DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, August, 2022.

Page Updated:- Saturday, 20 August, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest Aug 1864

Harvey Hotel

Latest Mar 2004

46 Dover Street

(Raglan Villas / Harvey Road 1871Census)

Folkestone

Harvey Hotel 1932

Above photo 1932 showing licensee Frederick Grew standing outside. Kindly sent by John Waters.

Harvey Hotel 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Harvey Hotel 1990

Above photo, circa 1990, kindly sent by Philip Dymott.

Former Harvey Hotel 2012

Above photo kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 8 January, 1875.

CATCH CLUB

The "Original" Catch Club at the "Harvey Hotel," had a successful opening night on Monday.

 

From the Folkestone Herald, 3 March 1900.

Harver Hotel dining room 1900

Above photo showing the Harvey Hotel dining room, 1900.

Harvey Hotel business card 1932

Above business card 1932, Kindly sent by John Waters.

Harvey Hotel business card 1932

Above business card 1932, Kindly sent by John Waters.

 

Closed May 2004 and now another private building or indeed flats.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 August 1864.

General Annual Licensing Meeting – Special Sessions.

Wednesday 24th August:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, and A.M. Leith Esqs.

Applications for new licence was made by Mr. Minter, and granted, for the following person; George Marsh, Harvey Inn, Mill Lane.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 January 1867.

Thursday January 24th: Before J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Kelcey Esqs.

Henry Ramsden appeared in answer to a summons, issued at the insistence of the Superintendent of Police, charging him with being in possession of a hare, unlawfully obtained. Mr. Minter appeared for the defendant.

P.C. William Bevan, K.C.C., stationed at Uphill, said: On the 17th of January, at half past ten o'clock, I was on duty in Mill Lane, where I saw the defendant carrying something, and on examination I found it was a hare. I asked him where he got it from, and he said up the Romney Road, and it was for “anyone that likes”. I told him I must take possession of the hare, and he said “I'm glad to make a sixpence how I can; you know me very well; it was sent down to Mr. Prebble's by his brother”. He commenced crying, and begged me not to report him. He said he took it to make what he could of it. He had it from a man named Pope, at Romney. He had not done such a thing before.

Cross examined: I was specially ordered on duty in Folkestone; defendant was carrying the hare openly in his hand.He and I did not go drinking over the job. We did go to the Harvey Inn, where I gave him a pint of beer; another man came in and we had two pots between the three.

The bench said there was no case. Prisoner was not proved to have come by the hare illegally.

Mr. Minter characterized it as a most unwarrantable interference on the part of the constable, and recommended the defendant to take an action against him.

 

Folkestone Observer 26 January 1867.

Thursday, January 24th: Before J. Tolputt and J. Kelcey Esqs.

Henry Ramsden appeared to summons for being in possession of a hare in violation of the game laws.

Mr. Minter appeared for defendant.

P.C. Bevan, K.C.C. said that on the night of 7th January, about half past ten o'clock, he saw defendant in Mill Lane, in this borough, carrying a hare, and asked him where he had got it, when he replied that he had picked it up in Romney Road. Witness asked who it was for, and was told it was for anyone that liked. Witness then asked if he was sent to anyone individually, and was told he was not. He then told defendant that he must detain the hare, when he said he was not aware he was doing wrong. Mr. Prebble, the carrier, had asked him to take the hare to his brother in Sandgate Road, and he was glad to make a sixpence where he could. They then walked up the street together, and the defendant began crying. Witness said to him “I suppose you bought this of a party in New Romney?”. He said it was not exactly so. He would tell him the real truth. It was given to him by a farmer at New Romney to make what he could of. He had hardly ever brought any before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minter: He was one of the Kent County Constabulary, and specially ordered on duty here by the Superintendent, with instructions to search everybody that he suspected had game. He saw the hare in the prisoner's hand. He was carrying the hare openly in his hand down the street. He told prisoner he had rendered himself liable to penalties, and he then began crying. He did not have something to drink with prisoner, not till some time after. (Laughter) They adjourned to the Harvey Inn. Witness gave defendant a pint of beer. Defendant did not give him (witness) three pints of beer. There were others there when the three pints were had.

The Clerk said this being the only evidence there was no case. There must not only be possession of the hare, but a reasonable presumption that defendant was on lands in pursuit of game.

Mr. Minter said the proceeding was a most unwarrantable interference on the part of the policeman, and if he did not apologise to the defendant he might hear more of it. The defendant was a most respectable man, who had had the hare given to him by a most respectable farmer, Mr. Thomas Tunbridge, of Romney Marsh.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 26 October 1867.

Coroner's inquest.

An inquest was held at the Harvey Inn on Monday afternoon, before the Borough Coroner, John Minter Esq., on the body of a child which was scalded on Thursday last.

Mr. Bateman was called and deposed that he was sent for on Friday afternoon, between five and six o'clock, to see the deceased at a cottage on The Narrows. He found it had been severely scalded on the back of the head and neck, and several splashes of scalds on the body and limbs. Deceased had sickness and shivering, which showed that the system had received a severe shock, from which it never rallied, and died early the next morning. Had he been sent for at once, he did not think he could have done any good.

Mary Ann Sacree, the mother of the child, was called and deposed that he was thirteen months old, and his name was William Frederick Sacree. She was a widow, and lived in a room at No. 9, Prospect Cottages, on The Narrows. On Thursday afternoon, between five and six, I took my two other children and deceased into my room and put them to bed. The kettle was boiling on the fire for my tea. I set the deceased on the floor to give another child a piece of bread and butter, and before I could cut it I heard the baby scream, and turning round I saw the kettle falling, and the water running all over him. I snatched him up, and called to Mrs. Ovenden, who was in Mrs. Peake's room, to come and help undress him. She gave me the money to get some oil for him. I applied the oil and some flour to the scald all night. I gave him some wine and water, some broth, and bread and milk. He continued to take nourishment up to twelve o'clock on Friday night, when he got worse. Mr. Bateman saw him on the Friday afternoon. After he got worse, there was not time to send for anyone before he died, at twenty minutes to three o'clock.

Ellen Ovenden, wife of Richard Ovenden, mariner, said: On Thursday afternoon last I was on The Narrows, in a lodger's room (Mrs. Peake's). I was talking to her between five and six o'clock when I heard Mrs. Sacree scream out “Oh, my child has scalded himself”. I ran upstairs and saw her with deceased in her lap. I took off my white petticoat and wrapped it round him. I sent for some oil, which was applied to the scalds, and next morning I sent some white rag, and some money for more oil. I was too ill to go for Mr. Bateman.

The witness stated, in answer to a juryman, that the mother of deceased was not drunk at the time, nor had she been quarrelling.

The jury returned a verdict that “Deceased lost his life through being accidentally scalded by the upsetting of a kettle of boiling water”.

 

Folkestone Observer 26 October 1867.

Inquest on a child.

Mr. Minter, coroner, held an inquest at the Harvey Inn on Monday, on the body of a child who was scalded to death.

Mr. Bateman, surgeon, deposed that he was sent for on Friday afternoon between five and six o'clock, to see the deceased at a cottage on The Narrows. He found the deceased had been severely scalded on the back of the head and neck, and several splashes of scalds were on the body and limbs. Deceased had sickness and shivering, which showed that the system had received a severe shock, from which he never rallied, and died early the next morning. Had he (Mr. Bateman) been sent for at once he did not think he could have done any good.

Mary Ann Sacree said: Deceased is my child. He is thirteen months old, and his name is William Frederick Sacree. I am a widow, and reside in one room in one of the Prospect Cottages, No. 9, on The Narrows. On Thursday afternoon, between five and six, I took my two other children and deceased into my room and put them to bed. The kettle was boiling on the fire for my tea. I set the deceased on the floor to give another child some bread and butter, and turning round I saw the kettle falling and the water all over him. I snatched him up and called to Mrs. Ovenden, who was in Mrs. Peak's room, to come and help undress him. She gave me the money to get some oil for him. I applied the oil to the scald all night, and some flour. I gave him some wine and water, some broth, and bread and milk. He continued to take nourishments up to twelve o'clock on Friday night, when he was taken worse. Mr. Bateman saw him on Friday afternoon. After he was taken worse there was not time to send for anyone before he died at twenty minutes to three o'clock.

Ellen Ovenden, wife of Richard Ovenden, mariner, said: On Thursday afternoon last I was on The Narrows, in a lodger's room (Mrs. Peak's). I was talking to her, between 5 and 6 o'clock, when I heard Mrs. Sacree scream out “Oh, my child has scalded himself”. I ran upstairs and saw the deceased in her lap. She was in black, and I took off my white petticoat and wrapped it round him. I sent for some oils, which were applied to the scalds, and next morning I sent some white rag and some money for more oils. I was too ill to go for Mr. Bateman. The mother of deceased was not drunk at the time, nor had she been quarrelling.

The jury returned a verdict that deceased lost his life through being accidentally scalded with a kettle of boiling water.

 

Southeastern Gazette 29 October 1867.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Harvey Inn, on Monday before Mr. John Minter, borough coroner, on the body of a child which was scalded on Thursday last.

Dr. Bateman deposed that he found the deceased had been severely scalded on the back of the head and neck, and several splashes of scalds on the body and limbs. Deceased had sickness and shivering, which showed that the system had received a severe shock, from which he never rallied, and died early next morning. Had he (witness) been sent for at once he did not think he could have done any good.

Mary Ann Scarce, the mother of the child, said her child was thirteen months old. She was a widow, and resided in one room of the Prospect Cottages, No. 9, to The Narrows. On Thursday afternoon, between five and six, the kettle was boiling on the fire for tea. She set the deceased on the floor, and turned away. She then heard the baby scream, and turning round saw the kettle falling and the water all over him.

A witness stated, in answer to a juryman, that the mother of the deceased was not drunk at the time, nor had she been quarrelling.

The jury returned a verdict “That deceased lost his life through being accidentally scalded by a kettle of boiling water.”

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 January 1868.

Fatal Accident.

On Friday last, a maiden lady, named Elizabeth Collins, living with Mrs. Finn at 12, Charlotte Terrace, while left in the house alone, fell downstairs and never spoke afterwards, dying on Saturday afternoon. From the evidence given at the inquest, which was held on Monday at the Harvey Inn before John Minter Esq., borough coroner, it appears that Mrs. Finn and deceased had been out in the evening, and when they returned Mrs. Finn went out to get something for supper. While she was gone, Mr. Harris, landlord of the Oddfellows Arms (sic) came with the supper beer, and heard deceased fall downstairs, evidently in coming to take the beer, for the mat at the top was kicked up, as though she had tripped over it. Mr. Harris gave an alarm, and Mrs. Impett, living next door but one, went into the house and found deceased lying doubled up at the bottom of the stairs. Mr. Eastes, surgeon, attended her, but she remained insensible till she died. A verdict of “Accidental Death” was returned.

Note: Reporter confused the Oddfellows Arms with the Oddfellows Inn, where Harris was landlord.

 

Folkestone Observer 4 January 1868.

Inquest At The Harvey Inn.

An inquest was held on Monday last before J. Minter Esq., coroner, on the body of Elizabeth Collin.

Thomas Collin, living at Broadstairs and proprietor of the bathing establishment there, identified the body of deceased as being that of his sister, Elizabeth Collin. She was 57 years of age, and lodged with Mrs. Finn, 12 Charlotte Terrace. He had been in monthly communication with his sister, and had received a letter from her on Christmas Day.

Elizabeth Impett, wife of Frederick Impett, sailor, living at 14, Charlotte Terrace, said that last Friday evening, between 8 and 9 o'clock, Mr. Harris, landlord of the Oddfellows, came to her door and said that he had heard a crash as if somebody had fallen at No. 12. Witness went to Mrs. Smith at No. 11 and got a key and opened the door, and saw deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs, her head under her right arm, which was resting on the wainscot. Witness called her husband, and he picked her up. She was bleeding from her right ear, her nose, and mouth. Washed her face with water and laid her in the room. When Mrs. Finn came home shortly after, witness left. When witness went into the house, no-one was there besides deceased.

Silvester Eastes, surgeon, said that on Friday evening last, between 9 and 10 o'clock, Mrs. Finn came to his house and told him that the person who lodged with her had just fallen downstairs. Went immediately, and found deceased lying on the floor of the front room downstairs. She was quite insensible, and could not be aroused. There was copious bleeding from the right ear, and she had all the symptoms usually produced by fracture of the base of the skull. The case was hopeless. Saw her again twice during the night, and two or three times the following morning. She continued in precisely the same state, quite unconscious, neither swallowing nor moving a voluntary muscle. She continued the same, and died a little before three on Saturday afternoon, from fracture of the skull, which no doubts was caused by the fall down stairs as described by the last witness.

Elizabeth Finn, widow, living at No. 12, Charlotte Terrace, said deceased lodged with her. On Friday evening she had been out for a walk with deceased, paying some bills, and they returned home about half past seven. Went out again a little before eight, at the request of deceased, to get something for supper, and left her is the house alone, upstairs. Returned about half past eight, and found deceased lying in the front room, and Mr. and Mrs. Impett with her. When she went upstairs she found the mat turned over, as if tripped against.

James Harris, landlord of the Oddfellows, Dover Street, said that at 8 o'clock on Friday evening he knocked twice at No. 12, Charlotte Terrace, with the supper beer which he was in the habit of taking there. After waiting two minutes he heard a heavy fall, as if a body was falling downstairs. Went to No. 14, and told Mrs. Impett that he thought someone had fallen. Mrs. Impett borrowed a latch key, and went in with her husband. He followed them in, and when they had put the body in the front room he left. Heard no cry with the fall.

The Coroner then summed up, and the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 August 1868.

Coroner's Inquests.

Horrible Discoveries.

On Monday evening our residents were horrified with the intelligence that Mrs. Banks, widow of Mr. Richard Banks, had been found dead lying on her bed. On enquiry the news was found to be only too true, the unfortunate lady, who lived in her house in Mill Lane quite alone, having been dead as was thought more than a fortnight. The particulars will be found in our account of the inquest, which was held within two hours of finding the body, so that no time might be lost before it was interred.

Almost at the same time another almost equally startling discovery was made in the Cheriton Road, on the south side, just before reaching the cemetery, and to add to the horror this case was supposed to be a murder. On making a strict examination, however, a purse of money and a bloody knife were found near him, while the wounds were such as would be if self-inflicted, and there were no marks of any struggle. Up to the time of our going to press the body has not been identified.

An inquest on the body (Mrs. Banks) was opened on Monday evening at the Harvey Inn, before John Minter Esq., borough coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr. D. Owen was chairman. The body having been viewed and identified, an order for burial was given, and the enquiry adjourned to the following day at the Town Hall. The following was the evidence given:-

John Banks, sworn, said: I am an auctioneer at Folkestone, Kent. I identify the body which the jury have now viewed as that of Elizabeth Banks, the widow of my brother, Richard Holtham Banks, deceased, who was formerly a builder in this town. About half past five o'clock this evening, the deceased's son, Joseph, came to me and said his mother was black, and he thought she was dead. He gave me the keys of the house and I went up and in the house with Mr. Marsh, the landlord of the Harvey Inn. I found her lying on the bed in the same position she is now. Her clothes were in the same position as now. The window of the bedroom was shut. I have not had any personal communication with Mrs. Banks, nor seen her since about the middle of April. I went and fetched Dr. Fitzgerald, who came back with me to the house.

Harriet, wife of James Parker, Raglan Cottage, said: I knew Elizabeth Banks, and have known her about four months by seeing her at the window or kitchen door, when I have spoken to her. About three months ago she called me to ask me to get her some victuals. Three weeks ago last Friday I fetched her 2s. worth of brandy from Mr. Marsh's, next door. About a fortnight ago I saw the Venetian blind of her sitting-room window move. I went and told Mrs. Marsh there was someone about as I had seen the blind move.

John Banks, recalled, said he had found 31 in the house.

Joseph Banks, son of deceased, living in Cambridge Terrace, said: I last saw my mother alive at her house in Mill Lane. From that time until yesterday I have not seen her. I went yesterday to get a pair of spectacles which Mrs. Shellston had left there in April last. My mother has been giving way to drink and she has been in the habit of shutting herself in the house and not allowing anyone to come. I have several times got into her house at the basement window with a knife and found her first in one room and then in another. She has grumbled at me and turned me out sometimes. Yesterday at 5 o'clock I went and got in at the back basement window, which was fastened. I went into the lower rooms and into the ground floor rooms and saw no-one. The doors and windows were all fastened, and the furniture undisturbed. I went upstairs, and in a back room I saw deceased lying on the bed. I came away as soon as I could, and went to Mr. Marsh and Mr. John Banks. My mother seemed to be lying across the bed, her head to the door. I have tried to persuade my mother to have a nurse, and went, about a month ago, to try to persuade her to let her stop, but she refused.

Charles Egerton Fitzgerald, physician and surgeon, said: Yesterday I was called between 6 and 7 o'clock to see the body of the late Mrs. Richard Banks. I found it lying across the bed in the back room, face uppermost, with her petticoats raised above one knee, one of her boots on the ground and the other under her as though she had been in the act of pulling them off. I carefully examined the body, and could detect no marks of violence. It was in a very advanced state of decomposition. I am of opinion that deceased died from natural causes, from the position of her dress, and of her body, and the furniture being undisturbed. There were appearances of deceased having been alone ill and consequently unattended. The night commodes and utensils in both rooms had been used and quite full, as also the wash hand basin. The leg of the towel horse was broken, but the horse still retained it's upright position. It seemed as if someone had leant on it.

This being all the evidence, the coroner summed up, and the jury returned a verdict that Mrs. Banks was found dead, and that the death arose from natural causes.

The body was buried at the cemetery, in the same grave as that of her husband, at daylight on Tuesday morning.

Note: The inquest on the body found on Cheriton Road returned a verdict of “Died by his own hand”

 

Folkestone Observer 1 August 1868.

Inquest.

On Monday evening last an inquest was opened by J. Minter Esq., the Borough Coroner, at the Harvey Inn, on the body of Elizabeth Banks, who was found dead on her bed the same afternoon.

The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner said it would be necessary to go and view the body, which he understood was in a very shocking state when seen by Dr. Fitzgerald, and what he proposed to do that evening was simply to give an order for burial, and then adjourn the inquiry till the following morning, when another would be held.

The jury then went to deceased's house in Mill Lane and viewed the body, which was in a very advanced stage of decomposition, and on their return Mr. John Banks was called, who said: I am an auctioneer, living at Folkestone. I identify the body of the deceased as being that of the widow of my late brother, Richard Banks, who was formerly a builder in this town. About half past five o'clock this evening deceased's son, Joseph Banks, came to me and told me that his mother was black, and he thought she was dead. He gave me the keys of the house and I came up, and seeing Mr. Marsh, who lives at this house (the Harvey Inn) standing at his door, I asked him to go into the house with me. He did so, and we then saw the body lying on the bed in the same position as now. The window of the room was shut when I entered. I have not had any personal communication with the deceased, nor seen her since about the middle of April last. I went for Dr. Fitzgerald, who came back with me to the house. The last time I saw the deceased alive she had a nurse living with her. I knew nothing about her living alone.

The inquiry was then adjourned, as there had not been sufficient time to collect further evidence, and the jury were sworn to appear at the Town Hall at eleven o'clock the following morning.

The body of the deceased was interred at the cemetery the same night.

The inquiry was resumed on Tuesday morning at the Town Hall, when Harriett Parker was called, who said: I am the wife of James William Parker, bath chair driver, living in Raglan Cottages, near Charlotte Terrace. I knew Elizabeth Banks, the deceased. I have known her about four months. I have been in the habit of going on errands for her. About three months ago was the first time I did so, and she then called me to her window. Since that time she has frequently called me. I was not the only one who went on errands for her. She sometimes called anyone who was passing to get what she wanted, which was generally cooked food or fish. I have never been in the house – not further than the kitchen door. I have fetched brandy for her. Three weeks ago last Friday I fetched 2s. worth of brandy for her from Mr. Marsh's next door. This was at half past twelve o'clock in the day, and she told me to make haste that her next door neighbours should not see it. I have never heard or seen anything of her since. I have not seen the door open or the blinds drawn up. I don't know that anyone has seen her since. I don't know any person who has been on errands for her since last Friday three weeks. About a fortnight ago I saw the Venetian blinds of the sitting room window move, but saw no-one. This was about eleven o'clock in the day.

A juror: Could you discern any hand when the blind moved?

Witness: No, I simply saw it move.

The juror: Were you not in the habit of fetching a great quantity of spirits for her?

Witness: Not a great quantity.

A juror: You often went to the New Inn for spirits, didn't you?

Witness: Yes.

The Coroner: That was because you should not go to Marsh's?

Witness: Yes, she told me I should not go there.

The Coroner: She used to pay you, I suppose?

Witness: Yes, sometimes twopence, sometimes threepence at a time.

The Coroner: Did you think it was a proper thing to do, to go and fetch spirits for a person under the circumstances you must have known existed?

Witness: I knew nothing of it until people talked about it.

The Coroner: Then why did you continue to do so?

Witness: Well, I fetched her food – cooked meat, fish, &c. as well.

A juror: How came you to see her first?

Witness: She called me as a perfect stranger, the same as she has done with others.

A juror: You never saw her before she called you?

Witness: Never.

Mr. John Banks, re-called, said: Since my examination last night I have searched the house in which the deceased was found dead. I found no appearance of any person having obtained an entrance improperly. I found 31 in money in a little box which was placed in a chest of drawers in the front room downstairs. The rooms presented their usual undisturbed appearance.

Joseph Banks said: I am the son of the deceased and live in Cambridge Terrace. I last saw her living about three weeks ago when at her own house. From that time until yesterday I had not seen her. I went to her house yesterday afternoon to get a pair of spectacles the nurse had left – that was Mrs. Shilston, who was compelled to leave and go home in April last on account of illness. I went to the next house below my mother's and asked them to allow me to go through their house that I might get over the wall and enter by the back way. I did this because she did not usually let me or anyone in if she could help it. She shut herself in, as she had given way to drink for some time past. I have got in at the back by opening the window with my knife, perhaps a dozen times before, sometimes finding my mother in one room, sometimes in another, often walking about. She used to grumble at me every time she saw me. It was about five o'clock yesterday when I entered the house by the basement window at the back. I went into the lower rooms, but saw no-one, and I then went through the ground floor rooms. Here also I saw no-one. The house presented it's usual appearance, both front and back doors being locked, and everything in it's place. I next went upstairs, and on going into the back room I saw the deceased lying on the bed. The window of the room was shut, I believe, but I cannot be positive as to that. I came away as soon as I could and went into Mr. Marsh's, thjen down to Mr. John Banks'. Deceased was lying across the bed with her head towards the door, I think. Deceased would have no-one to look after her after the nurse was gone. I have frequently talked to her and tried to persuade her to have a nurse or someone in the house with her, but she would not. In fact she locked me and everybody else out.

A juror: Have you stayed away from the deceased so long before?

Witness: No, I generally saw her once a week, sometimes twice, and sometimes more. I have done all I could to persuade my mother to have a nurse or someone to stay with her, but she always refused.

A juror: When did you see her last?

Witness: About three weeks ago.

A juror: How did you find her then?

Witness: She was then walking about and seemed to be excited.

The Coroner here remarked that Mr. Marsh had refused to supply her with spirits for some time, and if these women had refused to get it for her in all probability she would have been alive now.

Dr. Fitzgerald said: Yesterday evening between six and seven o'clock I was called by Mr. John Banks to see the deceased. I found her lying on the bed in the back room. She was lying on her back, partly undressed. One boot was lying on the ground, and the other was under her. I examined the body, but could detect no marks of violence. The body was in a very bad state of decomposition, and from it's position, and all the circumstances connected with it – the position of the furniture about the room, &c. –I am of opinion death resulted from natural causes. There was every appearance of a woman who had been ailing for some time, and had continued without attendance and in a very neglected state. It would appear that she had laid down on bed in the front room, for that had evidently been pressed, and finding herself ill then gone into the back room, where she made some efforts to undress herself; that she leant upon the towel horse, which broke under her, and she then sank back on the bed and died. Her countenance was quite placid, and altogether accorded with this view.

A juror: Did you know her previous to this?

Witness: No, I did not.

A juror: And you did not know any of her habits of life?

Witness: No.

A juror: You made an examination of the body. Did you discover any marks?

Witness: The body was too far advanced in a state of decomposition to admit of any light superficial marks being detected, but I am of opinion that no violence had been used. He body was in a most advanced stage of decomposition, being positively eaten away in many places by the maggots.

A juror: How long do you think she has been dead?

Witness: I should say she has been dead for ten days or a fortnight, but it is impossible to say exactly.

The Coroner said this was all the evidence to be brought before them, but Mr. Bradley was in attendance on behalf of the friends of the deceased, and if he wished to say anything, they would be pleased to hear him.

Mr. Bradley said he wished to make but very few remarks, simply that the deceased had an ample income, and every assistance had been offered by her friends, the whole of which she refused. She kept her own house, secluded herself from her friends, and had nothing to do with her neighbours, from the fact, it would appear, that she had this awful propensity and seemed ashamed to show it.

The Coroner then went carefully through the evidence, concluding by remarking that it seemed to him upon the evidence of Dr. Fitzgerald their verdict must be Found Dead, and that she died from natural causes, no marks of violence being found on the body.

After a very brief consultation the jury returned a verdict of the character suggested.

 

Folkestone Express 1 August 1868.

Mysterious Death.

On Monday afternoon a discovery was made at a house near the Harvey Inn, that the occupier, Mrs. Banks, was dead, and from the greatly decomposed state of the body, had evidently been so for some considerable time. The neighbours, though not seeing the deceased lady for some time, thought it nothing remarkable, for she was considered rather eccentric and held little communication with any of them. A full report of the inquest will be found below. The body was interred at three o'clock on Tuesday morning at the cemetery. The whole of the clothing and the bed of the deceased had to be destroyed.

Inquest.

The Coroner, J. Minter Esq., opened the inquest at the Harvey Inn on Monday evening at eight o'clock. After the jury had been sworn they proceeded to the house of the deceased to view the body, which presented a very sickening spectacle.

Mr. J. Banks, auctioneer, said: I identify the body as that of the wife of my late brother, at one time a builder in this town. At half past five o'clock this (Monday) evening the deceased's son, Joseph Banks, came to me and said his mother was black and he thought she was dead. He gave me the keys of the house, and I came and asked Mr. Marsh to go into the house with me. She lay on the bed in the same position as she was now. The bedroom window was shut. I had not seen her since about the middle of last April. I fetched Dr. Fitzgerald, and he came back with me to the house and at once told me to inform the Coroner. The last time I saw her she had an old nurse living with her.

The Coroner here said it would be better to adjourn further inquiry till Tuesday morning at eleven o'clock.

The adjourned inquest was held in the Committee Room at the Town Hall on Tuesday morning.

The first witness called was Harriett Parker, wife of J.W. Parker, Bathchairman, residing at Raglan Cottage. She knew the deceased; first saw her about four months ago, when Mrs. Banks called her as she was passing and asked her to fetch something, which she did. After that time she was in the habit of buying various articles at the deceased lady's request. The last time she saw deceased was three weeks ago last Friday at half past twelve o'clock in the morning, when she asked her to fetch two shillings' worth of brandy from Mr. Marsh's, and she told her to make haste as she did not wish for the neighbours to notice it. Witness' sister, and sometimes her lodgers, used to go in errands for the deceased. Witness did not know if anyone had fetched the deceased anything since she last saw her. Thought it very strange not seeing her so long, and mentioned it to Mrs. Marsh. Afterwards, seeing the Venetian blind move in the parlour, witness went back to Mrs. Marsh and said “There is someone about, as I seen the blind move”.

By the jury: Did not see any hand; only the blind move. Was not in the habit of fetching much spirits for her.

By the Coroner: Did not know she was in the habit of drinking; fetched her food as well as drink.

Mr. J. Banks, re-called, said he had searched the house, and had found 31 in a box in the drawers.

Mr. Joseph Banks, son of the deceased, who was greatly affected, deposed he had last seen his mother about three weeks ago at the house. She was then alive. He went to the house yesterday to fetch a pair of spectacles which had been forgotten by the nurse, Mrs. Shilston, who formerly attended on the deceased, but had left on account of illness in April last. Sometimes the deceased refused witness admission, so he had to go in the back way; he went there about five o'clock, and not being able to obtain admission in front, he opened the back basement window with a knife. Seeing no-one in the lower rooms, he went upstairs, where he saw the deceased lying on a bed. He closed the door, came out of the house, and spoke to Mr. Marsh, and from thence he immediately went to Mr. Banks. The doors were all fastened, and everything appeared in it's place. No-one had looked after deceased since the nurse left. She would not have anyone about her. He asked her to have someone a month ago, but she refused. Had not lived with deceased since last September. The last time he saw her alive she was excited. Deceased was in good circumstances.

Dr. Fitzgerald said that on Monday evening between six and seven o'clock he was requested by Mr. Banks to see Mrs. Banks. He found her lying on her back across the bed in the back room, one of her boots being on the ground, and the other under her. He examined the body and found it in a very bad state of decomposition. From the arrangements of her dress, the position of the body, and the furniture about the room being undisturbed, he was of opinion she died from natural causes. The deceased appeared to have been ill and vomited. She first lay on the bed in the front room, but afterwards struggled into the back room, and making a feeble attempt to take off her boots had fallen back, and there died.

By the jury: Did not know her previously, nor anything of her habits.

By the Coroner: There were no marks of violence on the body; in his opinion she must have been dead from 10 to 14 days.

Mr. Bradley, who attended on behalf of the friends of the deceased, wished to state that the deceased had an ample income.

The jury immediately returned a verdict of “Died from natural causes”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 16 July 1872.

Inquest.

On Monday evening an inquest was held at the Harvey Inn, Mill Lane, touching the death of Charles Newington, a labourer, 50 years of age, late in the employ of Mr. J. Bowley.

Mr. Bowley deposed: The deceased was mowing on the lawn in front of my house about six o’clock on the morning of Saturday, the 15th June, when he out the knuckle of the little finger of his left hand. He showed it me immediately afterwards, and was going to pull the piece of skin off. I persuaded him not to do so. It bled but a very little. I obtained a piece of rag and bound his hand up for him. He continued his work the whole of that day, and worked on the farm at Cheriton up to the 29th of June. On that day, when he took his money, I noticed a peculiar look on the right side of his face, which was drawn up. I asked him what was the matter. He said he had got a bit of a cold and a stiff jaw, and that he could not get his mouth open except to get his finger in. I asked him how long it had been so, and he said about three days. He stated that when he was out in the field he gaped, and when he shut his mouth his jaw cracked and had been stiff ever since. I asked him if he had seen the doctor about it, and he said he had not. I told him to do so as soon as possible. He said he thought it would be better in a day or two; it was only a little cold. I missed him on Monday from work, and sent round to enquire about him, and heard he was laid up.

Jane Mcklin said she lived at Bridge Street and had known the deceased about four months. She was living in the same house with him. Three weeks ago last Saturday he came home to dinner and said he bad cut his hand, but was in no pain with it. When he came home at night he washed and dressed it. He told witness he was sharpening his scythe, when it slipped, and, in catching it, he cut his hand. It. was healing up very nicely, and he made no complaint about its hurting him. On the Thursday he complained of stiffness and stayed at home the day, but went to work the week after and did not leave work the whole week. On the Thursday he complained of a stiffness of the jaw, and difficulty in opening his mouth. On the Monday witness sent for the doctor. Deceased went to bed on the Sunday and did not get up again.

Mr. Bateman surgeon, deposed: I was sent for to see the deceased. I found him in bed complaining of stiffness on the right side of the jaw. While he was speaking to me he had spasmodic catchings of the muscles. I immediately said, “Have you met with some accident and cut yourself anywhere?” He said he cut his hand a fortnight ago, and showed his left hand, from the knuckle of the little finger of which a small piece of skin had been shorn off. Marked symptoms of tetanus showed themselves—spasms of the muscles, of the body, and neck. The attempt to swallow brought, on spasms in the muscles of the throat. I attended him till Saturday afternoon, when he died from tetanus, no doubt brought on by the slight accident he had met with.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 December 1872.

Local News.

Folkestone Catch Club.

On Tuesday evening last the first concert was given in connection with this lately formed Club, at Mr. Marsh's Harvey Hotel. Mr. Marsh had taken great pains, and went to considerable expense to fit up the large room in his hotel for the accommodation of the Club and the public. The result gave every satisfaction, as every one of the large party who assembled on this occasion were comfortably seated, and their wants quickly attended to by those who waited upon them for orders.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 February 1873.

Catch Club.

On Tuesday last the fifth concert in connection with the club was held at Marsh's Harvey Hotel, under the presidency of Alderman T. Caister. The room was crowded.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 June 1873.

Coroner's Inquest.

On Saturday last, an inquest was held at the Harvey Hotel, on the body of Thomas Campion, a shoemaker, aged 41, lodging at 27, Charlotte Street, who was killed by falling into the harbour. Dr. Eastes said he was called to attend to deceased at about two o'clock on Wednesday morning last. He had all the symptoms of a person suffering concussion of the brain, but the only visible external injury was a lacerated wound on the scalp. He died on Thursday afternoon, having remained insensible during the whole of that time. William Henry Forbes, late of Hastings, stated that he lived at the Dew Drop Inn, Fancy Street. Had known the deceased about six years. On Tuesday last he was in witness's company all the evening, and at about eleven o'clock he asked him to have a ramble. They were both perfectly sober. They went down to the harbour, to the lower standing, where the people fish. Deceased went past and witness followed. It was very dark there. All at once witness missed deceased, and cried out “Tom, where are you?”. There was no answer, and on looking over the harbour, the tide being out, witness fancied he saw deceased lying on the rocks. He must have slipped and fallen six or seven feet. Having obtained assistance, he was conveyed home. They had no particular motive in going to the lower standing. They were on the best of terms, and had not quarrelled. John Kelway, a Custom House officer, confirmed the evidence of this witness. The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Folkestone Express 14 June 1873.

Inquest.

In our last impression we briefly recorded the fact that a man named Thomas Campion fell among the rocks under the lighthouse at the end of the quay at the harbour, and died from the effects of injuries received. An inquest was held on Saturday at the Harvey Hotel, before John Minter Esq., and a jury. After viewing the body the following evidence was taken:

S. Eastes Esq., M.R.C.S. deposed to being called to see deceased at 27, Charlotte Terrace at two o'clock on Wednesday morning. He found him in bed, the only visible injury being a wound behind the right ear. Endeavoured to raise him from his state of insensibility without effect. Deceased had all the symptoms of severe concussion of the brain. Gave directions as to what should be done and called again early in the morning; found patient still insensible. Saw him five or six times during the day and used the proper remedies. Deceased continued in the same state until three o'clock the following morning, when his breathing became difficult and he was no longer able to swallow, and gradually sank and died at half past two in the afternoon from concussion – not compression – of the brain, most probably caused by a fall which witness had been informed deceased had had.

Elizabeth Impett, 27, Charlotte Street, said deceased had lodged at her house about seven years, was 48 years of age. Knew nothing of his friends. Deceased left home between eight and nine on Tuesday morning; passed him between eight and nine in Dover Street, when he appeared sober. He was generally a sober man, but sometimes he got out a bit. Two policemen and Forbes brought deceased home insensible about one o'clock on Wednesday morning.

William Henry Forbes said he lived at the Dew Drop, Fancy Street. Had known deceased about six years. On Tuesday evening deceased had tea with him, had a game of draughts after tea, had four pints of half-and-half among three of them, went to the harbour and down the lower landing along the jetty leading under the lighthouse. Deceased was eight or ten paces ahead of him, and he missed him. Called out “Tom, where are you?”, and receiving no answer went in search of him. Found him lying among the rocks under the lighthouse. Both of them were sober. Thought the deceased, in trying to step upon the transoms, missed his footing. It was dark, and low water.

The Coroner remarked that it was a curious thing for witness and deceased to go to such a place at that hour of night. What were they going to do?

Witness said they went for a ramble. Jumped down to deceased and found he had fallen six or seven feet and was lying on his back unconscious. Went immediately for assistance. Deceased was perfectly sober, and they were not larking or spreeing, and were on good terms and smoking their pipes.

John Kelway, an extra man in Her Majesty's Customs said he was watchman at the harbour on the night in question, and corroborated the last witness. Went to his assistance and found deceased jammed in a hole between two rocks. Procured further assistance and deceased was got up and sent home. Deceased and Forbes were perfectly sober, and appeared to be on good terms.

Wilson Willis, the Company's night-watchman corroborated.

Verdict “Accidental Death”.

 

Folkestone Express 3 January 1874.

Monday, January 2nd: Before The Mayor, Col. De Crespigny, J. Tolputt, J. Gambrill and J. Clark Esqs.

William Court, father of the prisoner in the previous case, on bail, was charged with assaulting John Moulden Wilshere, Cheif Superintendent of Police.

Mr. Wilshere deposed: Last evening about seven o'clock I apprehended William Court, one of the prisoners in the last case, at his father's house. There was no-one in the house at the time. On the road to the police station I had occasion to call at Mr. Pierson's, baker, Dover Road, and on leaving there prisoner got hold of me and asked what I was going to do with the boy. I told him to go to the police station, when I would give him information. He then became very abusive, and followed me to the Harvey Hotel, where I took the boy for the purpose of identification, and he said I should not take him. I told him the boy was in my custody, and if he would go to the police station I would give him every information. I went into the Harvey Hotel, and asked Court to remain outside and meet me at the police station. I then put the boy in the parlour at the Harvey Hotel, and prisoner forced his way into the house and took hold of my collar and tried to throw me. I then asked Mr. Marsh, the landlord of the hotel, if I could speak to him privately. Prisoner forced his way in and tried to shut the door and we had a struggle; he afterwards became a little quieter. P.C. Keeler was outside, and I requested him to take Court to the police station. Shortly afterwards I went outside and saw prisoner scuffling with Keeler and we were obliged to handcuff him. P.C. Hogben came to our assistance and it took us all three to handcuff him.

By The Mayor: I shut the door when I went in the Harvey Hotel. I did not know the boy was Court's son. Prisoner did not ask for any information, but said I should not take the boy. I took the boy to Marsh's for the purpose of identification as I did not wish to take the wrong boy.

By prisoner: You took me by the collar. You did abuse me and handle me and said more than once that I should not take the boy.

By The Mayor: Prisoner said “What has the boy done?” and I told him he was in my custody, and if he would go to the police station he should have every information, but I could not tell him there.

P.C. Abraham Keeler deposed: About a quarter to seven last night I was called out by the Superintendent to go in search of the two prisoners in the last case. The Superintendent apprehended the boy Court himself, and as he was going along he went into Mr. Pierson's shop and I remained outside. Prisoner followed him into the shop. When they came out prisoner asked the Superintendent what he was doing with the boy, and the Superintendent directed him to go to the police station, where he would give him information. The Superintendent then went across to the Harvey Hotel into the parlour, and prisoner followed him into the room. I was standing in the passage. When prisoner was following the Superintendent into the room he requested him to keep outside a little while, as he wanted to speak to Mr. Marsh privately. Prisoner said he should not go, but should be where his boy was. The Superintendent then closed the door and prisoner shoved against it and burst it open, and then caught hold of the Superintendent by the collar, and asked him what he was going to do with the boy. The Superintendent turned round and put prisoner out of the parlour into the passage. Prisoner forced the door open again and collared the Superintendent a second time. They then closed with each other and came out of the passage and the Superintendent requested me to take prisoner to the police station, and I asked him to come with me quietly, and he said he should not until the boy came out. I asked him a second time to go out, and, as he would not, I was obliged to put him out by force. When we got outside he swore he would not go to the police station with me or any other constable. We were obliged to handcuff him, and with the assistance of P.C. Hogben, he was taken to the station.

By prisoner: The Superintendent did not shove you out like a bull and try to throw you down. He did not rush at you when you collared him.

By The Mayor: Mr. Marsh was there the best part of the time.

The Mayor to the Superintendent: Did you ask Mr. Marsh to come here this morning?

The Superintendent: Yes, but he is not here.

Mr. Henson here stepped forward and said Mr. Marsh was obliged to be away on business in the country.

This was the case, and on prisoner being asked if he wished to call Mr. Marsh, he replied that he could not say whether Mr. Marsh saw him, and on being further asked if he wished the case to be adjourned, he said it might as well go on, and went on to say: All I can say is I was going past Pierson's about a quarter to eight last night, when I saw the Superintendent and my lad. I went to his side and said “What is the matter?”, and he replied “The boy is in my custody”. If he had said he had been breaking into the church I would have said “Take him and let it be proved”. They went across to Marsh's and I asked him again, and he shoved me out of the door and said “It's no business of yours. Go out”. He then came to me with both hands and nearly shoved me down; he rushed at me like a bull. I will swear I never laid a hand on him. If he had said one word I should have been contented. I did not touch him till he did me. He asked me to hit him, but I knew better than that.

The Court was cleared for about twenty minutes, and on the re-admission of the public The Mayor said: Prisoner, you have been brought here on a very serious charge, which we are bound to take into consideration, and we are bound to uphold the police. At the same time the police should be strict as to what they do. We think the Superintendent erred in judgement in not at once telling you what he had got your son in custody for, but still that did not justify you in collaring the police. We have taken into consideration the provocation you have received. You have rendered yourself liable to a fine of 10, or six months hard labour, but taking into consideration the provocation you received in not being told what your son was in custody for, we only fine you 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

Prisoner: I will have seven days.

Prisoner was removed in custody, but a friend came forward and paid the money, and he was released.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 May 1876.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Harvey Hotel, on Monday evening last, before the Coroner, J. Minter Esq., on the body of James Williams, 56 years of age, who committed suicide by hanging himself. Dr. Mercer stated that deceased has for some time been suffering from disease of the brain, and he ordered that he should be watched. Arabella Ball, adopted daughter of the deceased, said deceased had had a good night's rest, and when she took him his tea in the morning he asked for brandy and water which he would have at eleven o'clock as the doctor had ordered it. At a quarter past ten she went to his room again, when she found him lying on the bed with his legs on the ground, and a piece of cord round his neck, fastened to the top of the bedpost. Dr. Mercer was sent for. Lucy Jenkins deposed to Mrs. Williams and the last witness visiting her in great excitement and telling her what had happened. She took a knife, went upstairs, and cut him down. He was not quite dead, but expired about ten minutes afterwards. The jury returned a verdict that deceased had destroyed himself whilst in an unsound state of mind.

 

Folkestone Express 13 May 1876.

On Monday morning last considerable excitement was created in Folkestone by a report being circulated to the effect that Mr. James Williams, confectioner and ginger beer manufacturer, of Fenchurch Street, had committed suicide. Upon enquiry it transpired that the report was but too true, the unfortunate man being discovered hanging to the bedpost. For some time he had been suffering from disease of the brain and a watch had been kept upon his actions, but on Monday morning he appears to have taken advantage of the temporary absence of his attendant and committed suicide.

An inquest was held the same night at the Harvey Inn, Dover Road, before Mr. Coroner Minter and a jury. The following evidence was adduced:

Mr. Richard Mercer said: I am a surgeon, practicing in Folkestone. I identify the body as being that of James Williams, of Fenchurch Street, confectioner. I have attended him occasionally since Christmas. He was suffering from disease of the brain. The family knew that; I cautioned them to watch him. This morning I was sent for and found him dead with the marks of the cord round his neck. Death, in my opinion, was carried by strangulation.

Arabella Ball said: I live at deceased's house. Deceased went to bed at ten o'clock on Sunday night and had a very good night. This morning at nine o'clock I took him up a cup of tea, and he said he would have some brandy and water at eleven o'clock according to the doctor's order. I went up again at a quarter past ten o'clock to ask him if he would have his brandy and water. I found him partly lying on the bed with his legs on the ground, and a piece of cord round his neck. The other end of the cord was fastened to the bedpost. I gave the alarm and then went for Mr. Mercer. Deceased was 56 years of age.

Lucy Jenkins: I am the wife of John Jenkins, mariner, and live in Fenchurch Street. At about ten o'clock this morning the last witness and Mrs. Williams came to me and asked me to go in. I went upstairs and took a knife. He was half lying and half sitting, and the cord was round his neck. I got over the bed and cut the rope. With assistance I placed him on the bed and took the rope off his neck. It had been tied thrice round his neck. He was not dead when placed upon the bed, but died in about ten minutes. I produce the rope.

The jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide while in a state of unsound mind.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 July 1876.

Inquest.

An inquest was held on Monday evening at Marsh's Harvey Hotel, on the body of John Pope, aged 84 years, who came to his death under the following distressing circumstances:- From the evidence of his daughter, Mrs. Wallace, it appears that deceased, who had been a mariner, had, with his bed-ridden wife, lived with her four years. He received support from the parish, which had been taken off. The principal burden of the support of her parents fell upon her, although she had four sons, one being a hall porter at Messrs. Rothschild's, a second proprietor of pleasure boats, and a third a captain in the merchant service. She had applied to them for support and they had given a trifle on a few occasions. The eldest brother, who lives in North Street, had given nothing, but she had never asked him to contribute, although he knew that she wanted help. Her father had not been out since Christmas, and sometimes she sat up a whole night with him, and on Sunday she did not go to bed until two in the morning. Deceased got up three times to go to the Mayor to speak about the relief being stopped. The relief was disallowed the previous Thursday, and that had evidently distressed his mind. She found him lying in the back yard, with his feet doubled up nearly to his chin. She had fastened the door of the room. From signs made by his wife, who is paralysed and cannot speak, she learned that deceased had crawled to the window (a distance of 20 feet from the ground) and got out. He went out once before, and she put wedges in the windows to prevent him from doing so again. Iden Hall, a carpenter who lived nerxt door, deposed to hearing a fall and finding deceased on the ground, and Dr. Mercer stated that death had resulted from concussion of the brain caused by the fall. The Coroner, in summing up, referred to the burden that had been borne by Mrs. Wallace in supporting her parents, which ought to have been shared by her brothers, who were apparently in a good position. The guardians had recently taken off relief from several, and thinking that the children were in a position to support their parents, they thought they should do so in this case. It had evidently affected the man's mind, as he was imbued with the idea of going to the Mayor about it. He thought the proper thing would have been for them to have summoned the sons to support their father, and not thus suddenly to disallow the relief, to the distress of the old man's mind. According to the suggestion of the Coroner the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and gave the fees to which they were entitled to Mrs. Wallace as a mark of approval of the manner in which she had supported her aged parents.

 

Folkestone Express 22 July 1876.

Inquest.

Considerable excitement was caused in the town on Sunday by the report that a man named John Pope, who had attained the venerable age of 84 years, and resided with his daughter in Harvey Street, had by some means or other fallen out of his bedroom window, and received an injury to the brain which proved almost immediately fatal. The report unfortunately proved to be true. At first popular feeling was much excited by the belief that the poor old man had committed suicide because his parish relief had been stopped by the Board Of Guardians. This matter, it will be seen, was inquired into at the inquest, and the evidence seemed to show that though the old man's mind had been much disturbed by this discontinuance of relief, his mental faculties had long ere this been in such a state as to cause much alarm to the widowed daughter who so affectionately tended him. The deceased, before old age laid him aside, was by occupation a mariner. He was one of the few remaining links connecting the present busy age with a generation long passed away. His boyhood and early manhood were spent when George III was King; he was 17 years old when the glorious news of Trafalgar arrived in England, and was yet in his early prime when Waterloo was fought. Those who were pained by the first rumours attending his death will be glad to share in the humane view taken by the Coroner, and to think that the venerable old man, who had passed through so many vicissitudes and escaped so many perils by land and sea, did not at last hastily rush headlong into the presence of his Creator, but “in age and feebleness extreme” was gathered like a ripe seed into the everlasting garner. And very satisfactory it is to know that no painful question was raised as to whether the deceased should be denied the rites of a Christian burial, but that over the grave of the aged sailor “delivered from the burden of the flesh” have been uttered those words of ineffable beauty and comfort concerning the hope beyond the grave with which the church is wont to console bereaved and sorrow-stricken hearts.

The inquest was held on Monday evening at the Harvey Hotel, before John Minter Esq., Coroner and a jury.

The first witness was Charlotte Wallis, who deposed: I am a widow, living at No. 26, Harvey Street, and identify the body which the jury have just seen as that of my father, John Pope, who was 84 years of age and lived with me. He was formerly a mariner, and had lived with me for the last four years and upwards. His widow also lives with me. She was paralysed several years ago, and is utterly incapable of helping herself. For the last eighteen months the deceased had been in receipt of parish relief. He and his wife had 5s. a week allowed between them. Beyond that they had been principally supported by myself, with occasional assistance from my sister, Mrs. Nicholls, wife of a painter, and two of my brothers, one of whom is a porter in the employment of Messrs. Rothschild, and the other captain of a vessel. I have another brother, William Pope, who lives in Folkestone, and owns boats, but he had not contributed to his parents' support. With the exception of lucid intervals my father has been out of his mind since Christmas, and I have had on several occasions to sit up with him all night. On Saturday the deceased was very restless, and dressed himself three times, saying that he must go out to see Mr. Sherwood (the Mayor) respecting his relief having been stopped. Last Thursday it was that I sent my little girl for the relief and received a message that no more would be allowed. I told my mother and then my father. He said nothing about it until Saturday, when he dressed himself several times with the intention of going to see Mr. Sherwood. Between tow and three on Sunday morning, Mr. Ivan Hill called me up, and in consequence of what he said I went into the back yard and found my father lying in the yard. He was insensible and never opened his eyes. He was bent almost double. With the assistance of Mr. Hall I carried him in, and Mr. Mercer was sent for. My father slept in the same room as my mother, being on the second floor back. I had fastened the bedroom door as usual, to prevent my father coming out, and it was still fastened when Mr. Hill found him in the yard. On going into the bedroom I found the bottom sash open. My mother cannot speak so as to be understood by others, but by signs to me she indicated that he had gone to the window and got out, falling a distance of 20 ft. to the ground. In my opinion he fancied that he was going out to Mr. Sherwood's. The deceased died at twenty five minutes past three on Sunday morning. On Good Friday he attempted to walk through the window and fell into the yard, but did not appear to have hurt himself much.

By a juryman: I think the withdrawal of the relief he had been in the habit of receiving had affected his mind.

The Coroner said the brothers ought to be ashamed of themselves for not rendering further assistance. (Hear, Hear)

Ivan Hill, a carpenter living at 14, Harvey Street, deposed: About half pat two on Sunday morning I heard groans proceeding, as I thought, from a room in the next house. About ten minutes before I had heard a noise, as of someone slamming a door. I went to my window and saw the deceased lying on the ground. I got up and called Mrs. Wallis, and went with her and we together carried the deceased into the house. I then went for Mr. Mercer.

Mr. Richard Mercer, a surgeon practicing in Folkestone, deposed: On Sunday morning I was called to 26, Harvey Street, and found the deceased lying on a sofa in the back room, suffering from very severe concussion of the brain which might have been cause by a fall similar to what I have heard described. I saw that he was dying, and his injuries were so serious that there were no means of assisting him. There was a slight wound on the top of the head. I have no doubt that his death was caused by concussion of the brain brought on by the fall from the window.

The Coroner, in summing up, said it seemed to be clear that the poor old man had at times an idea that he could walk anywhere, and on the Saturday before he died he dressed himself several times with the intention of going to the Mayor respecting his relief. The daughter, who, greatly to her credit, had supported her poor father and mother without that assistance which she ought to have had from her brothers, who, he durst say, were much better able to assist her, seemed to have taken every possible care of the old man which in her position was possible. She even took the precaution of fastening the window, but on the present occasion he managed to unfasten it and get out. It was supposed at first that the stoppage of his relief had so preyed upon his mind that the poor old man had committed suicide in consequence. But the evidence rather seemed to show that the deceased imagining, as was natural in his state of mind, that he could get through the window as easily as through the door, opened it, and falling to the ground came to his sad end. It was to be regretted perhaps that the relief had been stopped in the way it was, though even had this not occurred the old man might have determined on going out for something else. The jury and himself had nothing to do with the action of the Board Of Guardians, though they might have their own feelings as to the propriety of stopping the relief without first making the sons contribute to the support of the deceased. Still it was not for them to pass judgement on the action of the Guardians, as they had not all the materials before them, and the Board, it must be remembered, had a duty to perform to the ratepayers. Nevertheless he rather wondered why they did not summon the sons before stopping the relief. It was not to his mind a case of suicide at all, but one of accidental death.

The jury were of a similar opinion and returned a verdict accordingly.

Mr. Trevanion said the jury all agreed with the remarks the learned Coroner had made. They thought the Guardians should have made the sons contribute before discontinuing the old man's relief.

The Foreman proposed that the jury should give their fees towards the expense of burying the old man, but others of the jury thought the sons ought not to be relieved of their natural and legal obligation. Most of the jury, however, the Foreman included, kindly gave their shillings to Mrs. Wallis, whose conduct they heartily commended.

 

Southeastern Gazette 24 July 1876.

Inquest.

On the evening of Monday last, the borough coroner, J. Minter, Esq., held an inquiry at the Harvey Inn, touching the death of John Pope.

It appears that deceased, who was in his 85th year, had for some time been in failing health, and was living at 16, Harvey Street, the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Wallace, who is a widow. He had been for the last 18 months in receipt of a parish allowance of 5s. per week for himself and wife (who is bedridden, and upwards of 30 years of age). On Thursday in last week, however, an intimation was given the poor old couple by the relieving officer that the allowance would be discontinued from that date by order of the Guardians. The old gentleman regarded this as a great hardship, and on Saturday several times attempted to dress himself to go to the Mayor respecting the matter. His daughter was unable to get him to bed till two o’clock on Sunday morning, when she fastened the window and door. Half an hour after he was found in the yard beneath the bedroom window. He was picked up, but expired an hour afterwards.

Dr. Mercer deposed that deceased died through concussion of the brain. It was shown in evidence that three sons of the deceased are in good circumstances, but have only occasionally assisted Mrs. Wallace in the maintenance of their parents.

The jury, who censured the conduct of the sons, returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

 

Folkestone Express 26 May 1877.

Tuesday, May 22nd: Before Captain Fletcher, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

George Hart, a tramp, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Dover Road on the 21st of May, and with assaulting P.C. Keeler in the execution of his duty. The prisoner pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Marsh, the landlord of the Harvey Inn, stated that the prisoner was in his house on the previous evening, and as he was intoxicated he refused to serve him, but while witness's back was turned his wife served him with some beer, and he tried to take the glass away from him. Prisoner conducted himself in a disorderly manner and witness called in P.C. Keeler, who took the prisoner into custody.

Mr. Tunbridge deposed that P.C. Keeler called upon him to assist him in removing the prisoner from the Harvey Hotel, and he did so. The prisoner was very violent and struggled with them, and once succeeded in throwing Keeler to the ground.

Superintendent Wilshere stated that when the prisoner was brought into the station, Keeler complained of a pain in his back, and he directed him to go home. Dr. Bateman had since seen him, and from examination found that he was suffering from a severe sprain in the back, caused by a fall.

The Bench fine the prisoner 5s. and 3s. 6d. costs for drunkenness, and for the assault upon the police sentenced him to fourteen days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 January 1878.

Inquest.

On Saturday evening an inquest was held at the Harvey Hotel by the Coroner (J. Minter), respecting the death of Robert Burley, a member of the Borough Police Force.

James Burley, K.C.C., deposed: I identify the body as that of my brother, Robert Burley. He was a member of the Folkestone Borough Police and was 21 years of age. I saw him on Thursday last at two o'clock. He was in bed, and told me that when he came off duty on Tuesday he went out with a friend, and remained with him until three or four o'clock in the morning, leaving him at the bottom of Dover Street. On going up Dover Street a little way he ran against two artillerymen, who turned round on him and gave him a thrashing, knocked his hat all to pieces and cut his head. He found blood was running down, and went to a friend's house and knocked, but could not make anyone hear. He then hurried home to his lodgings, and on going up to the front door fell into the area. He remembered nothing more until he found himself in bed.

William Willis Cooper, landlord of the British Lion, deposed: On Thursday afternoon I went to see the deceased. From information I received I went and asked him if he had called at my house on Wednesday morning at 3-45, and he said “Yes”. I also asked him if he went to my mother's house at 103, Dover Street, near Radnor Bridge, the same morning, and he replied “Yes”, but did not say what for. He pointed to he left eye, and said he had been knocked about by two soldiers.

Elizabeth Cooper deposed: I am a widow, living at 103, Dover Street. I knew the deceased, Robert Burley. On Wednesday morning, about 20 minutes past four, I was in bed and heard someone come to the door. He knocked with his fist and tried the latch. I got out of bed and opened the window. I said “Who's there?”. He said “Oh, Mrs. Cooper, will you come down? I am nearly murdered”. I replied “I don't know who you are. You had better go home. I know nothing of you”. He said “Thank you” and left a few seconds afterwards.

Frank Martin deposed: On Wednesday last, about twenty minutes to five, I was in bed and was aroused by some groaning, and in consequence of that I looked out of the window, and afterwards went down and saw deceased lying in the area. I then called Mr. Woodlands and we took him up to bed. He was insensible. We sent for Dr. Mercer, and he came. There was a large scar on the left eyebrow. It was not bleeding. There was no blood on his face.

Mary Ann Hayward, living at No. 6, Queen Street, deposed: I saw two artillerymen on New Year's Day in the Bellevue Tavern. They told me they had been out all night, and had strayed away from Dover. As they had no money, my friend and I treated them to a quart of beer. The short one said he did not mean soldiering. I saw them again on Wednesday morning in the Bellevue Tavern. Jarvis told me afterwards that outside the Raglan Tavern they knocked up against a policeman between three and four o'clock in the morning.

Dr. Richard Mercer deposed: I found deceased lying perfectly insensible. He had a small graze over the left eyebrow, which appeared to have been done some time, as the blood was quite dry. I saw him again at eleven o'clock, when he was quite conscious, but paralysed below the left breast. I examined him, and found a fracture of the spine between the shoulders. There were no other marks of violence about him. I asked him if he was perfectly sober at the time, and he said “No”. He had had a little more than was good for him. Deceased died yesterday morning, the 4th instant, the cause of death being fracture of the spine, which in my opinion was caused by the fall. Supposing he had received the injury in a fight with soldiers it would have been utterly impossible for him to have got home.

The Coroner summed up, and the Jury, after putting a few questions to the Superintendent of Police, returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1878.

Last week we reported that Robert Burley, a member of the Borough police force, was seriously injured through having fallen down into the area of the house where he lodged. The poor fellow died about eleven o'clock on Friday morning. From statements made by the deceased to his brother, it seemed that before he got home on Wednesday morning he had been ill-treated by two soldiers, and in consequence of this report a considerable amount of interest was felt in the affair.

An inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Harvey Hotel, by J. Minter Esq., the borough coroner, when the following evidence was taken:

James Burley, a police constable stationed at Lyminge, identified the body as that of his brother. He deposed: His age was 21 last birthday. I saw him on Thursday last, having come to Folkestone in consequence of hearing of his accident. I found him in bed, and I asked him to tell me how it happened. He told me that when he went off duty he changed his clothes and went out with a friend. He was with him until between three and four o'clock in the morning, and left him at the bottom of Dover Street. He went up the street a little way and “ran against” two artillerymen, and they turned round and “dropped into him” and gave him a good thrashing, knocked his hat all to pieces and cut his head or eye. He found blood was running down his face and he went to a friend's house and knocked. Thinking he could not make anyone hear, he hurried home to his lodgings. Going up to the front door he kicked his left toe against the steps. He put his right foot out to try to save himself, and that slipped on the flag stones, in consequence of his boots having steel brads in them. That threw him round on his left side, and his back came on a low wall and pitched him over into the area. He remembered no more until he found himself in bed. He did not say if the soldiers followed him.

By a juror: I believe the soldiers recognised him as a policeman.

By the Coroner: I do not know if he meant to take them into custody.

The Coroner: From what I can learn, it appears that he thought they were two men absent without leave, and he might as well have the money for apprehending them.

William Wills Cooper, landlord of the British Lion, Bayle, said: On Thursday the 3rd, in the afternoon, I went and saw the deceased. Two men having come to my house on at 3.40 on the Wednesday morning, I asked the deceased if he was one of them and he said “Yes”. I also asked him if he went to my mother's house in Dover Street, and he said he did. He did not say what he went for. He lifted his right arm and pointed to his left eye and said he had been knocked about by two soldiers.

Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper, a widow, living at 103, Dover Street, said: I knew the deceased, Robert Burley. On Wednesday morning, about twenty minutes past four o'clock, I was in bed. I heard someone come to the door and knock with their fist, and then try the latch. I opened the window and saw a man and asked “Who's there?” A voice replied “Oh, Mrs. Cooper, will you come down? I am nearly murdered”. I said “I don't know who you are; you had better go home”. I could not see who it was. He said “Thank you”, and left a few minutes after. I did not know who it was, nor do I now, except from what my son has told me. The man appeared to be sober, as far as I could judge.

Frank Martin, a waiter, living at 28, Harvey Street, said: About twenty minutes or a quarter to five on Wednesday morning last I was in bed and was aroused by hearing someone groaning. I got up, went down to the front door, and looked over into the area, and there saw the deceased. He was lying on his left side, with his arm underneath him, and his hat was about a foot and a half from his head. He was insensible. I called the assistance of my father-in-law and we got deceased into the passage. We sent for Dr. Mercer, and afterwards put deceased to bed. There was a slight scar on his left eyebrow but there was no blood on his face or any part of him that I could see.

Mary Ann Hayward, a single woman, living at 6, Queen Street, said: On New Year's Day I saw two artillerymen in the Belle Vue Inn. They told me they had been out all night, and strayed away from Dover. I told them if they did not go back they would be taken into custody. I and a friend treated them to beer, and bread and cheese, as they had no money. The short one, Jarvis, said he did not mean soldiering. They left me at half past eight on Tuesday night, when I gave them twopence to go home with. I saw them again on Wednesday morning in the Belle Vue Inn. They bid me good morning. I asked them why they did not go home, and they said they met the picquet out marching, and if they had gone further they would have been taken in. Jarvis said they were at the Raglan about half past eleven, and that they had knocked up against a policeman about three or four o'clock in the morning. The tall soldier pushed Jarvis, and motioned him to say nothing, and Jarvis laughed. They told me they were hungry and we got them some bread and cheese. About an hour afterwards I hear that a policeman had been ill-used. I asked Jarvis what he had been up to, and he got up and laughed and they both went out. One of them had told me previously that he meant murdering someone. He had had six months imprisonment and did not mean soldiering. He also said he had just had a fortnight's confinement.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said: On Wednesday morning between six and seven o'clock I was called to deceased in Harvey Road. I found him lying in the passage of the house, perfectly insensible. He had a small graze over the left eyebrow, which appeared to have been done some little time, as the blood was quite dry. I assisted to carry him to bed and saw him again at eleven o'clock, when he was quite conscious, but paralysed below the breast. I examined him and found a fracture of the spine between the shoulders. There were no other marks of violence whatever – no bruises or cuts. I asked the deceased how it occurred, and he said he had been spending the evening with some friends and came home about four in the morning. When he got on the doorstep his foot slipped and he fell over the wall into the area. I asked him if he was perfectly sober at the time, and he said “No, I had a little more than was good for me”. In consequence of the reports about deceased having been knocked about by soldiers I have today and yesterday again examined the body, and there are no marks of violence other than those I have described. He died yesterday morning, the cause of death being the fracture of the spine, which in my opinion was caused by the fall. Deceased knew the critical state he was in, as I told him he was mortally injured, and he made the statement to me after I had so informed him. It would have been utterly impossible for him to have got home if he had received the injury at the hands of the soldiers.

Superintendent Wilshere, who was called by request of a juryman, said no report was made to him of the constable having been attacked by soldiers, and he only heard of it accidentally. It was quite probable that he attempted to take the two men into custody as deserters. He would be doing his duty if he did so.

The Coroner said that although at first it seemed that deceased had been ill-treated, the evidence of Dr. Mercer showed that such ill-usage was not serious and did not in any way contribute to his death. Had the soldiers followed him, and had he fallen in endeavouring to escape from them, it would then have been a question whether they would not be liable to a charge of manslaughter.

The jury at once returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

It having been stated that the deceased, out of his very moderate pay, contributed towards the support of his parents, the jurymen gave their fees to be transmitted to the old couple.

 

 

Folkestone Express 13 August 1881.

Saturday, August 6th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, J. Clark and J. Holden Esqs.

Henry Clements, a jeweller's assistant, was charged with stealing a watch and chain, and 19 francs, the property of Mr. Dernbach, on the 31st July.

Prosecutor, who is bandmaster of the town band, and resides at Charlotte Terrace, said that he had known the prisoner for some weeks as a jeweller's assistant, working for Mr. Reich in Tontine Street. On Sunday, July 31st, he was at the Harvey Hotel, about eight o'clock in the evening. The prisoner was there when he went in. They conversed together, and he asked if he could give him a job, as he wished to earn a few shillings. He said “Yes” and gave him a watch to regild and clean, a chain to repair, 20 half francs, one franc, two francs and five franc pieces to make a necklace of. Prisoner said that he would do what witness required, and he was to return the watch and chain, and the coins made into a necklace on Thursday at the latest, but he did not do so. He enquired on the Thursday if the prisoner was in Folkestone and found that he was not, and in consequence of what he heard he issued a warrant for his apprehension. He identified the property produced as his; it's value, including the money, was 8.

Superintendent Rutter said that he received the warrant for the apprehension of the prisoner on Friday. Prisoner was taken to the police station about nine o'clock that evening by Hogben, and he told prisoner that he held a warrant for his apprehension. He cautioned him, and he said “All right, sir, I have got all that gentleman's property in my pocket”. He was then charged, and on searching him he found one metal watch, a chain, and eight francs in French money.

The Superintendent asked for a remand until Wednesday, which was granted.

Wednesday, August 10th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, General Cannon, Alderman Caister, A.M. Watkin and F. Boykett Esqs.

Henry Clements was brought up on remand, charged with converting to his own use a watch, metal chain, and other articles, with which he had been entrusted. The following further evidence was taken:

William Robinson, hairdresser, of St. John Street, said the prisoner on Monday week offered him a chain for sale. It was similar to that produced, but he did not examine it as he had no intention of buying it. He asked prisoner if he came by the chain honestly and he replied “Yes”, and asked if witness came by his money honestly.

The magistrates considered there was not sufficient evidence to justify a committal, and discharged the accused man.

 

Folkestone Express 15 December 1883.

Wednesday, December 12th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Samuel Barker was charged with obtaining a horse and cart by false pretences from William Swan.

Mr. Minter prosecuted, and Mr. Martin Mowll defended.

Prosecutor said he was a labourer, living at Postling, and on the 5th of December he owned a pony and cart. He came into Folkestone on that day, and put up at the New Inn. Had not seen the defendant previously. He saw him at the New Inn stables, and afterwards at the bar. Witness was going to “chop” his horse and cart with a man named Stone, and he was waiting for Stone to come. Defendant told him Stone would not come back, he told him “straight”, and it was no use his waiting. Between three and four o'clock he told defendant that he would sell the lot and go to work again. He said he wanted 7 for it. Baker said he would give 5. He refused to sell it for 5, but afterwards told the defendant he could have it for 5 5s. Defendant said he would have it, and if witness would go with him he would pay him. They went to the Harvey Inn, and defendant asked if someone was in. The landlord said “No”. Defendant then took 10s. out of his pocket and gave it to witness, saying he would go out and get the remainder. He told Baker he was not going to have the horse and cart without the money. He replied “O h, you needn't be afraid of your money. You come along with me”. They went together to a public house in Dover Street, where defendant said he could “get a bit of money”. He said he was the owner of houses, and had lots of property. Then they went to the Eagle Tavern, High Street, where defendant had a paper written out (two or three scraps of paper were put in). He told witness he would pay at ten o'clock the next morning. Witness still refused to let him have the horse and cart. In the presence of the landlord, Baker said he was the owner of houses, and believing that statement was true, he allowed him to take the horse and cart, and defendant promised to pay him at ten o'clock the next morning. Witness went to defendant's house at Foord at ten o'clock the next morning and saw defendant's wife, but defendant was not at home. He could neither find defendant nor his pony and cart. He searched about the town for him that day and the next, and then went to the police.

Cross-examined: I came to Folkestone with the intention of “chopping” the pony away with a man named Stone, a horse dealer, of Dover, whom I saw the day before. The 10s. was paid me at the Harvey, and the agreement was drawn up at the Eagle Tavern by the landlord. It was drawn up to show Baker would have to pay me 4 15s. on the next day. I made an entry in my pocket book. I saw the police on Thursday morning. A policeman told me I must summons him. I believe I told the policeman that Baker said he had property.

Re-examined: I should not have parted with the horse and cart if Baker had not said he was the owner of houses. I proposed to come to your office. Baker said you closed at four o'clock. The sergeant of police told him the character Baker bore.

Sergeant Ovenden said he had known Baker about ten years. Never heard of his having any house property. Could not say whether the furniture in his house belonged to him.

By the Court: Defendant is a dealer in ducks, horses, rags and bones, and bottles.

Mr. Minter asked the Bench to commit the prisoner for trial on the evidence.

Mr. Mowll contended that there had not been a prima facie case made out, but that on the contrary, the complainant, a dealer, sold his property to another dealer, and that there was not the slightest possible cause for saying the defendant had been guilty of a criminal act.

The Magistrates' Clerk said if the defendant did not intend to pay for the property, and if all those papers were a mere trick, then it was a case of larceny.

The Bench decided to commit the prisoner for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 12 January 1884.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, January 5th: Before W. Frederick Laxton Esq.

Samuel Baker was indicted for obtaining by false pretences a horse and cart and harness, value 5 5s., from Wm. Swan, at Folkestone on the 5th December. Mr. Denman prosecuted, and the prisoner was undefended. The case was heard so recently before the magistrates that it is only necessary now to give a summary of the evidence.

William Swan, a labourer, living at Postling, stated that he came into Folkestone on the 5th December and put up at the New Inn, where he expected to meet a man named Stone, who had arranged to buy his horse and cart. Stone did not come, but he saw Baker, who said Stone would not be back, and asked him what he wanted for the horse and cart. He asked 7. Prisoner said he would give him 5, but afterwards offered 5 5s. Prosecutor agreed to sell for that amount. They went together to the Harvey Hotel, where prisoner gave him 10s. He told him that he need not be afraid about his money – that he owned lots of houses round about there, and had plenty of money. He wanted prisoner to go to Mr. Minter's office and get an agreement drawn up. Prisoner replied “Mr. Minter shuts up at four o'clock”. They afterwards went to the Eagle Tavern, where the landlord wrote a memorandum in prosecutor's pocket book to the effect that prisoner would pay the balance at ten o'clock the next morning. He believed that prisoner was the owner of houses, or would not have consented to part with the horse and cart. The next morning at ten o'clock he returned to Folkestone, and went to prisoner's house at Foord. His wife said he had gone down town. The money was not there. He searched all round the town for prisoner, but could not find him. He never received the money, nor had he seen the horse and cart since. He gave information to the police.

In reply to prisoner, witness said he did not order Mr. Back to hand the horse over to him. Prisoner paid for the stabling. He went three times to his house on the 6th, and again on the following day, and delivered a bill. He told him not to pay his sister, but told prisoner's wife he would take part of the money and leave the rest for a week or two.

Sergeant Ovenden was called, and in reply to Mr. Denman he said he had known prisoner for about ten years as a dealer in bottles, rags and bones, &c., going round with a cart. Never heard that prisoner had any property.

In reply to prisoner, witness said he had never known him to be before the magistrates.

Prisoner alleged that he bought the horse and cart, paid a deposit, and agreed to pay the balance in a few days.

At the close of the case, the Deputy Recorder asked Mr. Glyn if he had no evidence to negative the statement by the prisoner that he had lots of houses. It was quite possible that he had property which the police sergeant knew nothing of.

Mr. Glyn replied that if it were true that the man had houses it would be very easy for him to rebut the charge of false pretences.

The Deputy Recorder said it was a question whether he ought not to withdraw the charge and direct the jury to return a verdict of Not Guilty. However, in deference to Mr. Glyn, he would allow the case to go to the jury. He then summed up strongly in the prisoner's favour, pointing out that it was possible the prisoner had property, and it was not necessary that it should be situated in Folkestone. They must be careful not to allow a Criminal Court to become a Court for collecting or enforcing the payment of debts, because the prosecutor could recover the balance of his money in the County Court. Further, he referred to the fact that the prisoner, who had been known to the police for ten years, had nothing against his character, and that, considering his avocation was that of a dealer, a class of men likely to be thrown into contact with the police, it was very much in his favour.

The jury, however, retired for a few minutes, and returned with a verdict of Guilty.

Two previous convictions at the East Kent Quarter Sessions were then proved against the prisoner, and it appeared that on that occasion there was a prior conviction. This was in July, 1873, and prisoner then went in the name of Henry George, and was sentenced to six months' hard labour.

Superintendent Taylor said he had known the prisoner two or three years, and had had repeated complaints about him. He associated with three or four other persons who frequented fairs and markets in the neighbourhood to get hold of weak-minded people to swindle them out of their goods in such a manner as to evade the criminal law.

The Deputy Recorder, in sentencing the prisoner, said the facts of the case as just stated were not known to him, and perhaps it was quite right that a judge should not know them until after the prisoner was convicted. But the jury had found him guilty after having carefully considered their verdict, which they had not arrived at hastily. There was no doubt that the countryman parted with his property on the faith of the misrepresentations he had made, and the law held that to be an offence. Unfortunately for the prisoner, that was not his first offence. He did not pay particular heed to the statements of Superintendent Taylor, but there was the record against him, that he was convicted at the East Kent Sessions in July, 1873, and there was a conviction, it appeared, previous to that, and he was sentenced to six months imprisonment. Therefore that was the third offence known against him. Of course such cases must be severely dealt with. It was an unfortunate thing for the prisoner's family, but the law must take it's course without contemplating what would be the effects on a man's family. He had consulted the magistrates on the Bench and they quite concurred that it was his duty to pass a sentence of twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour.

The Court then rose.

 

Folkestone News 12 January 1884.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, January 7th: Before W.F. Laxton Esq.

Samuel Baker was charged with on the 5th December obtaining by false pretences a horse and cart, value 5 5s., from William Swan, with intent to defraud. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Denman, who appeared on behalf of the prosecution, addressed the jury.

Mr. Swan was then examined, and said he was a labourer at Postling. On the 5th December he had a pony and cart, and brought them into Folkestone. He went to the New Inn with the intention of meeting a man of the name of Stone, about twelve o'clock. He saw the prisoner there, but he did not know him before. Prisoner said Stone would not be back that day. Witness told the prisoner he was waiting for Stone. Witness saw prisoner again in the afternoon, and told him he should sell the horse and cart and go to work again. Prisoner was then at the New Inn stables, and said he would buy the things. Witness said he wanted 7 for them, and prisoner said he should only give 5. Witness refused to sell them for that price, and he afterwards came to the agreement to sell them for five guineas, whereupon prisoner bought them and said “Come along with me, and I will get the money”. They then went to the Harvey Inn, and prisoner asked for someone, but the party was not there. Prisoner then gave witness 10s., but witness said he should not have the horse and cart without the money. They then went into a public house in Dover Street, and when they got into the street again prisoner said “You need not be afraid of me, for I am the owner of houses all round here”. Witness then wanted to go to Mr. Minter's office to get an agreement drawn up, but prisoner said Mr. Minter shut up his office at four o'clock, and that it was no use going there. They then went to the Eagle Tavern in High Street, where they had a paper written out by the landlord. Prisoner signed it, and witness wrote a line at the bottom saying “the remainder on the sixth”. Prisoner promised to pay the balance at ten o'clock the next morning. Witness then let the prisoner have the horse and cart as he believed prisoner was the owner of houses and property. If it had not been for that belief he would not have allowed prisoner to have the things. Witness went to prisoner's house next morning, but prisoner was out and had left no money. Witness went at ten o'clock, the time fixed for the payment of the balance. Witness went about the town to find him, and returned to prisoner's house again about twelve o'clock. Witness never got either the money or his horse and cart. Witness gave information to the police. Witness again went on Friday, two days afterwards, with the bill. Prisoner paid the stabling of the horse to Mr. Back.

In reply to prisoner, witness said defendant's wife told him the prisoner was gone to Dover to sell the cart. Witness told the prisoner's wife that he would take a part of the money, and leave the rest for a week or two if they did not cause him any trouble. Witness did not call at prisoner's house again. Prisoner asked if he should leave the money with his (witness's) sister, Mrs. Bisco, but witness told him not to pay anyone but himself. Witness said he should not call at the house again.

Sergeant Ovenden, on being sworn, said he had known the prisoner about ten years. He was a dealer, dealing in poultry, bottles, rags, bones, iron, and such things. Prisoner went about with a cart, and lived at 7, Castle Terrace, Foord. Witness never heard that he was the owner of property. Witness had no recollection of prisoner having been before the Folkestone Bench of Magistrates.

Prisoner then addressed the Court, and said he bought the things of Swan, paid him a deposit, agreeing to pay the remainder in a few days. On the following morning prisoner waited till the time when he had promised the money, a quarter to ten, and then went out to look for Swan. He meant to pay the money. He did not say he had property in the town.

The Judge then summed up the evidence, stating that he thought the charge of false pretences had not been fully proved.

The jury, after retiring for a short time, returned a verdict of Guilty.

The prisoner was then asked by the Clerk of the Peace if he were the same man as one Henry George, who was indicted at Canterbury in July, 1873, for larceny in regard to two offences.

The prisoner replied that he was.

Supt. Taylor stated that he wished to give evidence as to the prisoner's character, and on being sworn said he had known the prisoner for between two or three years, and had repeatedly had complaints made to him by persons whom prisoner and some others had swindled. They got people to part with their goods in such a manner as to evade the criminal law.

The Judge, addressing the prisoner, said unfortunately for him it was not the first offence he had committed. It was recorded against him that he was charged at the East Kent Quarter Sessions of the Peace, at Canterbury, in July, 1873, with two offences, and was sent to gaol for six months for each offence, therefore the present was the third offence known against him. He (the Judge) should sentence him to twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 November 1884.

Friday, November 28th: Before Gen. Armstrong C.B., and Alds. Banks and Hoad.

Charles Snelling was brought up in custody, charged with stealing a pair of slippers, the property of Mr. George Marsh, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, and was also charged with a gold mourning ring, the property of William Hart, barman of the hotel, of the value of 3 3s.

It appears from the evidence given that prisoner came to the hotel on the 20th inst., in the evening, where he had tea, and engaged a bed for the night, being served with a pair of slippers for his use. The next morning, on coming downstairs, he made an excuse that he was going to the bootmaker to have some trifling thing done to his boots, and walking out of the hotel with his slippers on, and without paying the bill. Subsequently it was found that a ring was missing from the pocket of a waistcoat belonging to Hart, which was in his room, and to which prisoner had opportunity on the morning in question of gaining access, and he had artfully contrived to substitute a worthless ring in it's place.

Information was given to the police, and the Superintendent contrived to trace prisoner to Faversham, where he discovered the ring had been pawned. It is conjectured that prisoner is one of a gang of swindlers and that his antecedents will not bear examination.

The Bench committed him for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 6 December 1884

Friday, November 28th: Before General Armstrong and Alderman Banks.

Charles Snelling was brought up and charged with stealing a pair of slippers, value 1s., the property of Mr. G. Marsh, of the Harvey Hotel.

Prosecutor, proprietor of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, said prisoner went to his hotel on Thursday evening, the 20th, and engaged a bed for the night. After he had had his tea he said he should not go out again, and was supplied with a pair of slippers. He afterwards left the house and took the slippers with him. He identified those produced as his property, and he valued them at 1s.

William Hart, manager at the Harvey Hotel, said he saw prisoner about six o'clock on Thursday in the bar parlour. About eleven o'clock he saw him wearing the slippers. He again saw him next morning between nine and ten o'clock. He then had his boots in his hand, and asked to be directed to a cobbler's shop. Witness directed him to Tontine Street, and he left the house wearing the slippers. He did not return, nor did he pay his bill.

Edwin Kelway, a lad, living at 40, Canterbury Road, a coffee house, said the prisoner went there on the 21st, early in the morning. He had some refreshments, and remained about an hour. Before he left he said he would leave the slippers till dinner time and would call for them again. The slippers were wrapped in a piece of brown paper, on which the name of Mr. Marsh, Harvey Hotel was written. Prisoner did not return for the slippers and they were given up to Supt. Taylor on Thursday evening.

Supt. Taylor said he received the prisoner at the police station at Faversham on Thursday. He told prisoner the charge, and prisoner replied “Very well. You will find the slippers at the Welcome Coffee House, Canterbury Road”. Prisoner was detained in custody by the Faversham police. Witness received the paper and slippers from Mrs. Kelway on Thursday evening.

Prisoner was then charged with stealing a gold ring, value 3, and a silk handkerchief, value 3s., the property of William Hart.

Prosecutor said the prisoner slept in a room at the Harvey Hotel, opposite to the room where he (witness) slept. Prisoner went upstairs about twenty minutes before witness. Witness's bedroom door was unlocked. He got up about a quarter to seven, and prisoner came downstairs about nine. He left the house between nine and ten. On the following Sunday witness missed a gold mourning ring which he had left in the pocket of his waistcoat, and a silk handkerchief from his coat pocket. The coat and waistcoat were hanging on a peg near his bed, and covered over. He found a common ring in the place of his ring. He identified the ring produced as his property. He knew it by a slight flaw in the glass. He bought the ring at Mr. Darley's for 3 10s. or 3 5s., and valued it at 3. The silk handkerchief was, he believed, one he missed from his coat, and it's value was 3s.

John Edward Allen, manager to Mr. Samuel Barnard, pawnbroker of Faversham, said the prisoner went to their shop between two and three on Monday afternoon last, and offered the ring produced in pledge, asking 5s. on it. He advanced him 5s. at first, and subsequently 3s. 6d. more. He asked prisoner how he came by the ring, and he said he bought it in Oxford Street, second hand. He said he gave either 25s. or 35s. for it, he forgot which. He gave the name of Thomas Stacey, 23, Maison Dieu Road, Dover. Prisoner was respectably dressed, and was not in the same apparel as he wore in court. Witness gave up the ring to Supt. Taylor.

Supt. Taylor said he received the ring produced from Mr. Allen, and the handkerchief from the Superintendent of police at Faversham. He charged the prisoner with stealing the articles, and he made no reply. Prisoner had lived in the borough, but had no fixed residence. That morning he showed the prisoner the common ring which was found in Mr. Hart's pocket and asked him if it belonged to him. He replied “Yes, that's mine”.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the Borough Quarter Sessions.

Supt. Taylor wished to draw the attention of the Bench to the action of Mr. Allen, through whose instrumentality the prisoner was arrested. On several occasions he had been of great assistance to the police.

General Armstrong commended Mr. Allen's conduct.

 

Folkestone News 6 December 1884.

Friday, November 28th: Before General Armstrong and Aldermen Banks and Hoad.

A young man giving the name of Charles Snelling was charged with stealing a pair of slippers, value 1s., the property of Mr. Marsh, proprietor of the Harvey Hotel, and a ring, value 3, and a silk handkerchief, value 3s., the property of Mr. Hart, the manager of the establishment, the articles being taken from the Harvey Hotel. The things belonging to the two owners were made the subject of separate charges.

From the evidence of Mr. Hart and Mr. Marsh and a lad named Kelway, it appeared that the prisoner went to the Harvey Hotel on Thursday evening, the 20th November, and engaged a bed for the night. He appeared to be a very respectable person, and the landlord lent him a pair of slippers. He slept in a room opposite Mr. Hart, who had hanging up in a cupboard, but not locked up, a coat and a vest, in the pockets of which respectively were a silk handkerchief and a ring. Mr. Hart rose and came downstairs before the prisoner. The next morning (Friday) Snelling asked to be directed to a cobbler's shop, and was told where to find one. He left the hotel without paying for his bed, etc., and did not come back again. On Sunday Mr. Hart found out that the ring and handkerchief had been taken. On the following Thursday, the prisoner went to the Welcome coffee house and had some refreshment. He there left Mr. Marsh's pair of slippers, saying he would call for them at dinner time. He did not come back, however, but, as it subsequently transpired, went to Faversham. The police having been made aware of the thefts, prisoner was detained at Faversham, and Superintendent Taylor proceeded thither and arrested him on the same day.

From the evidence of Mr. Allen, assistant to Mr. Barnard, pawnbroker at Faversham, it seemed that prisoner went and pawned the ring for 8s. 6d. He said that he bought it in Oxford Street for 25s. or 35s. (the witness could not remember which), that his name was Thomas Stacey, and that he lived at 23, Maison Dieu Road, Dover. The handkerchief Superintendent Taylor found upon him at Faversham Police Station. In Mr. Hats waistcoat, in the place of Mr. Hart's gold ring, had been left a very common and worthless ring. Superintendent Taylor showed this to prisoner, and said upon apprehending him “I am going to ask you a question. You need not answer it unless you like. Does this ring belong to you?” He replied “Yes, that's mine”.

The prisoner, who declined to say anything in his defence, was committed for trial at the next Borough Quarter Sessions.

Superintendent Taylor called the attention of the Bench to the fact that Mr. Allen had been of great assistance to the police in this case, it being mainly through that assistance that the man was apprehended. It was not the first time Mr. Allen had aided the police in the interests of justice.

The Bench suitably thanked Mr. Allen.

 

Folkestone News 5 December 1885.

Saturday, November 28th: Before The Mayor, Colonel De Crespigny, H.W. Poole and F. Boykett Esqs.

Henry Ealding was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Dover Road. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Woods said he was on duty in Dover Road about half an hour after midnight. He heard a great disturbance outside the Harvey Hotel. About fifteen people were gathered round the defendant in the middle of the road. He asked defendant what was the matter, and defendant told him to “go to ----“. He was in a very excited state and wanted to fight. He refused to go indoors and witness told him if he did not go in he should lock him up. Defendant was drunk and very excited. Defendant's wife was outside and said he had been ill-treating her and she refused to go indoors with the defendant.

Sergeant Pay said the defendant was very excited and drunk when taken to the police station.

A fine of 10s. and 3s. 6d. costs was imposed, or fourteen days.

Defendant said he would be sent to gaol for fourteen days.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 May 1888.

Local News.

A robbery of a somewhat extensive nature took place on Saturday night. It would appear that during the night the fowl house belonging to Mr. Marsh of the Harvey Hotel was broken into and great havoc made amongst the fowls. On Sunday morning nineteen fowls were found dead in the house and tied up in a sack, evidently having been killed and packed up ready for the thieves to carry away, but it supposed that they were disturbed. A lot was also left behind near the sack. Several robberies of a similar nature have been committed in the town during the past few weeks, but no clue has yet been obtained.

 

Folkestone Express 19 May 1888.

Local News.

On Saturday night the hen roost belonging to Mr. Marsh, of the Harvey Hotel, near the viaduct, was broken into, and 21 fowls killed. Nineteen were found dead in a sack, having been killed and left ready for carrying away. It would appear that the robbers were disturbed and made off in a hurry, a hat being left in the hen house. No clue has yet been discovered, but it is supposed that the thieves belong to a party who have perpetrated several similar robberies in the neighbourhood west of Folkestone during the past week or two.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 September 1893.

Local News.

We regret to announce the death of our fellow townsman, Mr. George Marsh, proprietor of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road. Deceased had been ailing for some months, and a short time since his illness took a serious turn, terminating fatally yesterday afternoon. Mr. Marsh was one of Folkestone's most respected tradesmen. He built the Harvey Hotel some thirty years ago, and with much energy reared a flourishing business. For many years the trademen's annual dinner was held at this hostelry, and often at those festive gatherings have the Mayors for the time being congratulated the proprietor on the exemplary manner in which his trade has been carried on. Our old friend was a typical English gentleman, a loyal citizen, and a true friend. To his bereaved widow and grown up children we tender our respectful and heartfelt sympathy.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 6 September 1893.

En Passant.

The death of Mr. George Marsh, of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, occurred, after a few days' illness, on Friday last. The deceased, who was much respected, was 63 years of age, and was a native of Ash. He came to Folkestone about 36 years ago, and was for some years on the staff of the Pavilion Hotel, where he superintended the repairs and similar arrangements. He built the Harvey Hotel about 30 years since, and from that time has presided as it's landlord, providing himself with a genial and courteous boniface, and at his death he was the oldest licensed victualler in Folkestone. He was attended in his illness by Dr. F. Eastes, the family doctor. The bell of St. Michael's, of which Mr. Marsh was a parishioner, was tolled on his demise. The funeral will take place this (Wednesday) afternoon.

 

Folkestone Express 9 September 1893.

Local News.

A large number of old friends will hear with regret of the death of Mr. George Marsh, proprietor of the Harvey Hotel, who had been for a long time in bad health, but who at last passed away somewhat suddenly on Friday last. The deceased was 63. The funeral took place on Wednesday, when upwards of of the deceased's relatives and more intimate acquaintances followed in carriages, and a very much larger number were present at the cemetery. The coffin of polished oak was covered in beautiful wreaths and crosses, sent as tokens of sympathy with the deceased's widow and family. Mr. John Newman, a very old friend of Mr. Marsh's was the undertaker, and the Rev. E. Husband conducted the funeral service.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 September 1893.

Local News.

Not many hours had elapsed since the Town Hall was occupied by a gay and brilliant company who were enjoying the pleasures of the terpsichorean art, when a gathering of a very different nature took place within it's walls at eleven o'clock on Wednesday morning. In the short space which had elapsed the Hall had been denuded of all it's tasty decorations and luxurious appointments, and had put on it's everyday appearance for the transaction of the business of the Special Licensing Session, which had been appointed for the purpose of dealing with the licenses to which notice of opposition had been given by the police.

At the end of the Hall, backed by high red baize screens, raised seats had been arranged for the accommodation of the Licensing Justices. Here at eleven o'clock the chair was taken by Mr. J. Clark, ho was accompanied on the Bench by Alderman Pledge, Messrs. Holden, Hoad, Fitness, Davey, Poole, and Herbert.

Immediately in front of the Bench were tables for the accommodation of Counsel and other members of the legal profession, while in close proximity were seats for Borough Magistrates who were not members of the Licensing Committee, and for the brewers and agents interested in the cases that were to occupy the attention of the Bench. The body of the Hall was well filled with members of the trade and the general public, whilst there was quite an array of members of the police force who were present to give evidence.

The Harvey Hotel.

The first matter to occupy attention was a formal application by Mr. Minter for temporary authority to be granted to Mrs. Margaret Marsh, widow of the late Mr. George Marsh, to sell at the Harvey Hotel, and this was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 16 September 1893.

Adjourned Licensing Session.

The special sitting for the hearing of those applications for renewals to which the Superintendent of Police had give notice of opposition was held on Wednesday. The Magistrates present were Messrs. J. Clark, J. Hoad, W.H. Poole, W.G. Herbert, J. Fitness, J.R. Davy, J. Holden, C.J. Pursey and J. Pledge.

Mr. Lewis Glyn and Mr. Bodkin supported the applications on behalf of the owners, instructed by Messrs. Mowll and Mowll, with whom were Mr. Minter, Mr. F. Hall, and Mr. Mercer (Canterbury), and Mr. Montagu Bradley (Dover) opposed on behalf of the Good Templars.

Before the business commenced, Mr. Bradley handed to Mr. Holden a document, which he carefully perused, and then handed to Mr. J. Clark, the Chairman.

Mr. Glyn, who appeared for the applicants, speaking in a very low tone, made an application to the Bench, the effect of which was understood to be that the Justices should retire to consider the document. The Justices did retire, and on their return Mr. Holden was not among them.

The Harvey Hotel.

Temporary authority was given to Mrs. Marsh, widow of George Marsh, late of the Harvey Hotel, to sell until the next transfer day.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 December 1896.

Wednesday, December 9th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. J. Fitness, and General Gwyn.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred to Mr. Richard Marsh.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 January 1898.

Local News.

The Harvey Hotel: This hotel, so long carried on by Messrs. Marsh, and one of the few free houses in Folkestone, has, we learn, been sold to Messrs. Nalder and Collyer, of Croydon, for a very large sum.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 August 1898.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before Messrs. J. Pledge, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey.

Mr. Brooker was granted the transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 August 1898.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday licence was granted to Mr. Brooker, Harvey Hotel.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 6 August 1898.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before J. Pledge, W.C. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey esqs.

Transfer was sanctioned to Mr. Hand (temporary), Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, and Mr. Brooker (permanent), Harvey Hotel.

Note: No mention of Hand in More Bastions.

 

Hythe Reporter 13 August 1898

Folkestone Police Court.

At the sitting of the Bench of Magistrates last Wednesday, the following licence was transferred:

Mr. Hand applied for a formal transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel. Mr. J. Brooker, of Crawley Down, was granted temporary authority to sell at the same house.

Note: No mention of Hand in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 September 1898.

Wednesday, September 14th: Before Messrs. J. Banks, J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey.

Mr. Brooker was granted the transfer of the Harvey Hotel.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 September 1898.

Police Court Record.

On Wednesday transfer was granted to Mr. Brooker, Harvey Hotel.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 17 September 1898.

Wednesday, September 14th: Before Ald. Banks, J. Fitness, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

Transfer was made to Mr. Brooker, Harvey Hotel, Dover Road.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 5 November 1898.

Local News.

Folkestone people were considerably disturbed yesterday (Friday) afternoon at the news, which spread rapidly, that Mr. William Newman Hart, of 2, Harvey Street, had been found dead in bed about 11 o'clock in the morning. The case on enquiry proved far more sad than was at first imagined. The supposition was that Mr. Hart, who was well known as sub-manager of the Harvey Hotel, in Dover Road, had died in an apoplectic fit, to which ailment he was subject. The truth, however, it was evident, was that he had committed suicide. He had been serving in the bar of the Harvey overnight, and then exhibited unusual cheerfulness. As he did not come down in the morning, his room was eventually broken into, when his body was found, in night attire, lying beside the bed, his throat cut deep, and a razor lying beside him. At the side of the bed was a washstand basin, nearly filled with blood. He had cut his throat and leaned over the basin until nearly exhausted, and had then pulled himself on his back to die.

Mr. art lost his wife nearly two years ago, and had since displayed occasional despondency. Recently, however, he became engaged to a Miss Brooker, his niece, a young lady living in Croydon, and the marriage was fixed for November 14th. In the room was found a letter addressed to Miss Brooker, couched in affectionate terms, and expressing a regret that he felt sure he would never be able to keep her as became her station in life, and that he had therefore decided to die at once rather than engage in a life of hardship.

The deceased was in age a few years over 40. He was much respected in Folkestone, where he acted as election agent for Sir Israel Hart at the last Parliamentary Election, and the news of his death caused much sadness in the town. His father was confined in a lunatic asylum, and it is believed that insanity was hereditary with him, and that the death of his wife, which in itself was peculiar and sad, was so vividly recalled by his approaching marriage so as to unhinge his mind.

Inquest.

Mr. Minter (Coroner) held the inquest yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

Mr. Fred Pearson, of 6, Harvey Street, said that deceased lodged in Great Harvey Street, and was a barman out of employment.

Mr. Spendlow, father-in-law, said he went up to the bedroom at twelve o'clock that morning, and found the door locked. With a screwdriver and some keys he burst the door open, and found the man dead on the bed, with his throat cut, and a bowl in the room containing blood. The man was quite dead. He gave information to the authorities at once.

Mary Spendlow, mother-in-law of the deceased, said that deceased went out on Thursday night at seven o'clock, and returned at 11.15, his usual time. He occupied the front bedroom, first floor. She had left his supper waiting in the kitchen. Witness was in bed, but heard him go to supper, and afterwards up to his room. She did not hear him lock his door, but found it locked from the inside in the morning. Deceased was forty eight years old, and had been the husband of her daughter, who died eighteen months ago. She and deceased were alone in the house overnight. She went to his room and knocked at nine a.m., getting no answer. She went up again between ten and eleven, and then concluded that he had had a fit, to which he was subject. She then decided to get the door open, and this her husband did. Her husband and Mr. Fred Pearson opened the door. Deceased had been depressed and dull for some time, rarely talking. She did not know of any troubles the man had. He had no property that she knew of, except the furniture in his room. He suffered much from pains in his feet. She never heard him talk of committing suicide. As a rule he was an early riser. She knew no reason why he should commit suicide.

Dr. James William Thornton Gilbert said he was called to see deceased that forenoon a little after twelve, and found the body lying at the left hand side of the bed, on the floor, with a large gash in the throat. A razor was on the floor. The body was cold, and rigor mortis had set in. He had been dead four or five hours, and death resulted from haemorrhage following the injuries inflicted with the razor, no doubt by himself. The act was committed with the right hand, and the cut was from left to right, very deep. Witness had frequently attended deceased for pains in the body and feet. He was a big man, used to taking stimulants. The act was apparently premeditated. He had laid on the bed, and had got out again, and had kept a small lamp alight till it burnt out. He had been kneeling over the basin, which was canted up to catch the blood, and, when exhausted, had rolled over on to his side. In the room was found a letter (which the Coroner would not read).

The Coroner: This is evidently a letter written to an acquaintance of his.

The Doctor: That is the girl he was engaged to.

The Coroner: Stop, doctor. Stop a minute. You don't know any more than I do, except what you have been told. In this letter he is complaining of pain which he is suffering in his feet, and which he says is terrible. He feels like going mad, and he has concealed it for a long time, and he asks to be forgiven, and makes a kind of will, leaving everything belonging to him to someone not in this town, whom it is not necessary to name, evidently showing he contemplated the act, and finished with the words to the person “Good Bye”.

Mr. Chadwick, Coroner's Officer, produced a gold watch and chain, three knives, and silver watch belonging to his late wife. These were found in deceased's clothes.

His mother-in-law, re-called, said his father died in a lunatic asylum.

Verdict “Temporarily Insane”.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 November 1898.

Inquest.

Yesterday (Friday) afternoon the Borough Coroner (Mr. John Minter) held an inquest at the Town Hall, touching the death of William Newman Hart, aged 48, a barman, who was found lying in his bedroom with his throat cut about 12 o'clock yesterday. The jury went to No. 8, Harvey Street to view the body. The evidence taken was as follows:-

Frederick Reason deposed that he lived at 6, Harvey Street, and was apprenticed to a carpenter. He knew the deceased. He identified the body viewed by the jury as that of William Newman Hart. Deceased lodged at 8, Harvey Street. Mr. Spindlow was the deceased's father-in-law. That day at 10 minutes to 12, witness was called by Mrs. Spindlow. He went upstairs and found deceased in a room, locked. He called “Mr. Hart”, and then got some tools and keys. He got the door open, taking the stopper off. On entering the room he found the deceased lying in the position in which the body was when the jury had seen it. Deceased was dead. He had his throat cut. The bowl containing blood was in the same position as it was then. Witness gave information.

Mrs. Mary Spindlow deposed that she was the wife of Thomas Spindlow, and lived at 8, Harvey Street. Deceased lodged with her. His wife had been dead, she thought, for about 18 months. Deceased was 48 years old. He was a manager, or barman, but had been out of employment. He went out the previous day, Thursday, about his usual time. He came in at a quarter past eleven. He occupied the front bedroom, first floor. When he came in witness was in bed. She was in the back room on the first floor. She was sure it was deceased because she knew his footsteps. He went into the kitchen and had his supper, remaining down two or three minutes. He afterwards went into his bedroom. Witness did not hear him lock his door, but it was found locked next morning. She got up next morning, but saw nothing of the deceased. She went up and called him at 9 o'clock. She went again at 10, but could not make him hear. She rattled the door. She thought he had had a fit. She went again at 11 o'clock and rattled the door, but could not again make him answer. She kept waiting, thinking he would get up. Her husband rattled the door. They got alarmed and had the witness Reason in. He opened the door. The deceased was in the habit of having fits, and had been suffering from diabetes. He had seemed strange, and had not talked much. She did not know if he had troubles. She had never heard him talking about committing suicide. He had been suffering with his feet a long time. She did not know what it was. She knew no reason why he should have committed this sad act.

By a juryman: Deceased let himself in with his latchkey. She never heard him after half past twelve in the night.

Dr. James William T. Gilbert, practicing in Folkestone, deposed that he was called that morning to 8, Harvey Street, and found the body of the deceased lying on the left hand side of the bed on the floor. He had a terrific gash in his throat. There was a razor on the floor. The man was dead. He had been dead some considerable time. The cause of death was haemorrhage from the injuries to his throat, which were no doubt inflicted with the razor produced. In his opinion the act was committed by the deceased using his right hand, the cut being from left to right. The gash was very deep, and had severed all the important structures. He had attended the deceased on divers occasions. The basin was in the same position with the blood in it. The act was apparently premeditated. Deceased's bed had been laid on. In witness' opinion the man took the basin and razor and committed the act while in a kneeling position, and then rolled over. The basin was tilted up so as to catch the blood. Afterwards he came across the document produced.

The Coroner said it was a letter written to a person, complaining of the pain he was suffering from his feet, and which he said was horrible. He felt like going mad, and he had concealed for a long time the dreadful pain he had had. He asked to be forgiven for going before, and made a kind of will. It was not necessary to mention the person's name. Evidently, by this letter, he showed that he was contemplating doing what he did. What little things he had were to pay debts he had. He said “Goodbye”.

Mrs. Spindlow said that there was insanity in the family. His father had been in a lunatic asylum.

Mr. Edwin J. Chadwick, the Coroner's Officer, deposed that he had searched and found a gold watch and chain, a box containing gold cuff links, a sliver watch and steel chain (Mrs. Spindlow said the latter belonged to the deceased's wife), a ring, on which were his initials, a latchkey, three knives, 12s. in silver, seven pence in bronze, and a card case. The razor was on the floor.

The jury, in their verdict, found that the deceased committed suicide whilst temporarily insane.

 

Folkestone Express 22 July 1899.

Monday, July 17th: Before The Mayor, J. Banks, C.J. Pursey and W. Wightwick Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Walter James Davis and Christopher Lumley, excursionists, were charged with being drunk and disorderly, and Lumley was further charged with assaulting the police.

P.C. Johnson said at 1.45 on Saturday afternoon he was in the Dover Road and saw the prisoner Davis with his jacket off fighting another man. He went to him several times and asked him to go away, but he refused. Lumley all the time was egging him on to fight. They were both very drunk and both using very obscene language. There was a crowd of 50 or 60 people round them. When he arrested Davis, Lumley ran at him, struck at him and knocked him down. Witness and three or four more constables were severely mobbed by a crowd of excursionists. With the assistance of civilians prisoners were brought to the station.

P.C. Stannage said on Saturday afternoon he was called to the Harvey Hotel by the landlord to eject several excursionists who were creating a disturbance. With the assistance of other constables they did so. Lumley was outside using most filthy language. He saw Lumley strike Johnson.

The prisoner Lumley said on Saturday he had done a thing he had never done before – he took some drink. What he did he did in self-defence. Davis said he was very sorry. He wasn't quite himself at the time.

The Bench fined the defendants 20s. and 4s. 6d. costs for each offence, or in default 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 July 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Monday, Walter James Davies and Christopher Lumley were charged with being drunk and disorderly on the previous Saturday.

P.C. George W. Johnson deposed: At 1.45 p.m., on Saturday, the 15th inst., I was in Dover Road. I saw Davies, jacket off, fighting with another man. I went to him several times and asked him to go away, but he refused to do so. Lumley said “Never mind the policeman. You have a go”. They were both drunk, making use of obscene language. They caused about 50 or 60 people to collect. I took Davies into custody, and at the same time Lumley struck me in the back of the neck with his fist. He said “You don't lock him up”. I was knocked down on the path, my trousers being torn across the knee. With two or three other constables, we were mobbed by about twenty excursionists. These men are excursionists. I brought Davis to the police station with the assistance of civilians. Lumley was brought by P.C. Stannage and others.

P.C. Stannage deposed: On Saturday afternoon last I was called to the Harvey Hotel to eject men who were making a disturbance. Lumley was drunk and used filthy language. He refused to go away, and with assistance I brought him to the police station. Davis struck Johnson on the back of the head.

P.C. Johnson said Lumley was the one that struck him. He thought the witness had made a mistake.

Davies said that there were two separate parties. Someone wanted to fight, and he acted in self-defence. He did not see his way to leave.

Lumley said that he was trying to stop the other men from fighting.

The Bench took a lenient view, it being a first offence. The defendants were fined 20s. and 4s. 6d. costs for each offence, or 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 9 December 1899.

Wednesday, December 6th: Before J. Hoad, J. Holden, and J. Pledge Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Sydney Henry Cross was granted a transfer of licence for the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 December 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday transfer was granted to Mr. S.H. Cross, Harvey Hotel.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 15 December 1900.

Saturday, December 8th: Before J. Stainer Esq., and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

Mr. Cross, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, applied for an extension of time on Wednesday, on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Prussian Hermits. It was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 December 1900.

Saturday, December 8th: Before Mr. J. Stainer and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Mr. Cross, the landlord of the Harvey Hotel, applied for and was granted an hour's extension on the evening of Wednesday, the 12th inst., on the occasion of a dinner.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 March 1901.

We Hear.

That on Wednesday afternoon, Mr. Sidney Cross, the landlord of the Harvey Hotel, met with a very serious accident. He was riding near the Pleasure Gardens Theatre when the horse became restive, plunged on to a wood crossing, slipped, reared, and fell upon its rider, who was picked up unconscious and taken into the theatre, where Dr. Murray attended to the injuries. In the meantime, the police with an ambulance were summoned, and the injured man was removed to the Victoria Hospital without delay. Upon an examination, the house surgeon pronounced the case as one of concussion of the brain.

On the Thursday morning, Mr. Cross was removed to his home, being considered out of danger, but still in a very weak state. On going to pres we are informed that the patient is progressing favourably, although at times he relapses into unconsciousness.

 

Folkestone Express 7 December 1901.

Saturday, November 30th: Before Alderman S. Penfold, Alderman G. Spurgen, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Col. W.K. Westropp, and W.C. Carpenter, J. Stainer, and G. Peden Esqs.

Mr. Sidney Cross, of the Harvey Hotel, applied for an extension of time till 12 o'clock on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Post Office employees on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Express 22 March 1902.

Tuesday, March 18th: Before E.T. Ward and G. Peden Esqs., Aldermen Geo. Spurgen and T.J. Vaughan, and Colonel W.K. Westropp.

Alfred Weller pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly on the previous evening in Harvey Street.

P.C. Thomas D. Sales said he was in plain clothes on Monday evening about 8.20 o'clock, when he heard an altercation in the private bar of the Harvey Hotel. The prisoner was very abusive to the landlord, and witness had to assist Mr. Cross to eject him, and he continued his bad language towards witness.

Mr. Bradley: Did he cause a crowd to assemble? – There was a crowd of about a couple of dozen.

The Bench inflicted a fine of 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 20 December 1902.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Messrs. Wightwick, Swoffer, and Herbert, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The following transfer of wine, beer, and spirit licences was granted: The Harvey Hotel to Mr. W. Keates.

 

Folkestone Express 20 December 1902.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

A transfer of licence was granted to Mr. Keates, who formerly kept a licensed house at Great Yarmouth, in respect to the Harvey Hotel.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 December 1902.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before Alderman Banks, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Messrs. Herbert, Wightwick, and Swoffer.

This was a special sessions for the transfer of licences.

Mr. William Keates applied for the transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel. He had been granted a temporary licence at a previous Court. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 March 1903.

We Hear.

That Mr. T. Keates, of the Harvey Hotel, applied for an occasional licence to serve intoxicating liquors on the football ground during the Semi Final in the Kent Cup. The application was based on the ground that there would be between 2,000 and 3,000 spectators present, and that the Kent Executive had ordered that there should be no re-admission to the ground at half-time.

Chief Constable Reeve said that this was the first application of the sort, and he must oppose it, as it was not unreasonable for a man to go without drink for two hours at the most.

Mr. Stainer, one of the Magistrates, said he also opposed it, and was met with the curt reply from the Chairman (Mr. Wightwick) “Oh! You always oppose anything”. Upon this, the teetotal Magistrate subsided.

It subsequently transpired that the Magistrates by a majority would have granted the licence, but that as it was opposed by the Chief Constable, the Bench, to support his authority, refused it.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 March 1903.

Friday 20th March: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, J. Pledge, W.C. Carpenter, and Lieut. Colonels Hamilton and Westropp.

Mr. Keates, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, applied for a licence to sell liquors on the football ground from two till six o'clock during the afternoon of Saturday (today), on the occasion of the Semi Final tie of the Cup competition.

The Chief Constable said that seeing that the football match would not last for more than two hours, he did not think a licence was necessary, and he strongly objected to it.

Mr. Stainer: I strongly object to it, too.

Mr. Wightwick: Oh! You object to everything.

Colonel Westropp remarked that he would be inclined to grant it were it not for the Chief Constable's objection.

The Chief Constable: People will be coming from Ashford, and there will be plenty of facilities for their getting drink in the town.

Mr. Stainer: If you grant it now, you will have to grant it every Saturday.

The Bench refused the application.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 April 1903.

Monday, April 13th: Before The Mayor, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and Messrs. S. Penfold, E.T. Ward, G. Peden, J. Stainer, G. Spurgen, T.J. Vaughan, and W.C. Carpenter.

Walter John Prior, who had been in custody since Saturday afternoon, was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and further with assaulting P.C. Watson.

P.C. Watson said about 3.05 on Saturday afternoon he went to the Harvey Hotel, where he found the prisoner, who was drunk. The landlord had refused to serve him and requested him to leave the premises. Prisoner would not go away, and at the landlord's request witness ejected him. About 3.20 witness again saw accused at the Brewery Tap. The landlord told the man he would not get any beer there, and at the landlord's request witness ejected him from that house. Accused then became violent and bit witness on the finger of his left hand. The man continued to be violent, and with the assistance of P.C.s Rue and Kettle he was placed on a truck and conveyed to the police station.

Prisoner said that he had served in South Africa for 16 months with the Yeomanry and met some old friends and had a drink. A very little had upset him. He had had only two pints. He did not remember the assault. He must have been mad.

The Bench told prisoner that this ought to be a warning to him. The Bench were going to be very lenient; he would be fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs in each case, or in default seven days'.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 May 1903.

Wednesday, April 29th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert and G.I. Swoffer.

Harry Crow was charged with stealing a zither harp, tuning key, and music book, the property of Edwin Reynolds.

Prosecutor gave his name as Henry Reynolds, a musical instrument maker, of Blackburn, residing temporarily at No. 26, Darby Road. The prisoner, who was a porter at the Harvey Hotel, was engaged by him on the previous day to go to the Junction and fetch 25 zither harps. Prisoner placed the instruments on a barrow. Witness made a call at the Swan Hotel, sold one of the harps, and then instructed prisoner to take the remainder to 26. Darby Road. Witness returned to that address at 6 p.m., and found that one of the instruments and its case was missing, He made enquiries at the Harvey Hotel, and at prisoner's lodgings, and subsequently gave information to the police. At 10.30 he went to the police station, and was there shown the instrument (produced), which he identified. He did not give prisoner the instrument.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said that at 10.05 p.m. on Tuesday he visited 21, St. Michael's Square, where he found the prisoner in bed asleep. Witness roused him, and said “Mr. Reynolds, who employed you today, has missed a zither harp”. Witness noted a cardboard box under the bed. This he opened, and found it to contain the instrument, a tuning key, and music book (produced). Upon being charged, prisoner replied “Mr. Reynolds gave me 4s. 6d., and he gave me the instrument”.

Prisoner's first explanation was that “the gentleman gave him the instrument as he had no money”, but on being charged he pleaded Not Guilty, and said that “the gentleman told him he could have one of the instruments and pay for it next day”.

Chief Constable Reeve said there was no previous conviction against the accused, but he (the speaker) had previously received a complaint from a gentleman who sent prisoner out to get change for a sovereign. Prisoner forgot to return.

The Chairman said prosecutor having paid the accused 4s. 6d., it was not likely that he would have given him the harp, which the Bench believed the accused stole. He would be sentenced to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 May 1903.

Wednesday, April 29th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, G.I. Swoffer, W.G. Herbert, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Harry Crow, an hotel porter, was charged with stealing a zither harp, two thumb rings, a tuning key, a harp tutor, and a strap, value 25s., the property of Arthur Reynolds, 12, Calder Street,, Blackburn, ancs.

Prosecutor, a musical instrument dealer, who was temporarily residing at 26, Darby Road, said that about half past three the previous afternoon, he had occasion to hire the services of prisoner as porter in carrying 25 zither harps on a barrow from the Junction Hotel. A call was made at the Swan Inn, and prisoner was then instructed to take the instruments to 26, Darby Road. For this he was paid 4s. 6d. When witness returned to that address about six o'clock, he counted the harps, and found that one was missing. He gave information to the police.

Detective Burniston stated that on the previous night he went to 21, St. Michael's Square, where he found the prisoner in bed asleep. Witness roused him and questioned him as to the disappearance of the harp. While doing so, he saw a cardboard box (produced) under the bed, and on examining its contents, found the zither. Prisoner said that it had been given to him by Mr. Reynolds. At the station the remaining articles were found on the prisoner.

In defence, prisoner said “I had been working for the gentleman, and asked him if I could have one. He said “Yes, you can have one and pay me tomorrow”. That was in the Swan public house”.

The Chief Constable remarked that there were no previous convictions against prisoner, but a complaint had been received on one occasion of the prisoner forgetting to bring back the change of a sovereign which he had been sent to get.

The Bench sent the prisoner to Canterbury Gaol for one month, with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 July 1903.

Monday, July 13th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Lieut. Col. Westropp, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Mr. W.C. Carpenter, and Mr. G. Peden.

Wm. Henry Miles, a tall, burly, red-headed navvy, who appeared in the dock in his shirt sleeves, was charged with being drunk and disorderly on Saturday night, and further with assaulting P.C. Sharpe and P.C. A. Ashby.

Miles pleaded Not Guilty, and said “What I done, I done in self-defence”.

P.C. Sharpe said: At 10.15 p.m. on Saturday I was on duty in plain clothes with P.C. H. Johnson. I heard someone blow a whistle, and proceeded to Dover Road, where I found prisoner and another man fighting outside the Harvey Hotel. The men were parted, and I informed the prisoner I was a police constable in plain clothes. He said “Oh, you're a ---- detective” and struck me violently in the mouth, causing blood to flow. Accused then kicked me in the head.

Mr. Bradley: How did he kick you in the head?

Witness: We were on the ground struggling. Prisoner kicked me several times. P.C. Ashby then came to my assistance, and helped me handcuff the prisoner, who kicked and struggled violently all the way to the station. We had to take his boots off.

Mr. Bradley (to prisoner): Have you any questions to ask the witness?

Prisoner: The other man came up and knocked me down. I did not know the man.

Mr. Bradley: That is not a question. You can make a statement afterwards.

P.C. J.A. Ashby said: At 10.15 on Saturday night I was on duty in Dover Road. I heard a whistle blow, and upon running in the direction of the sound I found the last witness struggling with the prisoner on the ground. Prisoner was drunk. I assisted to handcuff him, and on the way to the station, when opposite the Co-Operative Stores, prisoner said “Now I'll give you a ---- tying up”. He put his legs round mine, and we all three went to the ground. Whilst on the ground prisoner got my thumb in his mouth and severely bit it.

Mr. Bradley: Are there any marks now?

Witness: Yes, sir. (Continuing): Prisoner kicked out in all directions, and we had to cut his laces and take his boots off. While doing this, he caught me under the chin with his foot and sent me spinning, causing blood to flow from my mouth. When we got him a little further on, he said “I'll walk now”. We allowed him to do so, and he at once became still worse. We then had to tie his legs and carry him to the police station.

The prisoner: When we were all three on the ground, did not a gentleman say “You cruel things; let him get up. You cowardly things, kicking him on the ground”?

Witness: I did not hear that. I was kicked on the ground.

Prisoner: How could I kick you when there were two or three on top of me?

Mr. Bradley (to witness): Did you kick him in the stomach?

Witness (emphatically): No, sir.

Police Sergt. Osbourne said prisoner was brought to the station by two constables and an Artilleryman. Prisoner was drunk. Blood was coming from the mouth of Sharpe and from Ashby's thumb.

Prisoner hoped the Bench would be lenient as he had a wife and four children. If he had assaulted the police it was because he had been treated cruelly. They pinched his muscles, and his ribs were black and blue. The first witness also kicked him in the face.

Prisoner, continuing, said he “chucked” the constables over because of their rough treatment of him.

The Chairman said there was no doubt that prisoner had behaved disgracefully, and that he had assaulted the police most violently. The Bench were quite sure that the police did not attempt to handcuff people unless they resisted. People were not handcuffed for the fun of the thing. For being drunk prisoner would be fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days', and for the assaults on the police he would be fined 20s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days', in each case, the sentences to run consecutively.

Prisoner, having no money, went to Canterbury Gaol for the 35 days.

The Chief Constable said it might interest the Bench to know that prisoner had been convicted 27 times previously, six of them being for assaults upon the police.

The Chairman said the information would have been useful a few minutes earlier.

The explanation as to why the Chief Constable did not put in the convictions prior to the committal is that he could not legally do so, there being no official present to confirm and prove such convictions.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 July 1903.

Monday, July 12th: Before Aldermen G. Spurgen and T.J. Vaughan, Councillor Peden, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and Mr. W.C. Carpenter.

William Henry Miles was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Dover Road on Saturday night, and also with assaulting P.C.s Raynor Sharpe and James Ashby in the execution of their duty.

P.C. Sharpe stated that about 10.50 p.m. he was in Harbour Street, in company with P.C. Johnson, in plain clothes. On hearing a whistle blow they went into Dover Road, where he saw the prisoner and another man fighting opposite the Harvey Hotel. They parted the men, and witness told the prisoner he was a police constable. Accused said something and struck him a violent blow in the mouth with his fist, causing blood to flow. He then took prisoner into custody, whereupon he became very violent, and kicked witness on the head several times. P.C. Ashby then came to his assistance, and it became necessary to handcuff accused. Prisoner continued kicking and striking out on the way to the station, and they had to take his boots off. They got him to the police station and charged him with being drunk and disorderly and assaulting them.

P.C. Ashby said he saw the last witness struggling with prisoner, who was drunk, on the ground. He assisted to handcuff him, and when opposite the Co-Operative bakery Miles used obscene language, and putting his leg round that of witness, caused all three to fall to the ground. While on the ground prisoner severely but witness's thumb, at the same time kicking out in all directions. They cut his bootlaces and took off his boots. As this was being done he caught witness under the chin with his foot and sent him spinning, causing blood to flow from the mouth. They eventually had to tie his legs and carry him to the police station.

P.S. Osborne deposed on being on duty at the police station when prisoner was brought in by the last witness and a soldier in the Artillery. Blood was coming from Sharpe's mouth, and Ashby's thumb was bleeding.

In defence, prisoner said he was walking home, and said “Goodnight” to a man who was passing, when the man turned round and knocked him down. On rising he found a constable trying to handcuff him.

In fining prisoner 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, in default seven days' imprisonment for being drunk, and 20s. and 4s. 6d. costs, in default 14 days' hard labour in each case for assaulting the two constables, the Bench said there was no doubt that he did assault the police and was violent. Policemen did not handcuff men “just for the fun of the thing”.

 

Folkestone Express 28 May 1904.

Monday, May 23rd: Before Alderman J. Banks, W.G. Herbert and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Frederick William Collins, one of the crew of H.M.S. Pembroke, was charged with being drunk and disorderly on Saturday afternoon.

P.C. Smith stated that at 2.30 on Saturday he went to stop a fight at the Harvey Hotel. On arriving there he went into the saloon bar, where he saw the prisoner, another bluejacket, and a petty officer. The prisoner had blood on his hand, face, and cap. The landlord pointed o the prisoner as the cause of the disorder, and asked witness to eject him. Witness ejected him into Harvey Street, and he then tried to re-enter the hotel. Prisoner was drunk and refused to go away, and caused a crowd of about 150 people to assemble. He used very bad language, and with assistance was taken into custody.

Prisoner said he only had had five glasses of stout, and was not drunk. He got excited and “went mad”.

A fine of 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs was imposed.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 June 1904.

Wednesday, June 1st: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Col. Westropp, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Messrs. W.G. Herbert and G.I. Pursey.

Thomas Henry William Keates, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, was summoned for permitting drunkenness upon his licensed premises on the 21st of May. Mr. Keates, who was not at the Harvey Hotel on the day in question, pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. J. Minter conducted the defence.

P.C.s Smith and G. Johnston gave evidence as to a disturbance at the Harvey on the 21st of May, to visiting the saloon bar and finding a glass and a chair broken, the furniture disarranged, evidence of a struggle, and spots of blood on the floor. There had been a fracas with two blue jackets and a petty officer. One of the blue jackets, named Collins, refused to go away, and was ejected from the premises, and subsequently arrested and charged at the Court with drunkenness on the next morning, when he was convicted. Mrs. Keates, the constable said, told him that Collins came to the house about 11.15 and had only four or five glasses.

Sergt. Dawson swore that Collins was drunk and excited when brought to the police station.

Charles Henry Erry and Herbert Jones gave it as their opinion that Collins was drunk.

Inspector Swift said that from something he was told he visited the saloon of the Harvey Hotel shortly before three o'clock on the 21st of May. He found the furniture disarranged and spots of blood on the floor. Miss Keates was present, and witness said “What time did these men come in?”

Mr. Minter: I submit that this evidence is eminently unfair.

The Chairman: It is admissible.

Mr. Bradley (Magistrates' Clerk): You cannot exclude it.

Witness, continuing: Miss Keates replied “About 12 o'clock, I think. I did not see them come in; they were in here when I came in about 12.30”. Witness then saw Mrs. Keates, and said “Are you aware that one of the men who was here is locked up on a charge of being drunk?” She replied “He was not drunk; they only had four half-tankards of stout the whole of the time, and they had been here since 11 o'clock”. Miss Keates interrupted with “Not eleven. Mother”. Mrs. Keates then said “Well, it may have been half past then”. Upon being told that she might be charged with permitting, etc., Mrs. Keates replied “They were as sober as I am”.

Mr. Frederick reason saw Mrs. Keates eject a painter from the Harvey on the day in question. The lady subsequently ejected a blue jacket and sent for the police – in the meantime a brutal assault was committed, two blue jackets jumping upon a petty officer. The blue jacket was drunk and excited.

Mr. Minter termed the case as having been nicely dressed up. Defendant, who was not present, was responsible for the actions of his servants, who, however, said the men were not drunk, but excited. He (Mr. Minter) would also point out the serious consequence of a conviction to defendant, who had held the licensed premises for 18 years without a single complaint.

Henry Crow, potman at the Harvey, said the men came to the house on the 21st about twelve o'clock; they were under his observation the whole time. From 16 years' experience he would say they were decidedly not drunk. They were decidedly sober, and were only served with two glasses of stout each. They were served with a third, but did not consume it, as the scuffle commenced. A petty officer passed through the saloon bar and the blue jackets started fighting him. Witness got hold of Collins and got him outside the door, but the man slipped back. Witness then went for the police.

Alice Katherine Keates, daughter of defendant, corroborated. She swore to being in the bar all the time the men were present, and flatly denied that part of the conversation given by Inspector Swift as to the conversation with her mother.

Mrs. Keates was not called.

The Bench retired, and upon returning into Court, the Chairman said the majority of the Bench considered there was a doubt in the case and defendant would be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 4 June 1904.

Wednesday, June 1st: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut Colonel Westropp, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, C.J. Pursey and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Thomas Henry William Keates, the landlord of the Harvey Hotel, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises on May 21st. Mr. John Minter appeared on behalf of the defendant.

P.C. Smith said about 2.20 p.m. on May 21st he was called to the Harvey Hotel to stop a fight. On arriving there he went into the saloon bar, where he saw two blue-jackets and a petty officer. The petty officer's head was much battered, and his face was covered with blood. The officer left by a door leading to the interior of the bar. There had evidently been a severe struggle, as the marble top of a table lay on the floor broken. Some panes of glass were also broken, and other things were scattered about. The two blue-jackets were drunk, and they had blood on their hands, faces, caps, and clothes. He asked the landlady if she wished to prefer any charge against them, and she replied she only wanted them to go outside. He then ejected them, and they became disorderly. One of them, Collins, had to be taken to the police station by witness and P.C. Johnson. Witness later went to the hotel and saw Mrs. Keates. She said the blue-jackets were the cause of the trouble, and the attack was made upon the petty officer as he was going from the saloon bar to the rear of the premises. She said the sailors had been there since about 11.30 a.m., but they were not drunk. Since they had been in the hotel they had only had four half tankards of stout each.

Cross-examined, he said the potman called him to the house. He did not know the potman had put the sailor out before witness went. After witness had put them out the sailor (Collins) went into the house again. They persuaded both the sailors to go away, and one did so, going up the Dover Road.

P.C. Johnson corroborated, and further stated that in the saloon bar a glass window was broken, as well as a vase, and a chair and the furniture had been upset.

P.S. Dawson said when Collins was brought to the police station he was decidedly drunk.

Charles Henry Errey, 85, Dover Road, said he saw P.C. Smith turn the two blue-jackets out of the hotel. Collins, who was drunk, was also very disorderly, and he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined, he said both blue-jackets were decidedly “fresh”, but they might have been more drunk.

Herbert Jones, 97a, Dover Road, also said both blue-jackets were drunk.

Cross-examined, he said the man who was locked up had difficulty walking.

Inspector Swift said he went to the Harvey Hotel at three o'clock on May 21st. The saloon bar was in a disorderly state, He saw Miss Keates, and asked her what time the men went into the house.

Mr. Minter objected to the evidence being given, because it was not fair for the Inspector to go fishing for evidence. No caution was given to Miss Keates by the officer, and in his opinion it was not fair for the officer to repeat what she said.

Witness said Miss Keates told him that the men came in about twelve o'clock. He then saw Mrs. Keates, and told her that Collins had been locked up and charged with being drunk, and she replied “He was not drunk”. She said the men had only had four half tankards of stout since they went in about eleven o'clock. Miss Keates then said “Not eleven o'clock”, and her mother then stated it would be about half past when the men went in. She also said that the men were as sober as she was.

Frederick Reason also gave evidence. He said that Collins was excited by drink, but was not very drunk.

Cross-examined, he said Collins used beastly language outside the hotel.

Mr. Minter, on behalf of the defendant, said that when a person was charged with permitting drunkenness on licensed premises, it was for him, under the Act, to prove that he took all reasonable steps to prevent drunkenness. He was going to call eveidence that he did everything to prevent drunkenness. Even if the men were drunk, and were served with drink, it would not make the landlord liable to the charge which was now preferred against him. He would, however, be liable to a charge of selling drink to a drunken person. The daughter would be the person who gave evidence. Mr. Keates was away at the time, but of course e was responsible for the action of his servants. Defendant had been a licence holder for 18 years. He came to Folkestone with the highest character, and had never had a complaint made against him. It was a serious matter for him if he were convicted, for he would have to leave the house.

Frederick Crow said he was a potman at the Harvey Hotel. He was cleaning the windows in the public bar when three blue-jackets came in somewhere about twelve o'clock. They were sober, and called for three half tankards of stout. Shortly after they called for another three half tankards, and presently for another three, but they never drank the contents of the third, because the petty officer came into the roo and the fight began. He went for a policeman, and saw P.C. Smith, who told him to go for another. He saw P.C. Johnson, and they went back together. Collins was excited, but not drunk.

Miss Alice Kathleen Keates said she was the defendant's daughter. She was serving in the bar when the blue-jackets came in. She served them three times with a half tankard of stout each. When they went into the house they were quite sober.

Cross-examined, she said she was in the bar the whole time the blue-jackets were there. Her mother did not supply them with any drink. The blue-jackets were perfectly sober.

The Magistrates retired for a short time, and on their return into Court the Chairman said the majority of the Bench thought defendant ought to have the benefit of the doubt because the case was not fully made out. The case would therefore be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 June 1904.

Wednesday, June 1st: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. C.J. Pursey, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Thomas Henry William Keates, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises.

P.C. Smith stated that at 2.20 p.m. on the 21st ult. he was called to the Harvey Hotel to stop a fight. Arriving there he saw, in the saloon bar, two bluejackets and a petty officer. The latter's head was much battered, and his face was covered with blood. He immediately left by a door leading to the interior of the house. There had evidently been a severe struggle, as the top of a marble table lay on the floor broken; also some panes of coloured glass. Other things were scattered about. Two bluejackets were drunk, and had blood on their faces and clothing. He asked the landlady if she wished him to prefer any charge against them as to the damage, and she replied “No, I only want them outside”. He then ejected them into Harvey Street, where they became disorderly, one so much so that he had to be taken into custody. He returned to the Harvey Hotel, where he saw Mrs. Keates. She said the bluejackets were the cause of the trouble, and had attacked the petty officer as he was going through the saloon bar; that they were not drunk, and had only had a pint of stout each.

P.C. Johnson said he was in Dover Street on the day in question, when he was informed by the barman that there was a fight at the Harvey Hotel, the barman asking him to go and stop it. He went, and in Harvey Street saw the two bluejackets having an altercation. They were drunk. He advised them to go away, and acting on his advice one named Gardener went up Dover Road. The other, Collins, re-entered the Hotel by the saloon bar, and witness immediately ejected him. Outside Collins refused to go away, and he assisted the last witness to take him to the police station. He afterwards returned to the Harvey Hotel, where he noticed in the saloon bar a glass window, a vase, and a chair broken, and all the furniture upset, as though a struggle had taken place.

P.S. Osborne stated that he was on duty at the police station when Collins was brought in by the last two witnesses. He was drunk.

Inspector Swift deposed that shortly before three o'clock on the 21st May he went to the Harvey Hotel, where he saw P.C.s Johnson and Smith, and found the bar in the disorderly state described by them. Keates' daughter was in the bar, and in consequence of a statement the constable made to him in her presence, he said to her “What time did these men come in?”, referring to the sailors. She replied “About twelve o'clock, I think. I didn't see them come in; they were here when I came in at half past twelve”. He then saw Mrs. Keates, the landlady, and said to her, after she had explained to him about the fight, “Are you aware that one of these men has been locked up, charged with being drunk?” She replied “He was not drunk, for they only had four half tankards of stout the whole time”. He said to her “You may be prosecuted for permitting drunkenness on licensed premises”. She replied “They were as sober as I am”.

Frederick Reason stated that on the day in question his attention was called to the Harvey Hotel, where he saw Mrs. Keates eject a painter – a civilian. A minute or two afterwards he saw Mrs. Keates eject a bluejacket, but the bluejacket ran back into the bar again. Mrs. Keates then sent for the police. In the meantime he saw two bluejackets set on the petty officer, and treat him most brutally. They were excited by drink, and their actions were those of madmen.

Mr. Minter addressed the Bench for the defence. In doing so he argued that (under Section 4 of the Act) the defendant had taken all reasonable steps in his power to prevent drunkenness. Defendant was the last man in the world who would permit his house to be used by drunken people, or to serve drunken people.

Henry Crow, barman at the Harvey Hotel, and Miss Keates, the landlord's daughter, having given evidence in support of Mr. Minter's statement, the Bench retired.

After an absence of about ten minutes the Chairman announced that they had decided to give defendant the benefit of the doubt and the case would, therefore, be dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 16 July 1904.

Wednesday, July 13th: Before W.G. Herbert and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Mr. Minter, solicitor, made an application on behalf of Mr. T. Keates, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, in respect of closing a door between the hotel and an adjoining house. He stated that some years ago the cottage was taken in by Mr. Marsh, the then landlord, who added it to the hotel adjoining. The present landlord wished to have the door closed up, and the cottage restored to its original position.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 July 1904.

Wednesday, July 13th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and Mr. W.C. Carpenter.

Mr. J. Minter made an application under Section XI of the Licensing Act, 1900, which provided that no alteration should be made to licensed premises without the consent of the justices. Some years ago, he said, the house adjoining the Harvey Hotel was added to the hotel for additional accommodation. Now that was not required, and he asked permission to block up all the doors, so as to make it a separate building.

The application was allowed.

 

Folkestone Express 13 August 1904.

Wednesday, August 10th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and J. Stainer Esq.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was temporarily transferred from Mr. Keates to Mr. Edward Smith.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 August 1904.

Wednesday, August 10th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was temporarily transferred from Mr. Keates to Mr. Smith.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 September 1904.

Wednesday, August 31st: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred from Mr. T.G. Keates to Mr. E. Smith.

 

Folkestone Daily News 9 January 1907.

Wednesday, January 9th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Herbert, Linton, Leggett, and Swoffer.

An extension of one hour was granted to the landlord of the Harvey Hotel on the occasion of the Fire Brigade dinner.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 February 1907.

Tuesday, January 29th: Before The Mayor, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Leggett, and Messrs. R.J. Linton, G.I. Swoffer, T. Ames, and J. Stainer.

Mr. Smith was granted an extension of one hour for the Harvey Hotel for the following (Wednesday) evening on the occasion of the Co-operative Society's dinner.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 February 1908.

Friday, February 28th: Before Alderman J. Banks, Major Leggett, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, W.G. Herbert, and J. Stainer.

An extension of licence was granted as follows: extension to Mrs. Smith, Harvey Hotel, on Monday evening, for smoking concert by the employees of the Post Office.

 

Folkestone Express 30 May 1908.

Wednesday, May 27th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett. G. Boyd and C. Jenner Esqs.

Mr. G.W. Haines made an application on behalf of the executors of the late Mr. E. Smith for the transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, to the widow, Mrs. Smith.

The Chief Constable raised no objection and the transfer was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 May 1908.

Wednesday, May 27th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Councillor C. Jenner, Major Leggett, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Mr. G. Boyd.

Mr. W.G. Haines made an application on behalf of Mrs. Smith, widow of the late Mr. Edgar Smith, for the transfer to her of the licence of the Harvey Hotel. Granted.

 

Folkestone Express 1 May 1909.

Saturday, April 24th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

Frederick Crundall was charged with being drunk and disorderly the previous night. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Kennett said at 7.25 the previous evening he was in Dover Road, and when near the Harvey Hotel he saw a crowd of people. The prisoner was in the midst of them, with his coat off, and he was shouting that he was an old soldier and would fight the best man in the town. Witness asked him to go away several times, but he continued to use bad language. He also said he would go when he had smashed witness's jaw, and then they would not find him. The man was drunk.

Prisoner said he was quiet enough until a man interfered with him, and he then turned round to him.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner had not been there for nearly five years.

In default of paying a fine of 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, Crundall went down for seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 1 December 1909.

Wednesday, December 1st: Before Justices Herbert, Stainer, Leggett, Fynmore, Swoffer, and Linton.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred.

 

Folkestone Express 4 December 1909.

Wednesday, December 1st: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Major Leggett, and Messrs. J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and G.I. Swoffer.

On the application of Mr. G.W. Haines, authority was granted to Mrs. Killick in respect of the Harvey Hotel. The late tenant, Mrs. Mary Jane Smith, who held the licence, died on Nov. 3rd. Mrs. Killick, who was one of the executrixes, was an assistant to the late Mrs. Smith.

 

Folkestone Daily News 26 January 1910.

Wednesday, January 26th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Stainer, Leggett, Swoffer, and Linton.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred to Mr. Bassett, formerly of the Princess Royal, the justices dispensing with the formal attendance of the former tenant at the Annual Licensing Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 29 January 1910.

Wednesday, January 26th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G.I. Swoffer, and Major Leggett.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was temporarily transferred to Mr. Bassett.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 January 1910.

Wednesday, January 26th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, Messrs. J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred temporarily to Mr. Bassett.

 

Folkestone Daily News 23 February 1910.

Wednesday, February 23rd: Before Messrs. Herbert, Swoffer, Linton, Hamilton, and Stainer.

Application was made for the transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel to Mr. Bassett.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 26 February 1910.

Wednesday, February 23rd: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, amd Messrs. J. Stainer, G.I. Dwoffer, and R.J. Linton.

The following transfer was confirmed: The Harvey Hotel, from Mrs. Killick to Mr. C.S. Bassett.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 February 1910.

Wednesday, February 23rd: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Major E.T. Leggett, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred from Mrs. Killick to Mr. C.S. Bassett.

 

Folkestone Express 28 October 1911.

Tuesday, October 24th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Jenner, and R.G. Wood Esq.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was temporarily transferred from Mr. Bassett to Mr. Wyborn (sic).

 

Folkestone Herald 28 October 1911.

Thursday, October 26th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Jenner, and Councillor R.G. Wood.

A temporary transfer of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, from Mr. Bassett to Mr. Wyborne, was granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 30 November 1911.

Wednesday, November 29th: Before Messrs. Stainer, Linton and Leggett.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred.

 

Folkestone Express 2 December 1911.

Wednesday, November 29th: Before J. Stainer and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Major Leggett.

The following licence was transferred: Harvey Hotel, from Mr. Bassett to Mr. Whiteman (sic). Temporary authority had been granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 December 1911.

Wednesday, November 29th: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Major Leggett, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred from Mr. Bassett to Mr. Whiteman.

 

Folkestone Daily News 25 July 1912.

Thursday, July 25th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Chamier, Owen, Fynmore and Jenner.

A soldier named O'Brien, of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, was charged with obtaining 4 from Mr. Whiteman, of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, by means of a forged cheque.

Arthur James Whiteman, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, deposed that prisoner on the 2nd July came to his hotel. Witness knew the prisoner to be a soldier, and knew the man by the name of O'Brien. The cheque produced witness changed for the accused, which he examined and queried the alteration of the names of payee. The accused replied that the payee was a friend of his and could not get away from the Camp, and he wanted the money to pay for some goods supplied at the Camp. Witness believed him and passed the cheque through the National Provincial Bank. It was returned unpaid, marked “Endorsement irregular”. He made enquiries and gave information to the police.

Phillip Edward Kelly, a lieutenant from Shorncliffe Camp, deposed that accused was in his regiment. The cheque produced was an open one, with the amount to be filled in, which he had drawn to pay an account due to Taylor and Taylor, of the Bricklayers Arms, London, to whom his regiment was indebted. He handed the cheque to Lieutenant Wakefield. When Mr. Whiteman showed him the cheque it had been altered without his knowledge or authority, from Taylor & Taykor to Taylor O'Faylority.

Accused was remanded till Tuesday, July 30th.

 

Folkestone Express 27 July 1912.

Thursday, July 25th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Chas. Jenner Esq., and other Magistrates.

James Edward O'Brien, a private in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, was charged with forging and uttering a cheque for 4 7s. 10d., with intent to defraud Mr. Whiteman, of the Harvey Hotel, Folkestone.

Arthur James Whiteman, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, Folkestone, said on the 17th July, in the morning, the prisoner went to his hotel. He knew him as a frequenter of the house since last December, and knew him to be a soldier stationed at Shorncliffe Camp, by the name of O'Brien. On the 17th inst., when he went in, he saw the prisoner in the bar. He produced a cheque, and asked him to cash it. Knowing the prisoner, he examined the cheque and asked him about an alteration n it, and asked the prisoner who Faylority was, that being the name to whom the cheque was apparently payable. The endorsement was on the cheque at the time. O'Brien replied to the effect that he was a friend of his who could not get away from the Camp, and the money was required to pay an account for goods supplied on the Camp. He believed the prisoner's statement to be true, and he cashed the cheque for 4 7s. 10d. – the full amount. Subsequently he paid it into the National Provincial Bank, and it was returned endorsed “Endorsement irregular”. He gave information to the police.

Philip Edward Kelly, a lieutenant in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, said he knew the prisoner as a private in the battalion. Early in July he was indebted to Messrs. Taylor and Taylor, of Bricklayers Arms Station, on the stable account, of which he had charge. He drew the cheque produced in payment of Taylor and Taylor's account on the 6th July. The amount was left blank, as he did not know the actual amount due. He afterwards handed the cheque to Lieut. Wakefield, of the same regiment, with certain instructions. The last witness saw him on the 23rd about the matter. He noticed that the cheque drawn by him had been altered without his knowledge or authority. The alterations were the date from June 30th to July 16th,, and the names of the payees to R. O'Faylority, by crossing the initial letters, and making it read Faylor and by adding “ity” to the second name, making it Faylority. There had also been an alteration of the word “stable”, and, after witness's signature, the letters “Capt”.

The Chief Constable asked for a remand until next Tuesday, and it was granted.

Mr. Whiteman, re-called, said prisoner did not say how he came to be possessed of the cheque, and witness did not ask him.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 July 1912.

Local News.

On Thursday, before the Folkestone Borough Bench, Alderman T.J. Vaughan being in the chair, and the other Magistrates being Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Alderman C. Jenner, Colonel G.P. Owen, and Captain A.C. Chamier, James Ed. O'Brien, a private in the 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, stationed at Shorncliffe, was charged with forging and altering a cheque for 4 7s. 10d. with intent to defraud Arthur Jas. Whiteman.

Arthur James Whitemen, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, deposed that on Wednesday, July 17th, the prisoner came to his hotel in the morning. Witness had known him as a frequenter of the house and a soldier stationed at Shorncliffe since December last. He knew him by the name of O'Brien. Accused asked witness to cash a cheque. Witness identified the cheque produced as the one he received from prisoner. Witness called prisoner's attention to the alteration on the cheque, and asked him who O'Faylority was. This was the person to whom the cheque was apparently made payable. So far as witness remembered, prisoner replied to the effect that O'Faylority was a friend of prisoner, who could not get away from the Camp, and the money was wanted to pay an account for goods supplied on the Camp. Witness cashed the cheque, believing the prisoner's representations to be true, and gave him 4 7s. 10d., the full amount of the cheque. Later he paid the cheque into his account at the National Provincial Bank, but it was afterwards returned to him marked “Endorsement irregular: alteration requires confirmation”. Subsequently witness made inquiries, and gave information to the police.

Lieut. Phillip Edward Kelly, of the 1st Batt. Royal Irish Fusiliers, said prisoner was a private in his battalion. Witness was in charge of the stable account of the battalion, and early in July the regiment was indebted to Messrs. Taylor and Taylor, of the Bricklayers Arms Station, London. Witness recognised the cheque as the one he drewin payment of this account, either on the 6th or the 5th of July. The amount on the cheque was left blank, as at that time he did not know the exact amount of Messrs. Taylor and Taylor's account. He afterwards handed the cheque to Lieut. Wakefield, of his regiment, with certain instructions. He later received the cheque from the last witness, and on July 23rd had an interview with him, and found that the cheque as drawn by himself (witness) had been altered without his knowledge or authority. The date of the cheque had been altered from June 30th to July 16th. The names of the payees had been altered to “D.R. Faylor O'Faylority”, by crossing the initial “Ts” and making them “Fs”, and by adding the letters “ity” to the second name Taylor. There was also an alteration to the word “stable” appearing on the cheque, but witness could not decipher what this alteration had been. The word “Captn”, meaning “Captain”, had been added to his signature.

The Chief Constable said that this was as far as he could take the case that morning, as it was necessary to get the evidence of Lieut. Wakefield, who was at the present time away on leave. He asked that the case should be adjourned until Tuesday next.

The Bench granted a remand until next Tuesday.

Mr. Whiteman, re-called, further stated that prisoner did not say how he became possessed of the cheque. Witness did not ask him.

 

Folkestone Daily News 30 July 1912.

Tuesday, July 30th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Giles, Jenner, Owen, Fynmore, and Chamier.

James Edward O'Brien was brought up in custody charged with forging a cheque, the property of Lieutenant Wakefield, of the Royal Irish Fusiliers.

The evidence (already reported) was repeated, and Lieut. Wakefield deposed to filling in the cheque and dropping it, in an envelope, in the post office box at Shorncliffe Camp. The cheque was in favour of Taylor and Taylor, forage contractors, Bricklayers Arms, S.E.

Detective Sergt. Leonard Johnson proved arresting prisoner at Shorncliffe Camp, and when charged he said “All right, I shall be glad to get it all over”. When charged at the station prisoner said he found the letter outside the post office half open; he picked it up, opened it, and found the cheque inside. He went down to the bank at Cheriton with it, and they told him they could not change it as it was not on their bank. They told him to get someone who knew him, as it was crossed. He had a wife and child to keep, and was only drawing 1s. a week, and his wife the remainder. In desperation he scratched out the name that was on the cheque. He went to Mr. Whiteman, who gave him the money. Prisoner said his wife was not yet 19, and he had a baby 7 months old.

The Chairman: It has been proved that you are Guilty. You will be committed to take your trial at the next Maidstone Assizes.

The Chief Constable said he should oppose bail unless in a very substantial sum. He had a very good reason for doing so.

Bail was offered, prisoner in 50, and two sureties of 25 each, or one of 50.

 

Folkestone Express 3 August 1912.

Tuesday, July 30th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Alderman Jenner, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Capt. Chamier, Colonel Owen, and J.J. Giles Esq.

James Edward O'Brien, a private in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, was brought up on remand charged with forgery.

The evidence given at the last hearing was read over.

Lieut. Wakefield, of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, said the cheque produced was handed to him by Lieut. Kelly on or about July 1st. At that time there had been no alteration in the date, which was then June 30th. It was then payable to Messrs. Taylor and Taylor. There had been no alteration on the face of the cheque then. The amount had not been filled in. Lieut. Kelly gave him certain instructions as to it, and on or about the 15th he filled in the amount, 4 7s. 10d., now appearing on the face of the cheque, which he had ascertained was the amount due to the firm. He wrote a letter to Taylor and Taylor, and enclosed it with the cheque in an envelope, which he addressed to “Messrs. Taylor and Taylor, Forage Contractors, Bricklayers Arms Station, London, S.E.” To the best of his knowledge he put the letter in the post box in the officers' mess. The box was cleared from time to time by the Post Corporal, and the letters were conveyed by him to the Shorncliffe Post Office. There was no endorsement upon the cheque when he posted it.

Detective Johnson said on the 24th July he received a warrant for the arrest of the prisoner O'Brien. About 3.45 p.m. he saw him at Shorncliffe Camp, and told him he was a detective officer and held a warrant for his arrest. He cautioned him, read the warrant to him, showed him the cheque produced, and said “This is the cheque you are charged with forging”. He replied “I shall be glad when it is all over”. He then brought him to the police station, and on being formally charged he replied “I found a letter outside the officers' quarters half open. I picked it up, pulled it open, and found a cheque inside, and went down to the bank at Cheriton with it. They told me they could not change it, at it was not on their bank. They told me I must get someone who knew me, as it was crossed. As I have a wife and child to keep and I was only drawing 1s. a week, and she was drawing the remainder, through desperation I scratched out the name on it and altered it. I went to Mr. Whiteman and he gave me the money.

Prisoner said he wished to say what he did to the police officer. His child was seven months old, and his wife was not nineteen years old until December. He had never been up on a charge like that before, and his character in the Army was spotless.

O'Brien was committed for trial at the next Kent Assizes.

The Chief Constable opposed bail unless it was substantial.

The Magistrates offered bail, in himself in 50, and one surety of 50, or two of 25.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 August 1912.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday morning, before Alderman T.J. Vaughan in the chair, Lieut. Colonel R.J. Fynmore, Alderman C. Jenner, Colonel Owen, Captain Chamier, and Mr. J.J. Giles, James Edward O'Brien, a private in the Royal Irish Fusiliers was charged on remand with forging a cheque for 4 7s. 10d.

The evidence given at the previous hearing of the case was read over.

Lieut. Wakefield, of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, identified the cheque produced. It was handed to him by a Lieut. Kelly about the 1st July, and at that time there was no alteration of the date. The date then was June 30th. It was made payable to Messrs. Taylor and Taylor, and there was no alteration on the face of the cheque. The amount was not filled in then. Lieut. Kelly gave witness certain instructions with regard to filling in the amount, and at a later date witness filled in the amount payable on Messrs. Taylor's bill. That was about the 15th July, to the best of his knowledge. He then wrote a short note to Messrs. Taylor and Taylor, saying he had enclosed the amount. He enclosed the cheque in an envelope with the letter. He addressed the letter to “Messrs. Taylor and Taylor, Forage Contractors, Bricklayers Arms Station, London, E.C.”. To the best of his knowledge he put it in the post box in the hall of the Officers' Mess. It was cleared by a corporal at various times of the day, and the letters were conveyed by him to the Shorncliffe Camp Post Office. There was no endorsement on the cheque when he sent it.

Detective Officer Leonard Johnson deposed that on the 24th July he received a warrant for the prisoner's arrest. At about 3.45 p.m. the same day he saw the accused at Shorncliffe Camp, and said to him “I am a detective officer, and hold a warrant for your arrest”. He cautioned accused and read the warrant to him, showing him the cheque produced. Prisoner replied “I shall be glad when it is all over”. He then brought accused to the police station and formally charged him. He cautioned accused, who replied “I found a letter outside the officers' quarters, half opened. I picked it up and pulled it open, and found a cheque inside, and then went down to the bank at Cheriton with it. They told me they could not change it, as it was not on their bank. They told me I must get someone that knew me, as the cheque was crossed. As I had a wife and child to keep, and as I was only drawing 1s. a week, and she was drawing the remainder, in desperation I scratched out the name that was on it and altered it, and went to Mr. Whiteman, who gave me the money”.

The Chief Constable asked that accused should be committed to take his trial at the Kent Assizes.

Prisoner said he had a young wife who was not 19 years of age until December, and he had a child seven months old. He had never been up before on any charge like that, and his character in the army was spotless.

The Chairman stated that a case had been made out against the accused, who would take his trial at the next Kent Assizes, to be held at Maidstone.

The Chief Constable said that in teh event of bail being allowed he should oppose it, unless it was very substantial bail. He had a very good reason for doing so.

The Chairman said accused would be allowed bail in his own recognisances of 50, and one surety of 50, or two of 25.

Accused was then taken below.

 

Folkestone Daily News 12 November 1912.

Tuesday, November 12th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Herbert, Boyd, Vaughan, Harrison, Stace, Linton, Ward, Stainer, Fynmore, Giles, Morrison and Wood.

Mr. Wightman, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, applied for and was granted extension of licence on the 27th inst., the occasion of the Prussian Hermits' concert on behalf of the Juvenile Christmas treat, i.e. Councillor Martingell's Poor Dinner Fund.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 November 1912.

Tuesday, November 12th: Before The Mayor, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, Major G.E. Leggett, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Councillor A. Stace.

An extension of the licence of the Harvey Hotel for one hour on Wednesday evening for the annual dinner of the Folkestone Horse Owners' Protection Society was granted, and an hour's extension was also granted for Wednesday, November 27th for a concert in aid of the Poor Children's Fund.

 

Southeastern Gazette 26 November 1912.

Local News.

The Kent Assizes opened at Maidstone on Monday, before Sir Arthur Moseley Channell.

James Edward O’Brien, 21, soldier, pleaded guilty to forgery at Folkestone on July 17th, and also admitted previous convictions.

Mr. Weigall, prosecuting, said the prisoner was entrusted with a letter containing cheques for 4 7s., drawn by an officer, in payment of forage bills. He abstracted the cheques, altered the name, forged the endorsement, and cashed the cheque at a public house.

The Judge (struggling with a document): I am trying to read your statement, O’Brien. As far as I can see, it is that you were wrongly convicted on one of the previous occasions. That’s the effect of if, isn't it?

Prisoner: 'Yes, sir.

In sentencing prisoner to 15 months’ hard labour, His Lordship said he doubted whether he ought not to send him to penal servitude, but he would give him one more chance. He noticed that he had spent five years in a reformatory. One always heard that lads in a reformatory were turned into honest citizens, or if they were not, they turned out very badly, and he seemed to be one of the latter.

 

Folkestone Express 30 November 1912.

Local News.

At the Kent Assizes on Monday, James Edward O'Brien, 21, soldier, pleaded Guilty to forgery at Folkestone on July 17th, and also admitted previous convictions.

Mr. Weigall, prosecuting, said the prisoner was entrusted with a letter containing cheques for 4 7s., drawn by an officer, in payment of forage bills. He abstracted the cheques, altered the name, forged the endorsement, and cashed the cheque at a public house.

The judge (struggling with a document): I am trying to read your statement, O'Brien. As far as I can see, it is that you were wrongly convicted on one of the previous occasions. That's the effect of it, isn't it?

Prisoner: Yes, sir.

In sentencing prisoner to 15 months' hard labour, his Lordship said he doubted whether he ought not to send him to penal servitude, but he would give him one more chance. He noticed that he had spent five years in a reformatory. One always heard that lads in a reformatory were turned into honest citizens, or if they were not, they turned out very badly, and he seemed to be one of the latter.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 November 1912.

Local News.

At the Kent Assizes at Maidstone on Monday, James Edward O'Brien, a private in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, stationed at Shorncliffe, was sentenced to fifteen months hard labour for forging and altering a cheque to the value of 4 10s., with intent to defraud Arthur Jas. Wightman, the landlord of the Harvey Hotel, Folkestone. Mr. Weigall appeared for the prosecution. Prisoner pleaded Guilty, and admitted previous convictions.

The case for the prosecution was that on July 17th the prisoner went to the Harvey Hotel, and producing the cheque in question, asked Mr. Wightman to cash it. Mr. Wightman asked him who the cheque belonged to, and accused said it belonged to a friend at the Camp, who was unable to get away. The cheque was made payable to a man named O'Faylority. Subsequently the cheque was returned from the National Provincial Bank marked “Endorsement irregular; signature requires confirmation”.

Afterwards it transpired that Lieutenant P.E. Kelly, of the same regiment, who was in charge of the stable account, made out the cheque in payment of a bill from Messrs. Taylor and Taylor, of Bricklayers Arms Station, London. He did not fill in the amount of the bill, because he was not aware of the exact sum. This was afterwards done by Lieutenant Wakefield, who, to the best of his knowledge, posted the letter in the box at the Officers' Mess. Prisoner obtained possession of the cheque, and altered it by crossing the “Ts” in the name Taylor and adding “ity” to the last name, thus making the cheque payable to D.E. Faylor O'Faylority. The date was also altered from June 30th to July 16th. There was an indecipherable alteration to the word “stable”, and the word “Captain” had been added to the signature.

When arrested at Folkestone, prisoner stated that he found the letter outside the Officers' quarters, half-opened, picked it up, opened the envelope, and found the cheque inside. He took it to the bank at Cheriton, but they told him that as it was not drawn on their bank they would not cash it, and also told him to get a friend who knew him, as the cheque was crossed. He had a wife and child to keep, and as he was only drawing 1s. weekly, and she was drawing the remainder, in desperation he altered the cheque. He further added that his wife was not yet nineteen, that he had never been up before on a charge like that, and that his character in the army was spotless.

In passing sentence on him, Mr. Justice Channell said he doubted whether he ought not to send prisoner to penal servitude, but accused would be given one more chance. He noticed he had spent five years in a reformatory. One always heard that lads in a reformatory were turned into honest citizens, or if they were not they turned out very badly, and prisoner seemed to be one of the latter. The sentence was fifteen months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Daily News 7 March 1913.

Friday, March 7th: Before Messrs. Owen and Giles.

The police court was crowded on Friday morning, when Arthur James Wightman, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, appeared to answer a summons charging him with a breach of the Licensing Act, i.e., supplying intoxicating liquors at twenty minutes to twelve on Sunday evening. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

The Chief Constable, who prosecuted, said defendant was charged under Section 86 of the Licensing Consolidation Act, which made it an offence to keep open during prohibited hours, and did not necessarily make the prosecution prove the sale of intoxicating liquors to secure a conviction.

Inspector James Swift said: About 11.40 on Sunday night, the 2nd instant, I was in Dover Road, in company with Sergt. Sales. I saw lights burning in a room on the ground floor of the Harvey Hotel, and heard voices, then the playing of a piano and singing, both being conducted in a suppressed tone. In a few minutes the piano stopped, and someone said “What are you going to have?” A minute later a light was switched on in the bar and defendant came to the engine, drew several glasses of beer, left the bar with the drink, and returning again drew other glasses. The light was then switched off in the bar. About three or four minutes later the light was again switched on in the bar, defendant appearing and drawing several glasses of beer from the engine and left again. I kept observation until about 5 to 10 minutes past twelve. The defendant then came to the main door of the house and unfastened it. I met him and said “Who have you on your premises?”, and he replied “Friends, and they are just going”. I went in, and in the passage I found a man named Pitman with a bicycle, and apparently about to make a start. In the room were eight other men, fully dressed, with hats, caps, and overcoats on, most of them seated round the table, some standing. I said to defendant “What explanation have you to give for the presence of these men here?” He hesitated (looking round as if asking the men what reply he should give) and then said “They are friends of mine whom I invited to some music and a singsong”. I said “When did you invite them?”, and a man named Hogben, one of the men on the premises, said it was about 20 minutes to 10. Defendant said about 10. I said to defendant “Your explanation is not satisfactory, and I shall report you for being open during prohibited hours”. He replied “There was nothing sold whatever; everything was given”. After taking the names and addresses of the men, one said “As a matter of fact, we were invited here in the afternoon”.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: Witness said he told defendant he should report him for keeping open during prohibited hours for the sale of intoxicating liquors. That was not quite the wording on the summons this morning. The Chief Constable was responsible for that. The singing practically continued the whole time he was observing the house, but it was in a subdued tone.

Mr. Haines: All of the men were known singers giving their services at concerts, eh?

Witness: Some were painters and butchers. (Laughter)

Mr. Haines: Did you hear “Ora Pro Nobis”?” (Pray for us.)

Witness: No, ragtime music.

Mr. Haines: Were they all sober?

Witness: Yes.

Mr. Haines: After taking their names, did you say “Gentlemen, you can continue your party”?”

Witness: Oh, dear, no.

Sergt. Sales corroborated the evidence of the previous witness.

Mr. Haines addressed the justices on the point that they were there as defendant's guests. He suggested that the police had taken a perfectly right and proper course. They could not hold an impromptu petty sessions on the doorstep of the Harvey Hotel.

The defendant was sworn and said his wife went away on Friday morning under doctor's orders, and he for the time being was a bachelor. The whole of the names of the men found on his premises were friends of his. Not the whole eight, but the majority of them. He came to Folkestone without friends and made these, who always helped him at his concerts. On Sunday, being a bit lonely, and passionately fond of music, he invited a few friends to come in and have a bit of music. Last Sunday, too, there was a Prussian Hermits lecture, and before the members went up he said “I have a few friends coming back from Dover (there were 5 or 6); don't rush off at the finish, but come and join them”. I did this as a little recognition for what they had done for me. I entertained the men voluntarily as my guests. No-one offered to pay, no-one was asked to pay, and no-one was expected to pay. When the police came, witness was at the door to let his guests out, quite openly. He was surprised to see the police; it was quite unexpected.

The Chief Constable: Can you tell me who it was you invited early in the day?

Witness: Mr. Hogben and Mr. Highland, at midday.

The Chief Constable: Only those two?

Witness: I told Mr. Highland that he could bring some friends.

You did not mention any names or the number? – No.

When did you invite the others? – Mr. Pitman and Mr. Dewell, who were going up to the Prussian Hermits lecture, about ten minutes to 8.

When did you invite any of the others? – Mr. Davis I think about midday.

Who were the others invited? – The others were all friends that Mr. Highland brought.

How many did Highland bring? – The remainder must have come with Mr. Highland.

Those four that Highland brought you did not invite yourself? – No.

What were the names of the other friends? – Scott, Tommy Hales, Harry – I don't know his name – and a friend whom I had never seen before.

Do you wish the Magistrates to believe that you supplied all these men at your own expense? – I did do so.

Why did you tell Inspector Swift that you invited these men at 5 to 10? – Inspector Swift is not quite correct there.

By the Clerk: With the exception of one individual who accompanied Highland, the others were all regular customers. All the men, with the exception of three, had taken part in smoking concerts at my house.

Harry Davis, of St. John's Street, a bar manager, said on occasion he sang at concerts. He knew Mr. Wightman as a personal friend, whose house he quite frequently used. He had assisted Mr. Wightman, both at his concerts and dinners. At midday on Sunday witness was at Mr. Wightman's house, when defendant said he was going to have a little party in the evening and would they like to come. The invitation was extended to Mr. Highland and Mr. Hogben. Mr. Wightman said he was going to have a little bachelors' party in the evening, and would they all come. In the evening witness arrived at something between 9.30 and 9.45, and after 10 he went into Mr. Wightman's private room. After closing time they had some music. He had some friends with him – Mr. Hogben and two gentlemen whom I did not know. In the morning witness heard Wightman say “If there is anyone else bring them in”. Witness had two drinks at the invitation of Mr. Wightman. They were all asked to have a drink. He did not see any money passed, decidedly not. They were there as friends of Mr. Wightman. At the finish Mr. Wightman said “Gentlemen, I think it is time to break up”. We were getting ready to go. Inspector Swift came in and said “Gentlemen, what is the meaning of this?”, and took our names and addresses, and then said “Gentlemen, you can get on with the party”. (Laughter) He did not hear Mr. Wightman say that some of the invitations were given just before closing time. He would not swear that Mr. Wightman did say so.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: He was quite certain that he and two others were invited at midday. Hogben, Highland and himself were invited at the same time. All three were singers. When Pitman and Hale came downstairs from the Prussian Hermits, Mr. Wightman invited them. They were customers in the house. Just before ten o'clock it was that they were invited into the room. Highland arrived at 10.15 with three gentlemen, strangers to me.

By the Clerk: He did not know whether Pitman and the Hermits had been invited to the room earlier.

Frederick H. Pitman, of 73, Chart Road, a tailor, said he had known Mr. Wightman since he had been in the town. He went to the Harvey on Hermit nights, and was on the Concert Committee of the house. On Sunday witness went to the Harvey about ten to eight to attend the lecture. Mr. Wightman said “I am having a few friends; will you stop for an hour?” Before that the invitation was extended to Dewell. Of those who arrived at 10.15 he knew Highland and Hogben. He did not pay for anything; neither did anyone else.

The Chief Constable: Do you remember the Inspector asking the landlord what time you had been invited?

Witness: No.

William Hogben, of 29, Victoria Road, said he was a singer, and at times had assisted Mr. Wightman in some of his concerts. On Sunday morning he, with Highland and Davis, were at the Harvey when Mr. Wightman extended an invitation to a little party at the house after the house was closed, and the permission to bring a friend. Witness expected to see Highland turn up alone, yet the invitation was extended to all three. He understood that all three could bring friends. Highland introduced his friends to Mr. Wightman. No-one paid, and no-one was asked for payment.

By the Clerk: About five of us gave songs.

Witness met Highland and his friends just outside the Harvey and went in with them. It was late and he did not expect to get in. We went across the road and whistled, and were let in.

By the Chief Constable: It was midday when I was invited with Davis and Highland. He was not in the house from midday until he went in at 10.15 with Highland, who had come over from Dover.

Frederick Highland, 1, Radnor Bridge Road, a butcher and a singer, said on many occasions he had assisted Mr. Wightman at the Harvey. On Sunday last he was in the Harvey at midday. Davis was there. Mr. Hogben gave him an invitation to a little bachelors' party and said he could invite some of his friends. On returning from Dover witness went to the Harvey Hotel and introduced two of his friends. There were Mr. Scott, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Hale, and Mr. Hayward. He thought the last man's name was Tomsett; he did not know him as Hayward. At Mr. Wightman's expense refreshments were supplied. They were guests of Mr. Wightman's. When Inspector Swift came he (the Inspector) said “I am not satisfied with your explanation. Well, gentlemen, you can continue with your little party”.

The Chief Constable: You say you introduced your two friends to Mr. Wightman? – Yes.

How did you introduce them if you did not know them? – I knew one man as Tomsett, but you say his name is Hayward.

In consequence of the open invitation did you take your two friends with you because you had been to Dover together? – Yes.

Without retiring, the Chairman said they dismissed the case against defendant, but they must point out that it would have been wise to have given notice to the police. It was very indiscreet, and the police were perfectly justified in taking action.

The result was received with applause in Court.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 March 1913.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court yesterday (Friday) before Colonel G.P. Owen and Mr. J.J. Giles, Arthur James Wightman, landlord of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was summoned for a breach of the Licensing Act by selling drink on his licensed premises during prohibited hours, namely, at twenty to twelve on Sunday night last. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defence, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Inspector Swift deposed that at 11.40 on Sunday last he was in Dover Road and saw lights burning in a room on the ground floor of the front of the Harvey Hotel. He heard voices, and then the playing of a piano and singing, both being conducted in a suppressed tone. A few minutes later the piano playing stopped, and someone said “What are you going to have?” A minute later the light was switched on in the bar, which hitherto had been in darkness. Defendant came and drew several glasses of beer, left the bar with the drink, returned immediately, filled other glasses, and left with those. The light in the bar was then extinguished. Three or four minutes later the light in the bar was again switched on. Defendant appeared and again drew several glasses of beer, and left the bar with them, the light being again extinguished. Witness kept observation until about ten minutes past twelve At that time defendant came to the front door of the house and unlocked it. Witness met him, and said “Who have you on the premises?” Mr. Wightman replied “Friends, but they are just going”. In the room there were eight other men with hats, caps and overcoats on, and most of them were seated round the table. Witness said to the defendant “What explanation have you to give for the presence of these men here?” He hesitated, and then said “I invited them here to a little music and a singsong”. Witness said “When did you invite them?”, and he replied “I think it was about five minutes to ten”. Witness said to the defendant “Your explanation is not satisfactory, and I shall report you”. He replied “There has been nothing sold here whatever; I would not think of doing such a thing”. There were several glasses on the table, some containing beer. One of the men present, named Hale, said “We were invited here in the afternoon”. All the men were local residents.

Cross-examined: The singing was in a suppressed tone. They appeared to be making as little noise as possible. They were singing very tame songs. Witness did not hear “Ora Pro Nobis”. (Laughter) There was no attempt to cover up the window of the bar. All the men appeared to be sober. Witness did not say as he left “Gentlemen, you may continue your party”. He would not describe it as a little bachelor gathering. There was no chance for the men to bolt. (Laughter)

P.S. Sales, who was in company with Inspector Swift, gave substantially corroborative evidence. He also stated that when Inspector Swift took the names and addresses of the men he told them that they would be reported for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines, witness said some of the glasses contained the drains of liquor and two pint glasses were two thirds empty. Some of the men did not look very comfortable when witness entered.

Mr. Haines pointed out that it was laid down that the holder of a justices' licence should not be liable to a penalty for supplying intoxicating liquor after hours of closing to private friends bona fide entertained by him at his own expense.

Mr. Wightman, the defendant, on oath, said that he had held the licence of the Harvey Hotel for 18 months. On the previous Friday morning witness's wife went away, and witness was a bachelor for the time being. All the men who were found in the house were friends of his. Not long ago they assisted witness in a concert he gave for the Poor Children's Fund. The previous Sunday morning he saw Messrs, Davis and Highland, and he asked the latter to turn up and have a little music in the evening after closing time. Inviting other friends, who were Prussian Hermits, he took advantage of the opportunity of making some little return for the help they had given him on previous occasions. After closing time the invited friends went into witness's living room, and they had a little quiet singing. During the evening he supplied them with drink. He asked no money, received none, and there was no suggestion that he should receive money at any other time. He gave the drink quite voluntarily and freely. After the close of the party witness opened the door to let the guests out. He was surprised to see the Inspector, because it was quite unexpected.

Cross-examined: The invitation he extended at midday was to Mr. Hogben and Mr. Highland. He asked Mr. Highland to bring his friends. He mentioned no names, nor did he specify numbers. He asked Mr. Highland to bring his friends, because he was going with them to Dover. Witness invited two Prussian hermit friends at ten minutes to eight in the evening, before they went to a lecture in the club room. Witness also invited Mr. avis at midday. The other guests were friends of Mr. Highland, so that he must have brought four friends with him. There were nine guests altogether. Witness had not invited these four; they came through Highland's invitation. These four were Scott, Tommy Hales, and “Harry” – witness did not know his surname. He did not know the name of the fourth, nor had he ever seen him before. It was only Highland and his four friends, who came from Dover, who came into the premises after closing time.

In answer to Mr. Andrew, witness said that Mr. Highland was a well-known singer in the town. He was down to sing at the Folkestone Poor Children's Fund Concert, but was unable to come owing to illness. The Prussian Hermit lecture closed at ten minutes to ten. Highland and his friends arrived at 10.20.

In answer to the Chief Constable, witness said Inspector Swift made no reference to the time at which the guests were invited. He did not tell the Inspector that he invited them at ten minutes to ten.

In reply to Mr. Andrew, witness said that, with the exception of the one he did not know, all the guests were regular customers. All, with the exception of three, had taken part in concerts in the town.

Mr. H. Davis said that he lived at St. John's Street, and was a barman. He sang publicly on occasions. He knew the defendant as a personal friend, and he frequently used his house. He had assisted him in various ways at concerts. On the previous Sunday he was at the Harvey Hotel at midday, when he saw the defendant, who invited him to a little party he was going to give at closing time. Mr. Hogben and Mr. Highland were in the bar at the time, and he extended the invitation to them. It was possible that defendant and Mr. Highland had some conversation which witness did not hear. In the evening witness arrived just before 8.45. He went into the room in company with Mr. Dewell and Mr. Pitman, who had just come down from the Prussian Hermits lecture. That was before the defendant had closed up. After closing time they had some music. Mr. Highland arrived at about a quarter past ten. He had some friends with him, including Hogben, who was invited in the morning. Witness heard defendant say to Highland in the morning that if there were any others with him he could bring them in. He understood this to mean friends. Witness did not suffer greatly from “dryness”, but he had two drinks at the invitation of the defendant. All were invited to have drinks. There was certainly no question of a sale. Witness considered himself to be there as a friend of the defendant. As Inspector Swift left he said “Gentlemen, you can get on with the party”. (Laughter) Witness was not aware of any question put by the police as to the time at which the invitations were given.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: Dewell and Pitman were invited when they came down from the Prussian Hermits' lecture, just before ten o'clock. They were customers of Mr. Wightman just before then.

Mr. Fredk. Pitman said he lived in Chart Road, and was a tailor. He had known the defendant ever since he had been in the town, and he went to his house for club meetings. He was a member of the Prussian Hermits. Witness had assisted defendant in concerts. On the previous Sunday he went to the club lecture at the Harvey just before eight, and before the lecture the defendant asked him to stay behind, as he was going to have a few friends in. At about five minutes to ten he came away from the lecture, saw Davis, and went straight into the private room. Subsequently Highland and some of his friends arrived. Witness paid for no refreshments, was not asked to pay for any, and saw no-one pay for any.

Cross-examined: Witness would not be certain whether or not Inspector Swift said anything with regard to the time at which the guests were invited. Highland was accompanied by five others, including Scott and Hogben. He knew the other three by sight only.

Mr. Wm. R. Hogben said that he was in company with Mr. Highland and Mr. Davis at the Harvey the previous Sunday, and an invitation was extended to them to attend a little party at the Harvey after closing time. All three were invited to bring a friend with them if they cared to. No-one paid for refreshments, and they did not expect to pay, as they were the guests of the defendant.

Mr. F.F. Highland said that he lived at Radnor Bridge Road. He was a butcher, and a singer. (Laughter) He was one of defendant's guests. During the evening they had refreshments, and were decidedly not asked for payment. No-one, to witness's knowledge, made any payment. When Inspector Swift left he said “Well, gentlemen, you can continue your little party”. At the time of the police visit witness heard no reference to the invitation being given just before closing time.

Cross-examined: Defendant had met some of witness's friends before, but he could not say whether he had met two of them. The invitation was extended to himself and friends. There was no number specified, but witness would not have liked to take a score with him. (Laughter)

The case was dismissed, but the Chairman pointed out that it would have been wise of the defendant if he had given notice to the police, who were quite justified in bringing the case before the Court.

 

Folkestone Express 15 March 1913.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Friday, before Colonel Owen and J.J. Giles Esq., Arthur James Wightman, the landlord of the Harvey Hotel, was summoned for selling drink on his licensed premises at twenty minutes to twelve on Sunday night. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. G.W. Haine defended.

Mr. Reeve (the Chief Constable) said before calling the evidence he would like to draw the Magistrates' attention to Section 83 of the Licensing (Consolidation) Act. It read as follows; “In proving the sale or consumption of intoxicating liquor for the purposes of any proceedings relative to any offence under this Act it shall not be necessary to show that any money actually passed or any intoxicating liquor was actually consumed. If the Court hearing the case are satisfied that a transaction in the nature of a sale actually took place or any consumption of any intoxicating liquor was about to take place, then the licence holder is responsible”.

Inspector Swift said about 11.40 on Sunday night, the 2nd inst., he was in Dover Road, in company with P.S. Sales, when he saw lights burning in the front room of the ground floor of the hotel, facing Dover Road. He heard voices, then the playing of the piano and singing, both of which were conducted in a suppressed tone. In a few minutes the piano stopped. Someone said “What are you going to have?” A minute later a light was switched on in the bar, which had been previously in darkness, and he saw the defendant go to the engine in the bar and draw several glasses of beer. He left the bar with the drink and shortly after returned and drew some more beer, with which he left the bar. The light in the bar was switched off. About three or four minutes later the light was again switched on in the bar, and the defendant then drew some more beer, with which he left the bar. The light was switched off. He kept observation until between five and ten minutes past twelve, when the defendant came to the main door, and unfastened it. He (witness) met him and said “Who have you on your premises?” He replied “Friends, but they are just going”. He went in, and in the passage which led to the room referred to, he found a man named Pitman, with a bicycle, apparently ready to make a start. In the room there were eight other men, fully dressed, with hats and overcoats on. Most of them were seated round the table. He said to the defendant “What explanation have you to give for the presence of these men?” He hesitated, and then said “I invited them here to have some music and a singsong”. He asked him “When did you invite them?”, and he replied “About five minutes to ten. I think it was about that”. One of the men in the room said “It was before that. It was about twenty minutes to ten”. He said to the defendant “Your explanation is not satisfactory, and I shall report you for allowing your premises to be opened for the sale of drink during prohibited hours”. He replied “There has been nothing sold here at all”. There were several glasses on the table, some containing beer, some empty and dirty. After obtaining the names and addresses of the men, one named Hale said “As a matter of fact, we were invited here this afternoon”. All the men were local residents.

Cross-examined, witness said the singing was just snatches of songs. While he was watching the bar the piano and the singing were going on. He thought one man sang songs. He heard ragtime song being sung, but he did not hear “Ora Pro Nobis”. (Pray for us)(Laughter) There was no attempt to cover up the bar window. All the men appeared to be sober. He did not say when he left “Gentlemen, you can continue your party”. The landlord told him he could go anywhere to search the place. He would not describe it as a bachelors' little gathering.

In reply to the Clerk, the witness said the men were a little surprised to see him. There was no chance for the men to bolt. (Laughter)

P.S. Sales corroborated, and further stated that Inspector Swift told the men when he took their names and addresses that they would be reported for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines, the witness said some of the glasses contained the drains of liquor and two pint glasses were about two thirds empty. Some of the men did not look very comfortable when Inspector Swift and he went in.

Mr. Haines, in the course of his defence, said according to a section of the Act a holder of a Justices' Licence should not be liable for any penalty for supplying any intoxicating liquors after the hours of closing to private friends, bona fide entertained by him at his own expense. Therefore, if he satisfied the Magistrates that they were bona fide friends and were invited by the defendant and that they did not pay one penny for the entertainment, then the case must be dismissed. There was no suggestion that there was any noisy or rowdy singing going on.

Defendant went into the box, and said he had held the licence for eighteen months. On Friday his wife went away owing to the doctor's order. The men were all friends. Not long ago some of them assisted him at a concert. On Sunday morning he saw Mr. Davis and Mr. Highland and told them he felt lonely, and asked them to turn up in the evening and have a little singsong after closing time. Mr. Highland said he was going to Dover, and would not be back until the last train. He told him to knock at the door and he would let him in. Mr. Highland and his friends came. They numbered five. He asked one or two Prussian Hermits, who had met previously in the house, to join the party. He supplied the party with drink. He did not ask them for money, and no offer was made by any of them. He gave the drink to the men voluntarily. He switched up the lights in the bar. When he opened the door the Inspector stood there, and when he was questioned about having a little party he invited the Inspector in. He was surprised to see the Inspector, because it was quite unexpected.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, defendant said he invited Mr. Hogben and Mr. Highland to the house at dinner time. He left it to Mr. Highland to bring his friends, but they were to be men whom he knew. He invited Mr. Pitman and Mr. Dewell, who were in the club room, about ten minutes to eight, before they went up to the Prussian Hermits' meeting. He was certain he invited Mr. Davies at midday. The others were friends of Mr. Highland, who brought whom he liked. He had not invited the four men who came with Mr. Highland. Their names were Scott, Hales, and Harry, whose surname he did not know, and the fourth he could not remember. One of the men he had never seen before, but he came on the invitation of Highland. Mr. Highland and the other four entered his house after closing time.

In reply to the Clerk, he said Highland was a well-known singer in the town, and he extended the invitation to his friends who were singers. The Prussian Hermits' lecture finished at ten minutes to ten. When Highland came to the house he answered the door and Highland asked him if it was convenient for his friends to come in with him.

In reply to the Chief Constable, defendant said the Inspector did not ask him when he invited the men into the room. He did not tell the Inspector that he invited them at five minutes to ten.

Re-examined by Mr. Haines, defendant said he invited Highland's friends into the house.

In reply to the Clerk, defendant said all the men, with the exception of three, had taken part in smoking concerts at his house.

Herbert Davies, of 19, St. John's Street, said he was a bar manager. He sang on occasions, and had appeared at several concerts. He knew Mr. Wightman as a personal friend, and quite frequently used the defendant's house. He had assisted the defendant at his house. On Sunday he went to the house at midday, when he saw Mr. Wightman, who told him he was going to have a little bachelor party after closing hours and asked him to come. There were two other gentlemen in the bar, Mr. Hogben and Mr. Fred Highland, to whom he also extended the invitation. He did not hear Mr. Highland's reply, but it was possible for them to have had a conversation afterwards. In the evening he turned up shortly after half past nine, and at closing time he went into a private room with Mr. Dewell, Mr. Pitman, and Mr. Wightman, who asked them to go into the room. That was just before he closed up. After closing time they had some music, and Highland arrived at a quarter past ten. Mr. Highland and Mr. Hogben and friends came in. In the morning he heard Mr. Wightman ask Mr. Highland to bring his friends with him. He had two drinks on the invitation of Mr. Wightman, who asked for the others. He never heard Mr. Wightman ask for payment or anyone offer to pay. He considered there was no question of a sale. He was there when the police arrived, and the Inspector, as he was leaving, said “You can get on with the party”. He only heard the Inspector ask questions for an explanation. He did not hear Mr. Wightman say that he gave the invitations just before closing time.

In reply to the Clerk, witness said he heard Mr. Wightman tell the Inspector he asked some of them to come in the morning.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: Mr. Pitman and Mr. Dewell were invited into the room after they left the meeting just before ten o'clock, when they were in the bar. The three men with Highland were strangers to him.

In reply to the Clerk, witness said he could not say that the defendant had not invited Pitman and Dewell previously.

Frederick Henry Pitman, 73, Chart Road, said he knew the defendant, and went to the defendant's house for meetings. He had assisted at some of Mr. Wightman's concerts, as he was on the concert committee. On Sunday there was a meeting of the Prussian Hermits. He went to the house at ten minutes to eight, when he saw him in the usual way. Defendant then said that he was going to have a party after closing time. Mr. Dewell, who was present, and himself were invited to stay. At the close of the meeting Mr. Dewell, Mr. Davies and himself went into the room. They did not pay for the refreshments they had. He took it for granted that he was a guest.

William Reginald Hogben, a clerk, of Victoria Road, said he was a singer, and had assisted Mr. Wightman with concerts. When he was in the house at midday with Mr. Davies and Mr. Highland, Mr. Wightman invited them to bring a friend or two to a party after closing time. Highland said he was going to Dover, and he would not be back with his friend until after ten o'clock. Mr. Highland turned up about half past ten, with friends who were introduced to Mr. Wightman. Hey had refreshment, but no-one paid.

In reply to the Clerk, witness said five of them gave songs.

Francis Frederick Highland, of 1, Radnor Cliff Road, said he was a butcher. He was a singer, and had assisted Mr. Wightman at his concerts. On Sunday he was in the Harvey Hotel, when Mr. Wightman gave him an invitation to attend a party after closing hours, and he could bring one or two friends. He was not certain that Hogben was there at the time. On his return from Dover he was let into the house with his friends, two of whom he introduced to Mr. Wightman. The men with him were Messrs. Hales, Thompson, Wilson and Scott. He was not asked to pay for the drink, and he did not see anyone pay. He considered they were all guests of Mr. Wightman. When Inspector Swift left, he said “Now, gentlemen, you can continue the party”.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said he did not think Mr. Wightman knew two of his friends previously.

The Chairman said the Magistrates thought the police had done what was right in bringing that case there. It was not for the police to hold an impromptu petty sessions on the doorstep. They had decided to dismiss the case, but at the same time they would like to point out to the defendant it would have been wise if he had given notice to the police that he was going to have some friends in, as was generally done. The police were perfectly justified in what they did, and it was certainly indiscreet on the defendant's part not to have given that notice.

 

Folkestone Daily News 8 October 1913.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before Messrs. Ward, Herbert, Harrison, Vaughan, Swoffer, and Linton.

The transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel was granted to Mr. Gough from Mr. Wightman.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 October 1913.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Alderman C. Jenner, and Councillor W.J. Harrison.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred from Mr. Wightman to Mr. Gough.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 January 1915.

Wednesday, January 13th: Before Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Councillor W.J. Harrison, and Col. G.P. Owen.

An application was made for a protection order for the Harvey Inn, Dover Road. Mr. Charles Henry Piper said that he was going into possession that day.

The Magistrates granted the application.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1915.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Colonel Owen, R.J. Linton, W.J. Harrison, J. Stainer, and R.G. Wood Esqs.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel, temporarily transferred to Mr. Charles Edward Piper, was confirmed.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1915.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Councillor R.G. Wood, Councillor W.J. Harrison, and Col. G.P. Owen.

The transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel to Mr. Charles Edward Piper was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 11 September 1915.

Local News.

On Tuesday another case of giving whiskey to a soldier came before the Magistrates, R.J. Linton being in the chair, when Vincent Andrew Sackett, a well-dressed man, was charged with an offence under the Defence of the Realm Act, and further with being drunk and incapable. He pleaded Guilty to the drunkenness, but denied the more serious charge.

Corporal Corder, of the Canadian Military Police, said at 8.10 the previous night he was in Harbour Street, when he saw the prisoner surrounded by four Canadian soldiers. He saw the prisoner give the bottle of whiskey (produced) to a Scotch Canadian, who put it under his kilt. Witness placed the four soldiers under arrest, and called on Sergt. Graham, of the Canadian Military Police, to assist him in arresting Sackett. All the soldiers were sober and on leave in the town. He saw no money pass between the soldiers and the prisoner.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said that was as far as he could take the case that morning, as he had not been able to get the necessary instructions from the competent authority at to how the prisoner should be prosecuted.

The Magistrates remanded Sackett until the following day, bail being offered to him in one surety of 10 and himself in 10.

On Wednesday morning Sackett again appeared before the Magistrates, and he was defended by Mr. H. Stainer.

Corpl. Corder repeated the evidence he gave on the previous day. Further, he stated that he had since found that the soldier to whom the whiskey was given was Pte. Mitchell, of the 42nd Battalion.

P.S. Prebble said about 8.15 on Monday evening the prisoner, together with the bottle of whiskey, was handed over to him by Sergt. Graham, who said he had seen Sackett give the bottle to a Canadian soldier. Prisoner said nothing. He (witness) brought him to the police station, where he charged him with unlawfully giving a bottle of whiskey to a soldier, and also with being drunk and incapable. In answer to the former, he said “I did not”.

Cross-examined, witness said the prisoner was very sensible, and knew all that was said to him, but his legs would not hold him up.

P.S. Sales said when the prisoner was brought to the police station he was drunk.

Captain Blake, Assistant Provost Marshal, said the members of the regiment to which the soldier belonged should be in camp by 9.30 p.m. In his judgement the possession of a bottle of whiskey by a soldier would be against that man efficiently carrying out his duties.

Mr. Stainer said the prosecution had to prove an intent that the defendant wished to make the soldier less capable of doing his duty. No doubt the Bench would infer that if a bottle of whiskey was given to a soldier it would make him les capable of carrying out his duties. If the defendant was drunk, he did not know how the prosecution could support the intent.

Sackett, giving evidence, said he had been a licensed victualler at Herne Bay. He had suffered with dropsy, and had been in Folkestone for about three months, staying for the last two months at the Harvey Hotel. After his illness the doctor told him not to touch anything but stout, except gin once or twice a week. On Monday he had two glasses of stout for dinner, but he did not have anything else. He left the Harvey Hotel somewhere about seven o'clock in the evening, and came down Dover Road. He did not know any more until he woke up in the police station on the following morning. He was charged on that morning. He did not remember going into a public house, and he did not know how he came into possession of the bottle of whiskey.

Mr. Piper, the landlord of the Harvey Hotel, said Sackett had been seven weeks in his house. Defendant generally had four glasses of stout during the day, and only one glass of gin. He only knew of the defendant having two Guinnesses on Monday. He had found the defendant forgetful at times.

In reply to the Chairman, witness said the defendant had no gin in his house that day, but he had three stouts.

Questioned by the Chief Constable, Mr. Piper said he knew nothing of the defendant's movements after 6.30 in the evening.

The Bench retired, and on their return the Chairman (Mr. Linton) said the Magistrates had very carefully considered that case, and they were unanimously of opinion there must be a conviction. The defendant would be fined 20, and if he had not been in a feeble state they would have sent him to prison. In default of payment he would have to go to prison for a month.

On the application of the defendant, he was allowed ten days in which to pay.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 September 1915.

Local News.

A heavy penalty was imposed by the Folkestone Magistrates on Wednesday morning, when Vincent Andrew Sackett, formerly a licence holder in Herne Bay, was charged on remand with giving a bottle of whisky to a Canadian soldier, Pte. Mitchell, of the 42nd Battalion. Defendant, who was a well-dressed, elderly man, was fined 20, being allowed ten days to pay, or one month's imprisonment. He consented to pay the fine.

The previous day he was charged with being drunk, and also with giving a bottle of whisky to a Canadian soldier, contrary to the Defence of the Realm Act Regulations. He pleaded Guilty to being drunk, but Not Guilty to the other charge.

Corpl. C. Corder, of the Canadian Military Police, said he was on duty in Harbour Street on Monday, about 8.10 p.m. He saw prisoner surrounded by four Canadian soldiers. He saw a bottle of whisky passed from the prisoner to one of the Canadians, who put it under his tunic. Witness then placed the four soldiers under arrest, and called Sergt. Graham to assist him in detaining the prisoner. He took the four soldiers to the guard room. The four men were sober, and not on duty. He did not see any money pass.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) asked that the prisoner might be remanded until Tuesday, so that he might communicate with the competent military authority.

The remand was granted, prisoner being allowed bail in the sum of 10 himself, and one surety of 10.

Defendant surrendered to his bail on Wednesday morning, and was this time represented by Mr. H Stainer, of Hythe.

Corpl. Corder. of the C.M.P., repeated his evidence. He further said he had ascertained that the Canadian who received the whisky was Pte. Mitchell, of the 42nd Batt.

Cross-examined, witness said prisoner was under the influence of drink.

P.S. Prebble said that about 8.15 on Monday evening he was in Harbour Street, where the prisoner was handed to him by Sergt. Graham, of the C.M.P. Prisoner was drunk. Sergt. Graham said, ‘“I have seen the prisoner hand a bottle of whisky to a soldier”. Witness brought accused to the police station, where he charged him with unlawfully giving a bottle of whisky to a member of His Majesty's Forces, and he also charged him with being drunk. In answer to the first charge, prisoner said “I did not”.

Cross-examined, witness said that accused understood everything that was said to him.

P.S. Sales said he was on duty at the police office when prisoner was brought in. Prisoner was drunk at the time.

Captain Blake, Assistant Provost Marshal, said that soldiers of the 42nd Battalion were required to be back at Camp, St. Martin's Plain, at 9.30 p.m.

Mr. Stainer, addressing the Bench, said that they had to prove that there was intent to make the soldier drunk. There was no direct evidence about that. They said the defendant was drunk. If he was drunk, he did not know how they could support the intent. Defendant had been a licence holder himself. Mr. Stainer then called the defendant.

Vincent Andrew Sackett, said he had been a licence holder at Herne Bay. He had been attended by a doctor and went to a hospital for dropsy. He went after that to a convalescent home for three months, and to a farm for three months. He then came to Folkestone, and had been here three months. He was at the Clarence Hotel first, and then he went to the Harvey Hotel. After his illness his doctor told him not to have anything else to drink but stout every day, and gin once or twice a week. He had always kept to that. On the afternoon of the day in question he went to bed. After having tea, he left the hotel about 7 o'clock. He came down the Dover Road, and when he got to the bottom he did not remember anything else till he “woke up” in the police station. He did not know if he went into a licensed house. He did not know now he came into possession of the bottle of whisky. He knew quite well about the regulation, and he left his house at Herne Bay on December 29th, after the issue of the order.

Charles D. Piper, licensee of the Harvey Hotel, said the defendant had been living with him for seven weeks. He had never known defendant to be the worse for liquor. On Monday defendant had! a Guinness at lunch time. He was quite sober when he left the house at 6.30 on the Monday evening. He found the defendant forgetful.

After a short deliberation in private, the Magistrates returned to the Court and the Chairman said there must be a conviction. He would be fined 20, or one month's imprisonment. If he had not been in feeble health they would have sent him to prison for one month with hard labour. He would be allowed ten days in which to pay the fine.

Defendant decided to pay the money.

 

Folkestone Express 29 January 1916.

Thursday, January 27th: Before G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, A. Stace, and C.E. Mumford Esqs.

Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards were charged with supplying cocaine to soldiers, contrary to section 40 of the Defence of the Realm Regulations on January 26th.

Pte. Herbert Welch, of the Canadian Force, said he belonged to the “Black Devils”. He was billeted at 46, Dover Road. He recognised the two prisoners, whom he had known about two months. He had purchased from the man, whom he knew as “Horace”, stuff called “cocaine” on 20 or 30 occasions, or perhaps 40. Some times had had paid for it and on others not. He had received the stuff in small packets and had paid 1/- and 2/6 for it, according to the size of the packets. He had received from the female prisoner small packets of cocaine on ten or twelve occasions. He had not paid her anything, but the stuff had been a gift from the woman. He had mainly received the packets from the male prisoner in the Harvey Hotel, but from the female he had received it at the Theatre, in the streets, and in restaurants.

The Clerk: Have you ever been to a house in Shellons Street?

Witness: I cannot say that I have.

Have you ever been to a house to see these prisoners? – No, sir.

Kingsley said he noticed the charge against him was dated the 26th January. He wished to ask Welch if he sold him any on the previous day.

Welch: No, you did not.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said at the present stage it was immaterial whether he was charged with committing an offence on a certain date. The Bench could receive evidence of any similar transaction within six months of that date.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said that was as far as he could take the case that day and asked for a remand.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had decided to remand the prisoners until next Thursday.

Both prisoners asked to be allowed to have bail, and the Bench fixed the sureties at 25 each defendant, and one surety of 25 each, the sureties to be to the satisfaction of the Chief Constable.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 January 1916.

Thursday, January 27th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, and Councillor C. Edward Mumford.

Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards were charged with supplying cocaine to members of His Majesty's Forces, contrary to Section 40 of the Defence of the Realm Regulations. Both pleaded Not Guilty.

In answer to questions put by the Chief Constable, Herbert Welch, a private in the 8th Canadian Infantry (the Black Devils), stated he was billeted at 46, Dover Road. He recognised the prisoners. Kingsley was known to him as Horace. He had known them about two months, and had purchased something from him. It was stuff called cocaine. He had purchased it on twenty or thirty, perhaps forty, occasions. Sometimes he had paid him for it, sometimes he had not. He had received it from him in small packets. Sometimes he paid him 1s., and sometimes 2s. 6d. It depended upon the size of the packet. With regard to the female prisoner, he had received things from her ten or twelve times. He had received small packets of cocaine. He had not paid her anything at any time. It had been a gift from the woman. The packets had generally been handed to him from the male prisoner at the Harvey Hotel, and from the female prisoner in different places, sometimes in the theatre, sometimes in the street, and sometimes in a restaurant.

The Chief Constable said that was as far as he could go with the case that day, and asked for a remand.

The Bench adjourned the case for a week.

Prisoners asked for bail, which was allowed, each in his or her recognisances of 25 and a surety of 25 in each case.

 

Folkestone Express 5 February 1916.

Local News.

Yesterday at the Police Court, Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards appeared on remand charged with supplying cocaine to soldiers, contrary to Section 40 of the Defence of the Realm Act.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said the two prisoners were before the Court a week previously, and were remanded in order that further inquiries could be made. He had been instructed by the Director of Public Prosecutions to state that he was willing to conduct the prosecution. Therefore he asked for a further remand for a week on the evidence already given. An analysis had to be conducted, and other matters had to receive attention.

The Clerk said he understood that the prosecution at the next hearing would be represented by Mr. Travers Humphreys.

Prisoners were remanded for a week, bail being offered, themselves in 25 each, and one surety of 25 each.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1916.

Thursday, February 3rd: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, and Councillor A. Stace.

Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards were charged on remand with supplying cocaine to members of His Majesty's Forces, contrary to Section 40 of the Defence of the Realm Act.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said the two prisoners appeared before them a week ago, and on that occasion they were remanded till today. He had been instructed that the Director of Public Prosecutions had expressed his readiness to take the case up and prosecute, and he had asked for a remand for another week. Enquiries had to be made.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew): They are still being made, I think?

The Chief Constable: Yes, they are.

The Magistrates' Clerk said the drugs were being analysed.

The male prisoner asked for bail.

The Chairman said they would both be remanded till Thursday next, bail being allowed, each in his or her own recognisance of 25 surety and a surety of 25.

 

Folkestone Express 12 February 1916.

Thursday, February 10th: Before Alderman Spurgen and other Magistrates.

Horace Dennis Kingsley pleaded Not Guilty to three separate charges of selling cocaine to a Canadian soldier on different dates in January. The cases were heard together.

Mr. Travers Humphrey, who appeared on behalf of the Public Prosecutor, said the prosecution was taken under regulation 40 of the Defence of the Realm Act, which provided that if any person gave or sold to a member of His Majesty's Forces any intoxicant when not on duty with intent to make him drunk or less capable of efficiently discharging his duties would be guilty of an offence. The arrest of the prisoner, together with a woman who would also be brought before the Magistrates, was considered to be a matter of some importance, because Major Morrison, A.P.M., had for some time been endeavouring to find out the source from which Canadian soldiers were getting large quantities of cocaine. The effect of the habit which they acquired was pitiable, and most disastrous. It made it absolutely useless to try and control the man, who was made unreliable, and very often resulted in insanity. If a Canadian soldier was found to have acquired the habit, he was considered absolutely useless for the sake of the Army from that day henceforth.

Corporal Price, of the 8th Batt., C.I., said he had known the prisoner two months. On January 12th he was in the Granville public house in Dover Street, when he saw the prisoner with some soldiers and women. He saw the prisoner hand small paper packets, similar to the one produced, to two soldiers and a woman. He spoke to him and asked him what it was, and he replied “Snow”. He asked him how much it was, and he said he would sell him one for 2/-. He bought one. The packet contained white powder, and he marked it January 12th. On January 16th he saw the prisoner in Harbour Street, and asked him if he could have more “snow”. He gave him a packet, and witness purchased it for 2/-. He was exactly in the same uniform as he was that day. He was acting under the orders of his superior officers, and to that extent was on military police duty. On January 26th he accompanied the prisoner to Dover and went with him to Thompson's chemist shop, 186, Snargate Street. He waited outside while he went in. When he came out witness asked him if he had been able to purchase any “snow”, and he replied “I have been able to gat half a drachm, and have ordered two drachms for Wednesday”. On Wednesday afternoon, the 26th, he went to Dover with the prisoner. That was early closing day. The man opened the side door, and prisoner handed him an empty bottle. He afterwards left the shop. They returned in three quarters of an hour, and prisoner went to the side door. The man answered the door again and handed him the bottle, which was full of powder. It was marked “Poison, cocaine hydrochloride”. The label bore the name Lewis Thompson, Snargate Street, Dover. Prisoner put the bottle in his pocket, and after he left the shop he asked him if he would sell him some. Prisoner went into a lavatory, and when he came out he handed him a small packet containing powder, for which he paid 2/6. They came back to Folkestone, and on their arrival prisoner was arrested by Det. Sergt. Johnson with the bottle in his possession. The packets were handed over to Johnson also.

Det. Sergt. Johnson said on January 26th, about 3.40 p.m., he was in company with P.C. Butcher on Grace Hill, and saw the prisoner and Price arrive from Dover. He went to Kingsley and told him they were two police officers, and should take him to the police station. He replied “All right”. At the police station he found in prisoner's possession the bottle marked “Cocaine; poison”, and an empty bottle which had got the label of Mr. Thompson, and also a packet containing powder. He later charged the prisoner with selling a certain quantity of powder to members of H.M. Forces with intent to make them less capable of performing their duties. Prisoner said “How can I make them less capable? They are my friends”. He later received the packets from Price, and took them to the Laboratory, Shorncliffe, and handed them to Capt. Malone.

Capt. Reginald Malone, M.D., said he was in the C.A.M.C. he received and analysed the contents of packets and bottles. They all contained a soluble salt of cocaine.

Capt. J.B. McMurray, C.A.M.C., said he was acquainted with the effect of cocaine, and had had experience of it. He was in charge of Moore Barracks Hospital. Cocaine was a most dangerous drug and a poison. Taken in repeated small doses it would become a habit. The effect of acquiring the habit eventually led to insanity. It was very difficult to get rid of the habit once acquired. In the early stages of that habit it gave very brilliant ideas, supernatural ideas, and nothing was impossible. The reaction left the man sullen, morose, bad tempered and totally unfit for duty. They had had in Moore Barracks over forty cases of the drug habit. He had examined one or two of the samples, and, in his opinion, if taken in quite small quantities, would have rendered a soldier less capable. Cocaine was a great stimulant drug.

In reply to the Clerk, the forty cases he referred to had acquired the habit. It took about two or three weeks to acquire the habit.

Questioned by the prisoner, witness said one of the small packets would certainly affect a man.

Major Morrison, A.P.M., said he had seen the effect of the cocaine. What first drew his attention to it was the men under its influence coming into the guard room. The effect of cocaine taking rendered a man less efficiently capable of discharging his duties. The cocaine was known as “snow” by the Canadians.

Prisoner elected to give evidence on oath. He said he was living at No. 6, Shellons Street. He had been to Dover on the day he was arrested because his chemist in Folkestone had run short. Owing to the price of the cocaine he was not in a position to give it away, but he did not sell it to the soldiers in a direct manner, receiving 2/6 or 2/- more as a gift when hard up. The men were personal friends of his, and he had known them three months. The Corporal was a little scared that he would be arrested. Corporal Price did not give him any money, although he lent him money to get it. He had no recollection of giving the first two packets to Corporal Price. He was an old soldier himself, and had been 12 years in the Army, had been wounded at the Front, and had been invalided out. He came to Folkestone to recuperate. He had been willing to do his bit and he did not want to injure other people. He had a North West Frontier medal of 1911, having seen service in India. He asked the Magistrates to deal leniently with him.

Cross-examined, prisoner said he had not his military papers with him. They were at 14, Storr Street, Tottenham Court Road. He had a small pension of 1/6 a day from the War Office. He had not applied for it lately, because when he got it he had a “grand slam”, and was no good for three weeks after. He had no occupation at Folkestone. He distributed the cocaine because the men were his personal friends. He got the stuff from chemists at Folkestone, but he would not give the names at present. The soldiers could not get it from chemists, because Major Morrison had put a bar on it for soldiers. He only knew that from what the soldiers said. He knew Rose Edwards, who had given a little cocaine to soldiers. She and he lived in the same house. She came from London. Other people besides themselves gave the soldiers cocaine. The soldiers had given him some because he took cocaine.

Mr. Travers Humphrey: What effect has it upon you?

Prisoner: It makes you more keen on what you are doing than what you would be without. It has a stimulating effect.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return the Chairman said that was a very serious offence. The Bench had found the prisoner Guilty of the charge, and he would be sentenced to six months' hard labour on each charge, but the sentences would run concurrently.

Rose Edwards was then placed in the dock. She pleaded Not Guilty to three charges. Mr. Travers Humphrey prosecuted.

Corporal Price said he knew the prisoner. He saw her on January 14th at the Bellevue Hotel. When he came out of the house he saw empty some white powder in a soldier's handkerchief from a small box. He asked her what it was and she said “Snow”. He asked her if she could spare some for him and she said she could. She gave him some for which he gave her 2/6. At half past four the same day he saw her again and he asked if she could sell him another packet, and he paid her 2/- for it. On January 17th he saw her in the Granville Hotel and he bought a packet of “snow” from her for 2/6. On the 24th January he visited her house at 9.15 a.m., and he purchased a packet from her for 2/-. She wrapped the cocaine up in an envelope bearing her address as Little Fenchurch Street.

Mr. Travers Humphrey: It is a Y.M.C.A. envelope. (Laughter)

Detective Sergt. Johnson said on January 26th he saw the prisoner at the police station and he charged her with selling the powder to soldiers with the intent of making them less capable of efficiently performing their duties.

Captain Malone gave evidence of analysing the contents of the packets produced by Corporal Price.

Captain McMurray gave evidence as to the effect of the drug.

Prisoner gave evidence on oath. On the 14th January she gave Price a little “snow”, but she did not sell it to him. On January 17th and 24th she did not see Price at all, as she was in bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Travers Humphrey, she said she obtained the cocaine from a fellow who sold it in the West End of London. He was not a chemist, but the man sold it to the girls in London. He sold it in the streets. She had never tried to purchase it from a chemist in Folkestone. She had only given it to two Canadian soldiers. She had been in the habit of taking cocaine, but she had broken herself of the habit since Christmas. She had only given “snow” to Price on two occasions. She could get a pill box full of the stuff in London for 2/6.

Kingsley, called by Edwards, said he had never known the prisoner to take money for the cocaine.

The Chief Constable mentioned that the woman belonged to London, and was a well-known prostitute.

The Magistrates sentenced her to six months' hard labour on each charge, the sentences to run concurrently.

Corporal Price was called forward and the Chairman said the Bench wished to express their appreciation on the way he had given his evidence and had acted in the case.

The Chief Constable said with regard to Kingsley's statement, they had found that on January 17th, 1913, he was sentenced to two months' hard labour for felony in London.

Charges under the Pharmacy Act against both prisoners were withdrawn.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1916.

Thursday, February 10th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Lt. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G.P. Owen. Councillor A. Stace, Councillor C. Edward Mumford, and Mr. H. Kirke.

Horace Dennis Kingsley and Rose Edwards were charged on remand with committing a breach of the Defence of the Realm Act by giving cocaine to soldiers. Mr. Travers Humphrey appeared to prosecute on behalf of the Director of Public Prosecutions. It was decided to take the cases separately, so the woman was removed from the dock.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew), addressing Kingsley, said he would be charged firstly with that he on January 26th did sell to a member of His Majesty's Service a certain intoxicant with intent to make him drunk or less capable of performing his duties, contrary to Section 40 of the Defence of the Realm (Consolidation) Act.

Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty, and also denied two similar offences on January 12th and 16th.

Mr. Travers Humphreys said the Director of Public Prosecutions had taken up these proceedings at the request of the military authorities. It would not prejudice the prisoner if the three charges were taken together. The arrest of the man and the woman was considered to be a matter of considerable importance, because Major Morrison had been for some time trying to find out who were the persons supplying the Canadian soldiers with this drug. The effect of this drug on the soldiers was most pitiful and most distressing. Defendant was a distributing agent for this drug amongst the soldiers. The drug made the person unreliable, delusional, and sometimes produced insanity. If a man was treated for it, he did not get over the ill-effects it produced. They would have certain evidence to show that. If a Canadian soldier was found to have acquired the habit of taking cocaine, he was absolutely useless for the Army from that day forth.

Corporal C.F. Price, of the 8th Battalion, Canadians, said he had known the accused about two months. On the 12th January he was in the Granville public house, Dover Street, where he saw accused with some soldiers and woman. Prisoner handed packets to two soldiers and one woman. The packets were small, and similar to those produced. He spoke to the accused, and asked him what it was, and prisoner said “Snow”. He asked how much it was, and the reply was “2s.”. Witness bought a packet, which was quite plain, with no writing on it. It contained white powder. He saw the accused again on the 16th January in Harbour Street, and bought another packet. He asked prisoner if he could have some more “Snow”, and accused said “Yes”. He paid 2s. again for another packet. He was in uniform, and was acting under the orders of his superior officers. He was on police duty. On the 24th January he went to Dover with the accused. They went to Lewis Thompson's chemist shop, 186, Snargate Street, Dover. He waited outside whilst prisoner went in. Witness asked him when he came out if he had got any “snow”, and he said “Yes, only half a drachm. I ordered two drachms, and I have to fetch it on the following Wednesday or Thursday” On Wednesday, January 26th, he went again with accused to the same chemist. Prisoner went to the side door, as it was early closing, and it was opened by a man.

Prisoner: A lie.

Witness, continuing, said prisoner handed over a bottle to the man at the chemist's (produced). To his knowledge accused had not more than 7s. or 8s.

Prisoner: No.

Witness said they then left and returned later. The bottle, which was empty, was handed over to accused, full of white powder. The bottle was marked “Poison. Cocaine Hydrochloride. Lewis Thompson, Chemist, Dover”. They left, and witness said he would like some “snow”, asking him to spare him 2s. 6d. worth. Prisoner said he would, and gave witness a little packet containing the white powder. They returned to Folkestone, where they were met by Detective Sergeant Johnson, who arrested the accused with the bottle in his possession. Witness handed over the packets on the 26th inst. in the evening to the detective.

Detective Sergeant Johnson said on January 26th, about 3.40 p.m., he was in company with P.C. Butcher on Grace Hill, and saw the prisoner and Price arrive from Dover. He went to Kingsley, told him they were two police officers, and would take him to the police station. He replied “All right”. At the police station he found in prisoner's possession the bottle marked “Cocaine. Poison”, an empty bottle, which had got the label of Mr. Thompson, and also a packet containing white powder. He later charged the prisoner with selling a certain quantity of powder to members of H.M. Forces, with intent to make them less capable of performing their duties. Prisoner said “How can I make them less capable? They are my friends”. He later received the packets from Price, and, in company with Major Morrison, took them to the laboratory at Shorncliffe, handing them to Captain Malone.

Captain Reginald Malone, M.D., of the C.A.M.C., said he analysed the contents of the packets and bottles. They all contained a soluble salt of cocaine.

Captain J.B. McMurray, of the C.A.M.C., said he was acquainted with the effect of cocaine, and had had experience of it. He was in charge of the Moore Barracks Hospital. Cocaine was a most dangerous drug and a poison. Taken in repeated small doses, it would become a habit. The effect of acquiring the habit eventually led to insanity. It was very difficult to get rid of the habit once acquired. In the early stages of the habit it gave very brilliant ideas, supernatural ideas, and nothing was impossible. The reaction left the man sullen, morose, bad-tempered, and totally unfit for duty. They had had in Moore Barracks over forty cases of the drug habit. He had examined one or two of the samples, and in his opinion, if taken in quite small doses, would have rendered a soldier less capable. Cocaine was a great stimulant drug.

In reply to Mr. Andrews, witness said the 40 cases referred to had acquired the habit. It took about two or three weeks to acquire the habit.

Questioned by the prisoner, witness said one of the small packets would certainly affect a man.

Major Morrison, Assistant P.M., said he had seen the effect of the cocaine. What first drew his attention to it was the men coming into the guard room. The effect of cocaine taking rendered a man less capable of discharging his duties. The cocaine was known as “snow” by the Canadians.

Prisoner elected to give evidence on oath. He said he was living at No. 6, Shellons Street, Folkestone. He had been in Dover on the day he was arrested because his chemist in Folkestone had run short. He would like to state that owing to the price of hydrochloride cocaine he could not give it away. When he ran short of money his friends would give him a shilling or two. He did not sell it to the soldiers. The soldiers were friends of his, and he had been about with them for two or three months. The Corporal had nit given him any money, although he had lent him money to get it. He had no recollection of giving the first two packets to Corporal Price at all. He had been in the Army for twelve years, and had been to the front. He had only just come out of hospital. He came to Folkestone to recuperate himself. He had a relapse, and was taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital. He had been willing to do his bit, and did not see why he should want to prevent these soldiers doing their bit. He had got the Indian North West Frontier medal. He was in a very weak state of health.

Cross-examined, accused said he had not got his military papers. They were at 14, Stall Street, Tottenham Court Road. He had written for them several times, but had received no reply. He came to Folkestone in July. He had a little money he had saved, and 1s. 6d. a day from the War Office. It was paid quarterly, and he had not applied for it yet. He did not get it as it was not much, and as he had been ill he could not have a grand slam. He had not sold any cocaine. He had given it away. He bought the cocaine at different chemists in Folkestone. He would not like to give their names at present. He knew the soldiers were not allowed to buy the stuff from chemists, as Major Morrison had put a bar on it. He knew a woman named Rose Edwards, who had been giving a little cocaine to soldiers. They were living in the same house. She was a friend of his. She did not come from London.

Mr. Humphrey: You were very kind to give it to soldiers.

The prisoner: Yes. When I had not got much the soldiers gave me some.

Mr. Humphrey: What effect does it have?

The prisoner: It makes you most keen on what you are doing.

In reply to a question by the Magistrates' Clerk, prisoner said he had taken the drug for five or six years. It had no ill-effect on him.

The Bench retired, and on their return the Chairman said it was a very serious case indeed, and the Bench found him Guilty. He would be sentenced to six months' hard labour in each of the three cases, the sentences to run concurrently, making six months in all. If he was not well enough to do hard labour, the prison authorities would see to that.

Mr. Humphrey said the other charge under the Pharmacy Act would be withdrawn. It was only a minor matter.

Rose Edwards was then charged with three similar offences. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty to all.

Corporal Price said he knew the prisoner. He saw her on January 14th at the Belle Vue Hotel. When he came out of the house he saw her empty some white powder in a soldier's handkerchief from a small box. He asked her what it was, and she said “Snow”. He asked her if she could spare some for him, and she said she could, and she gave him some, for which he gave her 2s. 6d. At half past four the same day he saw her again, when he asked if she could sell him another packet, and he paid her 2s. for it. On January 17th he saw her in the Granville Hotel, and he bought a packet of “snow” from her for 2s. 6d. On the 24th January he visited her house at 9.15 a.m., and he purchased a packet from her for 2s. She wrapped the cocaine up in an envelope bearing her address (Little Fenchurch Street).

Mr. Travers Humphrey remarked that it was a Y.M.C.A. envelope.

Detective Sergeant Johnson said on January 26th he saw the prisoner at the police station, and he charged her.

Captain Malone deposed to analysing the content of the packets produced by Corpl. Price, and Captain McMurray spoke of the effect of the drug.

Prisoner said she was living at 6, Shellons Street. Corporal Price came up on the 14th inst., and asked if she could spare a little. She gave him some. She never received money for the “snow”. On the 24th she was in bed and did not see Price.

In reply to Mr. Humphrey, prisoner said she got the “snow” from a fellow in the West End in a public house.

Mr. Huimphrey: What sort of a fellow?

Prisoner: He sells it to all of us girls.

In further reply to Mr. Humphrey, the accused said she did not give it to other soldiers. She had taken the drug herself, but broke herself of the habit just before Christmas. She gave it to Corporal Price on two occasions only.

Mr. Humphrey: How much does this powder cost?

Prisoner: Oh! You can get a pill-box full for 2s. 6d. in London.

Kingsley, on oath, said he had never known Edwards to sell cocaine.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said the prisoner came from London. She was a well-known prostitute, although there had been no convictions against her.

The Chairman said it was regarded as a very serious offence at the present time by the Government. Prisoner would be sentenced to six months' hard labour for each offence, the sentences to run concurrently, making six months in all.

The Chairman, addressing Corporal Price, said the Bench wished to thank him. They greatly appreciated the way in which he had given his evidence. They were also grateful for the splendid way he took the matter on, and the way he brought the evidence before them.

The Chief Constable said that Kingsley's statement as to having served in the Army was incorrect. He was sentenced to two months' imprisonment in London in 1913 for felony.

 

Folkestone Express 27 November 1920.

Local News.

Plans for alterations to the Harvey Hotel, submitted by Mr. Jackson, architect, Ashford, on behalf of the owners, to the Magistrates, on Tuesday morning were approved.

 

Folkestone Express 13 August 1921.

Local News.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was on Tuesday temporarily transferred to Mr. George F. Maxted, the previous licensee having recently died.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 August 1921.

Wednesday, August 24th: Before The Mayor, Sir Stephen Penfold, Councillor E.T. Morrison, Councillor A. Stace, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Alderman C. Jenner, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Councillor W. Hollands, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Councillor Miss E.I. Weston.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred to Mr. Geo. Frederick Maxted.

 

Folkestone Express 7 January 1922.

Local News.

The following extension was granted at the Police Court on Tuesday: Harvey Hotel, January 18th, 11 p.m., Co-Operative Staff Dinner.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 January 1922.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Colonel G.P. Owen presiding, the Harvey Hotel was allowed an extension till 11 p.m. on the 18th inst., for a dinner of the Co-Operative Stores' staff.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 June 1923.

Monday, June 5th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Mr. Arthur Stace, and Alderman Dunk.

William Whiting was charged with stealing a pair of boots from 73, Tontine Street, the premises of Messrs. R.G. Wood.

Cyril George Harold, employed by Mr. R.G. Wood in the boot department, said that at 9.30 a.m. on the 1st June he hung outside the shop a rod, on which were placed ten pairs of men's boots, which were hanging on hooks. Later, about 7.45, he missed one of the pairs of plain-fronted Derbys, size eight, similar to those produced. He had not sold any from the rod during the day. On Sunday he was called to the police station, and there shown a pair of boots, which he identified as the pair which was missed from outside the shop on Friday. They had had about two days' wear. Their selling value was 13/6.

P.C. Butcher said from information received he made certain enquiries, and at 11 a.m. on Sunday he was in Canterbury Road, in company with P.C. Allen, when he saw the prisoner coming towards them. He noticed that he was wearing a new pair of boots, and he stopped him and said “I see you are wearing a new pair of boots, Whiting”. He replied “Yes, I bought them about eight months ago, and have had them at home in my case”. He said “Where did you buy them?” Prisoner replied “I don't know”. He then told prisoner that they answered the description of a pair of boots stolen on the 1st inst. from outside 73, Tontine Street. At the police station as he was taking his boots off he said “I bought them about three months ago at an auction on Grace Hill for 10/-“. He then showed the boots to the last witness, who identified them. Later the prisoner was charged in his presence, and he replied “I was at work from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.”.

The Chief Constable asked for a remand so that enquiries could be made.

The Magistrates adjourned the case until yesterday (Friday).

When the prisoner was brought up on remand yesterday, Dr. W.J. Tyson was in the chair.

Prisoner put in a statement in which he stated that he finished work on Saturday at 12.30, and on his way home he called at the Harvey Hotel for a drink. A man outside offered to sell him the pair of boots in question for 6s., stating that he had just come out of the Naval Reserve and wished to get to Whitstable. He (prisoner) bought the boots for 6s. He had been working on the Sports Ground since December, a week on and a week off, and he now had a promise of regular employment. He therefore asked for another chance for the sake of his wife and children. He hoped the Magistrates would give him an opportunity of proving himself a good citizen.

Inspector R.J. Bourne (the Acting Chief Constable) stated that prisoner was a local man, born in the town. There were two convictions for drunkenness against him, and on November 28th, 1921, he was fined 10s. and 14 17s. 6d. costs, or in default two months' imprisonment, for breaking a window at the Labour Exchange. On October 17th, 1921, he was sentenced to three months in the second division for breaking and entering a dwelling house in Shorncliffe Road.

The Chairman said the accused would be sentenced to three months' hard labour. He could consider that very lenient. He had better be very careful in the future.

Whiting: I shall.

 

Folkestone Express 16 June 1923.

Local News.

On Friday at the Folkestone Police Court William Whiting was charged on remand with stealing a pair of boots from the shop of Mr. R.G. Wood, Tontine Street, of the value of 13s. 6d.

The evidence given at the previous hearing was read over. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty to stealing.

The Clerk read a statement handed in by prisoner, in which he stated that after he finished work on Saturday at 12.30, on his way home he called at the Harvey Hotel to have a drink. When he came out a strange man pulled him up and asked him if he would buy a pair of new boots for 6s., saying he had just come out of the Naval Reserve, and wished to sell them to get to Whitstable. He bought them for 6s., and wore them up to the time he was arrested. He appealed to the Magistrates to give him a chance now that he was in regular employment, for the sake of his wife and children, and let him prove himself a good citizen.

Inspector Bourne said prisoner was a local man. There were two conviction for drunkenness, and on 28th November, 1921, he was fined 10s., and 14 17s. 6d. for breaking a window at the Labour Exchange, or in default two months. On the 7th October he was sentenced to three months' imprisonment in the second division for breaking and entering a dwelling house in Shorncliffe Road.

Whiting was sentenced to three months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 25 August 1923.

Local News.

On Wednesday, at the Folkestone Police Court, Mr. Jackson, architect, Ashford, submitted plans for alterations to the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, and the plans were approved.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 November 1923.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday (before Mr. G.I. Swoffer) the licence of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was transferred to Mr. George Parker.

 

Folkestone Express 21 February 1925.

Local News.

The following extension of licence was granted by the Magistrates at the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday:—Harvey Hotel, one hour, on the occasion of the dinner of the Ancient Order of Druids.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1925.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday (before Colonel G.P. Owen, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. J.H. Blamey, and Miss A.M. Hunt) various licensing matters were dealt with.

The Harvey Hotel was granted an extension of licence until 11 p.m. on February 18th for the annual dinner of the Druids.

 

Folkestone Express 6 June 1925.

Saturday, May 30th: Before Mr. G. Boyd, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, and Col. Broome-Giles.

Pte. David Falconer and Pte. James Smith, both belonging to the Inniskilling Fusiliers, were charged with breaking two glass panels at the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, the property of Mr. George Parker.

Mr. George Parker said at 11.05 p.m. the previous night he heard a knock at the door of his hotel, and he found there were two soldiers leaning against the glass panels of the door. He asked them what they wanted, and they said “Will you give us a drink?” He told them he could not as it was past the time for serving. He advised them to go home. He left the door, thinking that was the end of the matter, and went back to his private room. Immediately after he heard a smash of glass. He went to see what it was, and found the broken panels of glass. He telephoned for the police. He saw the two soldiers almost at the same moment a police constable arrived. The glass was 38ins. by 15ins., and the cost for replacing it was four guineas.

Albert Edward Tritton, a taxi driver, said at 11.10 p.m. the previous night, when on the way home in his car, he saw two soldiers leaning against the glass panels of a door of the Harvey Hotel. He saw one of the soldiers draw back and slip, and give the glass a smash. He could not see who they were, as it was dark, but they were soldiers.

P.C. Pay said at 11.10 p.m. the previous evening he was on duty in Dover Road, and saw the two soldiers standing on the kerb. He told them he had been informed that they had broken some glass panels, and that he would take them into custody. He took them to the police station, where they were formally charged. Falconer replied “I am willing to pay for it”. Smith replied “I deny the charge”. Both were under the influence of drink. He examined a stick of one of the defendants, and found the knob was dented.

An officer from the Camp said Falconer's character was good, but the character of Smith was only fair. They had been in the regiment for about four years.

The Chairman said each would have to pay 2 2s. towards the damage done to the panels, and they would also have to pay a fine of 5s. each, and 5s. witness's fees.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 June 1925.

Saturday, May 30th: Before Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman C. Ed. Mumford, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, and Colonel P. Broome-Giles.

Pte. David Falconer and Pte. James Smith were charged with wilfully damaging two glass panels in a door of the Harvey Hotel on the previous evening. Both prisoners pleaded Not Guilty.

George Parker, licensee of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, said that at two minutes past eleven on the previous night there was a knock at the private door. He went to see what it was, and there were two soldiers leaning against the glass panels. He asked the men what they wanted, and one said “Give us a drink”. He told them it was past time and advised them to go home. He left the door, thinking that that would end the matter, and walked back to his private room. Only a couple of seconds had elapsed when he heard a smash of glass. He at once telephoned to the police station, and then went outside. The prisoners were on the pavement. Almost at the same time a taxi drove up and a constable jumped out. The cost of replacing the glass would be 4 4/-.

Albert Edward Tritton, of 26, East Cliff, a taxi driver, said that about 11.10 the previous evening he was on his way home in his car when he looked round at the Harvey Hotel and saw two soldiers leaning against the front glass door. He saw one of the men smash the glass panel of the door. He could not see which of the prisoners it was. He then proceeded up Dover Road, and found P.C. Pay, whom he told what had happened and drove him to the Harvey Hotel.

P.C. Pay said that when he arrived at the Harvey Hotel he saw two soldiers standing on the kerb. He told the men that he had been informed that they had damaged the glass windows in the door of the Harvey Hotel, and that he would take them into custody. He took the prisoners to the police station, where they were formally charged and cautioned by P.S. Cradduck. Falconer replied “Yes, and I am willing to pay for it”. Smith replied “I deny the charge”. Both men were under the influence of drink. He later examined a stick which belonged to Smith, and found that the knob was badly damaged, and that there was a small piece of glass embedded in the stick.

An officer said that the character of Falconer was excellent, and that of Smith was fair. There were no civil convictions against the prisoners, and they had never been court-martialled.

Prisoners were fined 2 12/- each.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 January 1926.

Tuesday, January 12th: Before Mr. G. Boyd and Dr. W.W. Nuttall.

An application for an extension of hours made by Mr. Parker, of the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, was granted.

The Chairman said in regard to the granting of extensions he hoped the licensee took care to see that no-one other than those for whom the extension was granted came into the house. If he did not, he was liable to get into trouble. He had the authority of the Bench in saying what he had. Of course, what he said applied not only to Mr. Parker, but to all those who applied for an extension.

Mr. Parker said he took great care over the matter. He might say the outer door was locked.

Mr. Boyd said it was a general statement he had made. It applied also to those who had an extension for dances. He had a reason to make those remarks.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew): The reason, I venture to suggest, is not in regard to Mr. Parker's house at all.

Mr. Boyd: Oh, no. His was merely the first case to come before me.

 

Folkestone Express 15 January 1927.

Monday, January 10th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and Mr. A. Stace.

Mary Anne Williams was charged with wilful damage, and with being drunk and disorderly on Saturday evening.

She was not present when the case was called, having been bailed out, but when the evidence was being proceeded with she entered the Court.

The Deputy Clerk (Mr. Rootes) told her she was late, and she replied that she had been waiting for her husband to come with her.

Defendant pleaded guilty to both charges, and said she had had too much drink because she had the flu.

Mr. George Barker, the landlord of the Harvey Hotel, said on Saturday night, about half-past nine, the defendant came into the private bar. He noticed she was drunk, so for he would not serve her. He tried for ten minutes at least to persuade her to leave the premises. As she did not appear as if she would go he went to the other side of the counter and helped her out. He closed the door and she immediately smashed one of the panes of glass in the door, either with her fist or an umbrella. He went outside, and she immediately moved away to the Dover Road. A police-sergeant came along, and he reported the matter to him, and the defendant was arrested. The value of the pane of glass was 5s.

Defendant: He came and threw me right out into the street.

Witness: I took hold of her shoulders and assisted her out.

P.S. Hollands said about 9.35 p.m. on Saturday when going down Dover Road, he heard someone shouting. On looking round the corner of Harvey Street he saw the defendant, who was shouting abuse, coming from the doorway of the hotel. He saw she was drunk, so he went to her and cautioned her. She became quieter and started to go aw ay w hen Mr. Barker came up, and from what he said, he (witness) took her into custody.

Defendant said she was very sorry. She had had the flu, and she had a little drop too much to drink, and it overcame her. She asked the Magistrates to look over it and give her another chance. If they did so she would try again.

The Chairman: When was she here last?

Inspector Pittock: On August 25th, when she was dismissed after the case had been adjourned for a month. She had been here on 35 occasions.

Mr. Stace: When was the occasion before the last occasion?

Inspector Pittock said that was on July 7th, 1925. She had not been fined since February, 1923, when the Salvation Army promised to look after her.

Mr. Stace: Is anyone here from the Salvation Army?

Inspector Pittock: I think they have finished with her now.

The Chairman said the Magistrates could not overlook that now. She would have to pay 5s. fine and 5s. for the damage she had done on the first charge, and 5s. fine for being drunk and disorderly. In default of payment she would have to go to prison for seven days on each charge, or 14 days in all.

The Magistrates allowed the defendant seven days in which to pay the fine.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 January 1927.

Monday, January 10th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and Mr. A. Stace.

Mary Ann Williams was charged with wilfully damaging a pane of glass at the Harvey Hotel, and further with being drunk and disorderly on Saturday night.

Defendant, who had been bailed out, did not appear, and Inspector Pittock said defendant was bailed out on Sunday morning and when the copy of the bail form was served upon her she was told that she must attend at the Court at eleven o'clock on Monday morning.

The Acting Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) said they would take certain evidence in defendant's absence, but just after the first witness had been sworn defendant arrived. After apologising for being late, defendant said she pleaded Guilty to both charges.

Mr. George Parker, licensee of the Harvey Hotel, Harvey Street, said at 9.20 on Saturday night defendant came into the private bar. He noticed that she was drunk, and he refused to serve her. He tried to get her to leave the premises and as she did not go he helped her out. He closed the door on her, and she immediately smashed one of the panes of glass, valued 5/-. Witness went outside, and he saw that defendant had moved away towards Dover Road. A police sergeant then came along, and he reported what had occurred to him.

Defendant: Mr. Parker came and threw me out into the street.

Witness: I took hold of her by the shoulders, and assisted her out of the door.

Police Sergeant Hollands said at 9.35 p.m. on Saturday he was walking down Dover Road, when he saw defendant at the corner of the Harvey Hotel, making a lot of noise. She was drunk, and he told her to get off home. She became quieter and started to leave, but just as she was going the last witness came to him, and from what he said he took defendant into custody.

Defendant said she was very sorry to come before them again. She had had the flu, and when she had a drop of drink it overcame her. If the Bench liked to give her another chance she would try again.

Inspector Pittock said on August 25th of last year defendant was before them on a charge of being drunk and disorderly. The case was dismissed after being adjourned for a month. February 5th, 1923, was the last time defendant was convicted.

The Magistrates fined defendant 5s. on each charge, and also ordered her to pay the 5s. damage to the window. In default she would have to go to prison for fourteen days altogether.

Defendant asked for time to pay, and the Bench allowed her a week.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 June 1931.

Local News.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Waghorn, who left the Harvey Hotel, Dover Road, Folkestone, yesterday, to take over the Nag's Head, Dover Street, Canterbury, were the recipients of a handsome engraved silver fruit bowl, presented to them by Mr. Walter Scott, on behalf of the Folkestone and District Meat Traders' Association.

On Wednesday of last week, at a smoking concert, Mrs. B. Marks presented Mrs. Waghorn with a handbag, and Mr. Waghorn with a silver-mounted walking stick, on behalf of customers and friends. Mrs. Waghorn also received a glass flower vase from other friends.

 

Folkestone Express 18 July 1931.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday the following licence was transferred: The Harvey Hotel, from Mr. Waghorn to Mr. Sherrin, formerly of the Chequers Inn, Ash, near Sandwich.

 

Folkestone Express 26 November 1932.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, before Mr. J.H. Blamey and other Magistrates, the licence of the Harvey Hotel was transferred from Mr. H.J. Sherrin, who is leaving the town for Margate, to Mr. F.J. Grew, of Streatham.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 November 1932.

Local News.

The licence of the Harvey Hotel, Folkestone, was transferred from Mr. H.J. Sherrin to Mr. F.J. Grew, of Streatham, on Wednesday at the Folkestone Licensing Sessions. Mr. Sherrin is leaving Folkestone to take over another house at Margate.

 

Folkestone Express 25 November 1933.

Wednesday, November 22nd: Before Mr. J.H. Blamey, Alderman T.S. Franks, Councillor Mrs. E. Gore, Mr. F. Seager, Mr. W. Smith, Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, and Alderman J.W. Stainer.

Mr. J.A. Evans, formerly of Llandudno, applied for the transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel from Mr. Grew. The applicant said he had been a holder of a licence for fourteen years. The Bench granted the application.

 

Folkestone Express 7 November 1936.

Local News.

The Magistrates, on Tuesday, granted a protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the Harvey Hotel from Mr. J.T Nye to Mr. Ernest G. Green, of the Lion and Lamb, Brentwood.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 November 1936.

Local News.

Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a Protection Order to Mr. Ernest G. Green, of the Lion and Lamb Hotel, Brentwood, in respect of the Harvey Hotel. The outgoing tenant is Mr. James T. Nye.

 

Folkestone Express 30 December 1939.

Local News.

Two sixteen-year-old boys were summoned at the Folkestone Juvenile Court on Friday morning for consuming intoxicating liquor when under the age of 18. Both defendants pleaded guilty.

P.C. Crane said at 12.45 p.m. on Sunday he was on duty in Harvey Street, walking towards Dover Road. When about 100 yards away from the Harvey Hotel he saw two youths go into the hotel. He drew level with the hotel and saw one of the boys peering through the window of the bottle and jug department. A few minutes later he opened the door and saw the two defendants inside. One boy was sitting on his left against the counter and next to him was an empty glass. The other boy was holding a half pint glass containing about an inch and a half of beer. He (witness) said to him “Is that beer?” and the boy said “Yes”. He examined the empty glass and found that that also had contained beer. He asked the boy with the empty glass how old he was. He said he was 18 years of age. The other boy said he also was 18. He told the boys he did not believe them and he would find out. The first boy then said “No, I am 16”, and the other defendant admitted he was only 16. He told them they had committed an offence by entering licensed premises, ordering beer and drinking it. He told them they would be summoned. He spoke to the licensee and he made a statement as follows: “At about 12.45 p.m. today two youths entered the jug and bottle department of my premises. I asked them their age and they replied they were over 18 and on that understanding I served them with two half pints of beer and charged them 2d. each. I do not wish to break the law, but thought they spoke the truth”.

The Chairman (Alderman Mrs. E. Gore) to the defendants: You knew you had no business there?

One of the defendants: We knew that if we went into the public bar we would not get served, but would in the bottle and jug.

The mother of one defendant said the hoys were not in the habit of doing it. She understood they had been in the hotel once before and the landlord asked them their age, but he did not do so on the occasion in question. She had spoken to the licensee and he said the boys looked 18, but they did not.

The Chairman: Of course, they don’t.

The father of the other boy said he did not know his son frequented the place until the constable brought him borne.

The Chairman said “You are here for a very serious offence, you both knew you were doing wrong. We are going to dismiss the case with a caution, if you give your assurance that you will not do this again. You promise that?

The boys: Yes.

The Chairman: If you do there will be very serious trouble.

The Magistrates’ Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes): This finishes it for the two boys, but one thing, the licensee is liable to get into very serious trouble.

 

Folkestone Express 23 March 1940.

Lighting Order.

Ernest George Green, Harvey Hotel, was summoned in respect of an illuminated sign.

P.C. Miller said at 3 a.m. on March 8th he was in Dover Road when he saw a light coming from the public bar of the Harvey Hotel. On closer examination he saw it came from an illuminated sign in the window. The sign was the word “Open”. He called the defendant, who said the light had been forgotten.

Defendant said it was only a small sign and did not cast much of a light.

Fined 10/-.

 

Folkestone Express 30 March 1940.

Lighting Order.

Offences against the lighting regulations continue, and a number of cases have been heard at the Folkestone Police Court by the Magistrates.

There was a further long list of summonses on Tuesday, when the Magistrates on the Bench were Councillor R.G. Wood, Mr. A.E. Pepper, Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens, Alderman J.W. Stainer, and Miss Grace Broome-Giles.

Margaret Green, Harvey Hotel, did not deny the offence.

P.C. Seamer said at 10.50 p.m. he saw a light shining through two windows on the first floor of the hotel, and the buildings on the opposite side of the street were brightly illuminated. The electric light was on the landing of the first floor.

The defendant said she left the light on for her husband. She did not think it would show through the door, which had coloured glass in it.

Fined 10/-.

 

Folkestone Express 20 April 1940.

Lighting Order.

Ernest George Green, Harvey Hotel, admitted the offence.

War Reserve Police Constable Maxted said the light was shining through the hotel entrance at 9.40 p.m.

The defendant said the light was reflected from his office, and the lamp was 22 feet away from the door.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said there was a previous conviction on March 19th.

Fined 10/-.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 April 1979.

Local News.

As Dan Kissane left the Harvey pub, Folkestone from which he had been previously banned, the licensee heard glass breaking in a door. At Folkestone Magistrates' Court on Friday, Kissane, aged 47, admitted criminal damage.

Diane Wray, defending, said the incident occurred on New Year's Eve and her client, of Marshall Street, Folkestone, had been with a family party which began at 2.30 p.m.

Kissane was fined 25 and ordered to pay 150 compensation.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 November 1980.

Local News.

A chase from Folkestone's Harvey Hotel and the subsequent recovery of 96 from a gutter in nearby Queen Street was recalled at Folkestone Magistrates' Court last Friday.

Gareth Jordan, 18, admitted burglary, involving theft of cash. He was given a three month prison sentence, suspended for two years.

Inspector Ronald Young said a customer at the hotel chased Gordon and caught him. The money had come from a till.

The Court heard that Jordan was at present undergoing Borstal training for other offences.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

MARSH George Aug/1864-93 (age 51 in 1881Census) BastionsFolkestone ChroniclePost Office Directory 1874

MARSH Margaret 1893-96 Bastions

MARSH Richard & Charles 1896-98 Bastions

HAND Mr 1898

BROOKER James A 1898-99 BastionsKelly's 1899 (Danes Road)

CROSS Sydney 1899-02 (age 20 in 1901Census) Bastions

KEATES Thomas 1902-04 Bastions

SMITH Edgar 1904-08 Bastions

SMITH Mary 1908-09 Bastions

KILLICK Nellie 1909-10 Bastions

Last pub licensee had BASSETT Charles 1910-11 (age 37 in 1911Census) Bastions

WIGHTMAN Arthur 1911-13 Bastions

GOUGH William 1913-15 Bastions

PIPER Charles 1915-17 Bastions

ABRAMS Emily 1917-21 Bastions

MAXTED George 1921-23 Bastions

PARKER George 1923-29 Bastions

WAGHORN Charles 1929-31 Bastions

SHERRIN Harold 1931-32 Bastions

GREW Frederick J 1932-33 Bastions

EVANS John 1933-35 Bastions

NYE James 1935-36 Bastions

GREEN Ernest 1936-48 Bastions

BROWN Frank 1948-49 Bastions

TIGWELL Edward 1949-50 Bastions

SMITH Cyril 1950-55 Bastions

SIMPSON Percy 1955-58 Bastions

LAWRENCE William 1958-68 Bastions

GRIFFITHS Ivor 1868-70 Bastions

LINEY Francis 1970-71 Bastions

PEARCE Kenneth 1971-76 Bastions

JARVIS Basil 1976-78 Bastions

HARRINGTON Brian 1978-85 Bastions

PARSFIELD Boyd 1985-90 Bastions

CRAWFORD Anthony & HEALEY Simon 1990-91 Bastions

WILLIAMS Michael & FARMER Avril 1991-95 Bastions

HALL Trevor & CHILDS Michael 1995 Bastions

SHIEL Kim and Stella & CHILDS Michael 1996 Bastions

ATKINS David & MEES John 1996 Next pub licensee had Bastions

Last pub licensee had O'SHEA Andrew 1996-98 Bastions

Last pub licensee had LAIDLOW Peter & COX Philip 1998 Bastions

FRISKEN Stephen (Also "Victoria Hotel.") & DUNHAM Amanda 1998-2004 Bastions

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

Folkestone ChronicleFrom the Folkestone Chronicle

CensusCensus

 

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