DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Dover, May, 2019.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 29 May, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Barry Smith and Paul Skelton

Earliest 1756

Green Dragon

Latest Dec 1938

16 Strond Street

12 Strond Street Pikes 1924

Dover

Green Dragon

Above photo, circa 1930 showing the "Green Dragon" as the white house on the right of the picture. Kindly sent by Paul Wells.

 

Kept by Holmes in 1791 and an outlet of Shepherd Neame at the closure. It stood opposite the old harbour station with a passageway to Custom House Quay on one side and the "Royal Mail Hotel" on the other, 27 yards away. I sometimes came across a "Dragon Inn" which I have presumed to be the same. Bagshaw's Directory Bagshaw's Directory 1847 and also Melvilles Directory Melville's 1858 refers a pub in Strond Street called Dragon and Henry Hogben and Stephen Court respectively.

 

Shepherd Neame were the lessees from Dover Harbour board in 1938 when it was referred. With eight other fully licensed houses within two hundred yards, or fifteen within four hundred yards, the result was inevitable. Compensation was paid on 24 December that year. If still present, the property would have been removed in 1951 together with the remainder of the street.

 

From the Kentish Post or Canterbury News-Letter, July 28-31, 1756. Kindly sent from Alec Hasenson.

Sale of Valentine Andrews', (Carpenter), Stock in Trade, at the Sign of the "Green Dragon" in Dover.

 

From the Kentish Post, December 27-30, 1758. Kindly sent from Alec Hasenson.

Sale of Cloth, Buttons, Twine, at the Sign of the "Green Dragon" in Dover, 1st January.

 

From Kentish Gazette 23 October 1804.

Saturday morning a fire was discovered in the bar of the "Green Dragon" public-house at Dover, which, by timely assistance of the family, was happily extinguished just in time to prevent the most fatal effects. There were several lodgers in the premises, one of them, who drives the morning coach to Canterbury, having rose at three o'clock, on going down the stairs, he encountered so suffocating vapour as to occasion him to let a box fall from his arms he was carrying out, which induced him immediately to alarm those in the house:- on opening the bar the wainscotting all round burst into flames and the fire had communicated to the wainscotting in the room adjoining. The accident was occasioned by a piece of wood in the chimney, which had many years been concealed by contracting the fire-place.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, 3 April, 1858. Price 1d.

BOROUGH PETTY SESSIONS

John Harris, a man of advanced age, was charged with fraudulently obtaining goods.

Francis Mitchell Herring: My place of business is 13, Basinghall Street, London, and I am a wholesale brush and comb manufacturer. The letter produced I received on the 24th March, (dated March 23.) from a person named John Harris, requesting me to send him 2 doz. preventive brushes and half a dozen magnetic brushes, and other articles. I sent them in accordance with such letter, addressed to "Mr. John Harris, Stationer, Strond Street, Dover." It was written on an address label, having my own name printed thereon, and the parcel was sent by the South-Eastern Railway. Two other letters, in the same handwriting as that of the 23rd of March, and dated respectively the 12th and 19th of March, were received during my absence in Paris; and in consequence of the representations, made in the letter of the 19th, that he had a stationer's shop at Dover, I sent him a dozen brushes, the value of which is £6. I have made enquiries in Strond Street, Dover, but can find no such person as John Harris having a stationer's shop in Strond Street. I found a person of that name, the prisoner, staying at the "Green Dragon Inn."

By the Court: Prisoner had never had any transactions with us before. His first letter was received during my absence in Paris, and was written in a way that led my folks at home to suppose I knew him, and had had some previous dealings with him. I have received no post-office order for the goods. The first lot was sent to Brighton.

By Prisoner: I was absent from London when the first parcel of goods was sent you. I have received no money from you. When I saw you on Saturday, I asked you if you were prepared to pay what you owed me. I did not say that I would give you in charge of the police if you did not pay me at all.

Examination in chief continued: When prisoner came into the room at the "Green Dragon," where I and the Police Superintendent were sitting, I said to him. "My name is Herring, of London. You have been getting goods off me." He said, "I have." I then said, "Are you prepared to pay for them?" He replied, "No." My rejoinder was, "Then I give you into custody." Afterwards he several times said he was prepared to pay me part but could not pay the whole.

By Prisoner: before leaving London I had tolerably good information that you were a swindler, but before giving you into custody, I thought it right to ask if you were prepared to pay the money, and did so.

Superintendent Coram, through whom the prosecutor was informed of the fraudulent proceedings of Harris, was not examined, as the present proceedings were merely preliminary to a remand, which Mr. Herring applied for; and the further enquiry was adjourned till Friday.

 

Dover Express 28th August 1858.

INFRINGEMENTS OF THE ALEHOUSE ACT.

Isaac Harrington, landlord of the "Dragon Inn," Strond Street, was charged on the information of PC Arnold with opening his house for the sale of beer at a quarter to twelve on the previous Sunday morning.

PC Barton said he visited the "Dragon Inn" on the morning in question, accompanied, as in the last case, by PC Arnold. On entering by the back door, he saw three men in a room on the left of the passage. Two of them were Dover men and one, who was in the act of quitting the room as witness entered, had in his hand a pot about half full of beer, another was smoking at a table on which there was a pot containing beer; and the third had a pewter pot at the side of him. On enquiring for the landlord, he was told he had gone to Church. The landlady admitted that she always kept the back door open during Divine service and that people occasionally dropped in and had a pint of beer.

By the defendant:- The parties stated that they were the sick visitors of a club to which you belonged.

Mr. John Gates, called by the defendant, said he went to Mr. Harrington’s house on the previous Sunday morning. He (witness) was one of the sick visitors of the Manchester Unity and Odd Fellows and the object of his visit was to ascertain the state of Mr. Harrington’s health. He was present when the police visited the house. He had some refreshment for which he paid.

The defendant was fined 2s 6d and the costs, 11s

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 24 December, 1869. Price 1d.

ROBBERY FROM A PUBLIC HOUSE

William Brigham, a discharged soldier from the 2nd Dragoon Guards, was charged with stealing one Inverness cape, the property of Mr. John Samson, landlord of the "Green Dragon Inn," Strond Street, Dover.

The Superintendent of police said he thought there would be other charges brought against the prisoner if he should be remanded. One of the charges was that of obtaining money under false pretences from the same prosecutor who appeared in the present case.

Mr. John Samson said the Inverness cape produced by police-constable Hemmings was his property, and he had reason to suppose the prisoner had stolen it.

The prisoner was then remanded till Monday next.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 31 December, 1869. Price 1d.

REMANDED CHARGE OF FELONY

William Brigham, a discharged soldier from the 2nd Dragoon Guards, was charged with stealing an Inverness cape, value 10s., the property of John Sampson, landlord of the "Green Dragon Inn," Strond Street, Dover.

The prosecutor said the defendant came to his house on Thursday, Nov. 26. He stayed in the house about three weeks. On the Tuesday previous the prisoner asked witness to lend him his overcoat, to go up to the Brigade Office for his money. The prisoner was subsequently brought from London, where he was found by the police with the cape in his possession.

By the prisoner: You did not ask me to lend you the cape for any specified time; I expected that when you returned from the Brigade Office you would return it.

The prosecutor further stated that the prisoner returned from the Brigade Office with some papers, and said his money was all right, and that he had to go to the National Provincial Bank to get it. he asked witness to lend him 2s., and witness complied with the request. The prosecutor then went to the National Provincial Bank almost immediately afterwards and found he had not been there. He also made a similar enquiry at the London and County Bank, and found the prisoner had not been there either. In consequence of what he subsequently heard, the police telegraphed to London, and the prisoner was brought back to Dover the next morning, with the cape in his possession.

Police-constable Hemmings said the prisoner was apprehended in London on the morning of the 22nd inst., and charged with stealing the coat produced. Witness subsequently brought hjim back to Dover.

The prisoner pleaded guilty, and the Magistrates sentenced him to a month's imprisonment, with hard labour.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 7 September, 1883. 1d.

ANNUAL LICENSING DAY

THE GREEN DRAGON

On the name of the “Green Dragon Inn,” Strond Street, being called the Clerk to the Magistrates reported that the landlord of this house, Mr. F. Walker, had been convicted on the 17th of August last for serving liquors at 11.35 on Sunday morning.

The Mayor to Mr. Walker: Unless your house is well conducted the next ensuing year this offence will be remembered against you, and I therefore caution you. I hope the fine inflicted upon you then will be a sufficient caution to you. Your license will be re-issued.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 22 October, 1886. Price 1d.

ASSAULTING THE POLICE

Robert Cullin was charged with disorderly conduct in Snargate Street, assaulting the Police, and refusing to quit the “Green Dragon.”

W. Wilson, landlord of the “Green Dragon,” Strond Street, said the defendant went to his house on Monday night. He seemed sober and asked for a glass of beer, which was supplied to him. He seemed quarrelsome, and consequently was requested to leave. He went outside and threatened to smash the window. A Policeman tried to persuade him to go away. He came inside the house and went out again when ordered. He did not refuse to leave when ordered. He hung about, threatening to break the windows, but did not do so. He went away with the Policeman.

The defendant said that they were raffling, and Mr. Wilson was cross because he (defendant) had not enough of money by two-pence.

Witness: That is not so.

Police-constable A. Cadman (D.25) said his attention was called to the “Green Dragon” by loud talking and by filthy language of the defendant. He would not go away, but after being ordered out of the house he returned again. He entered the house, and was again ordered out. He saw him lift his fist and strike the window. He tried twenty minutes to get the defendant to go away, and on his persistently refusing he took him into custody. In passing up Strond Street he commenced kicking, bruising the Constable's leg and tearing his trousers. He continued that conduct on being taken up to the Police Station. Police-constable Knott assisted in taking the defendant to the Station.

The defendant was fined 2s. 6d. and 7s. costs, or seven days. Till Saturday he was allowed to pay the money.

 

From http://www.doverwarmemorialproject.org.uk/Casualties/WWI/SurnamesF.htm

On Saturday 5th September 1914, just 2 months into the "Great War", licensees Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. French sadly lost their son, Henry John French, 237873, an Able Seaman in the Royal Navy, when the HMS Pathfinder a light cruiser, was torpedoed and sunk by U.21 in North Sea. He is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial with another 260 casualties from that same sinking.

Henry John French

Above pictures showing Henry John French and HMS Pathfinder.

 

Dover Express 4th August 1916.

The licence of the “Green Dragon” was transferred from Mr. A. E. (sic) French to Mrs. S. O’Rourke who lately held the licence of the “Sir John Falstaff”. Her husband is with the Army.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News. 18 February, 1938. Price 1½d.

REFERRED TO COMPENSATION AUTHORITY

Mr. H. J. Baxter, instructed by the Town Clerk on behalf of the Chief Constable asked that the licence of the “Green Dragon,” Strond Street, should be referred to the Compensation Authorities, on the ground that the licence was redundant.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the owners and said that they were not considering the application.

Mr. Baxter said that it was a small house of £20 rateable value. There were eight other fully licensed houses within 200 yards of the “Green Dragon,” three more within 300 yards, and four more within 400 yards. It was necessary for him to remind the Bench that in recent years a good deal of property had been pulled down in the district, and although all these licences might at one time have been necessary, this one was now quite redundant. The Police visited this house, and a number of neighbouring ones, in January and the Officer would tell the Bench that he visited this house twelve times and found a total of 28 people using it, an average of two people a time, including even Saturday evening. The house was scarcely used at all. One ground put forward for considering the licence redundant was that the premises were structurally unsound, but he was abandoning that ground.

Inspector Saddleton gave evidence of visiting the “Green Dragon” and adjacent houses on twelve occasions in one week during January. In the “Green Dragon” there were 28 people present when he made those twelve visits. In the “Granville” there were 81, the “Archliffe Fort Inn” 59, the “Fleur de Lys” 39, the “Prince Imperial” 72, and the “Swan Hotel” 75, the “Shakespeare Inn” 30, the “Pavilion Bar” 49, and the “Hotel de Paris” 51.

The Magistrates' Clerk said that the Bench would hear that no other applications before giving their decision.

Mr. Baxter who applied for the Bench to adopt a similar course in the case of the “Liberty Inn,” Adrian Street, and the “Gothic Inn,” Snargate Street, stating that Mr. J. Douglass appeared in each case for the licensees. Those two houses were owned or leased by the same brewers, Messrs. George Beer and Rigden Ltd. He would remind the Bench of what the Town Clerk had told them that it was the function of the Court to refer the matter to the Compensation Authorities for them to decide whether or not the licences should be refused. That Court was not making and final decision. The view he would put before them was that these two houses were undoubtedly redundant and that there were ample facilities in the Adrian Street and Snargate Street areas. It was necessary for him to remind them of the great change which had come over that district in recent years, and houses which at one time might have been necessary had become completely unnecessary by reason of the changes in that area. The owners of these two houses had other houses in the district and would not be unduly prejudiced even if both of these houses were closed. The “Liberty Inn” was a house of the rateable value of £32. Within 200 yards of it there were no fewer than 23 licensed premises, of which 17 were fully licensed, and one of the others was a beer “on” licence. Within 300 yards were a further 16 licensed premises, of which 14 were fully licensed, and within 400 yards there were a further five fully licensed houses, so that within an area of 400 yards there were no fewer than 45 licensed premises and in addition there were six clubs. Furthermore, that 400 yards included a large area of sea, the Granville Dock and a large area of War Department land. There was another house belonging to the same brewers, the “Criterion,” within about 80 yards of the “Liberty,” so that even if the brewers felt that “Kent's Best” was desirable for the inhabitants of the district they would only have to go another 80 yards, and no doubt their thirst would be greatly stimulated by the extra walk! There were 47 persons to each licensed house in the district and if this inn was demolished there would be only 49, a figure which compared with the average of 266 for the borough as a whole. Another indication of the fact that the house was redundant was that there had been three transfers of the licence within the last five years, and in November last the house was closed down for nine days, nothing being served there at all. The Police visited this house, and others in the district, in January, and during twelve visits to the “Liberty” found a total of 36 people present, an average of three per visit. The numbers present at other houses in the vicinity were: At the “Trocadero” 91; the “New Mogul” 130; the “Clarendon” 54; the “Invicta” 121; the “Hippodrome Bars” 76; the “Gothic” – the other house concerning which he was making application 45; the “Prince Louis” 251. There was one other one, the “Avenue,” at which the attendance was smaller, but the Police were of opinion that there were special circumstances attached to the “Avenue” which accounted for the number being smaller. The Police felt that the licensee there now was a man of great experience, who could be trusted to greatly improve its position. In the case of the “Gothic” it was also abundantly clear that the licence was redundant. Within 200 yards of the house there were eight licensed premises and one club, within 300 yards there were 14 more and four clubs, and within 400 yards a further 14 and one club, making a total of 41 licensed premises and six clubs with 400 yards. Here again, the 400 yards included a lot of unoccupied space in the sea, and War Office land. Within 200 yards of the houses were 88 persons to each licensed house. During twelve Police visits in January there were 45 people present in the “Gothic,” an average of under four per visit.

Inspector Saddleton gave evidence of visiting the two houses concerned, and adjacent ones during January, and proved the figures given by Mr. Baxter. In the case of the “Gothic” there had been six transfers of the licence in the last seven years.

Replying to Mr. Doughty, witness agreed that the summer would be the best time of the year for these houses. He agreed that the coastwise steamer trade probably helped the trade of the “Gothic.” It was very conveniently situated for that business. The trade was stated to be about £15 a week at the “Gothic.”

Mr. Doughty said that they had no desire to be obstructive. It was clear from the evidence that there was perhaps a slight redundancy in this neighbourhood, but was that a good reason for closing two of three houses they owned there, having already listened that morning to the “Wheatsheaf,” another of their houses being closed in another part of the town? They had no objection to the “Liberty Inn” being referred for the question of compensation but they did object to the “Gothic” being so referred. The transfers of that licence were all due to family reasons, except in one case where a lady tenant left because she indulged in some unwise speculations and went bankrupt. The present tenant was Mrs. Mills, who made a very good living. Her customers were nearly all crews from coasting barges and small vessels of that kind. They found it a very convenient house, and patronised it freely, and the house sold about 150 barrels of beer a year and about 120 gallons of wines and spirits. During the last nine years the brewers had spent £418 in repairs to the house. The figures given about the inhabitants of the locality were really irrelevant, because they did not rely very much on the local inhabitants for their trade.

Mrs. Emily Mary Mills, the licensee of the “Gothic” gave evidence, and said that she was quite satisfied with her takings, which averaged £15 a week. She employed one maid, and others according to the ups and downs of the trade. Her customers were chiefly sea fairing people, and quite a lot came from the “Hippodrome.” There were few local customers. She got a few soldiers, but not a lot.

Questioned by Mr. Baxter, witness said that it was most unfortunate when the Police came, because she had more people in, but at the time of the visits there were not many.

Mr. Baxter: The Police always do hit on an unfortunate time.

The Chairman announced that all three licences would be referred to the Compensation Authority.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, 11 March, 1938.

Referred to Compensation Authority

Mr. J. H. Baxter, instructed by the Town Clerk on behalf of the Chief Constable asked that the licence of the "Green Dragon," Strond Street, should be referred to the compensation authority, on the grounds of the licence was redundant.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the owners and said they were not contending the application.

Mr. Baxter said that it was a small house of £25 rentable value. There were eight other fully licensed houses within 200 yards of the "Green Dragon," three more than within 300 yards and four more within 400 yards. It was unnecessary for him to remind the Bench that in recent years a good deal of property had been pulled down in that district, and although all those licences might have at one time been necessary, this one was now quite redundant. The police visited this house, and a number of neighbouring ones, in January, and the officer would tell the Bench that he visited this house twelve times and found a total of 28 people using it, an average of two people a time, including even Saturday evening. The house was scarcely used at all. One ground put forward for considering the licence redundant was that the premises were structurally unsound, but he was now abandoning that ground.

Inspector Saddleton gave evidence of visiting the "Green Dragon" and adjacent houses on twelve occasions in one week during January. In the "Green Dragon" there were 28 people present when he made those twelve visits. In the "Granville" there were 54, the "Archliffe Fort" Inn 59, the "Fleur de Lys" 39, the "Prince Imperial" 72, and the "Swan Hotel" 75, the "Shakespeare" Inn 30, the "Pavillion" Bars 49, and the "Hotel de Paris" 51.

The Magistrates Clerk said that the Bench would hear the two other applications before making their decision.

Mr. Baxter also applied for the Bench to adopt a similar course in the case of the "Liberty" Inn, Adrian Street, and the "Gothic" Inn, Snargate Street, stating that Mr. J. Doughty appeared in each case for the licensee. These two houses were owned or licensed by the same brewers, Messrs. George Beer and Rigden, Ltd. He would remind the bench of why the Town Clerk had told them that it was the function of the Court to refer the matter to the compensation committee for them to decide whether or not the licences should be referred. That Court was not making any final decision. The view he would put before them was that these two houses were undoubtedly redundant and tat there were ample facilities in Adrian Street and Snargate Street areas. It was unnecessary to remind them of the great changes which had come over that district in recent years, and houses at one time might have been necessary had become completely unnecessary by reason of changes in the area. The owners of these two houses had other houses  in the district and would not be unduly prejudiced even if both of the houses were closed. The "Liberty" Inn was a house of the rateable value of £32. Within 200 yards of it there were no fewer than 23 licensed premises, of which 17 were fully licensed and one of the others was a beer "on" licence. Within 300 yards were a further 15 licensed premises, of which 14 were fully licensed, and within 400 yard there were a further five fully licensed.

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, 17 June, 1938.

CLOSING DOWN PUBLIC HOUSES

THE LIBERTY

The East Kent Licensing Authority met at Canterbury on Friday last, when the four Dover houses referred to by the licensing Justices came up.

There was no opposition in the case of the "Liberty" Inn, Adrian Street, and the "Green Dragon," Strond Street, both of which had been referred.

The renewal was refused.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

HOLMES W 1791-92+ Dover and Deal Directory and Guide 1792

HAMMOND 1805

HOGBEN Elizabeth 1823-28+ Pigot's Directory 1823Pigot's Directory 1828-29

HOGBEN Henry 1832-1847 Bagshaw's Directory 1847 (HOGBIN Pigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1839Pigot's Directory 1840Census)

LITTLE James 1851

COURT Stephen 1858 Melville's 1858

HARRINGTON Isaac 1858-Jan/68 Dover Express

ADAMS Jan/1868+ Dover Express

SAMPSON John 1869

WILDISH William Charles 1874 Post Office Directory 1874

THORN Charles to Nov/1879 Dover Express

POCOCK William Henry Nov/1879-May/80 Dover Express

WALKER Frank May/1880-83 Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1882 (Bromley, fruiterer)

WILSON W 1886 Dover Express

HUNT J J approx 1884-1895 (1904 dec'd)

LANDALL Stephen 1891-95 Post Office Directory 1891Pikes 1895

LANDALL Mrs Annie 1899 Kelly's Directory 1899

MARTIN W to Nov/1900 Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1903

DOVE G Nov/1900+ Dover Express

HISCOCK Joshua to Dec/02 Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1903

Last pub licensee had HUNT James Harold Dec/1902-04 dec'd Dover Express

HUNT Mrs June/1904-05 Dover Express

Last pub licensee had FRENCH Arthur Henry 1907-Aug/16 Next pub licensee had Pikes 1909Post Office Directory 1913

Last pub licensee had O'ROURKE Mrs S Aug/1916+

O'ROURKE Owen to Aug/1922 Post Office Directory 1922Dover Express

SCOTT Henry Elvey Aug/1922-24+ Dover ExpressPikes 1924 (Naval pensioner of Canterbury)

MUNSON Arthur or C A 1926-27 end

JURY Ernest Edgar John 1927-28+ end

EDWARDS Edward Manning 1934 ?

GLADMAN Thomas William 1930-Apr/36 Next pub licensee had Post Office Directory 1930Pikes 1932-33Dover Express

EDWARDS Edwin M June/1934 (secretary to Messrs Shepherd Neame & Co)

CLAXTON Jack Whitta Apr/1936-Feb/38 Dover Express

KNOTT Stephen John Feb/1938+ Post Office Directory 1938Pikes 1938-39

 

According to the Dover Express, 1936, Jack Witta Claxton was from 12, Cliff Rd., Dovercourt and a bookmaker.

 

Dover and Deal Directory and Guide 1792Dover and Deal Directory and Guide 1792

Pigot's Directory 1823From the Pigot's Directory 1823

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-9

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Pikes 1895From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1895

Kelly's Directory 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1901

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Pikes 1909From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1909

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Pikes 1924From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1924

Pikes 1932-33From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1932-33

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Pikes 1938-39From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1938-39

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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