’ hard labour.

William Grimes, 22, a private in the 4th regiment, stationed at Shorncliffe, was indicted for stealing a railway wrapper, value 7s., the property of Mordecai Hart, on the 7th November last.

It appeared that the prosecutor missed the wrapper from the door, and acquainted the police. Prisoner was seen to walk up stairs at the Bellevue Tavern with a parcel under his arm, and when the policeman arrived he found the prisoner on a sofa, tipsy, and the rug about three yards from him. There were several soldiers in the room at the time.

Prisoner said that a soldier named Carney had stolen the wrapper.

The jury having returned a verdict of not guilty, the Recorder, in discharging the prisoner, said he had had a very fortunate escape; happily for him the jury did not know what he (the Recorder) did, that he was one of the soldiers in company with Baker, and he cautioned him as to his future conduct.

 

Southeastern Gazette 9 February 1858.

Local News.

Wednesday: Before the Mayor and J. Kelcey, Esqs.

Alfred Tidmarsh was charged with an assault on Mary Striler, servant at the Belle Vue Tavern.

One month’s hard labour, in default of paying 10s. and costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 April 1858.

Thursday April 1st:- Before the Mayor and James Kelcey esq.

John Taylor, a private in the West York regiment of militia, was charged with obtaining 5 under false pretences, as detailed below.

Sarah Constable, wife of the landlord of the Mechanics Arms, Bellevue Fields, stated that about a fortnight ago, prisoner asked her for change of a 5 note, at the same time giving her what she supposed was a 5 note; not having the change herself she sent her servant to a neighbouring public house, the Bellevue Tavern, to get it changed, her servant brought the change, and she gave the same to the prisoner.

The servant corroborated the evidence of her mistress.

Mary Hills, wife of the landlord of the Bellevue Tavern, deposed, that about a fortnight or three weeks ago, the last witness came to her and asked for change of what she supposed was a 5 Bank Of England note; she gave change for it, and put it away in a purse with some gold; she did not see it again until yesterday morning (Wednesday), when her husband having a payment to make, she gave him the note folded up; no person, not even her husband, had access to the drawer in which she kept her purse containing the money.

William Hills, husband of the last witness, deposed that his wife gave him what he supposed was a Bank Of England note for 5, upon unfolding it, however, he found it to be a note on the Bank Of Engraving, No. 7651, he immediately enquired of his wife where she got it, upon her telling him, he went to the witness, Constable, who told him she had got it from the prisoner. The police were then communicated with, and the prisoner taken into custody.

The prisoner, in answer to the charge, said he took a 5 note to the witness, Mrs. Constable, for change, he should be able to identify the note again; upon taking it she opened and read it, and said it was all right. He had received it from a young man in Lancashire for work he had done for him.

The magistrates committed the prisoner for trial on Tuesday next, at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 April 1858.

Quarter Sessions.

Tuesday April 13th :- John Taylor, a private in the West York Militia regiment pleaded Not Guilty to a charge of obtaining under false pretences the sum of 5, the property of Richard Constable, at Folkestone, on the 22nd March, 1858.

Mr. Biron, by direction of the Recorder, conducted the prosecution, prisoner was defended by Mr. John Minter. Before the case commenced the witnesses were ordered out of court.

The learned counsel for the prosecution then said, this was a case of obtaining 5 by false pretence. The facts were as follows – on 22nd March prisoner went into a beerhouse kept by the prosecutor, and asked his wife if she could change a 5 note for him, she could not herself, but sent her servant to a neighbour's and there obtained it. She paid the money over to prisoner, and heard no more about it, until a few days ago, when Hills, the neighbour whose wife had changed the note, had occasion to make a payment, and then it was found the supposed note was one on the “Bank of Engraving”, perfectly useless. Mr. Biron then called Sarah Constable, who on examination deposed the above facts.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter. Could not swear that the piece of paper produced was that given her by the prisoner. Was a married woman. Had not any more flash notes. Did not tell the superintendent that she had more flash notes in her possession – told Mr. Hills that she had some six years ago. Knew a man named Homer Smith, of the 3rd West Yorks Rifles – left her husband's house with Smith – took with her a timepiece, some blankets, and the money from the till, and her clothes. Her husband has never prosecuted Smith.

Cross-examined by the Court. Was a week and three days away with Smith – went away just after prisoner changed the note – returned about a week since.

Catherine Godden deposed to having been sent to Mr. Hills for change.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter. The prisoner came frequently to the house before and since the note was changed.

Mary Hills deposed to giving change for what she supposed was a Bank Of England 5 note - had put it away until a payment was required to be made, she then gave it to her husband.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter. Knew the prisoner well – did not believe him capable of committing such a crime.

William Hills deposed, he was husband of the last witness, and landlord of the Bellevue Tavern, his wife gave him the paper produced as a 5 note, said she had received it from the servant of Mr. Constable – when he went to Mrs. Constable she told witness she had several such notes as that, this one had been given to her by a soldier, naming the witness.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter. Knew the prisoner well – he was a well conducted young man – could not believe him guilty of the offence. Mrs. Constable said before the superintendent she had two or three flash notes in her workbox.

William Martin, superintendent of police, deposed that the piece of paper now produced had been given to him by Mrs. Constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter. Heard Mrs. Constable say she had some flash notes like that one in her workbox. This completed the case.

Mr. Minter in addressing the jury for the defence said, he trusted the jury would give the prisoner the benefit of the grave doubts that must arise in their minds from revising the evidence given in support of this charge – he had a good foundation to go upon. The evidence in this case asked them to believe a manifest absurdity; here is a man in the daily habit of visiting a house where it is proposed to be proved he had effected this fraudulent transaction. Now, if the man were guilty, surely the house where he had done it would not be the house he should make his resort, putting himself as it were into the very hands of justice; how was he to know the landlady would have to send out for change, when that was proposed, one would imagine that having a guilty knowledge of the note, he would have said, “No, give it back to me”; but he does no such thing, he goes upstairs to his company, and quietly sits down till called by the landlady to receive the change. The only person upon whom the prosecution rests, is Mrs. Constable; and who, hearing that witness's evidence, was to prove that she did not take one of the flash notes out of her workbox, and send for change, when, if discovered, she could easily say the soldier gave it to me. The learned counsel for the prosecution had not asked the question. “who was there when the note was given by the prisoner to Mrs. Constable”, he should assume no-one else. What then is the conviction that should force itself upon their minds, - that looking at the witness's conduct, she wanted money to go off with her paramour. Suppose Mrs. Constable an honest woman, there would be no corroborative evidence, - but she had admitted herself to be a prostitute. The entire case rested upon her evidence, and he trusted the jury would show their idea of it by returning a verdict of Not Guilty.

The Recorder in summing up said, the prisoner was charged with obtaining five pounds by false pretences. Considering the serious nature of the charge against the prisoner, and taking into consideration the slight nature of the evidence against the prisoner, he thought they ought to agree in acquitting him. The only fact against the prisoner was, that soldiers are not often in possession of 5 notes. The principal grounds on which they ought to return a verdict of Not Guilty, in his opinion, arose from the fact of the principal witness being not worthy of belief. When a woman runs away from her husband and robs him, it makes her evidence excessively doubtful against the prisoner; again, it is impossible that anyone would take that piece of paper from another person, and that person a soldier, as a 5 note. He thought the jury would be quite right in acquitting the prisoner, though of course it was their verdict, and not his.

The jury the consulted for a few moments, and returned a verdict of “Not Guilty”.

Some applause was manifested in court at the verdict, but it was immediately suppressed.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 May 1858.

County Court.

The Court was held on Wednesday, before C. Harwood, Esq.

William Hills v. Richard Constable.: This was an action for 5. Mr. Minter for plaintiff.

The facts, as stated by Mr. Minter, and proved in evidence, were, that the defendant’s wife went to the plaintiff with a note purporting to be a Bank of England note, and asked for change, which was given by Mrs. Hills, landlady of the Bell Vue Tavern, who did not then observe that it was a “ flash” note. Mr. Hills, about a fortnight afterwards, asked his wife for the note; he then discovered what it was, and saw the defendant’s wife, who said she had obtained it of a soldier, named Taylor. The latter was apprehended and acquitted at the quarter sessions. It came out then that the defendant’s wife had several similar “flash” notes. Plaintiff now sought to recover the 5 obtained by the defendant s wife.

Mr. and Mrs. Hills were examined, also Taylor, of the West York Militia, who bore the character of a respectable man in his station. The Judge examined him as to how he came into possession of the 5 note. He said he was in work in Manchester previous to joining the Militia, at min shoring, and earned a portion; a man named “Nickem Jack” paid him 3 10s., borrowed money, with the 5 note, which he had kept in his knapsack, in an envelope, until he changed it at the Mechanics’ Arms. He gave a Bank of England note to Mrs. Constable, and had been in the habit of going to her house since.

His Honour said the further the case proceeded, the more it criminated the defendant’s wife, and he did not wish to have to commit her. He did not like Taylor’s account of how he became possessed of the note, and the question was who was to be the loser? He thought the husband was not liable for the acts of his wife. He would consider what verdict should be given.

Verdict deferred.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 May 1858.

Tuesday May 18th:- Before R.W. Boarer esq., W. Major esq., and G. Kennicott esq.

Alfred Tidmarsh was charged with assaulting Mary Hills, landlady of the Bellevue Tavern. Fined one shilling and costs.

William Corke was charged with using threatening language to the above complainant by which she went in bodily fear. Prisoner was further charged with resisting the constable in the execution of his duty, and with being drunk and riotous while in the police station. Dismissed on the first charge, fined 3 and costs on the second charge, and committed for seven days on the third charge.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 July 1858.

Coroner's Inquest.

An inquest was holden at the Bellevue Tavern before S. Eastes esq., and a respectable jury, on Monday June 28th, on the body of Robert Conquest, aged 12, who was unfortunately drowned whilst bathing in East Wear Bay on the Saturday previous. The jury having been sworn proceeded to the residence of the deceased, and viewed the body; after which the following evidence was adduced: - John Lott, a youth, deposed that several boys, deceased amongst them, were bathing; deceased could swim a little; after being in the water a short time he called out for help, but none of the other boys could swim, so that they could not help him; after a little while deceased sunk, and then the boys ran for assistance.

Wm. Matthews deposed he was called by one of the boys, and wading into the water he discovered the body of deceased in about four feet of water, deceased was quite dead, having been in the water some time; he however, took him to his cottage and put him in a warm bath, and used other remedies. The coroner having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of "accidentally drowned while bathing".

The funeral of the above unfortunate youth took place at Christ Church on Wednesday last, twenty eight of his schoolfellows, with their master, following him to the grave.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 October 1858.

Tuesday September 28th:- Before Gilbert Jennicott esq., and W Major esq.

Mary Ann Hall was brought up on remand, and Daniel Livingstone, a private in the 100th Regiment, charged with stealing a Portemonnai, containing a gold Albert chain, and several articles of jewellery, value 9, the property of Corporal Salter, of the 100th Regiment.

It appeared from the evidence, that the prosecutor Salter, had been invalided to the hospital at the Camp, Shorncliffe, and left the above property in his knapsack in charge of Corporal Browning – That a short time after, he was also invalided to the hospital, and during his absence his hut had been entered, and the property abstracted from his knapsack.

A few weeks ago, the prisoner Hall, and another female, Louisa Bowlden, were in the Alma public house, Sandgate, when the prisoner Livingstone came in, and calling Hall out, gave her the purse, &c., saying “take care of this, and if it is claimed, you must deliver it up”. Hall took it, and next day sold it to Mrs. Hills, landlady of the Bellevue Tavern, Folkestone, for 2.

The prisoner Livingstone said he went into the room and called for a pint of beer – and shortly after, on getting up to go away, in stooping to pick up his stick, he found the purse, &c., under the table. He delivered it up to Hall (believing she was a waitress in the house) and told her to take it to her master, or take charge of it until it was claimed. Both prisoners were committed for trial at St. Augustine's, Canterbury.

Wednesday September 29th:- Before the Mayor, G. Kennicott and W. Major esqs.

This being the adjourned licensing day the following licence was transferred: The Bellevue Tavern from William Hills to Charles Griggs.

 

Southeastern Gazette 5 October 1858.

Victuallers’ Licenses.

At the sitting of the magistrates on Wednesday, the following licence was transferred: The Belle Vue Tavern, from William Hills to Charles Griggs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 October 1858.

East Kent Quarter Sessions. October 19th -20th.

Daniel Livingstone, 18, Soldier, and Mary Hall, 20, married, the former charged with stealing 1 Albert chain, 2 gold lockets, and other articles, the property of Thomas Salter, of Cheriton, on 1st September and the latter with receiving the same well knowing them to be stolen. – Acquitted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 June 1859.

Monday June 13th:- Before the Mayor, A.M.Leith, James Tolputt, and W. Major esqs.

John Banks, hay and straw dealer of Mill Lane, was brought up by police constable Reynolds, charged with being drunk and disorderly near the Bellevue Tavern, on Saturday Night, also with assaulting the police. The case was fully proved, and the magistrates sentenced the defendant to three weeks imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 11 July 1874.

Advertisement Extract.

Mr. John Banks is instructed to sell by Auction, at the King's Arms Hotel, Folkestone.

On Monday, July 27th, 1874, at Six O'Clock in the Evening.

The Following Valuable Freehold and Leasehold Properties and Ground Rent.

Lot 15: All that well and substantially built Freehold fully licensed Public House known as the Bellevue Tavern, at the corner of St. John's Road and St. Peter Street, containing on the Basement: Good beer and coal cellars. Ground Floor: Bar, Parlour and kitchen. On the first and second floors: Large Club Room, 4 Bedrooms and W.C. In the occupation of Mr. Charles Griggs.

The landlord's fixtures will be included in the sale.

 

Folkestone Express 1 August 1874.

Local News.

At the Auction Sale held at the King's Arms Inn on Monday last by Mr. John Banks, the following property was sold: Lot 15 600.

 

Folkestone Express 17 March 1877.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday the license of the Bellevue, New Zealand, was transferred from Charles Griggs to George Piddock, late of the Carpenters Arms (West Hythe).

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 January 1878.

Inquest.

On Saturday evening an inquest was held at the Harvey Hotel by the Coroner (J. Minter), respecting the death of Robert Burley, a member of the Borough Police Force.

James Burley, K.C.C., deposed: I identify the body as that of my brother, Robert Burley. He was a member of the Folkestone Borough Police and was 21 years of age. I saw him on Thursday last at two o'clock. He was in bed, and told me that when he came off duty on Tuesday he went out with a friend, and remained with him until three or four o'clock in the morning, leaving him at the bottom of Dover Street. On going up Dover Street a little way he ran against two artillerymen, who turned round on him and gave him a thrashing, knocked his hat all to pieces and cut his head. He found blood was running down, and went to a friend's house and knocked, but could not make anyone hear. He then hurried home to his lodgings, and on going up to the front door fell into the area. He remembered nothing more until he found himself in bed.

William Willis Cooper, landlord of the British Lion, deposed: On Thursday afternoon I went to see the deceased. From information I received I went and asked him if he had called at my house on Wednesday morning at 3-45, and he said “Yes”. I also asked him if he went to my mother's house at 103, Dover Street, near Radnor Bridge, the same morning, and he replied “Yes”, but did not say what for. He pointed to he left eye, and said he had been knocked about by two soldiers.

Elizabeth Cooper deposed: I am a widow, living at 103, Dover Street. I knew the deceased, Robert Burley. On Wednesday morning, about 20 minutes past four, I was in bed and heard someone come to the door. He knocked with his fist and tried the latch. I got out of bed and opened the window. I said “Who's there?”. He said “Oh, Mrs. Cooper, will you come down? I am nearly murdered”. I replied “I don't know who you are. You had better go home. I know nothing of you”. He said “Thank you” and left a few seconds afterwards.

Frank Martin deposed: On Wednesday last, about twenty minutes to five, I was in bed and was aroused by some groaning, and in consequence of that I looked out of the window, and afterwards went down and saw deceased lying in the area. I then called Mr. Woodlands and we took him up to bed. He was insensible. We sent for Dr. Mercer, and he came. There was a large scar on the left eyebrow. It was not bleeding. There was no blood on his face.

Mary Ann Hayward, living at No. 6, Queen Street, deposed: I saw two artillerymen on New Year's Day in the Bellevue Tavern. They told me they had been out all night, and had strayed away from Dover. As they had no money, my friend and I treated them to a quart of beer. The short one said he did not mean soldiering. I saw them again on Wednesday morning in the Bellevue Tavern. Jarvis told me afterwards that outside the Raglan Tavern they knocked up against a policeman between three and four o'clock in the morning.

Dr. Richard Mercer deposed: I found deceased lying perfectly insensible. He had a small graze over the left eyebrow, which appeared to have been done some time, as the blood was quite dry. I saw him again at eleven o'clock, when he was quite conscious, but paralysed below the left breast. I examined him, and found a fracture of the spine between the shoulders. There were no other marks of violence about him. I asked him if he was perfectly sober at the time, and he said “No”. He had had a little more than was good for him. Deceased died yesterday morning, the 4th instant, the cause of death being fracture of the spine, which in my opinion was caused by the fall. Supposing he had received the injury in a fight with soldiers it would have been utterly impossible for him to have got home.

The Coroner summed up, and the Jury, after putting a few questions to the Superintendent of Police, returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1878.

Last week we reported that Robert Burley, a member of the Borough police force, was seriously injured through having fallen down into the area of the house where he lodged. The poor fellow died about eleven o'clock on Friday morning. From statements made by the deceased to his brother, it seemed that before he got home on Wednesday morning he had been ill-treated by two soldiers, and in consequence of this report a considerable amount of interest was felt in the affair.

An inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Harvey Hotel, by J. Minter Esq., the borough coroner, when the following evidence was taken:

James Burley, a police constable stationed at Lyminge, identified the body as that of his brother. He deposed: His age was 21 last birthday. I saw him on Thursday last, having come to Folkestone in consequence of hearing of his accident. I found him in bed, and I asked him to tell me how it happened. He told me that when he went off duty he changed his clothes and went out with a friend. He was with him until between three and four o'clock in the morning, and left him at the bottom of Dover Street. He went up the street a little way and “ran against” two artillerymen, and they turned round and “dropped into him” and gave him a good thrashing, knocked his hat all to pieces and cut his head or eye. He found blood was running down his face and he went to a friend's house and knocked. Thinking he could not make anyone hear, he hurried home to his lodgings. Going up to the front door he kicked his left toe against the steps. He put his right foot out to try to save himself, and that slipped on the flag stones, in consequence of his boots having steel brads in them. That threw him round on his left side, and his back came on a low wall and pitched him over into the area. He remembered no more until he found himself in bed. He did not say if the soldiers followed him.

By a juror: I believe the soldiers recognised him as a policeman.

By the Coroner: I do not know if he meant to take them into custody.

The Coroner: From what I can learn, it appears that he thought they were two men absent without leave, and he might as well have the money for apprehending them.

William Wills Cooper, landlord of the British Lion, Bayle, said: On Thursday the 3rd, in the afternoon, I went and saw the deceased. Two men having come to my house on at 3.40 on the Wednesday morning, I asked the deceased if he was one of them and he said “Yes”. I also asked him if he went to my mother's house in Dover Street, and he said he did. He did not say what he went for. He lifted his right arm and pointed to his left eye and said he had been knocked about by two soldiers.

Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper, a widow, living at 103, Dover Street, said: I knew the deceased, Robert Burley. On Wednesday morning, about twenty minutes past four o'clock, I was in bed. I heard someone come to the door and knock with their fist, and then try the latch. I opened the window and saw a man and asked “Who's there?” A voice replied “Oh, Mrs. Cooper, will you come down? I am nearly murdered”. I said “I don't know who you are; you had better go home”. I could not see who it was. He said “Thank you”, and left a few minutes after. I did not know who it was, nor do I now, except from what my son has told me. The man appeared to be sober, as far as I could judge.

Frank Martin, a waiter, living at 28, Harvey Street, said: About twenty minutes or a quarter to five on Wednesday morning last I was in bed and was aroused by hearing someone groaning. I got up, went down to the front door, and looked over into the area, and there saw the deceased. He was lying on his left side, with his arm underneath him, and his hat was about a foot and a half from his head. He was insensible. I called the assistance of my father-in-law and we got deceased into the passage. We sent for Dr. Mercer, and afterwards put deceased to bed. There was a slight scar on his left eyebrow but there was no blood on his face or any part of him that I could see.

Mary Ann Hayward, a single woman, living at 6, Queen Street, said: On New Year's Day I saw two artillerymen in the Belle Vue Inn. They told me they had been out all night, and strayed away from Dover. I told them if they did not go back they would be taken into custody. I and a friend treated them to beer, and bread and cheese, as they had no money. The short one, Jarvis, said he did not mean soldiering. They left me at half past eight on Tuesday night, when I gave them twopence to go home with. I saw them again on Wednesday morning in the Belle Vue Inn. They bid me good morning. I asked them why they did not go home, and they said they met the picquet out marching, and if they had gone further they would have been taken in. Jarvis said they were at the Raglan about half past eleven, and that they had knocked up against a policeman about three or four o'clock in the morning. The tall soldier pushed Jarvis, and motioned him to say nothing, and Jarvis laughed. They told me they were hungry and we got them some bread and cheese. About an hour afterwards I hear that a policeman had been ill-used. I asked Jarvis what he had been up to, and he got up and laughed and they both went out. One of them had told me previously that he meant murdering someone. He had had six months imprisonment and did not mean soldiering. He also said he had just had a fortnight's confinement.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said: On Wednesday morning between six and seven o'clock I was called to deceased in Harvey Road. I found him lying in the passage of the house, perfectly insensible. He had a small graze over the left eyebrow, which appeared to have been done some little time, as the blood was quite dry. I assisted to carry him to bed and saw him again at eleven o'clock, when he was quite conscious, but paralysed below the breast. I examined him and found a fracture of the spine between the shoulders. There were no other marks of violence whatever – no bruises or cuts. I asked the deceased how it occurred, and he said he had been spending the evening with some friends and came home about four in the morning. When he got on the doorstep his foot slipped and he fell over the wall into the area. I asked him if he was perfectly sober at the time, and he said “No, I had a little more than was good for me”. In consequence of the reports about deceased having been knocked about by soldiers I have today and yesterday again examined the body, and there are no marks of violence other than those I have described. He died yesterday morning, the cause of death being the fracture of the spine, which in my opinion was caused by the fall. Deceased knew the critical state he was in, as I told him he was mortally injured, and he made the statement to me after I had so informed him. It would have been utterly impossible for him to have got home if he had received the injury at the hands of the soldiers.

Superintendent Wilshere, who was called by request of a juryman, said no report was made to him of the constable having been attacked by soldiers, and he only heard of it accidentally. It was quite probable that he attempted to take the two men into custody as deserters. He would be doing his duty if he did so.

The Coroner said that although at first it seemed that deceased had been ill-treated, the evidence of Dr. Mercer showed that such ill-usage was not serious and did not in any way contribute to his death. Had the soldiers followed him, and had he fallen in endeavouring to escape from them, it would then have been a question whether they would not be liable to a charge of manslaughter.

The jury at once returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

It having been stated that the deceased, out of his very moderate pay, contributed towards the support of his parents, the jurymen gave their fees to be transmitted to the old couple.

 

Folkestone Express 2 August 1884.

Monday, July 28th: Before W. Bateman, J. Fitness and J. Holden Esqs., and Alderman Caister.

Thomas Robins was charged on a warrant with assaulting Henry Wood on the 22nd inst., and also with using threatening language.

Complainant said he was employed as a bailiff to go to a house in Peter Street to levy a distress for rent. He went at seven o'clock in the morning, and saw the defendant in the street. Defendant asked him to go and have a drink at the Belle Vue Tavern. They went there, and on coming out, as they turned the corner, defendant struck him in the face and made him bleed. At the same time he said “You are a bailiff, and I'll kill you”. He had not told defendant his business. Defendant was a lodger in the house where he was going to levy. After he struck him, he asked witness to go and have another drink, but he declined, although they went together to the tavern, where defendant washed his face.

A witness named Eliza Keeler said she saw the blow struck, and heard the defendant say “I'll kill you”.

The Bench fined the defendant 5s. and 20s. costs, or 14 days', and bound him over in the sum of 5, with one surety in the same amount, to keep the peace for three months.

 

Folkestone Express 13 November 1886.

Advertisement.

Fountain Inn, High Street, Folkestone, TO LET, to which a new bar is now being added, making it the most attractive house in the High Street. Also Belle Vue Inn, Belle Vue Street. Apply Hythe Brewery.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 29 May 1889.

Inquest.

On Thursday evening there were rumours in the town that a horse had bolted down Sandgate Hill and had thrown out of a carriage two ladies, the wives of officers in the Carabiniers. Later in the evening it was stated that one of the ladies was dead, and unfortunately rumour was, in this case, speaking only too truly. But the facts of the case will best be conveyed to our readers by the reproduction of the evidence tendered before the Borough Coroner (J. Minter Esq.) at the inquest, which was held at the Town Hall on Saturday at three o'clock, “to enquire touching the death of Agnes Mary Green”.

The Jury having been sworn and having chosen Mr. Frederick Petts as foreman, the Coroner said that Dr. Charles Lewis, who was a witness, had a most important case to attend, and he (the Coroner), would go out of the ordinary course and take the evidence before the Jury viewed the body.

Dr. Charles Lewis then deposed: I was called shortly before seven on Thursday evening to the residence of the deceased in Darnley Terrace, Sandgate, in consultation with Dr. Chubb, who was in attendance. I found the deceased insensible, and suffering from a fracture of the left side of the skull, about five or six inches in length. There was also a large wound near the right ear. The injuries were such as would be produced by a fall. I remained with deceased until her death. There was nothing that could possibly be done, and she died about 8.45.

The Jury then proceeded to Sandgate to view the body, and on their return to the Town Hall the following additional evidence was given.

William Barr: I am a groom in the employ of Mr. Dixon Green, who is a Lieutenant in the Carabiniers, and resides at 2, Chichester Villas, Sandgate. I identify the body which the jury have seen at that of my late mistress, Agnes Mary Green. On Thursday evening Mrs, Green, in company with the wife of Colonel Dennis, drove a mare in a dog cart to witness the Yeomanry sports in a field off Sandgate Road. Shortly after six o'clock we were returning; Mrs. Green was driving and I was on the back seat. Going down Sandgate Hill the whip was hanging over the reins and touched the mare, causing her to jump forward. I immediately jumped down, intending to get to the mare's head, but before I could do so she had bolted and was galloping down the hill. I followed as quickly as possible and saw the mare swerve to the offside as if she was intending to pull up at the house, which she evidently knew. When she saw the wall she shot out again, but the wheel of the cart caught the wall and Mrs. Green was thrown out. I saw her fall. The mare galloped on through Sandgate. When I reached the place where Mrs. Green was lying, I found her insensible, and with blood flowing freely from her head and face. Some other men carried her into the house, and I ran off for a doctor. Mrs. Green had been in the habit of riding and driving for a good while. The mare was half-bred. She would not stand a whip, but was otherwise quiet.

Sidney Saunders, landlord of the East Cliff Tavern, said: On Thursday evening I was going across the footpath from the Leas into Sandgate, when I saw a dog cart in which there were two ladies, with a groom on the back seat. They were going down the hill at a gentle trot, when suddenly the mare plunged, but I could not see from what cause. The groom jumped down and rushed to the horse's head, but the horse had galloped off before he could get to it. I went as fast as I could and saw the horse run over to the offside. The wheel of the cart caught the kerb, and the lady who had been driving was thrown against the wall. The lady was insensible and blood was flowing from her head and mouth. I lifted up her head, got a towel and some water, and washed her mouth out. Someone said that she lived a few doors below, and we then carried her into her house. Dr. Chubb was sent for and soon came.

Samuel Saunders, of the Belle Vue Tavern, and Joseph Whiting, of the Bricklayers' Arms, who were in company with the previous witness, having corroborated his evidence, the Coroner said he thought the jury would have no difficulty in coming to a decision.

A verdict was immediately returned of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Express 7 March 1891.

Wednesday, March 4th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, H.W. Poole and J. Brooke Esqs.

Transfers.

The licence of the Bellevue Inn was transferred to Charles Thomas Adams.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 11 March 1891.

Wednesday, March 4th: Before Col. De Crespigny, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

The Belle Vue Inn will find a new landlord in Alfred Adams.

 

Folkestone Express 1 June 1889.

Inquest.

On Saturday afternoon an inquest was held at the Town Hall before J. Minter Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of Agnes Mary Green, who was killed on Thursday evening by being thrown from a dog cart.

Mr. Charles Lewis, surgeon, said: On Thursday evening, a little before seven o'clock, I was called to attend the deceased at her residence in Darnley Terrace, Sandgate, in consultation with Mr. Chubb, who was in attendance. I found her insensible, and suffering from a fracture of the left side of the skull some four or five inches in length. There was also a large wound near the right ear. She remained insensible until her deat, about an hour and a half after I left. She died from injuries to her head, which were such as would be produced by a fall. There was nothing which could be done to save her. She was evidently sinking when I first saw her.

William Barr, a groom, in the employment of Mr. Dixon Green, lieutenant in the Carabiniers, stationed at Shorncliffe, and residing at 2, Chichester Villas, Sandgate, identified the body viewed by the jury as that of Agnes Mary Green, wife of Lieut. Green, and said on Thursday, in company with the wife of Col. Dennis, she drove a mare in a dog cart to the sports in Sandgate Road. I was in attendance and riding on the back seat. About ten minutes past six in the evening we were returning, and on driving down Sandgate Hill, the deceased being driving, she accidentally hit the mare with the whip, which caused the mare to jump forward. I jumped down to get the mare's head to steady her. Before I could get there the mare bolted and galloped down the hill. I followed, and saw the mare turn off, as if with the intention of pulling up at the house from which they started. She made for the wall on the off side. The mare saw the wall and shot out again. The cart collided against the kerb, and Mrs. Green was thrown out. I saw her fall between the wall and the wheel. The mare continued on through Sandgate, and on my arrival at the place where deceased laid on the path I noticed that she was insensible and blood was flowing very freely from her head and face. I ran off for the doctor, knowing I could not catch the mare. Deceased had been in the habit of riding and driving the mare for the past eight or nine months. It was half-bred, and would not stand the whip, otherwise she was quiet.

Sidney Saunders, a publican, living at East Cliff, said: On Thursday, the 23rd May, I, with others, was walking across the footpath leading into Sandgate Road, and saw a dog cart, in which were two ladies and a groom. The horse was going at a gentle trot. I saw it make a plunge forward, and the groom get off the back of the trap and rush towards the horse's head. Before he got up to it the horse had bolted. He then made a grasp at the trap, appeared to stumble, and the horse was gone. I ran as fast as I could. I saw the horse turn towards the kerb on the off side, and as the wheel caught the kerb, one of the ladies was pitched out against the wall. The horse went right away through Sandgate. I found deceased lying on the path, insensible, and blood flowing freely from the head and mouth. I lifted up her head, unfastened her bodice, and procured some water and washed her mouth. Someone came along and said the deceased lived a few doors off, and asked them to carry her indoors. They did so, and Dr. Chubb came. Samuel Saunders and Joseph Whiting were with me.

These two having given corroborative evidence, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 July 1891.

Wednesday, July 22nd: Before Captain Crowe, Alderman Banks, W.G. Herbert and W. Wightwick Esqs.

Alfred Thomas Adams, landlord of the Bellevue Hotel, was summoned for keeping his house open during prohibited hours on the 9th of July, and pleaded Guilty.

P.S. Harman said he visited the Bellevue Hotel on the night in question in company with P.C. Stannage. Stannage went to the rear of the house, and witness remained at the front. The doors were locked and he knocked, but could obtain no answer. The window of the bar was only frosted half way up and witness looked over the top and saw defendant draw a glass of beer. There were two men and a woman in the bar drinking. He saw several men get up from their seats and go into the passage. Witness was afterwards let in at the bar door and four men immediately rushed from the direction of the back door, defendant following. Witness told them they were fairly caught and that they had better keep quiet. There were several glasses about containing beer. He told defendant he would have to report the matter, and he replied that he had not drawn anything after eleven. It was half past eleven when witness first visited the house.

Defendant, who has held his license scarcely six months, said he was not aware that it was quite so late.

Supt. Taylor said he had no complaint to make against the house.

Fined 1 and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 25 July 1891.

Wednesday, July 22nd: Before Capt. Crowe, Ald. Banks, W. Wichtwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Alfred Thomas Adams was summoned for keeping open his house, the Belle Vue Inn, during prohibited hours. He pleaded Guilty.

Sergeant Harman said he saw the defendant serve beer at half past eleven on the 9th July. In the front bar there were two men and a woman, and in the back room four men, and several glasses containing beer. There was no disturbance, and there were lights all through the house.

Defendant said he was not aware the time was so late. There was no complaint against the house.

He was fined 1 and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 August 1891.

Saturday, July 25th: Before Alderman Banks, Major H.W. Poole, W.G. Herbert and W. Wightwick Esqs.

Five men named Crowe, Charles Mortleman, Nicholas White, Ely Lea, and Alfred Moore were summoned for being found at the Bellevue Hotel after closing hours on the night of the 9th of July.

Each of the defendants pleaded Guilty, and, the circumstances having been stated by P.S. Harman, they were each fined 5s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 1 August 1891.

Saturday, July 25th: Before Ald. Banks, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Five persons named Mortleman, Crow, Lee, White and Moore were summoned for being found on licensed premises during prohibited hours. They all pleaded Guilty, and said they did not know it was so late. The defendants were found in the Belle Vue Inn on the 9th inst., and the landlord had been fined for keeping the house open after hours on the occasion.

They were each fined 5s., and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 August 1891.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before J. Clarke, J. Pledge, J. Holden, W. Wightwick, H.W. Poole and F. Boykett Esqs.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Superintendent Taylor objected to the renewal of the licence of the Bellevue Hotel (Mr. Adams), and also to the renewal of the licence of the Globe Hotel (Mr. Hall). The latter was represented by Mr. F. Hall.

The licenses of both these houses were withheld until the adjournment.

The adjourned Sessions will be held on the 23rd of September.

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 September 1891.

Licensing Sessions.

The annual Licensing Sessions were held on Wednesday, when objections were raised against the renewal of the licences for the Globe Hotel, the Bellevue Hotel, The Bouverie Hotel, and the Tramway Tavern. Mr. Rooke appeared on behalf of the council of the Folkestone Temperance Society, and the whole of the cases were eventually adjourned until Sept. 23.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 September 1891.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before J. Clarke Esq., Major Poole, J. Holden, W. Wightwick, F. Boykett and J. Pledge Esqs.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Bellevue.

Mr. Minter, under instructions from the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association, appeared to support Mr. Alfred Thomas Adams's application for a renewal of the licence of the Bellevue Hotel.

Supt. Taylor said on the 22nd of July five persons were found on the premises after closing time. Adams was fined 1 and 9s. costs. The other people were also convicted. He had had no complaints since, and the general conduct of the house was good.

The licence was granted with a caution.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1891.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before J. Clark, J. Holden, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, F. Boykett and J. Pledge Esqs.

Adjourned Licensing Day.

The Belle Vue.

Alfred Thomas Adams applied for a renewal of the licence of this house. He had been fined 20s. and costs in July, 1891. Mr. Minter appeared for the applicant.

Superintendent Taylor said four persons were found on the premises after hours. There had been no complaints since or previous, and the general conduct of the house was good.

The licence was renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 26 December 1891.

Wednesday, December 23rd: Before Aldermen Sherwood, Pledge and Dunk, J. Fitness and E. Ward Esqs.

Iden Pritchard, gardener, was summoned for stealing two heath plants, value 2s., from a greenhouse belonging to George Pilcher. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Prosecutor, a florist, having premises in Dover Road, said defendant had been in his employment as working gardener for more than 18 months. He left a week ago last Saturday. Since defendant left he had missed plants from his premises, and among them were three heaths of the kind produced, from a greenhouse. He missed the heaths on Friday, 18th. Defendant was in the house on the Wednesday or Thursday previous, saying he wanted to buy some shrubs, but he went away without buying anything. When he missed the plants he gave information to the police. There were nine plants of this sort in the greenhouse. He could swear positively to one of those produced, as it was peculiar in it's appearance, and he had tried to sell it to a customer a few days ago. They were also of an uncommon size to be flowering so freely. The value was 1s. each.

By defendant: I bought twelve plants of a nurseryman, and sold three. The nurseryman had plenty more of the same sort, and he served the trade. The greenhouses were not kept locked. I have had reasons to suspect you have taken goods. You were formerly a very useful man, but latterly you have given way to drink and been careless. I do not remember having given you a good recommendation lately.

Alice Maud Mary Jordan, of the Red Cow Inn, said the defendant went to her mother's house on Thursday with Christmas Trees and two plants. She recognised one of the heaths. Defendant asked her to buy it, and she did, paying 9d. for it. She knew defendant as a customer.

Mary Ann Maple, wife of Thomas Maple, of the Honest Lawyer, Belle Vue Street, said the defendant went to that house with one plant on Thursday evening. He asked 1s. for it, and she bought it of him for 6d. She knew him as a customer.

William Jenner, a lad in the service of the prosecutor, said he saw the defendant on Wednesday evening at ten minutes to ten, outside the garden gate in Dover Road, walking to and from.

Thomas Alfred Tutt, another lad in the prosecutor's employ, said he saw the defendant about ten o'clock on Wednesday evening go into the Belle Vue with a Christmas tree in his hand. Witness saw him again on Thursday evening near St. John Street with a plant like those produced in his hand.

Prosecutor was re-called, and said the garden was approached by gates. The larger one was locked, but not the smaller one. Mr. Wilson had a right of way to his premises there. The greenhouse was not fastened in any way.

Defendant said he bought the plants from a hawker, but did not know his name.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined defendant 10s., 2s. the value of the plants, and 18s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour, telling him he was liable to be imprisoned for six months.

The Bench recommended Mr. Pilcher to keep his premises locked in future.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 3 June 1893.

Saturday, May 27th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, Major H.W. Poole, and Mr. Wightwick.

The licence of the Belle Vue Inn was transferred to Mr. Thomas Nolan.

 

Folkestone Express 3 June 1893.

Saturday, May 27th: Before Col. De Crespigny, H.W. Poole, and W. Wightwick Esqs.

The licence of the Belle Vue Inn was transferred to Mr. Thomas Nolan.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 August 1896.

Saturday, August 1st : Before The Mayor, General Gwyn, Alderman Banks, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, H.D. Stock, and C.J. Pursey.

The licence of the Belle Vue Inn was provisionally transferred to Mr. Hobson.

 

Folkestone Express 8 August 1896.

Saturday, August 1st: Before The Mayor, General Gwyn, Alderman Banks, and W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, H.D. Stock, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The licence of the Belle Vue Inn was provisionally transferred to Mr. Hobson.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 September 1896.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before Messrs. J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert, H.D. Stock, and J. Pledge.

Mr. Hobson was granted the transfer of the licence of the Bellevue Hotel.

 

Folkestone Daily News 28 July 1906.

Saturday, July 28th: Before Messrs. Banks, Herbert, Stainer, Hamilton, and Linton.

The Magistrates granted a transfer of the licence of the Belle Vue Inn.

 

Folkestone Express 4 August 1906.

Saturday, July 28th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, and R.J. Linton Esqs.

The licence of the Belle Vue Inn was temporarily transferred from Mr. J.A. Hobson to Mr. Warren.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 August 1906.

Saturday, July 28th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Alderman Herbert, Major Leggett, and Messrs. R.J. Linton and J. Stainer.

The licence of the Bellevue Hotel was temporarily transferred from Mr. G. Hobson to Mr. Thomas Horace Warren.

 

Folkestone Daily News 29 August 1906.

Wednesday, August 29th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Linton, Carpenter, Ames, Herbert, Hamilton, and Fynmore.

The licences of the Belle Vue Tavern and the Brewery Tap were transferred to the new tenants.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 September 1906.

Wednesday, August 29th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Mr. R.J. Linton, and Mr. T. Ames.

The licence of the Bellevue was temporarily transferred from James Hobson to Horace Thomas Warren.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 February 1909.

Saturday, February 20th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Aldermen Spurgen and T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Mr. G. Boyd.

Edward Sings appeared in answer to a charge of being drunk and disorderly in St. John's Street the previous day.

P.I. Swift deposed that a a quarter past five the previous afternoon, in consequence of what he was told, he went to the Bellevue public house, in St. John's Street, where he saw the prisoner in the bar in an intoxicated condition. Witness requested him to leave, and he did so. He went outside and then became very abusive, and being drunk and disorderly, witness took him to the police station. He saw the landlord, who said that he had not served him.

There were a number of previous convictions against prisoner, who pleaded Guilty.

A fine of 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour, was imposed.

 

Folkestone Daily News 26 May 1909.

Wednesday, May 26th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Swoffer, Jenner, Fynmore, Stainer, Linton, and Boyd.

An application was made for permission to make certain structural alterations at the Bellevue Hotel. The application was granted with the exception of that portion which related to the Children's Bar.

 

Folkestone Daily News 18 September 1909.

Saturday, September 18th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Swoffer, Linton, Stainer, and Boyd.

Franc Alfane was summoned for causing an obstruction with his ice cream barrow. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Simmonds said he saw the barrow standing unattended in Bellevue Street for twenty minutes. He then went into the Bellevue public house and saw defendant sitting in the tap room.

Defendant said he went into the public house, but only had two half pints of beer and some bread and cheese.

As he declined to pay a fine of 5s. and 9s. costs he was sent to gaol for seven days with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 October 1909.

Saturday, October 2nd: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Fynmore, and Linton.

Frederick Hollands was charged with being drunk on licensed premises on the 25th September.

Inspector Swift deposed that he heard noisy conduct in the Bellevue Tavern. He entered and saw the defendant, who could not stand steady nor speak distinctly. He told defendant he should report him for being drunk. Defendant made no reply, but went towards his home in Harvey Street, where he staggered about, and another man assisted him.

Cross-examined: He heard noisy conduct. There were several men in the bar, but the defendant was the only one drunk. The landlord was looking at two men dancing a jig, and was not trying to turn anyone out. He seemed to enjoy the fun. He saw defendant go to Harvey Street, but did not see his wife. The landlord did ask time to have the accused examined by a doctor, but accused was not present.

By the Justices' Clerk: When he first left he was walking steady, but staggered as he got on a bit.

P.C. Allen deposed to following Swift in, and the Inspector drew his attention to Hollands, when the landlord requested him to leave. When accused got outside he seemed to get worse.

This concluded the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Haines called defendant and several other witnesses, who proved that he was not drunk.

The Chairman, in dismissing the case, said the evidence was so conflicting that defendant must have the benefit of the doubt.

The Chief Constable asked permission to withdraw the summons against the landlord for permitting drunkenness.

 

Folkestone Express 9 October 1909.

Saturday, October 2nd: Before Alderman Vaughan and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Frederick Hollands was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared on behalf of the defendant.

Inspector Swift said at about a quarter to eleven on the night of the 25th September, in consequence of the noise and conduct he heard in the Bellevue public house, St. John's Street, he visited the house, accompanied by P.C. Allen. In the bar he found from fifteen to twenty men, among them the defendant, who was leaning on the top of the counter, with his hat off, in a half-dazed condition. In consequence of what he said to a woman behind the counter, the defendant got up from the counter and faced witness. He was unable to stand steadily, indistinct in his speech, and drunk. Witness called the attention of the landlord to him, and in consequence of what he said to the landlord the defendant left the premises. Before he went away he told defendant he should report him for being drunk on licensed premises, and he made no reply. Defendant went in the direction of his home in Dover Street. As he got into Harvey Street witness noticed that he was very unsteady in his gait. A man who had also been in the Bellevue came along and took him by his arm, and they went away together.

Cross-examined, witness said he did not suggest defendant was making part of the noise in the Bellevue. He did not take hold of defendant and turn him round. He had no doubt about his condition. The landlord was not endeavouring to remove a man who had just come in. He seemed to be enjoying the fun.

P.C. Allen corroborated. In his opinion defendant was drunk.

Defendant then went into the witness box. He said he was a greengrocer and fishmonger, and on the day in question he had been out at work all day. It had been very wet, and he was wet through. He went into the Bellevue public house about nine o'clock. There were several people in the bar. He remained there until the arrival of Inspector Swift, at about half past ten. Witness's hat was off, and lying on the table. He was leaning over the counter talking to the barmaid. Somebody put his hand on his shoulder and said “Hollands”. Witness turned round, and Inspector Swift said “You are drunk”. Witness replied that if he was drunk he would go home, and he picked up his hat and left the house. He was not drunk. He walked in the direction of Harvey Street, where he met his wife. After he got home, Mr. Bridgland came up, and he had a conversation with him. Then witness and Mr. Bridgland went to the Druids' Club. He ordered drinks, but did not drink, as he was called away by Horace Waddell, who had been in the Bellevue. He accompanied him to Dr. Gilbert's house. The landlord of the Bellevue was with them. He saw Dr. Gilbert, and he also saw Dr. Lidderdale. He was prepared with the fee to have a certificate as to his condition, but he did not obtain it.

The Chief Constable objected to the statement made by the doctors being given as evidence.

Mr. Haines said the statement would show why the doctors were not present.

The Magistrates Clerk asked the witness if they had examined him.

Hollands replied in the negative.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said his going to the doctors was the landlord's doing. The steward of the Druids' Club was not present in court. He said he didn't want to come. If he had come, he would have said witness was sober.

Frederick Thompson, of 49, Marshall Street, said he was in the Bellevue public house on September 25th. He went in at about a quarter to nine. He spoke to defendant. The police did not suggest that he was drunk, and he (witness) had more drink than defendant. (Laughter) Inspector Swift first went into a side room. Then he came and caught hold of Hollands and turned him round. Swift called the landlord and told him defendant was drunk. Hollands took up his hat, and said if he was drunk he would go home. He left the house. P.C. Allen stood just in the doorway. Defendant was not indistinct in his speech or half-dazed. He was sober. Witness accompanied defendant to Dr. Gilbert's and Dr. Lidderdale's. They did not assist defendant to walk.

Cross-examined, witness said it took defendant an hour to drink a bottle of ale. He also had three or four twopenny worths of whisky. Defendant was perfectly sober.

Horace Waddell, painter, 47, Marshall Street, said he saw Hollands in the Bellevue, and he did not do anything which would lead him to think he was drunk. He saw defendant go along St. John's Street, and he walked straight. He was sent by the landlord, in company with Thompson, after defendant, and found him at the Druids' Club. He accompanied him to Drs. Gilbert and Lidderdale. Hollands was sober.

Cross-examined, witness said he thought it was strange the police should pick on defendant.

William Bridgland, 28, Dover Street, said he saw defendant come out of the Bellevue public house. He was walking straight, and did not show any signs of intoxication Witness overtook defendant in Harvey Street. He was talking to his wife. All three then walked together to defendant's house. Hollands asked him if he would have a drink, and they went to the Druids' Club. Defendant ordered some whisky for himself and a pint of beer for witness. Defendant did not drink his. He was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined, witness said defendant told him he had been accused of being drunk when he got home. Witness did not assist him home.

John Hatfield, 2, Black Bull Road, said at about a quarter to eleven on the night in question he was coming down Harvey Street, when he met defendant and said “Goodnight” to him. Witness was going home, and he had to pass the Bellevue public house. Defendant was walking perfectly straight.

This concluded the case.

The Chairman said the evidence was very conflicting, and they gave the defendant the benefit of the doubt.

The Chief Constable then asked to be allowed to withdraw the summons against the licence holder of the Bellevue for permitting drunkenness. He understood Mr. Haines was appearing for him on Wednesday next. As they had dismissed the case against defendant, it was useless to proceed with the summons. The landlord was present in court.

The Magistrates allowed the summons against Warren to be withdrawn.

The Chairman called forward Inspector Swift, and addressing him he said they did not wish him to think that they did not consider that he had done his duty in that matter, but they thought that he might have taken a little more care to convince himself that Hollands was drunk.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 October 1909.

Saturday, October 2nd: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Fredk. Hollands was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises. Mr. G.W. Haines represented the defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Inspector Swift said that at a quarter to eleven on the night of the 25th September, accompanied by P.C. Allen, in consequence of the noise he heard, he went to the Bellevue public house in St. John's Street. In the bar he saw about fifteen or twenty men, and among them was the defendant. He was leaning on the top of the counter in a half-dazed condition. In consequence of what witness said to the female behind the counter, he raised himself from the counter and faced witness. He was unable to stand steadily, was indistinct of speech, and distinctly drunk. Witness called the attention of the landlord to him, and in consequence of what he said to him, the defendant left the premises. Witness told him he should report him for being drunk on licensed premises, and he made no reply. Defendant left the premises and went in the direction of his home in Dover Street. As he got into Harvey Street, witness noticed that he was very unsteady in his gait. Witness followed him. He stopped halfway up Harvey Street, and staggered about there. A man who was also in the bar of the house at the time came up to defendant and took him by the arm, and went in the direction of his house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: It was in consequence of the unusual noise which he heard that he visited the house. He did not suggest that the defendant was making part of the noise. There were fifteen or twenty men in the bar. Witness selected defendant out because he was the man who, he thought, was precisely drunk. It was not a very large bar, and would be pretty full with twenty men in it. Defendant's back was to him when he entered the bar, and his hat was off. He was making no noise. Witness swore that he did not take hold of him and turn him round. He had no doubt as to his condition. He did not see a man go in just before he visited the house. The landlord was among the customers, and he was not endeavouring to turn out a man who was half clothed. The landlord was with two other men doing a jig. There was one man who was attired only in his shirt and trousers, but the landlord was not endeavouring to remove him. The landlord seemed to be enjoying the fun. He did not call the attention of the landlord to that man because he was not drunk. Witness looked round the bar to see if there were any men drunk. He saw the defendant go right along Harvey Street. He did not see his wife or a lady with him. One could see about halfway up Harvey Street from the Bellevue. Witness knew that the defendant was indistinct in his speech, because he heard witness speak to the landlord, and said “All right, Mr. Swift”, but he could not get “Swift” out.

P.C. Allen corroborated, and said that in his opinion the defendant was drunk.

Defendant was then sworn, and said that he was a greengrocer and fishmonger. On the day in question he had been out at work until 8 o'clock at night; from eight to nine he had been collecting “trusts”. He was wet through. He went into the Bellevue about nine o'clock. There were several people in the bar. He remained there until the arrival of Inspector Swift at about half past ten. He was leaning on the counter when the Inspector came in, and was talking to the barmaid. Inspector Swift touched him on the shoulder and said “Hollands”. Witness turned round; he did not know who it was for the moment. The Inspector said “You're drunk”. Witness said “If I am drunk, Mr. Swift, I will go”. He then took his cap from the counter and went in the direction of Harvey Street. He was not drunk. It was while he was talking to his wife that Bridgland came up. He saw him outside his house, and had a conversation with him. Witness then went to the Druids' Club with Bridgland. He ordered a drink for himself, and one for Bridgland. He did not drink it, however, because he was called outside by Horace Waddell. They then went to Dr. Gilbert's, and the doctor came to the door. They also went to Dr. Lidderdale's house, and saw him also.

Neither of the doctors was in court.

Mr. Haines: I think I can make a statement as to his condition.

The Chief Constable: I shall object to any evidence of that kind.

Mr. Haines said that the doctors refused to be there, because they declined to be mixed up with any case in which the police took part.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: It was the landlord's doing that he went to see the doctors. Although he had been accused of being drunk by Inspector Swift, he was quite content to go straight away home. It was after the landlord sent to him that he went to see the doctors.

Evidence was given by Fredk. Thompson, Horace Waddell, Wm. Bridgland and John Atfield, all of whom testified that defendant was sober.

The case was dismissed, the Chairman remarking that the evidence was very conflicting.

A summons had been taken out against Horace Warren, the manager of the public house, to be heard on Wednesday. On the application of the Chief Constable, however, this was withdrawn.

The Chairman told Inspector Swift that the Bench did not think that he did not do his duty in that case, but there was not enough care taken before he put his hand on the defendant's shoulder.

 

Folkestone Daily News 19 January 1910.

Wednesday, January 19th: Before Messrs. Ward, Herbert, Fynmore, Leggett, and Linton.

The licence of the Bellevue Tavern was transferred from Mr. Warren to Mr. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Express 22 January 1910.

Wednesday, January 9th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, Major Leggett, and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

The following licence was transferred: The Bellevue Hotel from Mr. H. Warren to Mr. F.J. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 January 1910.

Wednesday, January 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Major Leggett, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert and R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Belle Vue Hotel, St. John's Street, was transferred from Mr. Herbert Warren to Mr. F.J. Taylor.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 May 1911.

Thursday, May 25th: Before Mr. W.H. Herbert, Major Leggett, Messrs. J. Stainer and R.J. Linton.

Frederick George Fennell was charged with stealing two breeching straps, the property of Mr. E.G. Moat.

Joe Mills, a vanman in the employ of Mr. E.G. Moat, carrying on business in St. John Street, identified the straps produced as being a portion of the harness of a horse which was the property of his employer. On the 23rd inst., at about 3.30 in the afternoon, he took the horse out of the van, and hung the harness on a peg in the stable in St. John Street. Witness missed the straps the following morning at about 7.30, when he went to harness the horse. The straps were valued at 5s. 6d., and were almost new. Witness saw the prisoner in the Belle Vue Inn about half an hour after he had taken the straps off the horse.

John Francis Simpson, a dealer, of Folkestone, was then called. He stated he was very deaf, and some difficulty was experienced by the Clerk in keeping him to the point. He stated that he saw the prisoner in the Fishmarket on Tuesday. He was not sure whether it was in the afternoon, or at dinner time. “You see”, he began, “I had been there all the morning and....”. Here he was cut short by the Magistrates' Clerk, who requested him to keep to the point. Prisoner brought two straps to witness, who did not seem sure at first whether the straps produced were the same. He explained that he had a lot of old harness, “tons of it”, holding up a few straps tied with a piece of string. He commenced a statement about his business, which was, however, nipped in the bud by the Clerk. When he was brought back to the point again, witness stated that prisoner asked 1s. for the straps. Finally, however, witness gave him 6d. He said he did not know whether prisoner wanted to sell them, or whether he simply wanted a drink. Witness told him that he would keep the straps, and if prisoner wanted them again he could have them by paying 6d. He did not ask prisoner where he got the straps, which he handed over to Inspector Lawrence the next day.

Inspector Lawrence stated that he visited the shop of the previous witness, who handed him the pair of straps now produced, which were later identified by Mr. Mills as the property of Mr. Moat. Witness later saw prisoner in the Clarence Hotel. He showed him the two straps, and said “I want you to come to the police station with me. I shall charge you with stealing these straps from Mr. Moat's stable yesterday”. Prisoner replied “All right, sir”. At the police station prisoner said that he did not know anything about the straps.

Accused pleaded Not Guilty, and said that he saw a man on the Fishmarket, who asked him to sell the straps. He did not steal them. He took them, and at this man's request, he asked the witness Simpson 1s. for them.

The Chairman: Do you expect us to believe a tale like that? Do you mean to say that you would sell anything for a man you did not know?

Prisoner: Yes, sir. I have often done it.

The Chief Constable said there were twelve previous convictions against prisoner, ten for drunkenness, one for assaulting the police, and one for larceny.

The Chairman said there was no doubt in the minds of the Bench that prisoner had taken the straps, and he would be sentenced to 21 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 January 1915.

Friday, January 1st: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillors G. Boyd and W.J. Harrison.

Beatrice Kemp was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises. She pleaded Not Guilty, and exclaimed “There you are again”.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew): Behave yourself in Court.

Defendant: Of course I will.

P.C. Allen said that on Monday evening about 5.45 he went to the Clarence Hotel, in Dover Road. Later he went to the Belle Vue Inn, in St. John's Street, where he saw defendant.

Defendant: I know you have been following me about for some time.

Witness, continuing, said that he spoke to the landlord, who said that he had tried to put defendant outside, but she would not go.

Defendant again burst out, and said “Yes, I know you have been following me about”.

The Magistrates' Clerk said they had better remand the prisoner in custody till Saturday. Perhaps by then prisoner would be sober.

Prisoner was removed below shouting.

 

Folkestone Express 9 January 1915.

Friday, January 1st: Before J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, and W.J. Harrison Esqs.

When the name of Beatrice Kemp was called out to answer a summons for being drunk on licensed premises, a rather stylishly-dressed woman stepped forward and said “That's me”. She pleaded Not Guilty.

When P.C. Allen entered the box to give evidence, she exclaimed “Oh, you again”.

The Clerk (to the defendant): You behave yourself now. You are before the Magistrates.

Defendant: Most decidedly I will.

P.C. Allen commenced his evidence, but was interrupted by the defendant, who shouted out “You have been following me for weeks. You have tried to catch me”.

When the constable was allowed by the defendant to start his evidence, he said at 6.45 on Monday evening P.C. Prebble and himself were called to the Clarence public house. Later he visited the private bar of the Belle Vue Inn, John Street, where he found the defendant leaning against the wall drunk. He drew the attention of the landlord to her.

Defendant: Stick it up against me. Do what you like.

The Clerk (to the Magistrates): Will you remand the defendant in custody until tomorrow, then perhaps she will be sober?

Defendant: That is right. I want a rest.

The Magistrates thereupon remanded her until the following day.

Saturday, January 2nd: Before J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, and W.J. Harrison Esqs.

Beatrice Kemp, who was ordered on the previous day to be detained in the cells owing to her conduct, was brought before the Magistrates on a summons for being drunk in licensed premises.

Beatrice, who was rather fashionably attired, was in a repentant mood, and she immediately told the Magistrates that she was sorry for her behaviour on the previous day.

P.C. Allen repeated his evidence as to how he went to the Belle Vue public house and found the prisoner in the bar drunk and leaning against the wall. He further stated that he said to the landlord “You see this woman's condition?” He replied “Yes. She has only just come in. I have already refused to serve her”. The landlord requested her to leave. As she refused to do so, he (witness) requested her to go home, and after a good deal of persuasion she went outside, and was taken home by her mother. He had not the slightest doubt about her condition.

Prisoner: If you will give me another chance, I will sign the pledge.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said the prisoner had a very bad record. She had already 17 convictions against her, chiefly for drunkenness and obscene language.

Prisoner: Yes, I will promise to sign the pledge.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner was last there on November 13th, when she was fined 1 and costs. She was a great nuisance when in drink.

Prisoner: If I sign the pledge I shall not drink any more. You might give me another chance.

The Chairman said the prisoner had made promises before like that, but she had broken her promises.

Prisoner: I have never promised to sign the pledge before.

The Chairman said the prisoner must find two sureties, herself in one of 10, and another surety of 10, for her good behaviour for six months. In default of finding the sureties, she would have to go to prison for two months.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 January 1915.

Saturday, January 2nd: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd and Councillor W.J. Harrison.

Beatrice Kemp was charged, on remand, with being drunk on licensed premises. She pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Allen deposed that on the 28th ult. he went to the Belle Vue Inn, St. John's Street, where, in the public bar, he found defendant drunk. Witness said to the landlord “Do you see this woman's condition?” The landlord said that he had asked prisoner to leave. After much persuasion she went outside and telephoned for her mother.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said prisoner had a bad record, chiefly for drunkenness and obscene language.

Prisoner said she would sign the pledge. She was sorry.

The Chairman said she had made promises like that before.

Prisoner said she had never promised to sign the pledge before.

The Chairman said she would be placed under the care of Mr. Holmes (the Police Court Missioner), and would have to find a surety of 10 and enter into her own recognisances in the sum of 10 to be of good behaviour for six months, or go to prison for two months.

 

Folkestone Express 5 February 1916.

Local News.

Yesterday at the Police Court, Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards appeared on remand charged with supplying cocaine to soldiers, contrary to Section 40 of the Defence of the Realm Act.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said the two prisoners were before the Court a week previously, and were remanded in order that further inquiries could be made. He had been instructed by the Director of Public Prosecutions to state that he was willing to conduct the prosecution. Therefore he asked for a further remand for a week on the evidence already given. An analysis had to be conducted, and other matters had to receive attention.

The Clerk said he understood that the prosecution at the next hearing would be represented by Mr. Travers Humphreys.

Prisoners were remanded for a week, bail being offered, themselves in 25 each, and one surety of 25 each.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1916.

Thursday, February 3rd: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, and Councillor A. Stace.

Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards were charged on remand with supplying cocaine to members of His Majesty's Forces, contrary to Section 40 of the Defence of the Realm Act.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said the two prisoners appeared before them a week ago, and on that occasion they were remanded till today. He had been instructed that the Director of Public Prosecutions had expressed his readiness to take the case up and prosecute, and he had asked for a remand for another week. Enquiries had to be made.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew): They are still being made, I think?

The Chief Constable: Yes, they are.

The Magistrates' Clerk said the drugs were being analysed.

The male prisoner asked for bail.

The Chairman said they would both be remanded till Thursday next, bail being allowed, each in his or her own recognisance of 25 surety and a surety of 25.

 

Folkestone Express 12 February 1916.

Thursday, February 10th: Before Alderman Spurgen and other Magistrates.

Horace Dennis Kingsley pleaded Not Guilty to three separate charges of selling cocaine to a Canadian soldier on different dates in January. The cases were heard together.

Mr. Travers Humphrey, who appeared on behalf of the Public Prosecutor, said the prosecution was taken under regulation 40 of the Defence of the Realm Act, which provided that if any person gave or sold to a member of His Majesty's Forces any intoxicant when not on duty with intent to make him drunk or less capable of efficiently discharging his duties would be guilty of an offence. The arrest of the prisoner, together with a woman who would also be brought before the Magistrates, was considered to be a matter of some importance, because Major Morrison, A.P.M., had for some time been endeavouring to find out the source from which Canadian soldiers were getting large quantities of cocaine. The effect of the habit which they acquired was pitiable, and most disastrous. It made it absolutely useless to try and control the man, who was made unreliable, and very often resulted in insanity. If a Canadian soldier was found to have acquired the habit, he was considered absolutely useless for the sake of the Army from that day henceforth.

Corporal Price, of the 8th Batt., C.I., said he had known the prisoner two months. On January 12th he was in the Granville public house in Dover Street, when he saw the prisoner with some soldiers and women. He saw the prisoner hand small paper packets, similar to the one produced, to two soldiers and a woman. He spoke to him and asked him what it was, and he replied “Snow”. He asked him how much it was, and he said he would sell him one for 2/-. He bought one. The packet contained white powder, and he marked it January 12th. On January 16th he saw the prisoner in Harbour Street, and asked him if he could have more “snow”. He gave him a packet, and witness purchased it for 2/-. He was exactly in the same uniform as he was that day. He was acting under the orders of his superior officers, and to that extent was on military police duty. On January 26th he accompanied the prisoner to Dover and went with him to Thompson's chemist shop, 186, Snargate Street. He waited outside while he went in. When he came out witness asked him if he had been able to purchase any “snow”, and he replied “I have been able to gat half a drachm, and have ordered two drachms for Wednesday”. On Wednesday afternoon, the 26th, he went to Dover with the prisoner. That was early closing day. The man opened the side door, and prisoner handed him an empty bottle. He afterwards left the shop. They returned in three quarters of an hour, and prisoner went to the side door. The man answered the door again and handed him the bottle, which was full of powder. It was marked “Poison, cocaine hydrochloride”. The label bore the name Lewis Thompson, Snargate Street, Dover. Prisoner put the bottle in his pocket, and after he left the shop he asked him if he would sell him some. Prisoner went into a lavatory, and when he came out he handed him a small packet containing powder, for which he paid 2/6. They came back to Folkestone, and on their arrival prisoner was arrested by Det. Sergt. Johnson with the bottle in his possession. The packets were handed over to Johnson also.

Det. Sergt. Johnson said on January 26th, about 3.40 p.m., he was in company with P.C. Butcher on Grace Hill, and saw the prisoner and Price arrive from Dover. He went to Kingsley and told him they were two police officers, and should take him to the police station. He replied “All right”. At the police station he found in prisoner's possession the bottle marked “Cocaine; poison”, and an empty bottle which had got the label of Mr. Thompson, and also a packet containing powder. He later charged the prisoner with selling a certain quantity of powder to members of H.M. Forces with intent to make them less capable of performing their duties. Prisoner said “How can I make them less capable? They are my friends”. He later received the packets from Price, and took them to the Laboratory, Shorncliffe, and handed them to Capt. Malone.

Capt. Reginald Malone, M.D., said he was in the C.A.M.C. he received and analysed the contents of packets and bottles. They all contained a soluble salt of cocaine.

Capt. J.B. McMurray, C.A.M.C., said he was acquainted with the effect of cocaine, and had had experience of it. He was in charge of Moore Barracks Hospital. Cocaine was a most dangerous drug and a poison. Taken in repeated small doses it would become a habit. The effect of acquiring the habit eventually led to insanity. It was very difficult to get rid of the habit once acquired. In the early stages of that habit it gave very brilliant ideas, supernatural ideas, and nothing was impossible. The reaction left the man sullen, morose, bad tempered and totally unfit for duty. They had had in Moore Barracks over forty cases of the drug habit. He had examined one or two of the samples, and, in his opinion, if taken in quite small quantities, would have rendered a soldier less capable. Cocaine was a great stimulant drug.

In reply to the Clerk, the forty cases he referred to had acquired the habit. It took about two or three weeks to acquire the habit.

Questioned by the prisoner, witness said one of the small packets would certainly affect a man.

Major Morrison, A.P.M., said he had seen the effect of the cocaine. What first drew his attention to it was the men under its influence coming into the guard room. The effect of cocaine taking rendered a man less efficiently capable of discharging his duties. The cocaine was known as “snow” by the Canadians.

Prisoner elected to give evidence on oath. He said he was living at No. 6, Shellons Street. He had been to Dover on the day he was arrested because his chemist in Folkestone had run short. Owing to the price of the cocaine he was not in a position to give it away, but he did not sell it to the soldiers in a direct manner, receiving 2/6 or 2/- more as a gift when hard up. The men were personal friends of his, and he had known them three months. The Corporal was a little scared that he would be arrested. Corporal Price did not give him any money, although he lent him money to get it. He had no recollection of giving the first two packets to Corporal Price. He was an old soldier himself, and had been 12 years in the Army, had been wounded at the Front, and had been invalided out. He came to Folkestone to recuperate. He had been willing to do his bit and he did not want to injure other people. He had a North West Frontier medal of 1911, having seen service in India. He asked the Magistrates to deal leniently with him.

Cross-examined, prisoner said he had not his military papers with him. They were at 14, Storr Street, Tottenham Court Road. He had a small pension of 1/6 a day from the War Office. He had not applied for it lately, because when he got it he had a “grand slam”, and was no good for three weeks after. He had no occupation at Folkestone. He distributed the cocaine because the men were his personal friends. He got the stuff from chemists at Folkestone, but he would not give the names at present. The soldiers could not get it from chemists, because Major Morrison had put a bar on it for soldiers. He only knew that from what the soldiers said. He knew Rose Edwards, who had given a little cocaine to soldiers. She and he lived in the same house. She came from London. Other people besides themselves gave the soldiers cocaine. The soldiers had given him some because he took cocaine.

Mr. Travers Humphrey: What effect has it upon you?

Prisoner: It makes you more keen on what you are doing than what you would be without. It has a stimulating effect.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return the Chairman said that was a very serious offence. The Bench had found the prisoner Guilty of the charge, and he would be sentenced to six months' hard labour on each charge, but the sentences would run concurrently.

Rose Edwards was then placed in the dock. She pleaded Not Guilty to three charges. Mr. Travers Humphrey prosecuted.

Corporal Price said he knew the prisoner. He saw her on January 14th at the Bellevue Hotel. When he came out of the house he saw empty some white powder in a soldier's handkerchief from a small box. He asked her what it was and she said “Snow”. He asked her if she could spare some for him and she said she could. She gave him some for which he gave her 2/6. At half past four the same day he saw her again and he asked if she could sell him another packet, and he paid her 2/- for it. On January 17th he saw her in the Granville Hotel and he bought a packet of “snow” from her for 2/6. On the 24th January he visited her house at 9.15 a.m., and he purchased a packet from her for 2/-. She wrapped the cocaine up in an envelope bearing her address as Little Fenchurch Street.

Mr. Travers Humphrey: It is a Y.M.C.A. envelope. (Laughter)

Detective Sergt. Johnson said on January 26th he saw the prisoner at the police station and he charged her with selling the powder to soldiers with the intent of making them less capable of efficiently performing their duties.

Captain Malone gave evidence of analysing the contents of the packets produced by Corporal Price.

Captain McMurray gave evidence as to the effect of the drug.

Prisoner gave evidence on oath. On the 14th January she gave Price a little “snow”, but she did not sell it to him. On January 17th and 24th she did not see Price at all, as she was in bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Travers Humphrey, she said she obtained the cocaine from a fellow who sold it in the West End of London. He was not a chemist, but the man sold it to the girls in London. He sold it in the streets. She had never tried to purchase it from a chemist in Folkestone. She had only given it to two Canadian soldiers. She had been in the habit of taking cocaine, but she had broken herself of the habit since Christmas. She had only given “snow” to Price on two occasions. She could get a pill box full of the stuff in London for 2/6.

Kingsley, called by Edwards, said he had never known the prisoner to take money for the cocaine.

The Chief Constable mentioned that the woman belonged to London, and was a well-known prostitute.

The Magistrates sentenced her to six months' hard labour on each charge, the sentences to run concurrently.

Corporal Price was called forward and the Chairman said the Bench wished to express their appreciation on the way he had given his evidence and had acted in the case.

The Chief Constable said with regard to Kingsley's statement, they had found that on January 17th, 1913, he was sentenced to two months' hard labour for felony in London.

Charges under the Pharmacy Act against both prisoners were withdrawn.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1916.

Thursday, February 10th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Lt. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G.P. Owen. Councillor A. Stace, Councillor C. Edward Mumford, and Mr. H. Kirke.

Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards were charged on remand with committing a breach of the Defence of the Realm Act by giving cocaine to soldiers. Mr. Travers Humphrey appeared to prosecute on behalf of the Director of Public Prosecutions. It was decided to take the cases separately, so the woman was removed from the dock.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew), addressing Kingsley, said he would be charged firstly with that he on January 26th did sell to a member of His Majesty's Service a certain intoxicant with intent to make him drunk or less capable of performing his duties, contrary to Section 40 of the Defence of the Realm (Consolidation) Act.

Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty, and also denied two similar offences on January 12th and 16th.

Mr. Travers Humphreys said the Director of Public Prosecutions had taken up these proceedings at the request of the military authorities. It would not prejudice the prisoner if the three charges were taken together. The arrest of the man and the woman was considered to be a matter of considerable importance, because Major Morrison had been for some time trying to find out who were the persons supplying the Canadian soldiers with this drug. The effect of this drug on the soldiers was most pitiful and most distressing. Defendant was a distributing agent for this drug amongst the soldiers. The drug made the person unreliable, delusional, and sometimes produced insanity. If a man was treated for it, he did not get over the ill-effects it produced. They would have certain evidence to show that. If a Canadian soldier was found to have acquired the habit of taking cocaine, he was absolutely useless for the Army from that day forth.

Corporal C.F. Price, of the 8th Battalion, Canadians, said he had known the accused about two months. On the 12th January he was in the Granville public house, Dover Street, where he saw accused with some soldiers and woman. Prisoner handed packets to two soldiers and one woman. The packets were small, and similar to those produced. He spoke to the accused, and asked him what it was, and prisoner said “Snow”. He asked how much it was, and the reply was “2s.”. Witness bought a packet, which was quite plain, with no writing on it. It contained white powder. He saw the accused again on the 16th January in Harbour Street, and bought another packet. He asked prisoner if he could have some more “Snow”, and accused said “Yes”. He paid 2s. again for another packet. He was in uniform, and was acting under the orders of his superior officers. He was on police duty. On the 24th January he went to Dover with the accused. They went to Lewis Thompson's chemist shop, 186, Snargate Street, Dover. He waited outside whilst prisoner went in. Witness asked him when he came out if he had got any “snow”, and he said “Yes, only half a drachm. I ordered two drachms, and I have to fetch it on the following Wednesday or Thursday” On Wednesday, January 26th, he went again with accused to the same chemist. Prisoner went to the side door, as it was early closing, and it was opened by a man.

Prisoner: A lie.

Witness, continuing, said prisoner handed over a bottle to the man at the chemist's (produced). To his knowledge accused had not more than 7s. or 8s.

Prisoner: No.

Witness said they then left and returned later. The bottle, which was empty, was handed over to accused, full of white powder. The bottle was marked “Poison. Cocaine Hydrochloride. Lewis Thompson, Chemist, Dover”. They left, and witness said he would like some “snow”, asking him to spare him 2s. 6d. worth. Prisoner said he would, and gave witness a little packet containing the white powder. They returned to Folkestone, where they were met by Detective Sergeant Johnson, who arrested the accused with the bottle in his possession. Witness handed over the packets on the 26th inst. in the evening to the detective.

Detective Sergeant Johnson said on January 26th, about 3.40 p.m., he was in company with P.C. Butcher on Grace Hill, and saw the prisoner and Price arrive from Dover. He went to Kingsley, told him they were two police officers, and would take him to the police station. He replied “All right”. At the police station he found in prisoner's possession the bottle marked “Cocaine. Poison”, an empty bottle, which had got the label of Mr. Thompson, and also a packet containing white powder. He later charged the prisoner with selling a certain quantity of powder to members of H.M. Forces, with intent to make them less capable of performing their duties. Prisoner said “How can I make them less capable? They are my friends”. He later received the packets from Price, and, in company with Major Morrison, took them to the laboratory at Shorncliffe, handing them to Captain Malone.

Captain Reginald Malone, M.D., of the C.A.M.C., said he analysed the contents of the packets and bottles. They all contained a soluble salt of cocaine.

Captain J.B. McMurray, of the C.A.M.C., said he was acquainted with the effect of cocaine, and had had experience of it. He was in charge of the Moore Barracks Hospital. Cocaine was a most dangerous drug and a poison. Taken in repeated small doses, it would become a habit. The effect of acquiring the habit eventually led to insanity. It was very difficult to get rid of the habit once acquired. In the early stages of the habit it gave very brilliant ideas, supernatural ideas, and nothing was impossible. The reaction left the man sullen, morose, bad-tempered, and totally unfit for duty. They had had in Moore Barracks over forty cases of the drug habit. He had examined one or two of the samples, and in his opinion, if taken in quite small doses, would have rendered a soldier less capable. Cocaine was a great stimulant drug.

In reply to Mr. Andrews, witness said the 40 cases referred to had acquired the habit. It took about two or three weeks to acquire the habit.

Questioned by the prisoner, witness said one of the small packets would certainly affect a man.

Major Morrison, Assistant P.M., said he had seen the effect of the cocaine. What first drew his attention to it was the men coming into the guard room. The effect of cocaine taking rendered a man less capable of discharging his duties. The cocaine was known as “snow” by the Canadians.

Prisoner elected to give evidence on oath. He said he was living at No. 6, Shellons Street, Folkestone. He had been in Dover on the day he was arrested because his chemist in Folkestone had run short. He would like to state that owing to the price of hydrochloride cocaine he could not give it away. When he ran short of money his friends would give him a shilling or two. He did not sell it to the soldiers. The soldiers were friends of his, and he had been about with them for two or three months. The Corporal had nit given him any money, although he had lent him money to get it. He had no recollection of giving the first two packets to Corporal Price at all. He had been in the Army for twelve years, and had been to the front. He had only just come out of hospital. He came to Folkestone to recuperate himself. He had a relapse, and was taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital. He had been willing to do his bit, and did not see why he should want to prevent these soldiers doing their bit. He had got the Indian North West Frontier medal. He was in a very weak state of health.

Cross-examined, accused said he had not got his military papers. They were at 14, Stall Street, Tottenham Court Road. He had written for them several times, but had received no reply. He came to Folkestone in July. He had a little money he had saved, and 1s. 6d. a day from the War Office. It was paid quarterly, and he had not applied for it yet. He did not get it as it was not much, and as he had been ill he could not have a grand slam. He had not sold any cocaine. He had given it away. He bought the cocaine at different chemists in Folkestone. He would not like to give their names at present. He knew the soldiers were not allowed to buy the stuff from chemists, as Major Morrison had put a bar on it. He knew a woman named Rose Edwards, who had been giving a little cocaine to soldiers. They were living in the same house. She was a friend of his. She did not come from London.

Mr. Humphrey: You were very kind to give it to soldiers.

The prisoner: Yes. When I had not got much the soldiers gave me some.

Mr. Humphrey: What effect does it have?

The prisoner: It makes you most keen on what you are doing.

In reply to a question by the Magistrates' Clerk, prisoner said he had taken the drug for five or six years. It had no ill-effect on him.

The Bench retired, and on their return the Chairman said it was a very serious case indeed, and the Bench found him Guilty. He would be sentenced to six months' hard labour in each of the three cases, the sentences to run concurrently, making six months in all. If he was not well enough to do hard labour, the prison authorities would see to that.

Mr. Humphrey said the other charge under the Pharmacy Act would be withdrawn. It was only a minor matter.

Rose Edwards was then charged with three similar offences. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty to all.

Corporal Price said he knew the prisoner. He saw her on January 14th at the Belle Vue Hotel. When he came out of the house he saw her empty some white powder in a soldier's handkerchief from a small box. He asked her what it was, and she said “Snow”. He asked her if she could spare some for him, and she said she could, and she gave him some, for which he gave her 2s. 6d. At half past four the same day he saw her again, when he asked if she could sell him another packet, and he paid her 2s. for it. On January 17th he saw her in the Granville Hotel, and he bought a packet of “snow” from her for 2s. 6d. On the 24th January he visited her house at 9.15 a.m., and he purchased a packet from her for 2s. She wrapped the cocaine up in an envelope bearing her address (Little Fenchurch Street).

Mr. Travers Humphrey remarked that it was a Y.M.C.A. envelope.

Detective Sergeant Johnson said on January 26th he saw the prisoner at the police station, and he charged her.

Captain Malone deposed to analysing the content of the packets produced by Corpl. Price, and Captain McMurray spoke of the effect of the drug.

Prisoner said she was living at 6, Shellons Street. Corporal Price came up on the 14th inst., and asked if she could spare a little. She gave him some. She never received money for the “snow”. On the 24th she was in bed and did not see Price.

In reply to Mr. Humphrey, prisoner said she got the “snow” from a fellow in the West End in a public house.

Mr. Huimphrey: What sort of a fellow?

Prisoner: He sells it to all of us girls.

In further reply to Mr. Humphrey, the accused said she did not give it to other soldiers. She had taken the drug herself, but broke herself of the habit just before Christmas. She gave it to Corporal Price on two occasions only.

Mr. Humphrey: How much does this powder cost?

Prisoner: Oh! You can get a pill-box full for 2s. 6d. in London.

Kingsley, on oath, said he had never known Edwards to sell cocaine.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said the prisoner came from London. She was a well-known prostitute, although there had been no convictions against her.

The Chairman said it was regarded as a very serious offence at the present time by the Government. Prisoner would be sentenced to six months' hard labour for each offence, the sentences to run concurrently, making six months in all.

The Chairman, addressing Corporal Price, said the Bench wished to thank him. They greatly appreciated the way in which he had given his evidence. They were also grateful for the splendid way he took the matter on, and the way he brought the evidence before them.

The Chief Constable said that Kingsley's statement as to having served in the Army was incorrect. He was sentenced to two months' imprisonment in London in 1913 for felony.

 

Folkestone Express 22 April 1916.

Local News.

At the Police Court, on Thursday of last week, before J. Stainer Esq., and other Magistrates, Frederick John Taylor, the licensee of the Belle Vue Inn was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his premises on April 14th. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. G.W. Haines defended.

Sergt. G.T. Taylor, attached to the Town Commandant's staff, said on the evening of the 14th April he was in the bar of the Belle Vue when he saw Private Bell, of the 32nd Reserve Battalion, who was under the influence of drink. At twenty minutes past seven he saw the man go to the bar and order a double decker whisky, which was served by the defendant. About half past seven he was served with another double decker by the lady behind the bar. The man became quite drunk, so he went to fetch the picquet, returning at 7.48. The man was then served with a small whisky, the lady behind the bar serving him. The man was sitting down by the door, and Corporal Spilby, who was in charge of the picquet, asked him to stand up. After a little hesitation, he struggled to his feet. Corpl. Spilby then arrested Bell. The man was incapable then of supporting himself. When he told the landlord that he had found a drunken man on his premises, he replied “I am sorry”.

Mr. Haines, in commencing his cross-examination, warned the witness that he must remember he was on his oath. He pointed out that he had given evidence in previous prosecutions, and then asked witness if he was not interested in cases likely to come on. Witness admitted that was so.

Mr. Haines: You have sworn particularly as to Bell's condition. Were you present at the inquiry at the Camp when he was charged with being drunk?

Witness: I was not.

Who were the military police present then? – I do not know anything about it at all.

Do you know that ten witnesses appeared for the defence on that occasion? – No, sir.

Do you know he was acquitted? – No, sir.

You ordered this man to be arrested? – I turned him over to the picquet.

Did you attend the inquiry to support the evidence? – No, sir.

Do I understand you had been drinking in this house yourself? – Yes, I had a glass of beer.

Replying to further questions, witness said Bell was on the premises when he went into the house at 7.15. He saw Bell served with a double decker by the landlord and another by the lady behind the bar when he became incapable. Afterwards he saw him served with a small whisky by the lady.

Mr. Haines: Now I put it to you this man had only one glass of beer, or a pint of beer in the house. There is a difference between beer and a double decker. – I did not see him have a beer.

You say he was incapable of taking care of himself? – He was quite incapable of taking care of himself after the second glass of whisky.

Mr. Haines (to the Magistrates): I am bringing evidence to flatly contradict this witness. If my evidence is right, then you (turning to Sergt. Taylor) are grossly perjuring yourself. I only want to warn him, and I do not want him to be misled. He says that there were two double deckers drunk and that the man was drunk.

Corporal Mark Mildred, Military Police, said he went to the Belle Vue about a quarter to eight in answer to Sergt. Taylor's call. He saw Private Bell, who was incapable and drunk. In his presence he called for a small whisky, which was served by the lady behind the bar. He went out and brought the picquet and Corporal Spilby up.

Cross-examined, witness said he was not on duty. Taylor came down into Tontine Street for him, and asked Major Morrison if he could have his assistance. He went to the Belle Vue with Sergt. Taylor about a quarter or ten minutes to eight. The sergeant pointed out the man to him. Bell was sitting just behind the door. He went for the picquet, but the sergeant did not say anything then to witness, as he had previously said there was a man very drunk in the house. The man was quiet enough when he saw him. He simply carried out orders given to him. When ordered to stand up Bell staggered to his feet. He did not know the man had been to the front and had got trench feet. He saw Bell a quarter of an hour afterwards at the guard room. He saw him walk from the house to the main road, and the picquet had hold of him. He was present when Major Morrison saw Bell at the guard room. The man staggered out of the cell with no hat on, and saluted with his left hand. He did not attend at the inquiry.

In reply to the Clerk, witness said he went for the picquet as soon as he called for the small whisky.

Corporal John Spilby said he went into the Belle Vue with a picquet. He went into the public bar, where he saw Bell, who was drunk, sitting down on the left hand side of the door. He asked him to stand up, but he could not do so without witness's assistance. He was drunk and incapable. He arrested him.

Cross-examined, witness said he was not present when Bell was tried at the Camp. The man certainly needed assistance to enable him to get to the guard room.

Corporal Mills said he was in charge of the Canadian guard room in Rendezvous Street when Bell was brought in. Corporal Spilby preferred the charge against him. He was so drunk and incapable that he had to be held on by either arm.

Cross-examined, witness said Bell smelt very strongly of whisky.

Inspector Swift said on the evening of the 15th inst., he called on the defendant and told him there had been a report made against him by the military authorities for permitting drunkenness on his premises the previous evening, adding that he would probably be prosecuted. Mr. Taylor replied “That's wrong; there was no-one drunk here. A little before eight the military policeman looked into the bar here, and said “The picquet has just taken a soldier out of the bar, and most likely the boss will submit a report against you”. I did not see the man myself, but I was afterwards told by other customers he was a soldier known to me as “Old Bell”. He is a regular customer. He came in just as I was drawing the blinds. He was then perfectly sober. He sat down in the chair close behind the door and had one pint of beer only”.

Mr. G.W. Haines said that case presented a very serious aspect. The evidence he had obtained showed that it was entirely at variance with that of the prosecution, and it was clear one side or the other was committing the most wilful perjury. The two could not tally in any way. All the drink Bell had that day was one pint of beer for his dinner and one pint in that house. As for drinking spirits, he was told that he had not touched spirits for the last ten years. Bell had been to the front and now suffered from trench feet and rheumatism, and the consequence was that he now walked with a stick.

Sergt. Taylor, re-called, said he went into another bar to inform the landlord that he had arrested a man for being drunk on his premises. There were a bunch of men from a Highland Regiment in the bar, and he pointed out to the landlord that one Highlander was alsou nder the influence of drink, with the result that he got the man off the premises.

Cross-examined, witness said the man was sitting down, and he could generally tell when a man was drunk even if he was sitting down. He had his cap off, and was swinging it in his hand. He had a glass in front of him, but he would not swear that it contained milk. He did not know what the man had been drinking. He had not sufficient evidence for summoning the landlord for serving the man on the premises. He had not sufficient evidence to arrest the man. He left the premises in order to get assistance, and when he returned the man had gone away. He went out because he wanted to talk to Corporal Mildred about the other man.

Defendant gave evidence on his own behalf. He had been the licensee of the Belle Vue for six years. On the night in question his wife and he were serving in the bar. Private Bell was a regular customer, and he always found him a quiet and inoffensive chap. He sometimes had one to three pints of beer, but defendant never knew him to drink spirits. Bell came in as he was pulling down the blinds. Witness said “Good evening, Old Bell”. Private Bell then ordered a pint of beer, with which witness served him. He did not serve him with any whisky during the evening. After he had got his pint he sat down by the side of the automatic piano. He never served him with anything more that evening. He saw the man talking to other people in the bar that evening. He began to clear the bar about five or six minutes to eight. He had seen Sergt. Taylor in the bar drinking, and to the best of his knowledge he had beer. That was about ten minutes past seven. He never saw the going of the sergeant. He afterwards came to him in the private bar and said “I have just arrested a drunken man on your premises. I shall report you”. He then went out, but a second or two after he came rushing back and said “Clear these men out of the bar”. He did not point out to witness any particular man. When he came back he said “Where is that man who was here?” He replied that he had gone out. That man had a glass of milk in witness's house. He was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined, defendant said Private Bell could not have been served without his wife's or his knowledge. He had known Bell for three or four months.

Mrs. Emily Taylor, the defendant's wife, also gave evidence. She said she never served Private Bell on that particular night. She had never seen him drink whisky.

Private Oliver Bell, attached to the 32nd Battalion, C.E.F., said he had been to the front for nine months and came back in December. Before he joined up he had been a prison warder for fourteen months, and he was now on police duty. He came back with rheumatism, and still walked with a stick. It was over two years since he had tasted spirits in the shape of liquor. He drank beer, and was a regular customer at the Belle Vue Hotel. He left Camp on April 14th at 6 p.m., and came into Folkestone. He had a pint of beer at noon. He went into the bar a little after seven. Previously he had seen Private Bridges in the street. He ordered a pint of beer, and that was all he had in the house that evening. About ten minutes to eight a picquet arrested him. He was seated when they came in, but stood up when he was asked to do so. He was not drunk or incapable. He came before his Commanding Officer the next day on a charge of being drunk. He was examined, and was dismissed. He was told by his officer that it was an honourable dismissal.

Cross-examined, witness said no witnesses gave evidence at the inquiry. He was perfectly sober, and when he asked the Corporal what was the charge against him he replied “You will find out soon enough”. He did not need assistance to get to the guard room.

Private Godfrey Bridges, of the 32nd Batt., said he had known Bell for about five years. They enlisted together. On Friday, the 14th, he went to the Belle Vue and left his wife there. He went out, and later saw Bell in the street, returning a few minutes later. Shortly afterwards Bell came in. He went up to the bar and came back with a pint of beer. Witness was with him all the time, and he had nothing more to drink. He could not see how Bell could have got drink without him seeing it. He walked with the aid of a stick. It was not true that he was drunk.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said he came down to the guard room with a sergeant to try and find out what the charge was against Bell. The sergeant, who was away on leave, went into the guard room. He had never known Bell to drink whisky, and in Canada, where witness kept a bottle of spirits always in the house, he had refused to touch it.

Mrs. Bridges and Private Mackintosh gave similar evidence.

Mr. Haines mentioned that he had six more witnesses who would give corroborative evidence, therefore he would not call them. It was clear the Magistrates could not believe both sides, but if they believed the prosecution, then his witnesses were liars. There could be no mistake about what Sergt. Taylor said. He contended that he had laid before them evidence which would make it difficult for them to convict the defendant.

Major Morrison, A.P.M., was called by the prosecution at this stage. He said he went into the guard room on the evening in question, and had Private Bell taken out of the cells. He was satisfied that the man was drunk. The man walked out of the cell into the room without assistance, but staggered. He did not speak to him.

Cross-examined, witness said Bell had no stick with him when he saw him. He saw the man walk three or four yards.

In reply to the Clerk, Major Morrison said the man did not come to attention when he saw him.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return the Chairman said they had had a great mass of evidence before them, and by the utter discrepancy between one side and the other, there must have been gross perjury on the part of someone. There had been deliberate lying by one side or the other. That being so they were going to dismiss the case.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 April 1916.

Thursday, April 20th: Before Mr. J. Stainer and other Magistrates.

Frederick John Taylor, the landlord of the Belle Vue Hotel, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his premises. Mr. G.W. Haines defended.

Sergt. C. Taylor, of the Military Police, attached to the Town Commandant's staff, stated that on Friday, 14th April, he was in the bar of the Belle Vue Hotel, where he saw a man named Bell, a soldier of the 32nd Reserve Battalion, C.E.F., who was under the influence of drink. About 7.20 he ordered a whisky, and was served with it by defendant. It was a double-decker. He drank it, and about 7.30 he was served with another dounle-decker by a lady. He was quite drunk, and witness went out and fetched the picket. It was about 7.48 when he returned, and he then saw the man served with a small whisky. The lady served him on this occasion. Corporal Mildred was with him, and he saw Bell served with the whisky. The man by the door and the corporal with the picket asked Bell to stand up. He staggered to his feet, and the corporal arrested him for being drunk. Witness afterwards told the landlord he would report him for permitting drunkenness on his premises. Defendant said he was sorry.

Corporal Mildred, of the Military Police, stated that he was called by the previous witness to the Belle Vue Hotel. He entered the house, and there saw a man named Bell, who called for a small whisky, and was served by a lady.

Corporal Joseph Spilby, in charge of the picket, said when he went into the public bar he saw Bell, who was drunk. He was sitting down near the door. He asked the man to stand up, but he was unable to do so without witness's assistance. He found he was unable to take care of himself, and he handed the man over to the picket to be taken to the detention room. He was not able to walk up the street by himself, and was assisted by the picket.

Corporal Horace Hills, C.M.P., stated that when Bell was brought to the guard room he was drunk and incapable. He was assisted by the picket. He smelt strongly of whisky.

Inspector Swift stated that on the evening of the 15th inst. he called on the defendant and told him there had been a report made against him by the military authorities for permitting drunkenness on the premises, adding that he would probably be prosecuted. Mr. Taylor replied “That's wrong; there was no-one drunk here. A little after eight the military police looked into the bar, here, and said “The picket has just taken a drunken soldier out of the bar, and most probably the boss will report against you”. I did not see the man myself, but I was afterwards told by other customers he was a soldier known to me as “Old Bell”. He is a regular customer. He came in just as I was drawing the blinds. He was then perfectly sober. He sat down in the chair – the first one from the door – and had one pint of beer only”.

Mr. Haines said the case presented a serious aspect. There could be no question of a mistake. One side or the other was committing the most wilful perjury. The man had not drunk spirits for years. He had been to the front, and had got trench feet.

Defendant, on oath, said he had held the licence six years. On the night in question he and his wife were serving in the bar. Bell was a regular customer, and he always found him quiet and inoffensive. He sometimes had one to three pints of beer, but defendant never knew him to have spirits. Bell came in that night as he was pulling down the blinds. Witness said “Good evening, Old Bell”. He ordered one pint of beer, which witness served. He did not serve this man with any whisky during the evening. He saw the man talking to other people in the bar that evening. He began to clear the bar about five or six minutes to eight. Sergt. Taylor was in the bar drinking. To the best of his knowledge he had beer. Later the sergeant came to him and said “I have just arrested a drunken man in your bar”.

Mrs. E. Taylor said she assisted her husband at the hotel. There was no-one else. On the evening in question she was with her husband assisting in the bar. She knew Pte. Bell. She did not see him come in, but saw him during the evening from 7.15 to 8, and during that time she did not serve him with any beer or whisky. As far as she knew, he never drank whisky.

Pte. Oliver Bell, attached to the 32nd Battalion, C.E.F., said he had been to thje Front for nine months, and came back in December. Before he joined up he was a prison warder for fourteen months, and he was now on police duty. He came home with rheumatism, and still walked with a stick. It was two years since he had tasted spirits in the shape of liquor. He drank beer, and was a regular customer at the Belle Vue Hotel. He left Camp on April 14th at 6 p.m., and came into Folkestone. He had had a pint of beer at noon. He went into the bar a little after seven. He had had nothing to drink since he left Camp on April 14th at 6 p.m., and had a pint of beer, but no whisky of any description. He was arrested by the picket shortly before eight. He was seated when they came, but stood up. He came before his Commanding Officer the next day on a charge of being drunk. He was examined, and was dismissed without a stain on his character.

Pte. Godfrey Bridges, of the 32nd Battalion, said he had known Bell for about five years. They enlisted together. On Friday, April 14th, he went to the Belle Vue. His wife was there. A few moments afterwards Bell came in. He went up to the bar, and came back with a pint of beer. He was with him all the time, and he had nothing more to drink. He could not see how Bell could have got drink without witness seeing him. He saw Bell arrested and get up. He walked with the aid of a stick. It was not true that he was drunk.

Mrs. Bridges, the wife of the last witness, gave corroborative evidence.

Pte. C. McIntosh, of the 8th Battalion, said he had known Pte. Bell for five or six years. He used the Belle vue Hotel sometimes. On the night in question he went into the bar about 7.30 p.m. Bell was sitting talking, and witness had a few words with him. Bell was drinking beer. He was drinking beer. He remained in the Belle Vue till closing time. When the military police came in he stood up. He was sober, and did not stagger. It was incorrect to say he was unable to walk alone.

Major E.J. Morrison, Assistant Provost Marshal, said the case of Bell was reported to him, and he personally examined him between 8.30 and 9 p.m. on April 14th. He was satisfied that the man was drunk. He walked into the room without assistance, but was staggering.

The Magistrates having deliberated in private, the Chairman said there must have been gross perjury on one side or the other. They dismissed the case.

 

Folkestone Express 9 February 1924.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Miss Weston, Miss Hunt, the Rev. Epworth Thompson, Alderman Pepper, Col. Owen, Col. Broome-Giles, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, A. Stace, W. Hollands, E.T. Morrison, J.H. Blamey, and W.R. Boughton.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) presented his report as follows: I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 114 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor, and taking the population of the Borough according to the last Census this gives an average of one licensed house to every 329 persons. The following are particulars of the licensed premises: Full licences 71; beer on 7; beer off 6; beer and spirit dealers 13; grocers, etc., off 6; confectioners wine on 3; chemists wine off 4; cider and sweets off 1; Total 114 (81 on and 33 off). Fifteen of the licences have been transferred during the year. Four occasional licences have been granted to licence holders to sell drink on special occasions elsewhere than on their licensed premises, and 60 extensions of hours have been granted to licence holders when dinners, etc., were being held on their licensed premises. In no case has any abuse of the privilege been reported. Six hotels and one restaurant have authority under Section 3 of the Licensing Act, 1921, to supply intoxicating liquor with meals for one hour after 10 p.m. on weekdays, viz.: Metropole Hotel, Grand Hotel, Majestic Hotel, Regina Hotel, Esplanade Hotel, Royal Pavilion Hotel, and Central Cafe. During the year ended 31st December, 1923, 26 persons (21 males and 5 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 16 were convicted and 10 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. Of those proceeded against, 8 were residents of the Borough, 5 were soldiers, 10 were of no fixed abode, and 3 were non-residents. This is an increase of one as compared with the number proceeded against last year, when 25 persons (16 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 16 were convicted and 9 discharged. The permitted hours, as allowed by the Licensing Act, 1921, have been fixed by the Licensing Justices for the Borough of Folkestone as under: On weekdays from 10.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Sundays from 12 noon to 2 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. All the licensed premises have been periodically visited at irregular intervals by my officers during the year to see that the same are being conducted in a satisfactory manner, and I am pleased to report that with few exceptions no adverse reports have been submitted to me. There are 28 premises licensed for music and dancing and one for public billiard playing. During the year two licensees have been proceeded against for breaches of the Intoxicating Liquor Laws, viz.: (1) 15 June 23 Henry William Cork, George the Third, Fenchurch Street, permitting intoxicating liquor to be consumed on his licensed premises during non-permitted hours; the case was withdrawn upon my application to the Bench. (2) 7 September 23 Alfred John Cope, Rose Hotel, Rendezvous Street, failing to have his name and expression of business for which the licence was granted affixed to the premises; fined 10s. On 20th October, 1923, Michael Ivory, of the Bouverie Hotel, Bouverie Road, was convicted and fined 1 at Newport, Isle of Wight, for consuming intoxicating liquor on licensed premises during restricted hours. I beg to report that in my opinion there is still a redundancy of licensed premises on the older portion of the Borough. Observation has been kept, and it would appear that very unequal trade is done between house and house in the same neighbourhood. Three houses, viz.: The Oddfellows, Dover Street, The Belle Vue, St. John's Street, The Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, according to reports received, are doing the least trade in the area referred to, and I have no hesitation in saying that they are redundant to the needs of the public, and I accordingly recommend that the licence of each house be referred back for your consideration at the adjourned meeting. I have to express my appreciation of the fairness and courtesy extended to me by the Bench during my first year of office, and also for the able assistance I have received from your Clerk, Mr. John Andrew.

The Chairman said they were especially pleased, it being the Chief Constable's first year there, that he was in a position to present such a good report. The members of the Licensing Authority were very gratified that the report was so good. They were of opinion that such a good report must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law had been carried out and adhered to on every possible occasion. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded that in one instance the Chief constable withdrew the summonses, and in the other case the offence was of a technical nature. Then with regard to the cases of drunkenness, out of the 16 convictions only eight of them were residents of the Borough. When they considered the population of Folkestone and that Folkestone was a port, with a fishing quarter, and with a military district adjoining, the Magistrates thought it spoke well for the community. They knew the community of Folkestone was very sober, but it only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record. They were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past year, and they hoped the number would not be increased during the present year. On behalf of the Bench he offered his congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had enabled the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report. The Justices had given full consideration to the question of the renewal of those houses specifically mentioned with regard to redundancy, and they had decided to put back the renewal of those licences for consideration at the adjourned meeting, and they directed the Chief Constable to cause opposition to their renewal. As proceedings were also pending against the Prince of Wales Inn for alleged breaches of the Licensing Act that licence would not be renewed, but would be put back to the adjourned meeting also. The question of the renewal of the licences of the Rose Hotel and the George the Third had also been considered, and they would be renewed that day. All the other licences would also be renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1924.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman A.E. Pepper, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Councillor W. Hollands, Colonel P. Broome-Giles, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Miss E.I. Weston.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) read his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said they had heard the report of the Chief Constable, and they were especially glad, it being his first year, for him to be in a position for him to present such a good report at this annual licensing meeting. He did not think it required many words from him, beyond saying that the members of the licensing authority were very grateful that the report was so good, and they were all of opinion that having such a good result must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law was carried out and adhered to on all possible occasions. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded in one case that the Chief constable withdrew the summons, and the other case was of a technical nature. He thought they would agree with him that neither of these charges could have been of a serious nature. With regard to the convictions for drunkenness, they had heard that out of sixteen offenders only eight were residents of the borough. When they considered the population of Folkestone and further that the town was a port, with a fishing quarter, and had a military camp close at hand, to know that only eight of the offenders were residents spoke very well, he thought, for the community. (Hear, hear) The community as a whole was a very sober one in Folkestone. It only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record, and they were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past twelve months, and they hoped that the number of offenders would not be increased during the coming year. They offered their congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had undoubtedly assisted the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report as they had had that morning. The Bench felt that the question of the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows Inn, the Belle Vue, and the Richmond Tavern should have further consideration on the grounds of redundancy, and therefore they would put back the licensing of these houses to the adjourned sessions. They also directed the Chief Constable to give opposition to the renewals on the ground stated. The licence of the Prince of Wales, against which proceedings were pending, would also be put back. The Rose Hotel and the George the Third Inn had also been considered, and in these cases the licences would be renewed that day. Therefore, with the exception of the three houses mentioned on the grounds of redundancy, and the one against which proceedings were pending, all the other licences would be renewed that day.

 

Folkestone Express 1 March 1924.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson and other Magistrates.

The Magistrates considered the opposition of Mr. Beesley to the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street, the Richmond Tavern, and the Belle Vue on the ground of redundancy.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared in the cases of the Oddfellows Inn and the Richmond Tavern, both of which are owned by Messrs. Leney and Co., of Dover, and the respective licensees, Mr. G.A. Woodley and Mr. A. Ingleton, and Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for Messrs. Mackeson and Co., the owners, and Mr. F.J. Taylor, the licensee, of the Belle Vue Inn.

Evidence was given by Mr. Beesley and Inspector Pittock to the effect that the houses were unnecessary for the needs of the district, and the latter gave evidence as to the result of his observations regarding the trade done at the three houses compared with the other houses in the district.

The Magistrates decided to renew the licence of the Richmond Tavern, but referred the other two houses to the Compensation Authority at Canterbury.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 March 1924.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Mr. J. Blamey, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) opposed the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street, the Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, and the Bellevue Hotel, St. John's Street on the ground of redundancy.

The Bellevue Hotel.

In this case Mr. G.W. Haines appeared on behalf of the licensee.

The Chief Constable said the Bellevue Hotel was a fully licensed house situated in St. John's Street, and bordering on the congested area. The licensee was Mr. Frederick John Taylor, who obtained the transfer in 1910. The previous transfer dated back to 1906. The owners were Messrs. Mackeson and Co., of Hythe. The rateable value of the house was 24. The Harvey Hotel was situated 100 yards away, whilst the Mechanics Arms was 106 yards away, and the Honest Lawyer 100 yards away. Within a radius of 200 yards there were five fully licensed houses and three off houses.

By Mr. Haines: The house was well kept. The immediate neighbourhood was a quite respectable locality.

Inspector Pittock said observation had been kept on the house for a month, and the total number of customers in the house when visits were made was 89, whilst the numbers at the Harvey Hotel were 265; at the Mechanics Arms 165; and at the Honest Lawyer 175. These figures gave an average of 6 to the Bellevue Hotel, 24 to the Harvey Hotel, 12 to the Mechanics Arms, and 13.5 to the Honest Lawyer. The trade had fallen off considerably. The house was one of the busiest in the town a few years back.

Figures as to the trade of the house since 1923 were put in by a representative of Messrs. Mackeson and Company.

The licensee said he had been the holder of the licence for 14 years. He had brought up a family of seven children on the premises. During the summer months he provided luncheons and teas. He was quite satisfied with the living he got at the house.

Mr. W.H. Wilkins, managing clerk to Mr. Haines, put in figures as to the takings for the past fourteen years.

The Bench retired, and upon their return the Chairman said they had decided that the licence of the Richmond Tavern should be renewed, but with regard to the Bellevue Hotel and the Oddfellows Inn, they would be referred to the compensation authorities.

The licences of the Oddfellows Inn and the Bellevue Hotel were provisionally renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 August 1924.

Local News.

The East Kent Compensation Authority, sitting at St. Augustines, Canterbury, on the 1st instant, had before them the question of the renewal of the licences of the Oddfellows, Dover Street, and the Bellevue Hotel, St. John's Street, Folkestone, refused by the local Justices on the ground of redundancy. Mr. W.A. Wardley, instructed by Mr. C. Rootes, appeared in support of the Justices' refusal to renew, and Mr. L.S. Fletcher, instructed by Mr. Geo. W. Haines, appeared in support of the renewal of the licence of the Bellevue Hotel. In the result the Compensation Authority decided not to renew the licence, and as the owners of the Oddfellows did not contest the decision of the local Justices with regard to that house, both licences will cease to exist on payment of compensation in a few weeks' time.

 

Folkestone Express 22 November 1924.

Local News.

A meeting of the East Kent Compensation Authority was held at the Sessions House, Longport Street, Canterbury, on Monday, to approve the awards agreed as regards houses which had been referred for compensation. Lord Fitzwalter was in the chair. The following were the awards: Oddfellows, Dover Street, Folkestone, 1,525 - 1.314 1s. 1d. to Messrs. Alfred Leney and Co. Ltd., of Dover, and 210 18s. 11d. to Clement Augustus Woodley, the tenant; Belle Vue Hotel, St. John's Street, Folkestone, 1,320 - 1,071 18s. 6d. to Messrs. Macke

son and Co. Ltd., and 248 1s. 6d. to Frederick John Taylor, the tenant.

 

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 29 November 1924.

Compensation for extinguished licences.

A meeting of the East Kent Compensation Authority was held at the Sessions House, Longport Street, Canterbury on November 17th to approve the awards agreed as regards three houses which have been referred for compensation.

Lord FitzWalter presided and was supported by Messrs. W. A. Lochee, C. E. Bass, N. A. Poole, A.G. Iggulden, C. Igglesden, and A. H. Godfrey.

"Bellevue Hotel," St. John's Street, Folkestone (publican's) 1,320 - 1,071 18s 6d. to Mrs Messrs. Mackeson and Co., Ltd., and 248 1s. 6d to Frederick John Taylor, the tenant.

 

Folkestone Express 6 June 1931.

Tuesday, June 2nd: Before Alderman G. Spurgen and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

William Whiting was summoned for assaulting Robert Fryer by throwing a bottle at him on May 28th.

Robert Fryer, of 5, St. John's Street, said the defendant was one of his sub-tenants, and there were altogether four families living in the house, which was formerly a public house. About nine o'clock in the morning he heard a bumping about and swearing, so he got up and saw the defendant on the landing. He was creating the noise, and Whiting said one of the girls in another family had been peeping through the keyhole. He told him that he had already given him a week's notice to get out of the house and he did not want to hear anything about the matter. Miss Hiesley came up the stairs and he heard her tell Mrs. Whiting what her husband had said was not the truth. Mr. Whiting came out of one of the rooms and started to thump the girl and slapped her. He pushed her downstairs, and he (witness) managed to save her by putting out his arms. Defendant threw a scrubbing brush at her and then he told him (witness) to get downstairs and threw a glass water bottle at him. It struck him on his arm, which was bruised. At the time he thought the blow had broken his arm.

Madeleine Hiesley, of 5, St. John's Street, said defendant hit her and threw a brush at her.

Defendant said the water bottle fell out of his hand.

Alderman Spurgen: There was some ginger behind it. A fall of the water bottle would not hurt a man's arm like that has done.

Defendant: He did that by falling downstairs.

Whiting was then summoned for assaulting Madeleine Hiesley.

He pleaded Guilty, but said he had received provocation.

Complainant said the defendant struck her, threw a brush at her, and then threw her down the stairs.

In reply to the defendant, she said she did not rush upstairs and slap Whiting's face before he slapped her.

Defendant said the complainant came upstairs interfering, so he pushed her down. He was not going to be dictated to by her and have her “cackling”.

The Magistrates fined the defendant 10s. for the assault on Mr. Fryer, and he was ordered to pay 4s. costs on the second case. He was allowed 14 days in which to pay.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 June 1931.

Local News.

William Whiting was fined 10s. for assault when he was summoned at the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday of last week. There were two summonses, but the second was dismissed on payment of costs (4s.).

In the first case Robert fryer was the complainant. He said he lived at 5, St. John's Street. Defendant and two other families also lived in the house. On May 28th he was in bed at about 9 a.m., when he heard a noise. He came downstairs and saw defendant standing just outside the room. He alleged that “one of the girls” had been looking through the keyhole. He reminded defendant that he was under notice to leave the house. Miss Heesley also came out, and she said to defendant's wife “It is not the truth”. Defendant then slapped her face and pushed her down the stairs. Whiting next threw a water bottle at complainant, hitting him on the arm and causing a severe bruise.

Madeleine Heesley, another tenant in the house, also gave evidence.

Defendant said he called Mr. Fryer downstairs, and whilst they were talking the water bottle slipped out of his hand.

Alderman Spurgen: There was some “ginger” behind it for it to strike Mr. Fryer with such force.

Defendant: He did that rushing down the stairs. This house is not fit for children to live in.

Defendant pleaded Guilty to the second summons, under provocation.

Madeleine Heesley said on May 28th defendant struck her, and she thought “he threw me downstairs”. Her cheek swelled and the inside of her upper lip was cut.

Cross-examined, Miss Heesley denied that she rushed up the stairs and slapped defendant in the face.

Defendant said Miss Heesley came up interfering, and he pushed her down.

The Magistrates granted Whiting 14 days in which to pay the fine, and the Chairman added that the sooner defendant got out of the house the better it would be.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

HAYWARD Spencer Sept/1856-June/57 Next pub licensee had BastionsFolkestone Chronicle

HILLS George William June/1857-Sept/58 Folkestone ChronicleBastionsMelville's 1858

GRIGGS Charles Sept/1858-77+ (age 44 in 1861Census) Post Office Directory 1862Post Office Directory 1874Bastions

PIDDOCK George 1877-78 Bastions

GAYWOOD Arthur 1878-79 Bastions

CUMMING Lawrence 1879-80 Bastions

GLAZIER George 1880-81 Bastions

REVELL Alfred 1881-83 Bastions

LAWS Edward 1883-86 Bastions

EDWARDS James 1886 BastionsI

Last pub licensee had TITE William 1886-87 Bastions

SAUNDERS Samuel 1887-91 Bastions

ADAMS Alfred 1891-93 Next pub licensee had (age 31 in 1891Census) Bastions

NOLAN Thomas 1893-95 Bastions

SIGGS William 1895-96 Bastions

HOBSON James 1896-1906 Next pub licensee had BastionsKelly's 1899

WARREN Horace 1906-10 Bastions

TAYLOR Frederick J 1910-25 Kelly's 1913Post Office Directory 1913Post Office Directory 1922Bastions

 

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Kelly's 1913From the Kelly's Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

 

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