DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Ramsgate, November, 2021.

Page Updated:- Monday, 22 November, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1840-

(Royal) Oak Hotel

Open 2019+

66 Harbour Parade

Ramsgate

01843 592442

https://www.oakhotel.co.uk/

https://whatpub.com/oak-hotel

Oak Hotel

Above photos by Paul Skelton 21 July 2012.

Royal Oak plaque

Above plaque on the wall of the Oak Hotel, 2020. Kindly sent by dkpo1.

"To Commemorate all Ranks of 27 Air Sea Rescue of the Royal Air Force H.Q. Dover stationed at Royal Harbour Ramsgate based at the Royal oak from 1942 to 1945. Their combined actions during world war II often in extreme adverse conditions helped save the lives of over 13000 British, Allied and Enemy Aircrew.

 

I have just added the pubs of Ramsgate in July 2012 and will be updating the pages as time allows, however, with my site increasing in size I cannot guarantee to be able to update these pages with historical data from deep research on a regular basis. I will, however, update this page should anyone be good enough to send me any information about this pub.

Research has been taken to date from the following web site:-

http://janetandrichardsgenealogy.co.uk

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 18 February 1840.

Ramsgate.

(The following was in response to Queen Victoria's recent marriage to Prince Albert on 10 February 1840. Paul Skelton.)

The principal tradesmen suspended business and closed their shops, that all classes might join in the festive hilarity. About 200 children were feasted at the National School Rooms; 150 of the Teetotal Society took tea at Hubbard’s Rooms, and discussed the subject of the joys of matrimony; and 56 tradesmen sat down to a sumptuous dinner at Corbin's "Royal Oak Inn," served up in capital style, and worthy of the auspicious occasion. About 120 of the inhabitants and their daughters partook of a supper at Hiscock’s "Royal Hotel," after which they joined in the "graceful dance." Nearly 100 persons of the principal resident nobility and gentry were similarly engaged at Bear’s "Albion Hotel," keeping up the ball till near daylight. The poor at the Union were regaled with roastbeef, plum pudding, and beer, so that nearly the whole of the inhabitants did honour to the illustrious bride and bridegroom.


 

From the Kentish Gazette, 25 January 1842.

RAMSGATE.

The Royal Christening of the Prince of Wales will be celebrated by a ball at the "Albion Hotel," and an evening party, consisting of the principal gentry and tradesmen will meet at Corbin’s, "Royal Oak Hotel," to do honour to the occasion.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 1 February 1842.

RAMSGATE.

On Tuesday some of the principal tradesmen of Ramsgate, joined by a few friends from St. Lawrence, dined at the "Royal Oak Inn," to commemorate the young Prince’s christening. The chair was taken by our old townsman, Mr. Wildish, supported by T. Mayhew, Esq., Mr. Hutchinson, Mr. Edwards, &c. &c. The day passed with hilarity and great Spirit until eight o’clock, when the party adjourned to the Concert Room to meet a large body of their fellow townsmen. The chair was then taken by Mr. Sackett (the first time of his presiding since he has had the honour of becoming our Deputy), the vice by Mr. Wildish, and the evening passed off with great glee and good humour. Among those present we noticed the Officers of Customs, Captain Martin and the Officers of the Royal Harbour.

 

Thanet Advertiser, Saturday 9 October 1886.

A "PARTING BLOW."

The following' letter had been received;

Corbin’s Royal Oak Hotel, Ramsgate, September 27th, 1866.

Dear Sirs, — At the beginning of this season (if it can be called by that name) I wrote to the Mayor asking him to endeavour to relieve us of some of the nuisances existing in the thoroughfare (the principal use) and seriously affecting this business. I was led to believe that he sympathised with us, and certainly looked forward to a little consideration being shewn; but I find that I was mistaken, for, whether with fixed intent or not, most certainly every detail of the awful nuisances has been aggravated; there have been more wagonettes, carriages, barrows of all sorts, a great deal more maddening noise for people who come down for quirt; more blasting of horns, one or two more fights in the day-time than usual, and a few more nightly ones at the pier gates between 11 and 12 o'clock: more stench, urine, etc., from the cab stand, which is very properly placed no that by the fall of the roadway all liquid must gently trickle slowly across the thoroughfare; more coal, chalk, sand, and dirt has been shovelled in and out of vessels on the busiest excursion days, when the place required the most keeping clear and the greatest care to avoid accidents; more confusion; more complaints about these things by my own visitors; and, lastly, which no doubt all the Council will be pleased to hear, more people have left the hotel in consequence (the names of whom have been given me and the reason stated) this season.

After such treatment, sirs, it is not surprising that our rulers are received with scowls instead of smiles. The most cruel wrong ever inflicted on a body of ratepayers was the refusal to pave this thoroughfare with wood, or some other noiseless paving, and for which we have to thank the Mayor principally. Unless this is done soon, it is impossible for this hotel to continue the business. Why we, who have paid so much to the Town during fifty years, should be so wilfully wronged and refused so small a matter, is more than I or any of my friends can understand. I have just received a peremptory note from Mr. Dunt, I suppose intended as a threat to take proceedings if not paid, amounting to 30 paid this year only, and I ask for what? Simply nothing; not even common decency or ordinary treatment of a grievance. I should add that a poor old man, at 15s. per week, has been vainly trying to keep some of the filth under during the season; beyond this nothing whatever has been done.

Thanking yon, the Mayor and Council, for your kind consideration to us,

I am, Sirs yours faithfully,

Henry E. Corbin.

 

P.S. — Will you kindly endeavour to get the gas coal discharged opposite this hotel during the winter? It would save the town some expense and be more satisfactory to the contractor.

 

The Major said be heard soma few days ago that he was going to have a parting blow from an inhabitant, of that part of Harbour-street, for refusing to support the wood-pavement scheme, but if it was again brought up he should again be opposed to it. (Hear, hear.) His worship went on to repeat arguments he had previously used against wood pavement and the taking over of the Town Quay; and said with regard to the nuisances complained of, he had put himself in communication with Mr. Buss and begged him to do all he could to abate or lessen them. He knew the inhabitants were much annoyed, but the Quay was the only bit of front they had, and accommodation must be provided for the waggonettes, etc. He must say he was not surprised at Mr. Corbin's irritability of temper.

Councillor Pearce said something ought to be done. The noise of passing vehicles was dreadful, and visitors would not stop.

The Major said some first-class London hotels were situated in street paved similarly to the Quay.

Councillor Hobbs said he was walking down that part of Harbour-street on Sunday morning, when he saw mats being beaten outside one of the hotels. The foot passengers could not pass for clouds of dust. He did not think that was right.

Councillor Woolcott thought that the Quay should be put in proper repair by the owners, the same as other private roads were.

Councillor Emett said the great nuisance on the Quay was caused by the unloading of the colliers, and until they were shifted the inhabitants would never be free from annoyance. The Quay this year however had never been kept cleaner, but the mat-beating nuisance complained of by Mr. Hobbs was very bad.

The Mayor said that mats could be beaten before eight o'clock of a morning.

The discussion was continued by Aldermen Green, Pygott, and Upright, and then the matter dropped, no resolution being moved upon it.

 

LICENSEE LIST

CORBIN James 1840-41+

CORBIN Mr 1886+

WINKEL Alfred 1928+

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML

 

LINK to www.pubwiki.co.uk