DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 13 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest Nov 1843

Fountain

Latest 1894

(Name to)

53 High Street

Folkestone

 

1894 saw this premises change name to the "Channel Inn" and restaurant.

 

South Eastern Gazette 20 April 1852.

Wednesday, April 14th: Before W. Major and S. Mackie Esqs.

The following licence was transferred: From James Winch, Fountain Inn, to William Lawrence Yates, of Hastings.

Note: No record of Yates at Fountain.

 

Southeastern Gazette 22 February 1853.

Local News.

Wednesday, February 16th: Before The Mayor, W. Major, and T. Golder Esqs.

The Licence of the Fountain Inn was transferred from W.L. Yates to Thomas Martin.

Note: Date for transfer is at variance with More Bastions. No mention of Yates.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 19 November, 1864.

DRUNK AND DISORDERLY

Thursday November 17th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt, Esq.

James Knight, of Hastings, plasterer, was charged with being drunk, disorderly, and riotous in High Street on the previous evening. He had been drinking in the "Fountain Inn" and refused to pay for his drink. Being ejected from the house he was noisy and laid down in the street. The bench fined him 5s. and costs, or seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Observer 13 July 1866.

Monday July 9th:- Before R.W. Boarer Esq.

Robert Brand was charged with assaulting P.C. Swain in the execution of his duty on the 7th inst.

P.C. Swain, his face and eyes in a dreadfully battered condition, said: On Saturday night at a quarter to twelve I was on duty in High Street. I was called to the Fountain Inn by Mrs. Morford, the landlord's wife, to assist her husband in removing some men who were fighting in the back room. I saw Morford and several people in the room, the prisoner amongst them. The prisoner was doing nothing, and when I entered the room he left the room. Morford then asked me to assist in clearing the house as it was twelve o'clock. Several people left the room. I went out of the room and saw a man go into the bar where the prisoner was, and when the man got in the prisoner knocked him down. I was at this time in the street, but I could see what was going on in the bar. I was called into the house. I pushed open the door and the man who was knocked down was getting up. I put out my hand and said “That will do, Brand; no more of this; knock off”. I was closing the door with my right hand, when the prisoner struck me with his right hand in my left eye, and knocked my hand against the door. The blow partly stunned me, and in defence I struck the prisoner with my right hand somewhere, I believe in the face. I then attempted to take him into custody. He seized me by the whiskers with his left hand, and struck me with his right across the bridge of my nose. When I struck the prisoner I knocked him backwards on to a cask. I had got him then with my left hand by the collar of his coat. When he was getting up two women caught me by my hair, and while they were doing so the prisoner struck me with one hand, i believe the right, in my face. At the same time I received two knocks from some person, one on the back, and the other on the thigh. Mr. Morford, the landlord, then came to my assistance and released me. I then went into the street and wiped the blood from my face. I could scarcely see. The prisoner was brought out into the street by four or five people, and I again took him into custody. P.C. Smith came up at the time, and some resistance was offered by four or five people. It ceased, and we brought the prisoner to the station house. After I had taken the prisoner into custody, and when opposite Mr. English's, the prisoner kicked me on the left leg. After that he came quietly to the station house. When the prisoner struck me the second time he said “You ----, I'll smash you. You have no business in here. Your place is in the street”. My present appearance is the result of the prisoner's blows.

Cross-examined: When against English's I hit you with my fist after you kicked me. I did not strike you when I came into the bar, until after you struck me.

Re-Examined: The prisoner was drunk. I was sober.

Richard Morford said: I am landlord of the Fountain Inn. About half past eleven on Saturday night there was a quarrel in my back room between the prisoner and a plasterer. I parted them and in the meantime a policeman was sent for and P.C. Swain came. I requested Swain to clear the back room. Swain cautioned them and several went out. I believe the plasterer went out first, Brand went out afterwards. A few minutes afterwards I was called into the bar. The first thing I saw was that Brand had got hold of Swain's whiskers, with his right hand I believe. I saw no blows struck. I parted Brand and Swain. Swain left the bar. Brand went out some little time after. Brand was intoxicated. I remained in the back room getting the remaining parties out until I was called into the bar. Swain seemed to be perfectly sober.

Mary Ann Morford said: I am the wife of the last witness. About half past eleven o'clock on Saturday night I was busy in the bar with my customers. There was a row in the back room and I sent for the police. Swain came, and I sent him into the back room to clear it out. Swain shortly came out of the back room and went into the street. Some of the people who left the back room came into the bar. The prisoner was one of them. I went out of the back room, and in the meantime a scuffle arose, and when I came back into the bar I saw Swain standing in among the people trying to get hold of the prisoner. I turned round to attend to my baby in the cradle, and when I rose Swain's head was on my counter, being held down by a woman. I did not see what Brand was doing, and I went out of the bar to send for a policeman. When I came in again at the street door they were all clearing out. I saw no blows struck.

Prisoner, in his defence, said: As soon as the policeman came into the bar he knocked me down over a barrel by a blow from his fist over my nose. The blood flew out and covered my jacket, which is at home. After that I certainly did strike him. He said further that there were plenty of people there who could corroborate his statement and singled out a man amongst the crowd in court, who, he said, saw all that passed.

John Marshall, who said: I am a labourer, living in Folkestone. I was at the Fountain Inn on Saturday night about half past eleven. I was there from eleven to half past eleven. I was sitting in the back room, playing cards, when a row broke out between the prisoner and a plasterer. Swain came in and ordered us out of the back room. Prisoner was one of the first who went out. He was followed out by the plasterer. I went out afterwards and called for a pint of beer at the bar. Was standing drinking the beer when the plasterer came in; the prisoner had previously come in. They began to scuffle again. Swain came in while the scuffle was going on. The first thing he did on coming in was to hit the prisoner on the nose with his fist. He made nis nose bleed, and the blow knocked him backwards. The Swain leaned over him and attempted to pull out his staff. I said “Hold on, policeman. It is a pity to use a staff on a man”. The policeman then went out. Brand went out a little while afterwards. I saw Brand hit Swain twice with his fist in the face. Brand struck Swain after Swain first struck him.

Mr. Boarer said he believed the statement of the constable, and considered the assault case, one of the most frightful that had ever come into court since he had been on the bench, fully proved. The magistrates were determined to protect the constables in the execution of their duty, and Swain was doing his duty. He regretted that he could not inflict a heavier punishment on prisoner than one month's imprisonment, with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Observer 20 July 1866.

Saturday July 14th:- Before J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Elizabeth Grace Hall, a married woman, (cohabiting with Brand, who was sent to prison for assaulting P.C. Swain) was charged with assaulting P.C. Swain in the execution of his duty on the same occasion.

P.C. Swain said: Last Saturday night I was called into the Fountain Inn, to clear it, about 11-45. While I was there I was assaulted by a man named Brand and by someone else. Several women were standing round me. The prisoner was one of the women. She pulled my whiskers and several others pulled my hair. I believed that more than one woman pulled my hair, as I felt three hands holding my head down. The hair produced (as large as the pads used by ladies for their side hair) was pulled out of my head and face, and was picked up in the bar at the Fountain the next morning. The women held my head down on the bar for more than half a minute, and quite overpowered me. At that time I was attempting to take Brand into custody and had hold of the collar of his coat. When I was released, this woman was standing nearest to me.

Mary Ann Morford, wife of Richard Morford, landlord of the Fountain Inn, in High Street, said: I saw Police Constable Swain in my bar between half past eleven and a quarter to twelve on Saturday night. I saw the prisoner there also. I saw Swain attempting to take a man into custody. The prisoner tried to pull the man away from Swain's hands. In the course of my business I turned round in my bar, and when I next saw her she had got hold of Swain's hair and was holding his head down on the counter in order, she supposed, to prevent Brand from being taken into custody.

Mr. Kelcey told prisoner he was sorry to find the law did not provide any adequate punishment for her offence. It was most disgraceful for a married woman to be in a public house at 12 o'clock at night and mixed up in such an affair. The law did not allow them to give her what she deserved, and the limit was one month's hard labour, which she would have.

 

Folkestone Observer 24 August 1866.

Licensing Day.

The magistrates issued their licensing certificates on Wednesday to all established publicans who applied for them, Mr. Morford, of the Fountain, being the only pub who got a lecture, and that a not very severe one. There were seven applications for new houses, and certificates were granted for four, namely: The Rendezvous, Mr. S. Hogben (another publican lost a 10 bet over this, we hear); Alexandra, Mr. Spurrier: Raglan, Mr. Lepper; and a house in Bouverie Mews, Mr. J. B. Tolputt.

Notes: If this is the first license for the Raglan it puts the accepted date of 1864 into doubt. Also, no record of Tolputt having a license anywhere. Could this, however, be the first license for the Albion Hotel?

 

Folkestone Observer 14 September 1866.

Tuesday September 11th:- Before the Mayor and J. Kelcey Esq.

George Boorn was charged with feloniously stealing a linen shirt and two dimity valences, of the value of 5s, the property of John Stainer.

Eliza Gold said: I am a domestic servant in the employ of Mr. Stainer, High Street. About ten minutes past five yesterday afternoon I missed a shirt and a pair of valences from the drawers in my kitchen. The prisoner and a soldier had been in the kitchen a few minutes before. I saw the things safe on the drawers a little while before. When I missed them, I went to Mrs. Morford's, at the Fountain Inn, where the prisoner had gone in. There was a soldier with him, and they had come to our house by mistake seven or eight minutes before. They came to the back door, and into the kitchen, passing the drawers. I asked them what they wanted, and the prisoner said “This is the Fountain, is it not?”. I said “No, it is not. It is the next door”. I did not see them come in. I was coming downstairs, and met them at the bottom of the stairs. They had passed through the kitchen, and were in the passage beyond. As they were suspicious looking characters, as soon as they had left I looked around, and I missed the shirt and other articles. On missing them I went in to Mrs. Morford and made her acquainted with the loss. The prisoner was there. A man said he was going to perform some conjuring tricks, and cleared the room – the back parlour – and while the prisoner was gone the man looked into prisoner's bag, and there I saw the things. Prisoner had had a black bag in his hand while he was in our house. The shirt and valences produced are the things I took out of the bag, and they are the things I missed, the property of my master. After I had found the things I took the bag and things and went into the bar to him, and told him he had taken the things as he passed through our kitchen. He said he had taken them for a drunken lark. I went for a policeman then, and P.C. Swain came, and I gave prisoner into his custody, and I also gave him the shirt and valences. The things are worth about 4s.

P.C. Swain said: At half past five last night, from information received, I went to the Fountain Inn, High Street, and found the prisoner standing at the bar, detained by the last witness and the landlady. I received one shirt and two bed valences from the last witness, which I now produce. She stated that she had found them in the presence of the prisoner in a black bag which she saw him carrying when he left her master's house. She then gave him into my custody. I searched the black bag, which contained some work that he had to make up for a tradesman in the town. He is a boot closer by trade. I charged him with stealing the things. He said he had taken them in a drunken lark. (He was not drunk). He was very sorry for doing it. He said the soldier had nothing to do with it, and did not know that he had them. The soldier was then present. I searched the prisoner at the station, and found on him 5d.

The prisoner was then asked if he wanted to be tried at the quarter sessions or by the magistrates, and preferred an immediate decision, adding “I am guilty. I took them, but did not intend to steal them. I took them out in a lark, and I am very truly sorry for it. I did not intend to steal them. It is the first time. I have not done anything of the sort before. It will be a warning to me for the future”.

A person who gave his name as Spicer spoke from the body of the court, and said he had known the prisoner these last thirty years, and never knew a guilty trick of him, nor a guilty action. He firmly believed the prisoner did this present action through drink, and he was very apt to skylark. He was very sorry to see the prisoner in the position he was. He knew him from his childhood. He was a native of Canterbury.

The bench then sentenced him to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 September 1866.

Thursday September 13th:- Before the Mayor and J. Kelcey Esq.

George Boorn, a boot closer, was brought up in custody, and charged with having stolen one shirt and two bed valences, value 4s, the property of Mr. John Stainer, in High Street, on 12th instant.

Eliza Gould said: I am a domestic servant in the employ of Mr. Stainer, bookseller, Hugh Street. About ten minutes after five o'clock last night I was coming downstairs when I met the prisoner and a soldier at the bottom in the passage. I asked them what they wanted there, when prisoner said “This is the Fountain, is it not?”. I said “No, it's next door”. Prisoner said “I beg pardon; there's no damage done”, and went out again by the back door. I noticed that the prisoner had a black bag in his hand, and as he was a suspicious looking character, I went into the kitchen, and on looking round I missed a shirt and two dimity bed hangings from the top of some drawers, where I had seen them safe not five minutes before. The prisoner and the soldier had passed through the kitchen and into a little passage at the side when I met them. I went into the Fountain to look for the men, and found the black bag (which I had seen in prisoner's hand) in the little back parlour. Prisoner had left the room and gone into the bar to look at some conjuring tricks which were going on there, and in his absence I opened the bag and found in it the shirt and two valences which I had missed. I took the bag and the things to the prisoner, who was still in the bar, and accused him of having stolen them. Prisoner said he had taken them for a drunken lark. I detained him and sent for a policeman; Constabl Swain came and I gave him into custody on a charge of stealing the things. Their value is 4s. I identify the articles stolen.

P.C. Swain said: I went to the Fountain, in High Street, about half past five o'clock last night, and found the prisoner standing at the bar, where he was detained by the last witness and the landlady. I received the shirt and valences produced from last witness, who said she had found them in a black bag which she had seen in the prisoner's hand in Mr. Stainer's house. The prisoner is a boot closer by trade, and in the bag I found some work to make up. I charged the prisoner with stealing the things, and he said he took them in a drunken lark. Prisoner was not then drunk. He said he was very sorry for having taken them, and also that the soldier knew nothing about them and did not know that he had taken them. On searching him I found 5s on him.

Prisoner pleaded guilty and said he was sorry for what he had done; it was the first time he had been before any magistrates.

A shoemaker named Spodger, who was in court, here said he had known the prisoner for 30 years and never knew him to be guilty of a dishonest action before. Prisoner was born in Canterbury and had been respectably brought up. He had known him from childhood and really believed, as he stated, that he took the things for a spree, as he often did strange things under the influence of drink.

The Mayor told the prisoner they had the power to send him to prison for three months, with hard labour, but as he had pleaded guilty he would be sent to prison for one month, with hard labour.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 September 1866.

Local News.

On Thursday, before the Mayor and J. Kelcey, Esq., George Boorn, a boot closer, was charged with having stolen a shirt and two bed valances, value 4s., the property of John Stainer, High Street, on the 12th inst.

It appears that on the evening in question the prosecutor’s housekeeper was coming downstairs, when she met the prisoner and a soldier at the bottom in the passage. Witness asked them what they wanted there, when the prisoner said, “This is the Fountain, is it not?” Witness said “No, it is next door.” Prisoner said, “I beg pardon; there’s no damage done”, and went out again by the back door. She noticed that the prisoner had a black bag in his hand, and as he was a suspicious looking character, she went into the kitchen, and on looking round, missed the articles from the top of some drawers where she had seen them safe not five minutes before. The prisoner and the soldier had passed through the kitchen, and into a little passage at the side when she met them. She went into the Fountain to look for the men, and found the black bag which she had seen in prisoner’s hand in the little back parlour. Prisoner had left the room, and gone into the bar to look at some conjuring tricks which were going on there, and in his absence she opened the bag and found in it the missing articles. She took the bag and the things to the prisoner, who was still in the bar, and accused him of having stolen them.

Prisoner said he had taken them for a drunken lark. He seemed sorry for what he had done, and the Mayor said as he had pleaded guilty, he would be sent to prison for one month only, with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 November 1866.

Thursday November 15th:- Before W. Bateman Esq., Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

Margaret Corfield, a person connected with an itinerant rag and bone merchant, was charged with stealing a spirit measure from the Alexandra Hotel, on the previous day.

Charles William Spurrier, proprietor of the Alexandra Hotel, identified the measure produced as his property by certain dents outside, and sundry scratches inside it. The value of it was 1s.

P.C. Ovenden deposed that he was on duty in High Street on Wednesday afternoon. Just after three o'clock, from information received, he went in pursuit of prisoner, whom he found at the Dolphin Inn, Kingsbridge Street. He took her into custody on a charge of stealing from the Fountain Inn, and took her to the police station. On the way there she dropped the measure produced from under her clothes. He afterwards found this was not the measure that was stolen from the Fountain Inn, but belonged to the Alexandra Hotel.

Elizabeth Jacobs, barmaid at the Alexandra Hotel, deposed that prisoner came into the bar of the hotel between two and three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon and had a glass of ale. She was there about half an hour, but the bar was not left during that time. The pewter measures sometimes stand on the counter while in use, but she did not remember that they were there at the time, nor could she say when she had last seen the measure. She did not miss anything after prisoner left.

Prisoner stated that she took the measure from the Fountain; she did not take anything from the Alexandra, but she pleaded guilty for the purpose of being tried by the bench, and was committed for two months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Observer 17 November 1866.

Thursday November 15th:- Before W. Bateman and James Tolputt Esqs, and Captain Kennicott R.N.

Margaret Carefield was charged with stealing a pewter spirit measure.

Charles William Spurrier, proprietor of the Alexandra Hotel, identified a small spirit pewter measure as his property, value 1s. Had seen the prisoner at his house the day before yesterday, but not on yesterday.

P.C. Ovenden was on duty a little after three o'clock yesterday afternoon in the High Street, and from information received went to the Fountain Inn in that street, when Mrs. Morford told him she had lost a pewter measure, and described the prisoner. He then went in search of her and found her in the Dolphin Inn, and took her into custody. Bringing her up to the station, prisoner dropped the measure from under her clothes in Broad Street. Witness saw it fall, and as he stooped to pick it up a gentleman stooped at the same time and picked it up and gave it to witness. Had observed all the way up High Street the uneasiness of the prisoner, as if she had something she desired to get rid of. Made enquiries and ascertained that the measure belonged to Mr. Spurrier.

Cross-examined: Prisoner was just in front of witness, not an arm's length off, when the measure was picked up. It was picked up from close to his feet.

Elizabeth Jacobs Spurrier, residing at the Alexandra Hotel, saw prisoner come into the bar of the hotel yesterday between two and three o'clock for a glass of ale. Witness served her. She was in the bar about half an hour. Witness thought she did not leave the bar at all during the time prisoner was there. When the spirit measures are being used they stand on the bar. Could say that it was Mr. Spurrier's spirit measure, but could not say whether it was on the bar yesterday. Had not discovered the loss of the measure when the policeman called, between five and six o'clock. Identified the measure.

Cross-examined: Prisoner stood at the bar some portion of the time, while calling for the beer, and afterwards sat on the form. She was certainly there half an hour. Did not remember when she last saw the measure.

Prisoner now pleaded guilty to taking the measure from Mrs. Morford's bar.

The Clerk: If you plead guilty to stealing from Mrs. Morford's, that is not guilty to stealing from Mr. Spurrier.

Prisoner: Then I must plead guilty, I suppose, to have it decided here.

She was sentenced to two months' hard labour.

 

Southeastern Gazette 7 May 1867.

Local News.

At the Police Court, on Monday, Fanny Hardeman was charged by William Hills, late draper of High street, now of Royal Terrace, with stealing three night dresses and some muslin trimming, value 1 5s. 6d., some time between May and July last year.

Prisoner had been previous to December last in prosecutor’s service, but since at the Fountain Inn. Prosecutor could not identify the articles, except by the girl’s admission, which was not verified, and the bench discharged the prisoner.

 

Dover Express, Friday 8 November 1867.

Assault.

George Mercer was summoned for assaulting William Cockett, on 31st October. Pleaded not guilty. Mr. Minter appeared for defendant.

Prosecutors said:- I am a furniture dealer, and live at 30, North Street. On the 30th October, between 9 and 10 o'clock in the evening, I was at the "Fountain Inn," and was assaulted by 4 or 5 persons who were in the bar. I was in the passage. I was called a bankrupt and thief, but I took no notice. As I was leaving the house the defendant came out and struck me in the face with his fist twice. They have constantly insulted me during the last 12 months. I have given no provocation.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter:- James Mullet, George Mullet and William Mullet were with defendant in the bar. I did go to Mullet's house afterwards, but not to Mercer's. I did not call defendant "a thief," or "a monkey on a stick." Defendant did not ask me why I called him a thief. He did not strike me because I did so. I have never been turned out of a public house for insulting persons there. I did not fight defendant after he came outside the house.

Complainant called no witnesses.

Mr. Mintor, for the defence, did not deny that defendant struck complainant, but said that the blow was richly deserved because the
complainant provoked the assault and called defendant a thief. It was not proper for a person to take the law into his own hands, but under the circumstances a small fine would meet the justice of the case.

He called George Mullet who was at the "Fountain" at the time for the disturbance complained of. Complainant called defendant a thief, a monkey upon a stick, and tried to provoke everyone in the room, and then struck him.

William Adams, landlord of the "Fountain," deposed that complainant said "You're a thief." Defendant said "Do you mean me," and complainant said "Yes I do." Then the blow was struck.
Defendant said he had no question to ask, for it was a conspiracy on the part of all who come forward and he had no witnesses to call.

The Bench said the provocation was great, but defendant had no business to take the law into his own hands, and they must therefore fine him 5s. and costs 12s.

The fine was paid.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 November 1867.

Monday November 4th: Before Captain Kennicott RN and J. Tolputt Esq.

George Mercer, summoned for assaulting William Cockett, pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Minter appeared for defendant.

Prosecutor said: I am a furniture dealer, and live at 30, North Street. On the 30th October, between 9 and 10 o'clock in the evening, I was at the Fountain Inn, and was insulted by four or five persons who were in the bar. I was in the passage. I was called a bankrupt and thief &c., but I took no notice. As I was leaving the house, the defendant came out of the bar and struck me in the face with his fist twice. The defendant and others have constantly insulted me during the past twelve months. I have given no provocation.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter: James Mullett, George Mullett and William Mullett were with defendant in the bar. I did go to Mullett's house afterwards, but not to Mercer's. I did not call defendant a monkey – a thief on a stick. Defendant did not ask me why I called him a thief. He did not strike me because I did so. I have never been turned out of a public house for insulting persons there. I did not fight defendant after he came outside the house.

Mr. Minter, for the defence, did not deny that defendant struck complainant, but the blow was richly deserved, because the complainant provoked the assault and called defendant a thief. It was not proper to take the law into his own hands, but under the circumstances a small fine would meet the justice of the case. He called several witnesses who proved the great provocation of the charge.

Complainant had no question to ask, for it was a conspiracy on the part of all, and he had no witness to call.

The Bench said the provocation was great, but defendant had no business to take the law in his own hands. They must therefore fine him 5s., and costs 12s. The fine was paid.

 

Folkestone Observer 9 November 1867.

Monday, November 4th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

George Mercer was charged with assault.

Mr. Minter appeared for the defendant.

William Cockett, cabinet maker, living at 13, North Street, said on the 31st of October, between nine and ten in the evening, he was in the private bar at the Fountain Inn, and prisoner and four or five others were in the outer bar, and they called him all sorts of names – bankrupt, cheat, &c., and when he was coming out the defendant came around to him and struck him in the eye twice with his fist. He never said anything to them in the outer bar. The black eye he still had was the result of the blow.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter: There were in the outer bar James Mullett sen., John Mullett jun., and George Mullett. The three Mulletts were insulting him. Mercer was as well. After he left the Fountain he did not go near Mercer's house. He went to Mullett's house. He had lived there for the last four or five years. He did not say to them in the bar “You are a monkey up a stick. You are a thief”. Defendant did not go into the passage to him and say “What do you mean by calling me a thief?”. Did not reply “So you are a thief”, and defendant did not thereupon strike him in the eye. Had not any number of times been turned out of different public houses for insulting people who were standing at the bar. Did not have a fight with Mullett after he left the house. Mullett did not strike him, nor did he strike Mullett. That he swore.

Mr. Minter said he could not deny that defendant struck the blow, and of course it was improper for him to take the law into his own hands. All he could say was the complainant richly deserved all he got, and if he had had two black eyes instead of one he would have deserved them both. He asked the Bench to impose the very smallest fine, for the reason that the plaintiff was insulting George Mercer, calling him all sorts of names, ending with calling him a thief. Being called a thief, Mercer did that which any man would be likely to do – he struck plaintiff in the face. Of course it was improper for him to take the law into his own hands, but he was provoked to do it by the language used, and the smallest fine would amply meet the justice of the case.

George Mullett, coke carrier, was at the Fountain on the night in question, and heard Cockett call Mercer a thief, and he kept on saying “Monkey up a stick” to Mercer. He was doing all he could to aggravate Mercer, and also to aggravate everyone who was there.

William Adams, landlord of the Fountain, hear Cockett call Mercer a thief. He called out that someone was a thief, and Mercer said “Do you mean me?”. Cockett said he did. He also said something about a monkey on a stick, but who he was alluding to, witness would not say.

The Bench, in imposing a fine of 5s. and costs, and said if defendant had not had provocation they would have dealt with him very severely indeed.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 21 February, 1868.

SUDDEN DEATH

Mrs. Morford, who for some time kept the "Fountain Inn," High Street, but was compelled to give it up through illness, was on Wednesday morning found dead in her bed, having retired in her usual health, which however was far from good.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 June 1868.

Monday June 15th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

Patrick Farrard, a private, 3rd Buffs, was brought up in custody, charged on suspicion with stealing certain articles from the Fountain Inn, High Street, Folkestone.

William Adams, landlord of the Fountain, stated that on Tuesday, the 2nd of June, he lost a silver Geneva watch, a ladies' gold chain, three mens' silk scarves, three scarf pins, two shirt studs, a pair of gold ear drops, a silver drinking cup and 2s. in money – value altogether about 12. The goods were in his bedroom and the next room. The doors were not locked.

James Baker, a seaman, saw prisoner at the Fountain on the 2nd instant, in the bagatelle room.

Elizabeth Mackenzie saw prisoner about a fortnight ago at the Prince Of Wales, at Sandgate. He had a pair of gold ear drops, which he offered to sell for 3s.

Fanny Smith also saw him at the Prince Of Wales, and saw him pull the ear drops out of his trousers pocket. She offered him 1s. for them and he said “Do you think I'm such a fool as that?”

Prisoner was remanded to Thursday on the application of Mr. Martin, who on that day stated that he had no further evidence to offer. None of the goods had been found.

Prisoner was therefore discharged.

 

Folkestone Observer 20 June 1868.

Monday, June 15th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

Patrick Farlan, a private of the 3rd Buffs, stationed at the Camp, was brought up and charged on suspicion of being concerned in a robbery at the Fountain public house, in High Street.

William Adams said he was a publican, and kept the Fountain Inn, High Street. He lost some property on Tuesday, the 23rd of June; a silver geneva watch, a gold lady's chain, 3 silk scarves, 3 scarf pins, 2 shirt studs, pair of gold ear drops, silver drinking cup, and 2s. in money. The value of the articles is 12. The watch and chain, scarf pins, studs, and drinking cup were taken from his drawers. The ear drops and the money were taken from a box, and the money from a pocket of his wife's sister's dress. He discovered the loss about half past nine the same evening. Was not at home when the robbery was committed. Had not seen the articles since the 2nd June.

James Baker said he was a sailor on board one of the S.E.R. Company's boats, and was in the Fountain public house on the 2nd of June, about a quarter to 7 in the evening. Was upstairs in the bagatelle room. The prisoner was there with two other soldiers, one of the 3rd and one of the 5th Regiment. They were playing bagatelle. They all left the room at 7 o'clock and went downstairs. Saw them about half an hour after on the harbour, about half past seven.

Elizabeth Mackenzie, single woman, living at the Prince Of Wales beershop, Sandgate, said she knew the prisoner by sight. He offered her a pair of earrings in the tap room between 5 and 6 in the evening. There were several persons in the room. Prisoner produced a pair of earrings. He took them out of his trousers pocket and asked the company if they knew the value of them. He said he had been to the jeweller's shop to see if they were gold, but the jeweller was not at home, and he was going down again. He said he would take two shillings for them. Told him if they were gold they were worth thirty shillings. He made no answer, but took up his beer and went out of the room. Had no doubt that the man at the bar was the man who offered the earrings.

Elizabeth Smith, single woman, living at the Prince Of Wales beershop, Sandgate, said she knew the prisoner. Was present when he offered some earrings for sale. It was about 5 or 6 in the evening. He came into the tap room and took the earrings out of his trousers pocket. (Witness here described the earrings.) Witness thought they were gold. The last witness was in the room with her. He said to all of them that he had been to the jeweller's to see if they were gold. He then took up his beer and went out of the room. They offered him a shilling for them, and he wanted to know if they thought he was a fool. Did not hear him offer to take any sum for them.

On the application of Superintendent Martin the prisoner was remanded until Thursday.

Thursday, June 18th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott, Captain Leith, James Tolputt and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Patrick Farlan, on remand, was brought up and discharged, the evidence being insufficient.

 

Folkestone Express 20 June 1868.

Tuesday, June 16th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott, R.N., Alderman Boarer and A.M. Leith Esq.

Patrick Farlan, a private of the 3rd Buffs, stationed at the Camp, was brought up and charged on suspicion with being concerned in a robbery at the Fountain public house in High Street.

Mr. Adams, the landlord of the house in question, deposed that on Tuesday evening, the 2nd June, he lost property to the value of 12, and consisting of a silver Geneva watch, gold chain, 3 silk scarves, 3 gold scarf pins, 2 gold shirt studs, a pair of gold ear drops, a silver drinking cup, and 2s. in money, all of which had been taken from his bedroom, with the exception of the earrings and money, which had been taken from the adjoining room. He first discovered that the things had been stolen about half past nine o'clock the same night. The prisoner at the bar was in his house on the night in question between six and seven with three others, who were playing at bagatelle in a room situate on the first floor, the room from which the things were stolen being on the second floor. The doors were not locked, and anyone disposed to enter had easy access. The soldiers remained in the house about an hour. He was not present himself, but his wife served them. He had not seen the missing things since the 2nd June.

The prisoner said he knew nothing about it.

James Baker, an employee on board one of the S.E.R. steam packets, also testified to the prisoner and his companions being present on the night the robbery was committed.

Eliza Mackenzie and Eliza Smith, both lodging at the Prince Of Wales, at Sandgate, gave evidence to the effect that about ten days ago the prisoner was in their company at the Prince Of Wales and produced a pair of earrings from his pocket, asking them what they thought they were worth, as he would take 3s. for them, and from the description given by the prisoner of the earrings it would appear that they corresponded with the description given by the prosecutor of those stolen.

Mr. Adams, being re-called, said he could swear to everything stolen, with the exception of the earrings.

Superintendent Martin said that in the absence of a material witness whom he expected to be present he had to ask for a remand till Thursday, which was granted.

Thursday, June 18th: Before The Mayor, Captain Kennicott R.N., Aldermen Tolputt and Boarer, and A.M. Leith Esq.

Patrick Farlan was again brought up, and discharged, the case not being proved.

 

Folkestone Express 21 November 1868.

County Court.

Monday, November 16th: Before W.C. Scott Esq.

William Adams v Charles Dickenson: This was a claim for 10.

Mr. Creery appeared for the plaintiff, who he stated was the proprietor of the Fountain, High Street, and the defendant agreed to give him the above sum to leave his house, and wrote out a cheque for the amount, but on his presenting it at the bank for payment plaintiff found there was a wrong date on the cheque, and consequently it was useless. He took it back to Mr. Dickenson, who kept possession of the cheque, and refused to give him another, therefore these proceedings were instituted. The agreement was produced.

The defendant did not appear, and judgement was given for the full amount with costs.

 

Folkestone Observer 10 July 1869.

Wednesday, July 7th: Before Capt. Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

The magistrates granted the transfer of license of the Fountain to John W. Boorn.

 

Folkestone Express 10 July 1869.

Wednesday, July 7th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

An application from John Whittingham Boorn for a transfer of the license of the Fountain, High Street, was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 25 February 1871.

County Court.

Saturday, February 18th: Before R.T. Brockman Esq.

Alfred Leney & Co. v John W. Boorn: 4 10s. due for goods supplied. Ordered to be paid in one month. 10s. costs allowed plaintiff.

 

Folkestone Express 8 July 1871.

Transfer Of License.

At the Petty Sessions on Wednesday morning the license of the Fountain was transferred from John Boorn to Jas. Vainal.

Note: According to More Bastions Vainal does not appear on the list of licensees at the Fountain.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 February 1873.

Friday, February 14th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer and J. Gambrill Esqs.

George Marshall Tutt applied for a temporary authority to sell excisable liquors at the Fountain Inn under the license granted to James Bateman Major at the last General Annual Licensing Meeting. Granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 October 1873.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before R. W. Boarer Esq., and Col. De Crespigny.

Mary Fisher was summoned for assaulting Marshal Tutt on the 2nd inst. Mr.Wightwick appeared for defendant, and Mr. Minter for complainant.

George Marshal Tutt, landlord of the Fountain Inn, High Street, said the defendant lived in the Eagle Tavern, nearly opposite his house, and on the 2nd of October she came to him and said “Can I speak to you?”. He replied “Certainly you can”. She asked him to step outside the house, but this he declined to do. She came into the passage and said “You have a child here”, and accused him of telling her mother not to come into defendant's house. He did not wish for any words, and told her to leave the premises. She declined to do so, and made use of very bad language. He put his hand on her shoulder and told her to leave, when she said “Don't handle me” and struck him twice with both hands; also kicked him on the knee, and he put her out of the door, not using more force than was necessary. She flew at him again, and knocked his hat across the road. Her mother took her away. He had received many annoyances from her, and complained to the police. From her conduct he feared she would do him some injury.

In cross-examination witness said defendant had complained about the reports he had circulated concerning her, but he had done nothing of the kind.

Thomas Bayley corroborated this evidence, and defendant was fined 1 and 10s. costs, or in default 14 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express 11 October 1873.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq., and Col. De Crespigny.

Mary Fisher, of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was summoned for assaulting George Marshall Tutt of the Fountain Inn in the same street.

Mr. Minter appeared for complainant and briefly opened the case.

Complainant said: Defendant lives at the Eagle Tavern, nearly opposite to my house. At seven o'clock in the evening on the 2nd October I was standing in my passage, just behind my front door. Defendant came in and said “Can I speak to you?” I replied “Certainly you can”. She then said “Will you step across to my house?” I said “Certainly not. You must speak to me here”. She then came into my passage, past my wife, and said “You have a girl here nursing your baby”. I said “What of that?” She replied “Did you tell her mother not to let her come to my house?” I said “Certainly not. I don't want to have any words with you. I would rather we should be good friends”, and asked her to leave my premises. She said she should go when she liked. I put my hand on her shoulder and told her I did not want anything to do with her. She called me names which I cannot repeat, which caused me to put my hand on her shoulder. She turned round and said “Don't you meddle with me”, and struck me twice on the mouth with both her hands, and kicked me twice on the knees. I then pushed her out of the door, using only necessary force to do so. She flew at me again and missed my face, and knocked my hat across the road. Her language was awful. Her mother came and took her away. I have received annoyance from her for some time, and complained to the police several times. I am fearful that she will do me some injury.

By Mr. Wightwick, who appeared for defendant: I have kept the Fountain about fifteen months, and previously kept a public house at Dover about eleven months. A week ago defendant sent a prostitute to annoy me; I heard her do so. I don't know that complainant has complained of my putting about scandalous reports concerning her during the last fortnight. I have not made reports about her house. She kicked me with her right leg on my left knee first, and then with her left leg on my right knee. I did not strike her.

Re-examined: Defendant has been continually helloing after me and my wife in the streets. I told Superintendent Wilshere of her conduct and he told me if it occurred again to summon her, and to turn her out of my house.

By Mr. Wightwick: She called after me “Who stole the clock?”

Thomas Bailey corroborated complainant's evidence.

Mr. Wightwick said the Bench would have no difficulty in coming to the conclusion that it was a paltry case. Complainant and defendant kept two public houses and possibly there was a little jealousy between them. Defendant had kept the Eagle four years and has never had a complaint before the Magistrates. If there was a disturbance in a public house, which was open to the world, it was the landlord's duty to call the police, and complainant had really committed an assault by pushing defendant out of his house. If it had been a private house he would have been justified in doing so. Defendant, being a woman, was quite justified on striking complainant in her own defence.

The Bench said they had no doubt an assault had been committed, and complainant was justified in putting defendant out of his house, notwithstanding what Mr. Wightwick had said to the contrary. Defendant must pay a fine of 1 and 9s. 6d. costs.

Mr. Wightwick said he could produce a case in support of what he had stated.

Mrs. Fisher paid the money, and said she went to complainant about a report he had circulated with reference to an illness she had.

Note: Dates for both parties' tenure at their houses is at variance with information in More Bastions.

 

Southeastern Gazette 14 October 1873.

Local News.

At the Police Court, on Wednesday, before R. W. Boarer, Esq., and Colonel de Crespigny, Mary Fisher, landlady of the Eagle Tavern, High Street, was charged with assaulting Geo. Marshall Tutt, landlord of the Fountain Inn, High- Street, on the 2nd inst. Mr. Minter appeared for the complainant, and Mr. Wightwick for the defendant.

George M. Tutt said: On the 2nd inst., at seven o’clock in the evening, I was standing just within my front door, when defendant came up and said, “Can I speak to you?” I replied, “Certainly.” She said, “You have a child here nursing the baby.” I said, “Is that anything to you?” and she said, “But do not tell her mother not to come to my house.” I replied, “I said no such thing,” and that I did not wish to have any words, and asked her to leave, putting my hand on her shoulder. She turned, round and said, “Don’t you handle me,” and struck me twice in the mouth with both hands and kicked me on the knee. I then pushed her out. She “flew” at me again, and knocked my hat across the road. I have been receiving annoyances from her for some time.

Mr. Thomas Bailey having corroborated this evidence, the defendant was fined 1 and 10s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 21 March 1874.

Tuesday, March 17th: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, and J. Tolputt Esq.

Thomas Welch was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and assaulting P.C. Keeler.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty to being drunk, and Not Guilty of assaulting the police.

P.C. Keeler deposed: At twenty minutes past twelve last night I heard a great noise in High Street. On going to the place I saw prisoner opposite the Fountain fighting with a man. I advised him to go home several times, but he refused to do so, and I was obliged to take him into custody. He was very violent, and I had to call P.C. Hill to my assistance. We put him into the old station until we got the street cleared. When we got him to the door he turned round and struck me with his fist, and swore he would not go into the cell. About half past two we brought him to the Police Station. He struck me under the jaw bone with his closed fist.

By prisoner: You struck the man first.

By the Mayor: He was fighting with a man named Tice. I had several complaints of prisoner assaulting people that night. He came along quietly from the old station.

Prisoner said he was very sorry and would be “extremely obliged” if the Bench would let him off.

The Mayor: The other man must have been as bad as this one. Why was he not brought here as well?

P.C. Keeler: Tice went away as soon as I told him. Prisoner refused to give his name when I asked him.

Fined 5s. for each offence and 8s. costs, or seven days' hard labour in default in each case.

Prisoner asked to be allowed to pay the 18s. by weekly instalments of 5s., but was told he must pay it in the course of the day, and was removed in custody.

Lucy Welch, prisoner's wife, was charged with resisting the police in the execution of their duty.

P.C. Keeler said prisoner got hold of her husband and said he should not be locked up. Witness told her to go away, but she refused to do so. He did not know at the time she was Welch's wife. She was sober.

Prisoner was discharged.

 

Folkestone Express 29 August 1874.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, August 26th: Before The Mayor, W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.

The seventy four licensed victuallers, twelve beershop keepers and twenty three grocers and wine merchants had their licenses renewed, with the exception of those named.

The Fountain: Supt. Wilshere opposed the renewal of the license to George Marshall Tutt on the ground that the house was the habitual resort of prostitutes. There was a girl living in the house, but he believed she had gone.

Mr. Minter appeared for applicant, and said his client was not aware at the time he took the girl into his services of her character. The girl wished to reform, but the would-be-dictator, the Inspector under the Contagious Diseases Act, refused to take her name off the Register, and his client, rather than come into collision with the Inspector, dismissed the girl, who had no doubt gone back to her old life. It was very much to be regretted that the object of such men was to keep up their employment and keep the Act in force.

The Mayor said the Bench would renew the license, as the girl had gone away, and they did not think a public house was the best place for a girl to reform in.

 

Folkestone Express 19 December 1874.

License Transfer.

Wednesday, December 16th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer Esq. and Col. De Crespigny.

This was one of the days appointed for the transfer of licenses. The following application was heard:

That of the Fountain Inn, High Street, from George Marshall Tutt to John T. Brownutt.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1880.

Annual Licensing Day.

Wednesday, August 25th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, and Aldermen Caister and Hoad.

The existing licenses were all renewed, the only feature of note being that the landlord of the Fountain Inn, High Street, was cautioned against allowing his house to be a nuisance to the neighbours.

 

Folkestone Express 4 June 1881.

Saturday, May 28th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks and R.W. Boarer Esq.

William Hankard pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly in High Street on the 20th May. He was also charged with refusing to quit the Fountain Inn when requested to do so by the landlord.

Prosecutor said the defendant went to the house about 8.30 in the evening. He was then in drink, but prosecutor was not aware of it. He was supplied with a pot of beer at the bar, and then went upstairs and cause a disturbance by fighting with a soldier. He refused to leave the house, and continued fighting for about 10 minutes. Prosecutor therefore called in a police constable, but defendant still refused to go, and was then ejected.

Defendant was fined 10s. and 18s. costs, or 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 24 November 1883.

Tuesday, November 20th: Before The Mayor and Colonel De Crespigny.

Rose Cullen, 16. Was charged with stealing 14s., the property of Mr. Bird, her employer.

Mr. Bird, prosecutor, landlord of the Fountain Inn, said prisoner had been in his employ up to the previous day. On Saturday she was left in charge of the bar, and told to ask the landlady if she wanted any change. There was about a pound's worth of silver in the till. Later on prisoner told him the till had been robbed by a stranger whilst she was temporarily absent. Witness found that about 15s. was missing and gave information to the police, together with a description of the person whom prisoner said had stolen the money. From what came to his knowledge he accused prisoner of stealing it, and told her if she would tell the truth he would forgive her. She admitted having taken 5s.; she had bought a jacket with the money, and had left it at a shop in Tontine Street. He went with her to the shop, and the proprietor returned the 5s. He told her if she had taken the 5s., she had taken the other.

Sergeant Ovenden said he apprehended the prisoner and charged her with stealing 14s. or 15s., the property of her employer. She said “I did not take more than five shillings”.

Prisoner was fined 1 and 12s. 6d. costs, or in default a fortnight's imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express 13 November 1886.

Advertisement.

Fountain Inn, High Street, Folkestone, TO LET, to which a new bar is now being added, making it the most attractive house in the High Street. Also Belle Vue Inn, Belle Vue Street. Apply Hythe Brewery.

 

Folkestone Express 17 December 1887.

Wednesday, December 14th: Before Capt. Carter, J. Hoad, J. Fitness and E.R. Ward Esqs.


The licence of the Fountain Inn, was transferred to Mr. Peel.

 

Folkestone Express 29 November 1890.

Advertisement.

Fountain Inn, High Street, TO LET; Rent and ingoing moderate. Apply Hythe Brewery.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1891.

Advertisement.

FOUNTAIN INN, High Street, Folkestone, TO LET; Rent and ingoing moderate. Apply Hythe Brewery.

 

Folkestone Express 7 March 1891.

Transfers.

Wednesday, March 4th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, H.W. Poole and J. Brooke Esqs.

The licence of the Fountain Inn was transferred to Charles Thomas Nash.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 11 March 1891.

Wednesday, March 4th: Before Col. De Crespigny, H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick, J. Brooke and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

The licence of the Fountain Inn, High Street, was transferred to Charles Thomas Nash.

 

Folkestone Express 27 February 1892.

Advertisement.

To Let: The Fountain Inn, High Street, Folkestone, rent 20. For other particulars, apply Hythe Brewery.

 

Folkestone Express 29 April 1893.

Advertisement.

Fountain Inn, High Street, Folkestone, TO LET. Ingoing and rent moderate; extensive alterations contemplated. Apply Hythe Brewery.

 

Folkestone Express 3 February 1894.

Advertisement.

Fountain Inn, Folkestone, TO LET, from middle February; now being converted, at great expense, into a first class restaurant, new bar being added. Apply Hythe Brewery.

 

Folkestone Express 4 August 1894.

Transfer of Licence.

Wednesday, August 1st: Before J. Holden, J. Fitness and J. Pledge Esqs.

The licence of the Fountain was transferred to Mr. Holland.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

WINCH James 1843-52 (age 49 in 1851Census) Bagshaw's Directory 1847Bastions

YATES William Lawrence 1852-53

MARTIN Thomas 1853-56+ Bastions

COWLING Joseph 1856-63  (age 38 in 1861Census) Melville's 1858Post Office Directory 1862Bastions

MOR(E)FORD James 1863-67 Bastions

ADAMS William 1867-69 Bastions

Last pub licensee had BOORN John 1869-71 Next pub licensee had (age 36 in 1871Census) Bastions

VAINAL Vainal 1871

BOORN M 1871-72 Bastions

MAJOR James Bateman 1872-73 Bastions

TUTT George Marshall 1873-74 Post Office Directory 1874Bastions

BROWNWORTH John Turner 1874-77 Bastions

GEALL James 1877-82 Post Office Directory 1882Bastions

BIRD John Parker 1882-88 Bastions

PEALE William 1888-89 Bastions

BURGESS Fanny 1889-91 Bastions

BURGESS George 1891 Post Office Directory 1891

NASH Charles T 1891-94 (age 29 in 1891Census) Bastions

Renamed "Channel Inn."

 

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

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