DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, March, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 07 March, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1879

Bradstone Tavern

Latest 1995

8 Bradstone Road

Folkestone

Bradstone Tavern Bradstone Tavern

Above pictures showing the former Bradstone Tavern, taken from Google Maps 2010.

 

I have only recently added Folkestone to this site. The information gathered so far is from "Old Folkestone Pubs" by C H Bishop M.A. Ph.D. and Kevan of http://deadpubs.co.uk/

Any further information or indeed photographs would be appreciated. Please email me at the address below.

This page is still to be updated.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 August 1879.

Notice.

To the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I, GEORGE THOMAS TYAS, now residing at Tontine Street, in the Parish of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, hereby give you notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the Borough of Folkestone, to be holden at the Town Hall, in the said Borough, on the Twentieth day of August next, for a license to hold any License or Licenses to sell by retail under “The Intoxicating Liquor Licensing Act, 1828”, all intoxicating liquors, to be consumed either on or off the premises thereunto belonging, situate at the corner of and in St. John's Road and Bradstone Road, in the Borough aforesaid, of which premises I am the owner, and I hereby give you further notice that in the event of my said application being refused it is my intention to apply at the said meeting for a license to hold an Excise License or Licenses to sell by retail Beer, Cider, and Wine, to be consumed off the said house or premises.

Given under my hands this Fifteenth day of July, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy Nine.

G.T. Tyas.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 August 1879.

The Annual Licensing Session was held at the Town Hall on Wednesday, the magistrates on the Bench being Dr. Bateman (in the chair), Capt. Crowe, J. Jeffreason Esq., and Alds. Hoad and Caister.

St. John's Road.

An application made by Mr. Minter for a beer license for a house in St. John's Road in the occupation of Mr. Thomas Tyas was refused.

Mr. Tyas asked for leave to sell off the premises, which was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 23 August 1879.

Wednesday, August 20th: Before W. Bateman Esq., Aldermen Caister and Hoad, Captain Crowe, M. Bell, W.J. Jeffreason, and J. Clark Esqs.

Annual Licensing Session.

Application For New License:

House In St. John's Road.

Mr. Minter applied on behalf of Mr. George Thomas Tyas for a beer license for a house in St. John's Road, in the immediate neighbourhood of the Bradstone Hall.

Applicant said he was the owner of the house at the corner of St. John's Road, in the Bradstone Road, now used as a pork shop, and all the residents in the neighbourhood had signed in favour of a license being granted. He said he should not have applied for a license if he had known what else to do with the house.

Mr. Minter's application caused some amusement after the arguments he had used against the last application (Note: This was for the Bradstone Hall), and Mr. Mowll, who opposed, said Mr. Minter had relieved him from making any observations on the application.

The Bench retired to consider the application, and on their return the chairman announced that they had decided to refuse the application.

Mr. Tyas then applied for a license to sell off the premises, which was granted.

 

Southeastern Gazette 23 August 1879.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions were held at the Town Hall on Wednesday. There were several applications for new licences, but with one exception they were refused.

Mr. George W. Tyas applied for a beer licence for a house situate in the Bradstone Road, at the corner of St. John’s Road. Mr. Minter supported the application and Mr. Mowll opposed. It was stated that the premises in question were at present used as a pork butcher’s. The application was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 31 July 1880.

Notice.

To the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I. George Thomas Tyas, Beerhouse keeper, now residing at the Bradstone Tavern, Bradstone Road, in the Parish of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting to be holden at the Town Hall in the said Borough, on the twenty fifth day of August next, for a licence to hold any excise license or licenses to sell by retail under “The Intoxicating Liquor Licensing Act, 1828” all intoxicating liquors to be consumed either on or off the House and Premises thereunto belonging, situate at Bradstone Road, in the Borough aforesaid, of which I am the owner. And I herby give you further notice that in the event of my said application being refused, it is my intention to apply at the said meeting for a license to hold an excise license to sell by retail Beer, Cider and Wine to be consumed on the said premises.

Given under my hand this Twentieth day of July, One Thousand Eight Hundraed and Eighty.

G.T. Tyas.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 August 1880.

Wednesday last was the Annual Licensing Day for the Borough of Folkestone, the magistrates on the Bench being The Mayor, Ald. Hoad, Capt. Crowe, and Ald. Caister.

Mr. Mowll applied for a license for the Bradstone Tavern, kept by George Tyas.

The application was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1880.

Wednesday, August 25th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, and Aldermen Caister and Hoad.

Annual Licensing Day.

Application for New License:

The Bradstone Tavern.

Mr. Mowll also applied on behalf of Mr. George Thomas Tyas, for a license for this house, urging that there was a largely increasing population there, and putting in a memorial signed by 400 persons.

Mr. Dennis and Mr. Minter opposed, and the Mayor announced that the Magistrates had unanimously decided to refuse the application.

 

Southeastern Gazette 28 August 1880.

Annual Licensing Day.

The Folkestone annual licensing session was held on Wednesday, but presented no particular feature of interest. The applications of Mr. Fowler for a licence for the Imperial Hotel, Canterbury Road, and Mr. Tyas, for the Bradstone Tavern, were unanimously refused.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 July 1881.

Notice.

To the Overseers of the Poor of the Township of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I, ALICE OWEN TYAS, Beerhouse Keeper, now residing at the Bradstone Tavern, Bradstone Road, in the Town of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting to be holden at the Town Hall in the said Borough on the twenty-fourth day of August next, for a License to hold any Excise License or Licenses to sell by retail under the Intoxicating Liquor Licensing Act, 1828, all intoxicating liquors to be consumed either on or off the House and Premises thereunto belonging, situate at Bradstone Road, in the Borough aforesaid, of which premises I am the owner. And I hereby give you further notice, that in the event of my application being refused, it is my intention to apply at the said meeting for a license to hold an Excise License to sell by retail Beer, Cider and Wine, to be consumed ON the premises.

Given under my hand this Twentieth Day of July, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eighty One.

ALICE OWEN TYAS.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Day.

The Annual Licensing Day was on Wednesday last, the Magistrates on the Bench being The Mayor, A.M. Watkin, F. Boykett, and J. Clarke Esqs., and Ald. Caister.

The off license to Mrs. Alice Tyas, Bradstone Tavern, was renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 27 August 1881.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, W. Bateman, A.M. Watkin, J. Boykett and J. Clark Esqs.

Annual Licensing Day.

Mrs. Alice Owen Tyas applied for a license for the Bradstone Tavern. Applicant said the rating of the premises was 35. There were nine rooms in the house. Her husband had applied two or three times previously for a license. The neighbourhood had been growing ever since, and it would be a great convenience.

Mr. Mowll opposed, urging that the wants of the neighbourhood were sufficiently supplied, and the Bench decided not to grant an indoor license, but renewed the off license.

 

Southeastern Gazette 27 August 1881.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

On Wednesday the annual licensing meeting for the borough of Folkestone was held at the Town Hall. The Mayor presided, and there were also present: Alderman Caister, Dr. Bateman, and F. Boykett, A. M. Watkin, and J. Clark, Esqs.

Aleck Owen Tyas, of the Bradstone Tavern, Bradstone Road, applied for a full licence. Mr. Minter handed in a memorial numerously signed in favour of the licence being granted.

Mr. Mowll opposed the application on the grounds that this was not a new locality and that the wants of the neighbourhood were sufficiently supplied by the existing houses. The Bench refused the licence.

 

Southeastern Gazette 26 August 1882.

Annual Licensing Session.

This session was held on Wednesday.

On the application for new licences (indoor) being made by Mr. Abraham Huntley, Agnes Inn, Broadmead Road, and Mrs. Tyas, the Bradstone Tavern, St. John’s Road, Mr. Mowll, who appeared on behalf of both applicants, asked if Mr. Holden intended to sit on the bench during the hearing of these applications, as he (Mr. Mowll) saw that he wore the badge of the Blue Ribbon Army. He could not bring to bear upon the cases that fair and unbiased judgment that a gentleman who did not belong to the Blue Ribbon Army could; and therefore, on behalf of the two applicants he supported, he entered his protest against Mr. Holden’s presence.

Mr. Clark, who occupied the chair, said he was also a member of the Blue Ribbon Army, although he did not happen to be wearing it that morning. If it were considered that he would not act fairly he was willing to retire, but he could assure them that it would make no difference to him.

Mr. Mowll asked if the cases might be adjourned. He had known the chairman and had found him to be of a fair and unbiased mind, but when a chairman took a strong view in connection with a matter, it was only in common sense for him to protest. He was sorry to make any remarks about the Bench, but he was sure they would wish to avoid even the appearance of evil. He would ask those on the Bench who were members of the Blue Ribbon Army to retire.

Mr. Holden said he had been a teetotaller for several years, and had never been objected to before.

Mr. Bradley said there was no legal objection to Mr. Holden remaining on the bench, but he thought Mr. Mowll was quite right in making the protest.

Mr. Mowll farther said that some of the magistrates were not present that morning because they were holders of licences, or were interested in them, and they thought it might be considered they would be biased. He thought that the same thing would hold good in connection with the Blue Ribbon Army. Therefore he asked that the two applications should be adjourned.

Mr. Holden said that Mr. Mowll, having made the remarks he had, he (Mr. Holden) should be present at the adjournment.

In the end both oases were adjourned.

 

Folkestone Express 9 September 1882.

Auction Advertisement.

By Order Of Trustees.

Folkestone, Kent.

Auction Sale of a Freehold Corner Beer and Ale House, with frontages to Bradstone Road and St. John's Road of 62 feet, known as the Bradstone Tavern.

Mr. John Banks is instructed by the Trustees of the Will of the late Alice Owen Tyas to sell by Auction at the Clarendon Hotel, Folkestone, on Wednesday, September 27th at Seven o'clock in the evening, all that brick, slate and cement built corner Freehold Tavern, with the goodwill of the Business, situate at the corner of Bradstone and St. John's Road, Dover Road, Folkestone.

Containing in Basement – Dry Cellar.

Ground Floor – Double Fronted Bar, Parlour, Kitchen, Yard, and W.C.

First Floor – Drawing Room, Two Bedrooms and W.C.

Second Floor – Three Bedrooms

Possession will be given on completion of the purchase.

The trade fixtures, fittings, and utensils in trade, together with the blinds and rollers will have to be taken at the price named by the Auctioneer at the time of Sale, an inventory of which will be produced.

Particulars and Conditions of Sale may be had at the office of the Auctioneer, Tontine Street, and of Mr. H.B. Bradley, Solicitor, 69, Sandgate Road, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 30 September 1882.

Local News.

On Wednesday evening Mr. John Banks held an Auction Sale of freehold property at the Clarendon Hotel. The freehold house known as the Bradstone Tavern, having an off license, was sold for 530.

 

Folkestone Express 7 October 1882.

Auction Advertisement.

Sale by Auction by Mr. John Banks.

Bradstone Tavern, Bradstone Road, Folkestone.

Auction Sale of the Household Furniture and Effects, consisting of iron French Bedsteads, Palliasses, Mattresses, Feather Beds, Bolsters, Pillows, Washstands, Tables, Chairs, Blankets, Counterpanes, Tapestry Carpets, Chests Of Drawers, Chamber Services, Hearth Rug, Fenders, Fire Irons, Suite of Walnut Furniture, Loo, Pembroke Dining Tables, Chimney Glasses, Pictures, Chiffonieres, China, Glass, Earthenware, and Culinary Articles.

Which under instructions received from the Trustees of Alice Owen Tyas, Mr. John Banks will sell by Auction on the above premises, on Monday, October 16th, 1882, the above clean and useful furniture.

On view the morning of sale.

Sale to commence precisely at One O'Clock.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 August 1891.

Wednesday, July 29th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, Major H.W. Poole, W.G. Herbert Esq., and Alderman Banks.

John William Hetheridge and Arthur Pay, two boys who are well known to the police, were charged with stealing a till, containing 2 11s. 8d. in money, and a purse from the Bradstone Tavern, the property of Thomas Wilson, on the 27th July.

Hetheridge pleaded Guilty to stealing the till, and Day pleaded Guilty to being concerned in the robbery.

P.C. Butcher said he went to Hetheridge's house on Tuesday night. He found the prisoner in bed in a room upstairs. He awoke him and asked him if anyone occupied the room besides himself. He replied “No”, and witness told him to get up and dress himself. He complied, and witness searched the room. Under a mattress he found a leather purse containing 1 11s. 6d. Witness charged him with stealing the till from the Bradstone Tavern. He said “Yes”. Witness opened the purse and showed him the coins, and asked him if that were some of the money. He said it was. Witness accompanied him to a shed in a meadow near the Black Bull. When they got there the prisoner shouted out “Arthur, come out. It's no use, old man, we're caught”. Pay came out of the shed and witness charged him with being concerned in the robbery. He brought them to the police station, where he searched Pay and found 1 0s. 4d., which was in a purse. On Wednesday evening he found the till in a meadow near the Pavilion Gardens, hidden up behind some pea sticks. He took it to the Bradstone Tavern, where it was identified by Wilson.

Thomas Wilson, landlord of the Bradstone Tavern, said he knew the boy Hetheridge, who attempted to rob the till twelve months ago. He saw him in the bar on Monday evening for some sweets. He put the money in the till, and the prisoner saw him. The counter was about four feet high. Witness saw the till safe at half past ten in the evening, and missed it about ten minutes afterwards. In the meantime he had left the bar. He did not know exactly how much there was in the till – about 3, he thought. There was a purse in the till.

It transpired that Pay had absconded from an Industrial School, and they were both remanded in order that enquiries might be made into their antecedents.

 

Folkestone Express 1 August 1891.

Wednesday, July 29th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Capt. Crowe, H.W. Poole and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Joseph Etheridge (16) and Arthur Pay (14) were charged with stealing a till and 2 11s. 8d. from the Bradstone Tavern on Monday evening.

Sergt. Butcher said about 10.30 he went to No. 6, Young's Road, occupied by a man named Crumby, where Mrs. Etheridge and her son lodged. He found Etheridge there in a room on the first floor. He was asleep. He asked if anyone else occupied the room, and he said “No”. He told him to get up and dress himself, and he did so. Witness searched the room, and under the mattress he found a purse containing 1 11s. 3d., comprising three florins, a crown piece, 26 sixpences, 25 threepenny bits, 7 halpennies and 36 farthings. Etheridge, when charged with stealing a till from the Bradsone Tavern, said “Yes”. He asked him if that was all, and he said “No, the Pay boy had some”. He went with the prisoner to a shed in a meadow near the Black Bull, and Etheridge called out “Arthur, come out. It's no good, old man. We're caught”. Pay came out and was charged with being concerned with the prisoner in the robbery at the Bradstone Tavern. At the police station he found on Pay a purse containing 1 0s. 4d. That morning he found the till in a meadow between the Pavilion Gardens and the Viaduct hid behind some pea sticks. He took it to the Bradstone Tavern and Mr. Wilson identified it.

Thomas Wilson said he knew Etheridge, and saw him in his shop at five o'clock on Monday evening. The till was under the counter near the beer engine. It was safe at half past ten on Monday evening, and ten minutes after he missed it. The shop had been left unattended for about five minutes. The till contained about 3. In a purse was half a sovereign – the other money was in silver and bronze. The till produced he identified as the one he lost.

The prisoners pleaded Guilty. Etheridge, it appeared, had absconded from an industrial school, and Pay ran away from home. They were both remanded until Saturday in order that further enquiries might be made.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 August 1891.

Saturday, August 1st: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Colonel De Crespigny, Major Poole, W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

John William Hetheridge, 16, and Arthur Pay, 15, were charged, on remand, with stealing a till containing 2 11s. 8d., and a purse, the property of Thomas Wilson, from the Bradstone Tavern, on the 27th of July.

The case was adjourned on the previous occasion in order that enquiries might be made into the characters of the youthful prisoners, and Superintendent Taylor now stated that they had been concerned in previous robberies of a similar character. Hetheridge had recently absconded from an Industrial School.

The Chairman said Hetheridge was above the age of sixteen, and having been concerned in similar robberies the Bench had no alternative but to send him to prison for fourteen days' imprisonment. Pay was under the age of sixteen, and would be sent to prison for ten days and afterwards to a Reformatory School for a period of four years.

 

Folkestone Express 8 August 1891.

Saturday, August 1st: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, Ald. Banks, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

The boys Arthur John Pay and Richard Etheridge were again placed in the dock, charged with stealing a till and money, the property of Mr. Wilson, of the Bradstone Tavern.

Pay had absconded from home, and Etheridge from an industrial school.

Etheridge was sentenced to one month's imprisonment, and Pay to ten days' imprisonment and to four years in a reformatory.

 

Southeastern Gazette 11 August 1891.

Local News.

At the court of summary jurisdiction, on Monday, two boys, Pay, aged fifteen, and Hetheridge, aged sixteen, were charged on remand with having broken into the Bradstone Tavern and stolen the till, containing about 3 in money, and other articles. Notwithstanding their tender years, both boys have been concerned in previous robberies of a similar nature, and Hetheridge, it was stated, recently absconded from an industrial school. The Bench decided to send Pay to a reformatory for four years, and sentenced Hetheridge to a month’s hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 August 1891.

Saturday, August 21st: Before The Mayor and a full Bench.

Thomas Wilson, landlord of the Bradstone Tavern, was summoned for selling adulterated butter on the 31st July.

Mr. Haines prosecuted in this case.

The Inspector stated that on the 31st July he went to the Bradstone Tavern, which was kept by the defendant. In answer to witness, he said he kept butter at 1s. 3d. and 1s. a pound. He asked him for half a pound of shilling butter, and paid sixpence for it. He told him he wanted it for the purposes of analysis, and divided it in three parts in the usual way. Witness took one part to the Borough Analyst, whose report showed that the butter contained 93 percent of foreign fat.

Defendant said he bought it as pure butter.

The Magistrates fined him 2 and 31s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 May 1893.

Saturday, May 20th: Before Mr. J. Fitness, Mr. J. Holden, and Aldermen Sherwood, Pledge and Dunk.

A temporary authority to draw until next transfer day at the Bradstone Tavern was granted to Charles Birch Packer.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 December 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday Mr. Wheeler was granted a temporary off licence.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 January 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday the following transfer was granted: Beer licence in Bradstone Road, to Mr. Alfred L. Wheeler from Mr. George B. Packer.

 

Folkestone Express 2 November 1901.

Saturday, October 26th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., and Col. Hamilton.

A temporary transfer of an off beer licence in Bradstone Road was granted to Mr. Percy Earl.

 

Folkestone Express 7 December 1901.

Wednesday, December 4th: Before J. Stainer, G. Peden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Col. W.K. Westropp.

A special licensing sessions was held, when Mr. Earl was granted transfer of the licence for an off beer licence of the Bradstone Tavern.

 

Folkestone Daily News 10 February 1908.

Monday, February 10th: Before Messrs. Ward, Ames, Wood, Fynmore, and Carpenter.

J.W. Minter was charged with stealing a tin of brawn.

P.S. Lawrence deposed that he saw the prisoner standing in front of the Bradstone Tavern window. Some goods stood on a shelf outside the window, and he saw the prisoner take something and put it under his coat. Witness followed him into Dover Road, and asked him what he had, and discovered the tin of brawn produced, which he charged him with stealing. Prisoner said he took it for a poor woman who was starving. Previously he said he took it because he was starving.

Prisoner said he took it because he was starving.

Percy Earl, of the Bradstone Tavern, deposed that he unpacked some cases and placed them outside on show at 8.15. From a communication he received, he went outside and missed the tin.

The Chairman called attention to the goods being left outside, and said it was a great temptation to starving people.

Prisoner was sentenced to 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 23 December 1908.

Inquest.

An inquest was held on the body of Thomas Wilson, who expired suddenly at Westenhanger on Tuesday, was held on Wednesday afternoon by the Borough Coroner.

John Wilson, son of the deceased, identified the body as that of his father, aged 70, who lived at Sydney Villa, Denmark Street. He was a retired publican. Deceased was all right when he left home on Tuesday morning, but had lately complained of shortness of breath. He left home alone at 11.30 in the morning to go to the Folkestone races at Westenhanger.

Dr. Thornton Gilbert deposed that he was at Westenhanger on Tuesday afternoon. When he arrived at the station he was called to the down side of the station, where he saw the body of Thomas Wilson lying dead. Witness had known him for many years. He had examined the body of deceased and found the heart was fatty, the stomach contained undigested food, the liver was enlarged, and the kidneys enclosed in fat. In his opinion death was due to degeneration of the heart, which might have been hastened by hurrying.

James Albert Port, a gardener, and a member of the St, John Ambulance Corps, said he was on duty at the racecourse, under the direction of Dr. Gilbert. At 3.35 he passed the deceased, who was staggering on his way to Westenhanger Station. Witness told him to “Buck up” or he would lose the train. In witness's opinion he had had a glass too much. Witness went forward about half a dozen paces, when he heard a fall, and found deceased had fallen in the road. Witness helped to pick him up. Deceased did not say anything until they got to the steps to go over the bridge, when he asked to rest in order to get his breath. They stopped, and then went on again, but on reaching the platform deceased fell down. Witness tried artificial respiration, and then sent for a doctor.

In reply to the Coroner, witness said it was possible that the state of deceased's heart may have led him to think that he (deceased) had been drinking.

Sergeant Martin, of the Kent County Constabulary, said shortly after four p.m. on Tuesday he was informed that a man had died on the platform. Witness went to the down platform and found the deceased quite dead. Witness assisted to remove him and put him into a brake van for the purpose of conveying the body to Folkestone. In the meantime deceased's relatives were communicated with and told that they could remove it, but that if it remained till the morning the matter would have to be reported to the County Coroner. The body was eventually removed to the Folkestone mortuary the same evening. A purse found on the deceased contained 2 17s. 4d.

The Coroner said he could not understand why the option had been given to the relatives to take the body away.

Sergeant Martin said he acted under the instructions of Superintendent Hollands.

The Coroner said Superintendent Hollands had no authority to sanction the removal of any body until such removal had been sanctioned by the Coroner, and he (Mr. Haines) would have to make a note of it.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

 

Folkestone Express 26 December 1908.

Inquest.

On Tuesday afternoon Mr. Thomas Willson, of Folkestone, was returning from the races at Westenhanger, when he collapsed and died on the platform at the station. The body was removed to Folkestone the same night, and an inquest was held at the Town Hall on Wednesday afternoon, Mr. G.W. Haines (Borough Coroner) conducting the inquiry.

John Willson, residing at Sidney Villa, Denmark Street, a labourer, said he identified the body as that of his father, Thomas Willson, who lived at the same address as witness. He was a retired publican, and was about seventy years of age. Deceased had not enjoyed very good health lately, and had complained of shortness of breath. Witness last saw deceased at 11.30 on Tuesday morning. He was then going to the races at Westenhanger. He had attended race meetings on previous occasions. Deceased, who went alone, appeared to be in his usual state of health. Witness did not see any more of deceased until he heard of his death.

Dr. Thornton Gilbert, honorary medical offiver to the Folkestone Racing Club, said on Tuesday, as he got into the train at Westenhanger, he was told a medical man was wanted. He got out of the down side, and saw deceased laying on the floor dead. He had known deceased for a good many years. He had made a post mortem examination The heart was very much enlarged, and in his opinion death was due to fatty degeneration of the heart. Failure of the heart might have been brought on by excessive exercise. The story was that deceased had hurried to the station. There were no marks of a fall or injury.

James Albert Port, of 77, High Street, Cheriton, a jobbing gardener, said he was a member of the St. John Ambulance Brigade. He was on duty at the racecourse, under the direction of Dr. Gilbert. On Tuesday, about 3.35, he left the racecourse, and was proceeding to the old station, when he passed deceased. Witness was accompanied by Alfred Downs, who was also a member of the Ambulance Brigade. Deceased, who was alone, was staggering, and they told him to “buck up” or he would miss the train. They did not think he was ill. He replied “All right. I shall catch the train”. They went on about half a dozen paces, when they heard something fall, and turning round saw deceased on the ground. They helped him up and assisted him towards the station. When they got to the steps to go on to the bridge, deceased said “Stop a minute, till I get my breath”. On the bridge he stopped again. They went across the road to go down the steps and when they got to the bottom of the steps deceased collapsed. They assisted him to the platform. Subsequently witness felt deceased's hands and they were clammy and his breathing ceased. Witness then sent for a doctor. Deceased's speech was clear.

Sergt. Martin, K.C.C., said shortly after four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon he was on duty, accompanied by Supt. Hollands, outside Westenhanger Station, when they were informed that a man had died on the down platform. Witness proceeded there and saw the body of deceased, who was quite dead. They were told that Dr. Gilbert had seen him and had pronounced life extinct, and they also ascertained that deceased was a resident of Folkestone. Witness, with assistance, took deceased to a brake van, and in the meantime his relatives were communicated with, Superintendent Hollands stating that if they chose to remove the body that night and take it home he should not raise any objection. If it remained there until the morning it would be reported to the County Coroner. The body was removed to Folkestone Mortuary on Tuesday night. Deceased had in his possession a purse containing 2 17s. 4d.

The Coroner asked the sergeant whether it was part of his instructions when a body was found to give the relatives the option of removing it out of the Coroner's jurisdiction before the next morning, and after the morning if the body had not been taken away, to communicate with the Coroner?

Sergt. Martin said those were not his instructions.

The Coroner: As a matter of fact, it is not for you to say whether the body shall be removed out of the Coroner's jurisdiction. It is for the Coroner.

The Coroner asked whether the County Coroner was communicated with before the removal of the body to Folkestone.

The sergeant said he should not think he was.

The Coroner said he should have to make some further inquiries about the matter. It seemed to him that the body was out of the jurisdiction of the borough of Folkestone, and yet Folkestone was put to the expense of holding an inquiry. Supt. Hollands gave the relatives the option of removing the body out of the County Coroner's jurisdiction, but if it was left till the morning then he should communicate with the County Coroner. Immediately the body was dead it was under the County Coroner's jurisdiction.

The Coroner produced a telegram sent by Superintendent Hollands to the relatives, and after reading it, he said it bore out what the sergeant had said. The telegram said that the body could be removed that (Tuesday) night by the relatives, but if deferred until the morning he must communicate with the Coroner.

The jury returned a verdict of “Death from natural causes”.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 December 1908.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Wednesday afternoon regarding the death of Thos. Willson, a retired Folkestone publican, who expired suddenly on Westenhanger Station on Tuesday afternoon.

John Willson, of Sidney Villa, Denmark Street, a labourer, identified the body as that of his father, Thomas Willson, of the same address. The deceased was a retired publican, and was 70 years of age. Deceased had complained recently of shortness of breath He got about well. About 11.30 a.m. on Tuesday deceased said he was going to the races at Westenhanger. He was accustomed to go occasionally to the races, and he went alone. Apparently he was in his usual state of health.

Dr. J.W. Thornton Gilbert, Hon. Medical Officer to the Folkestone Racing Club, deposed that on Tuesday last a railway official at Westenhanger Station told him that he was wanted. He alighted from the train, and on the platform he saw the body of Thomas Willson, He was dead. Witness had known the deceased for many years. That (Wednesday) morning he made a post mortem examination. He attributed death to syncope due to fatty degeneration of the heart, which might have been brought on by any excessive exercise. There were no marks of injury or violence.

James Albert Port, of 77, High Street, Cheriton, a jobbing gardener, stated that he was a member of the St. John's Ambulance Brigade. He was on duty at the racecourse, under the direction of Dr. Gilbert. About 3.35 p.m. he left the racecourse, and on his way to the old station, in company with Pte. A. Downs, of the same Brigade, he saw deceased, who was staggering. They told him to “buck up”, or he would miss the train. Witness thought that the deceased had had a glass too much. He replied “All right, I shall catch the train”. Witness went forward half a dozen paces, and then he heard a fall. On turning round he saw the deceased on the ground. They helped him up and assisted him to the station. When they got to the steps to go to the bridge, deceased said “Stop a minute till I get my breath”. They did so. On the bridge the same thing happened. Deceased then asked witness to get his ticket clipped. At the bottom of the steps the deceased collapsed. Noticing that his hands were clammy, and as he did not breathe, witness started artificial respiration, which he maintained till the doctor arrived. Taking all the circumstances into consideration, he thought perhaps the man was not altogether the worse for drink.

P. Sergt. Martin, K.C.C., stationed at Westenhanger, proved receiving information of the death. He went on to the down platform and learned that Dr, Gilbert had pronounced life extinct. He also ascertained that deceased was a resident of Folkestone, so wit assistance the body was placed in a brake van. The relations were informed that if they chose to move the body to Folkestone he would raise no objection, but if they allowed to remain till the morning the matter would be reported to the County Coroner. The body was removed to the Folkestone Mortuary the same night. In a purse found on the body was 2 17s. 4d.

The Coroner: You are a sergeant, and have had some experience. Do you give people, in such cases, the option of taking the body away before the morning if they like?

Witness: That is hardly a fair question.

The Coroner: That is for me to decide.

Witness: Well, I was acting under instructions.

In reply to further questions, witness said it was not the usual thing to do.

The Coroner said that he would have to make some further enquiries with regard to the removal of the body. It seemed that the deceased had died outside the borough, and yet they were holding an inquest which it was the duty of the County Coroner to hold.

The jury returned a verdict of “Death from natural causes”.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 January 1914.

Friday, January 23rd: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert and other Magistrates.

The licence of the Bradstone Tavern was temporarily transferred from Mr. Earl to Mr. G. Cooper.

 

Folkestone Express 31 January 1914.

Friday, January 23rd: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, E.T. Morrison, and A. Stace Esqs.

The off licence of the Bradstone Tavern was transferred from Mr. Earl to Mr. G. Cooper, who has recently come from London.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 July 1917.

Local News.

The following licence was transferred at the Police Court on Tuesday, Mr. E.T. Ward being in the chair: the Bradstone Tavern, from the present proprietor to Mr. Percy Dean.

 

Folkestone Express 18 August 1917.

Local News.

On Wednesday at the Police Court the following licence was transferred; the Bradstone Tavern, an off licence, from Mr. J. Hartridge to Mr. P. Deal.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 August 1917.

Local News.

At a sitting of the Borough Magistrates on Wednesday, Mr. G.I. Swoffer presiding, the licence of the Bradstone Tavern off licence was transferred from Mr. J. Hartridge to Mr. P. Deal.

 

Folkestone Express 12 May 1923.

Local News.

A protection order was granted on Tuesday morning at the Police Court to Mr. Thomas Henry Jones, an insurance agent, 9, St. Francis Road, Morehall, for the off beer licence, Bradstone Tavern, Bradstone Road, from Mr. Percy Deal. Mr. Jones previously held the licence of the Britannia Inn, Horn Street, for sixteen years.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 May 1923.

Wednesday, May 23rd: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. J.H. Blamey, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

The licence of the Bradstone Tavern, in Bradstone Road, was transferred from Mr. Percy Deal to Mr. Thomas Henry Jones.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 October 1926.

Local News.

The Folkestone Licensing Magistrates on Wednesday sanctioned the transfer of the off beer and wine licence of the Bradstone Tavern to Mr. H. Older, of Portsmouth.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 April 1932.

Wednesday, April 13th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood and other Magistrates.

The licence of the Bradstone Tavern was transferred from Mr. H.E. Older to Mr. N.J. Rhodes.

 

Folkestone Express 27 January 1934.

Inquest.

“I cannot stand this pain and misery any longer” was the last message written by Mrs. Catherine Rhodes, the wife of Mr. N.J. Rhodes, of the Bradstone Tavern, Bradstone Road, Folkestone, and who, on Sunday morning, was discovered lying on the floor of the kitchen with her head in the gas oven, the taps of which were fully turned on. She was found by her husband. Artificial respiration was tried but without result, and Dr. Billings, who was called, was only able to pronounce that life was extinct.

Mrs. Rhodes had suffered with ulcerated legs, but for some time she had not been troubled so much with them, until Wednesday of last week, when she had to stop practically in bed the whole of the day, and since then she had complained of the pain.

Mr. G.W. Haines, the Borough Coroner, conducted an inquiry into the sad and tragic circumstances at an inquest on Tuesday afternoon at the Folkestone Town Hall. In the course of the proceeding, he read extracts from a letter which had been left by the deceased, who wrote that she was disappointed that the ulcers on her legs had broken out again so soon. One extract was “God forgive me for taking my life, but I cannot stand this pain and misery any longer”.

Mr. Norman James Rhodes, a grocer and licensed victualler, of 8, Bradstone Road, said he had been married twenty years. His wife, who was 48 years of age, had suffered with her legs on and off for the past nine years, she being troubled with varicose veins. On Wednesday of last week she stopped in bed practically the whole of the day. She used to dress her legs herself. She had not seen a doctor since the last outbreak. She finished with the doctor a little over three months ago. He had not noticed her very depressed, but she suffered great pain. She had never mentioned that her life was unbearable or that she had contemplated suicide. On Sunday morning last she got up at six o'clock. It was dark at the time. It occurred to him that she was feeling better. She asked him if he wanted a cup of tea, but he said he would have one at 8.30. He got up at 8.50 and went straight into the kitchen. The kitchen door was closed, and as soon as he opened it he noticed a strong smell of gas. The blinds were up and he then saw his wife lying on the floor with her head resting inside the gas oven. Her head was resting on a cushion. He pulled her out immediately and she was quite warm. He turned off the gas, opened the windows and doors, and then sent for a doctor. He found a note on the kitchen table in her handwriting. They had always had a very happy life.

Dr. B.R. Billings said the deceased was a patient of his. She informed him that she suffered from chronic ulcerated legs, for which he treated her. He last saw her on September 5th, when he discharged her as cured, and he had not been called since, although he warned her that the trouble might break out again. On Sunday morning about nine o'clock he was called and proceeded to 8, Bradstone Road. On arrival he found the police there and they informed him that they had applied artificial respiration. On examination he found her to be dead, the artificial respiration having proved ineffective. There was still a rather strong smell of gas in the kitchen. She showed all the characteristic symptoms of gas poisoning.

The Coroner said, functioning as a jury, he thought there was no doubt, on reading the letter that the deceased had written, that she intended taking her own life. The deceased, he continued, poisoned herself by taking carbon monoxide through the gas cooking stove whilst temporarily insane.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1934.

Inquest.

“My God forgive me for taking my own life, but I cannot stand this pain and misery any longer. I am very disappointed at my legs breaking out again so soon. I thank you for everything you have done for me and all your kindness. I don't like leaving you at all. Your loving wife, Kate”.

This letter was read at the inquest on Mrs. Catherine Rhodes at the Town hall on Tuesday afternoon by the Borough Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines). The Coroner sat without a jury and returned a verdict that deceased “Poisoned herself by inhaling carbon monoxide from a gas cooking stove whilst temporarily insane”.

Mr. Norman James Rhodes, of 8, Bradstone Road, Folkestone, a grocer and licensed victualler, said that deceased was his wife. They had been married for nearly 20 years. For the past nine years his wife had been suffering from varicose veins and ulcerated legs. On Wednesday last she stayed in bed the whole day. She used to dress her legs herself, and she had not seen the doctor since the last outbreak about three months ago. She suffered great pain, but she had showed no signs of suicidal tendencies. On Sunday morning last she got up at 6 o'clock. She said “I think I shall get up. Shall I make you a cup of tea now?” Witness had replied that he would have one about half past eight. He got up at 8.50 and went into the kitchen across the passage. The kitchen door was closed, and when he opened it there was a strong smell of gas. The blind was up, and he then saw his wife lying on the floor with her head resting inside the gas oven on a cushion. He pulled her away, turned off the gas, opened a window, and sent for the doctor. He found a note in her handwriting on the kitchen table, an extract from which was read by the Coroner.

Dr. Bernard Richardson Billings said deceased had been a patient of his. She suffered from chronic ulcerated legs, and he had first treated her in 1929. He last saw her on September 5th, 1933,, when he had discharged her as cured, although he warned her that the ulcers might break out again. On Sunday morning last he was sent for about nine o'clock and he proceeded to 8, Bradstone Road. On his arrival he found deceased lying on a stretcher and the ambulance waiting. On examination he found she was dead. Her pupils were dilated and fixed, and artificial respiration had been tried without effect. There was a strong smell of gas, and deceased showed all the characteristic signs of gas poisoning.

The Coroner gave his verdict as stated.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 January 1950.

Notice.

To: The Clerk to the Licensing Justices of the Borough of Folkestone.

The Clerk to the Rating Authority of the said Borough.

The Superintendent of Police Kent County Constabulary (Folkestone “J” Division).

And to All whom it may concern.

I, Norman James Rhodes, now residing at the Bradstone Tavern, 8, Bradstone Road in the said Borough, beer and wine retailer, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the said Borough to be holden at The Town Hall in the said Borough on the eighth day of February 1950 for the grant to me of a Justices Licence authorising me to apply for and hold an Excise Licence to sell by retail spirits and sweets for consumption off the premises situate at 8, Bradstone Road in the said Borough, known as the Bradstone Tavern, of which premises Emily Mary Roberts, of 50 Denmark Street in the said Borough is the owner, and Bushell, Watkins and Smith Ltd., of Westerham, in the County of Kent, are the lessees and of whom I rent them.

Given under my hand this Thirteenth day of January, 1950.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 February 1959.

Local News.

The off licence at 8, Bradstone Avenue, Folkestone, was transferred to Mrs. Edith Mary Rhodes. Mr. S.J. Moss, applying for the transfer, said unfortunately his client's husband, who was the licence holder, died suddenly on January 8th, but she was continuing the business.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 December 1981.

Local News.

Thieves smashed the window of an off licence in Bradstone Road, Folkestone, on Sunday night and stole two large cans of beer worth 5.62.

 

South Kent Gazette 6 October 1982.

Local News.

A sixteen-year-old shop assistant was held at knifepoint by youths who raided a Folkestone off-licence on Friday night. Two thugs, aged about 16 and 17, burst into Rhodes Stores, the off-licence and grocers in Bradstone Road, produced a knife and demanded cash from the till. The girl, Michelle Jeffrey, the only person in the store at the time, opened the till and gave the youths cash amounting to 180. Moments before, the owner Mr. Francis Rickard had gone upstairs to make a cup of tea. The youths entered the shop and it is believed a third waited outside and kept watch.

Police have appealed for witnesses or anyone who was in the area between 6.45 and 7 p.m. on Friday to contact Folkestone CID, telephone 54611. A police spokesman said “We are treating this as a serious incident particularly in view of the fact that a weapon was used in the course of the robbery”. Michelle was shaken but unharmed by the incident. The police are looking for three youths, aged about 16 or 17.

One youth who entered the shop is described as five feet ten inches tall with short mousy-coloured hair, wearing grey corduroys, a black donkey jacket and dirty white plimsolls. The other is younger-looking, slightly shorter, with short dark hair, wearing blue jeans and a camouflage jacket. The youth who waited outside is of similar description.

 

LICENSEE LIST

Last pub licensee had TYAS George 1879-80 Bastions

TYAS Alice 1880-82 (widow age 37 in 1881Census) Bastions

EDISS George 1882 Bastions

SMITH Frederick 1882-90 Bastions

Last pub licensee had WILSON Thomas 1890-93 Bastions

PACKER Charles 1893-1900 Bastions

WHEELER Alfred L 1900-01 (age 24 in 1901Census) Bastions

EARL Percy 1901-14 Bastions

COOPER George 1914-16 Bastions

HARTRIDGE John 1916-17 Bastions

DEAL Percy 1917-23 Bastions

JONES Henry 1923-26 Bastions

OLDER Percy 1926-32 Bastions

RHODES Norman 1932-59 Bastions

RHODES Edith later RICKARD 1959-93 Bastions

RICKARD Francis 1993-95 Bastions

 

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML

 

LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room