DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, March, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 10 March, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1849

Royal Engineer

Latest 1869

 (Old) High Street

Folkestone

 

Often referred to as simply the "Engineer." Said to be near the Bayle steps, but to date no definite address known.

This page is still to be updated.

 

Kentish Gazette, 8 October 1850.

Notice is hereby given, that's by an indenture dated the 27th day of September, 1850, John Baker, of Folkestone, in Kent, publican assigned to Edward Hills, of Dover in Kent, coachbuilder, all his stock-in-trade, debts and personal estate and effects, in Trust for the benefits of himself and the other creditors in the said John Baker, who, by executing the same, shall become parties hereto.

And notice is hereby also given, that the said deed of assignment was duly executed by the said John Baker and Edward Hills, on the day of the dates thereof, in the presence of, and was attended by, William Sladden, of Folkestone aforesaid, solicitor.

The said deed of assignment will lie at the offices of Mr. Sladden, at Folkestone, for the inspection of, and execution by, the creditors of the said John Baker, and debtors to the estate are requested to pay me the amount due from them forthwith.

William Sladden, Folkestone, Kent, Solicitor to the trustee. 5th October, 1850.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 31 October, 1863. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

DRUNK AND RIOTOUS

Saturday October 24th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and R. W. Boarer, Esq.

James Casey was charged with being drunk and riotous in the High Street, and also with assaulting P.C. Swain in the execution of his duty.

P.C. Swain said that last evening about 9 o'clock he saw the prisoner in the "Royal Engineer," in company with a man called Timothy Daly. He was refused drink, and commenced begging. He used very obscene language and collected a great crowd in the street. Witness told him to go to his lodgings, and offered him a place to sleep for the night. Witness told him he was a police constable. Prisoner told him to go to ----, used very filthy language, shouted and swore. He had a woman and three children with him, and she also was drunk. He said he shouldn't go until he liked. Witness then took him in custody, when he became very violent and kicked him on the leg several times. With the assistance of a civilian and P.C. Sharp he brought him to the station. He had been in custody two or three times before.

Sent to Dover jail for six months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Observer 30 September 1865.

Wednesday September 27th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and A.M. Leith Esq.

William Baker was charged with opening his house – the Royal Engineer beerhouse – for the sale of liquor, between the hours of three and five on the Sunday afternoon previous.

P.C. Smith proved that about four o'clock on the day mentioned he found several soldiers drinking in the house, and the bench fined defendant 1s., and the costs 9s.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 March 1866.

Friday March 16th:- Before J. Tolputt and A. M. Leith Esqs.

William Baker, landlord of the "Royal Engineer," in High Street, was summoned for having assaulted Catherine Richardson on Monday last.

Complainant said on the night in question she went out to look for her husband between eleven and twelve at night. Went to the "Royal Engineer," where she thought she heard her husband's voice, knocked at the door, and the defendant opened it. Told him she wanted to see her husband, when he “up with his fist and knocked her down”. She got up and he knocked her down a second time, and afterwards a third time. In answer to the defendant, complainant said she did not break the windows of his house. Defendant said her husband was not in the house, but she tried to force her way in.

The wife of Mr. Gloss, professor of music and languages, and a domestic servant who was with complainant corroborated her statement.

Defendant said the Mrs. Richardson had broken three panes of glass in his window, created a disturbance, and tried to force her way into his house, when he pushed her away and she fell down.

He called P.C. Swain, who said he heard a disturbance in High Street on the night in question, and on proceeding to ascertain what was the matter he met the complainant coming down street with her hat and shawl off. She said that Mr. Baker had knocked her down. She went back to defendant's door, and the latter came out with a candle and looked for something, when complainant tried to get into the house, as she said her husband was there. Defendant prevented her and pushed her away, when she fell down.

The magistrates said they considered the assault proved. If the complainant had broken his windows and made a disturbance, there were plenty of people to deal with her, and he had no right to take the law in his own hands. He would have to pay a fine of 1 and 12s costs, in default to be imprisoned for fourteen days, with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Observer 17 March 1866.

Friday March 16th:- Before J. Tolputt and A. M. Leith Esqs.

William Baker, of the "Royal Engineer," High Street, was charged with assaulting Catherine Richardson on Monday the 12th instant.

Catherine Richardson said: I am the wife of Henry Richardson. My husband keeps the "Mariner's Home" public house in Radnor Street. On Monday the 12th, about ten minutes to twelve o'clock at night I went to Mr. Baker's house, in High Street, to see if my husband was there. He had been out all day. When I got to the door I listened, and heard my husband's voice inside. I rapped at the door and asked them to let me in or else let my husband come out as I wanted him at home. Mr. Baker opened the door, and as soon as he opened it he up with his hand, struck me on the breast and knocked me down. I got up again and said I would go in, for my husband is inside. He then knocked me down a second time. He then shut the door, but opened it and struck me on the arm, and knocked me down a third time. He did not strike me again, and soon afterwards I went away.

Cross-examined: It was after twelve when I came to your house. I wanted to force my way in. You did say my husband was not there and you would not let me come in.

Catherine Floss said: I am the wife of Charles Floss. My husband is a professor of music and languages. I was coming up the High Street a little before twelve o'clock on Monday night. I saw Mrs. Richardson knocking at Mr. Baker's door, asking for admittance, as she said her husband was there. Mr. Baker opened the door, up with his fist and knocked Mrs. Richardson down. There was some abusive language used which is not fit to be mentioned. I could not see where he struck her as I was standing on the Mill Bay steps. When Mrs. Richardson got up he knocked her down again. I saw her try to force her way into the house, and heard her say her husband was there. As far as I am aware Mrs. Richardson was quite sober. I did not see any more blows as I then went away.

Mary Rolfe said: I am a servant at Mrs. Richardson's and went with her to look for her husband. Mrs. Richardson knocked at Mr. Baker's door and asked for her husband. Mr. Baker said her husband was not there, when he knocked her down three times. I am sure I heard my master's voice in the house. I thought it was his voice. My mistress was quite sober.

Defendant said he had not been at home long when Mrs. Richardson knocked at the door, broke two windows, and asked for her husband. He told her he was not there, and as she tried to force herself in he gave her a push and she fell down.

He called P.C. Swain, who said he was on duty on the night in question, and hearing a disturbance in the High Street he went there and met the complainant coming down, when she told him the defendant had struck her. Accompanied her to the defendant's house, and when she got there she tried to force her way in, but defendant would not let her and pushed her back, when she fell to the ground. He could not say whether the complainant was drunk, but she was very excitable.

The magistrates said the defendant's conduct was cowardly and disgraceful to strike a woman in the way that he had done. They would fine him 1 and 12s costs. The fine was paid.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 May 1867.

Friday May 3rd: Before R. W. Boarer, A. M. Leith, and J. Kelcey Esqs.

Thomas Spicer, late of the "Engineer," High Street, was summoned for one quarter's gas consumed and rent of meter 1 0s. 6d., due to the Gas Company of Folkestone.

Order made for payment within seven days, in default of payment a distress warrant to issue, and in default of distress, two months hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 may 1868.

Friday, May 22nd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and R. W. Boarer Esq.

William Dawkins, summoned for keeping a disorderly house on Sunday evening, pleaded guilty.

P.C. Swain said that about half past ten he was on duty in High Street and heard a great noise in the Engineer and defendant's brother asked him to clear the house. A man named Tyas was making the most noise, but the house was full – about twenty people. Defendant's mother, and her husband and others were there, but took no part in the disturbance. There were several prostitutes there who live in the house, which is not conducted well. I told the landlord to shut his house, and he did so directly.

Mr. Pearson complained of the noise and swearing all day on Sunday. Defendant turned them out. The house was well conducted till he got married. The house as now conducted was a great hindrance to him.

Mr. Gates corroborated Mr. Pearson's statement that during the last month the house had been very badly conducted. On Sunday there was a great noise and disturbance, which defendant tried to prevent. Tyas was a great nuisance.

Defendant said Tyas was a lodger, but he had got rid of him. He would try to conduct the house differently in future; it was his marriage that made all the difference; the house was quit before he married.

Fined forty shillings, and costs nine shillings, or one month's imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Observer 23 May 1868.

Friday, May 22nd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., and R. W. Boarer Esq.

Richard Dawkins of the "Royal Engineer" beerhouse was fined 2, with 9s. costs, for keeping a disorderly house on Sunday.

 

Folkestone Express 23 May 1868.

Friday, May 22nd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and Alderman Boarer.

William Dawkins, of the "Royal Engineer," High Street, was summoned for keeping a disorderly house on Sunday evening last.

P.C. Swain, who had charge of the case, testified to a disturbance which took place on the night in question, and the bad character of the house generally.

Messrs. Pearson and Gates, who reside opposite the house, also bore testimony to the annoyance they were subjected to in consequence of the bad language and continual uproar that took place.

The defendant said the house was always quiet until he got married, but since there was nothing but quarrelling, but he would endeavour to keep the house respectable for the future.

This being the defendant's first offence, the Bench fined him 2 and costs, or one month's imprisonment, with an intimation that if he was summoned again they would fine him 5.

The fine was paid.

 

Folkestone Observer 13 June 1868.

Wednesday, June 10th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

William Dawkins was charged with keeping open, during unlawful hours, the "Royal Engineer" beerhouse, on Sunday, the 7th instant.

P.C. Swain said that on Sunday afternoon, shortly after three o'clock, he watched defendant's house from a window of a house opposite. About a quarter past three he saw three soldiers knock at the front door of the defendant's house. Defendant opened the door, and after looking up and down the street, let the soldiers in. At ten minutes to four he passed five more in. Saw Dawkins draw something into a pint pot, but could not tell what it was. Could not see the soldiers after they went in. It did not rain when they went in.

Joseph Robert Gates said he kept a fancy repository in High Street. Was at home on Sunday afternoon, and saw eight soldiers go into defendant's house between the hours of three and five. Saw something drawn into a pot between three and four in the afternoon.

The defendant said he did not draw any beer for the soldiers. They came and asked him to allow them to dry their clothes. He did draw some beer for his lodger, which he drank in his own room.

Filmer Tyas said he was a labourer, and lodged with the defendant. Had lodged with him for eight or nine months. Was at home on Sunday afternoon – did not go out all day. Two or three soldiers came in between two and three and had a pot of beer, and went out about a quarter past three. Did not see any more soldiers come in, as he went upstairs afterwards. Did not know whether he had two or three pints of beer.

Captain Kennicott, addressing the defendant, said it was the second time he had been brought before the Bench. He (defendant) knew it was contrary to law to open his house on Sunday between the hours stated in his license, and the next time he appeared before them he would be fined 5, and for a third offence, 10, but as there was a possibility of doubt as toward this case they would dismiss it.

 

Folkestone Express 13 June 1868.

Wednesday, June 10th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., and Alderman Tolputt.

William Dawkins, of the "Engineer" beerhouse in High Street, was summoned for retailing malt liquor after hours on Sunday afternoon last, contrary to the Act.

P.C. Swaine, acting upon instructions from Superintendent Martin, took up his position on the afternoon in question in a house opposite, commanding a view of the defendant's premises. At about twenty minutes to four o'clock he saw two soldiers enter the house, followed shortly afterwards by others, the defendant soon afterwards drawing a quantity of beer in jugs, hence the summons.

Mr. Gates, a tradesman residing immediately opposite, corroborated the constable's evidence, besides testifying to the general character of the house.

The defendant said he had instructed Mr. Minter to appear for him, but as he was engaged in London, he would like the case adjourned till Friday.

Mr. Bradley said that was no reason for the case being adjourned, and it must go on.

The defendant said the soldiers did not have anything to drink, and only wanted to get sheltered from the rain. The drink was supplied to one of his lodgers, there being three in the house. Alderman Boarer said that a previous conviction should have deterred the defendant from committing himself again.

The defendant said he did not think he was doing any harm letting the soldiers in.

Filmer Tyas, a lodger in the defendant's house, deposed that he had lodged there nine months, and he was at home all day last Sunday. The soldiers were friends of his; they did not have anything to drink; what beer was drawn was for himself.

Captain Kennicott said it appeared to him the defendant was always in trouble. It was the second time of his coming before him. The first time he was fined 40s. and costs, which should have had the effect of altering his course of conduct. The defendant had no right to open his doors, raining or not raining. He must act according to the law, which says the house shall not be opened between certain hours. He had a very narrow escape of being fined 5, and if brought there again he would be fined 10. Having taken all things into consideration, the Bench would dismiss the case.

The defendant thanked the magistrates, and said he would give up the house altogether.

Alderman Tolputt said it was the best thing he could do.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 July 1868.

Monday July 20th: Before R. W. Boarer and A. M. Leith Esqs.

Filmer Tyas, charged with assaulting William Dawkins on the 18th inst., pleaded not guilty.

Wm. Dawkins, landlord of the "Engineer" beer house deposed: Last Saturday prisoner was in my house about nine o'clock and asked for a pint of beer, and I told my wife not to draw any more for him. I told him to leave my house, but he refused and called me all the foul names he could lay his tongue to. I called P.S. Reynolds to put him out. I was helping to put him out, and he began to wrestle with me, kicked the constable in the thigh, and I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined: You occupy a room in my house, but not with my permission. After a good deal of wrangling you went into your room. You were not interfering with anyone when P.S. Reynolds and I came into the house. You resisted the police when in custody. I did not hear any noise when you went up the street.

By the Bench: Prisoner had been drinking. He was not sober, but he was not drunk, only quarrelsome.

P.C. Reynolds deposed: I was called to the Engineer, High Street, on Saturday evening about half past nine, and prosecutor told Tyas to leave his house. He was then in a back room, and refused to go, using bad language. Dawkins took hold of him to put him out, and they had a scuffle together. I went to help prosecutor, and Tyas kicked me just above the thigh, resisting very violently. P.C. Sharpe came to my assistance, and he then went to the station quietly, except as to shouting. In trying to put him in the cell he was very violent, and tried to kick me twice.

Cross-examined: I did not punch you or threaten to knock your brains out. I did threaten to lock you in the dark cell, but used no more than necessary violence. You kicked me wilfully and spitefully. I did say you might think yourself lucky I had not my staff with me.

By the bench: Prisoner was not drunk.

Prisoner said: At six o'clock he had two glasses of ale in the house with prosecutor. I then went to Dover, and on coming back I went into a back room where four boys were playing cards and asked for a pint of beer and was refused, and Dawkins told me he wanted me out of the house, for he wanted my room for another girl. Prisoner complained very strongly of the violence of the constable and called Elizabeth Dawkins, wife of the landlord of the house, who said prisoner, who was a lodger, came into the house very quietly and asked for a pint of beer, which her husband had ordered her not to draw for him. Prisoner went out to her husband to ask why, and he told him to leave the house, which he refused to do until eleven o'clock. Prosecutor put himself in a great passion and got a policeman to put him out. After a struggle prisoner was put out, and he never struck or kicked at either. Several persons cried “Shame” for the way he was treated. My husband took his last week's lodging money. Prisoner was not drunk.

By the bench: My husband was jealous of prisoner.

Reynolds, recalled by the Bench: When Dawkins came for me, I thought there was a riot in the house. He told me Tyas had no business in the house.

After consulting, the bench decided to hear the other charge.

P.S. Reynolds recapitulated his former evidence.

Prisoner called Thomas Morford, the town sergeant, who said he was in the police station on Saturday evening to see what the noise was, and saw prisoner, crying “Murder”, tussling with Reynolds, and he saw no blows struck. He thought there was considerable violence used in the station house, because the cries of “Murder” were heard for some minutes before he went down to see.

The Bench considered the first case not proved, for the first assault was committed on him; but in the second case, he ought to have gone to the station quietly, and if he had not been severely punished he would have been more severely dealt with. As it was, he would be merely fined 5s., and 7s. 6d. costs, or fourteen days' imprisonment. The money was immediately paid by the prisoner's friends in court.

Harriet Tyas, mother of the prisoner in the last case, was then charged with riotous conduct on Saturday evening at the police station.

Mr. Minter appeared for this prisoner, against whom no evidence was offered, and she was accordingly discharged.

 

Folkestone Observer 25 July 1868.

Monday, July 20th: Before Alderman Boarer and Captain Leith.

Filmer Tyas was brought up in custody, charged with assaulting William Dawkins, landlord of the Engineer beerhouse, High Street, Folkestone, on the 18th inst.

Pleaded Not Guilty.

Complainant said: I am a labourer, residing at the "Engineer" beerhouse, High Street, Folkestone. Last Saturday evening the prisoner came to my house between nine and ten o'clock and asked for a pint of beer. I told my wife not to draw him any more beer as I had given him notice to leave, and I wished he should leave. He had been lodging with me. I told him if he did not leave the house I should fetch a policeman to put him out. He said he should not leave for me or any policeman. He would not go until he chose. I then went for a policeman and got Sergeant Reynolds, in whose presence I told the prisoner to go, but he still refused. I took hold of him and showed him the door, and he then began to wrestle with me. I called to the sergeant to assist me, and when he did so, prisoner kicked him. He took him into custody and he was locked up.

By the prisoner: You did go into the room after a deal of wrangling with me. You did kick the sergeant wilfully, when near the fireplace, and made great resistance. You have no room in the house now.

By the Bench: Prisoner was not sober. He had had just enough to make him quarrel with anyone. Prisoner has been lodging at my house, but he is not a lodger now.

Sergeant Reynolds deposed: I was on duty at the police station about twenty minutes past nine on Saturday evening last, when Dawkins came and complained to me that a man named Tyas was in his house creating a disturbance, and he wished me to go and put a stop to it. I went to the house and saw Dawkins go into the back room, and heard him tell the prisoner to leave the house. I saw the prisoner standing opposite the fireplace as he replied “I shan't go for you, nor yet any ---- in the house”. Dawkins then took hold of him by the arm, turned him round, and said “There's the door. Now go”. Prisoner still said “I shan't”. They began scuffling, and Dawkins called on me for assistance. I went and took hold of the prisoner and turned him round, when he instantly kicked me on the thigh, bruising my leg. The marks are there now. He resisted very violently, but I got him out at last, and, police constable Sharpe coming to my assistance, he walked up the street quietly, except shouting and making a noise. A great number of people followed us up the street. When I got him to the station and was about to put him in the cell again he became very violent, and we had a severe struggle with him to get him in. He made two attempts to kick me.

Prisoner cross-examined the sergeant at some length with the view of showing he was ill-used at the station, but the sergeant denied that he used more violence than necessary.

The Bench: In your judgement, was the prisoner sober?

Sergeant Reynolds: He might have had some drink, but nothing to speak of.

Prisoner then gave his version of the affair, denying that he assaulted Dawkins in any way whatever. On the other hand he alleged that Sergeant Reynolds assaulted him most unmercifully when at the station, and Mr. Morford, who was present at the time, if he spoke the truth, would say so.

He called Ellen Dawkins, wife of the complainant, who said: The prisoner came to our house on Saturday and called for beer, but I refused to draw him any as my husband had told me not to do so. Prisoner asked me the reason why, and I told him I did not know. He went and asked him, and my husband said he would not draw him any more beer, and told him to leave the house. Prisoner told him he would not go until he thought proper, for he was a lodger, and if he was not allowed to sit in the parlour he would go up into his own room until it was time for him to go, he having had a week's notice. My husband put himself in a great passion and said he should go out, for he would fetch a policeman to put him out. Prisoner said he would not go out for him or any policeman until eleven o'clock. My husband went for a policeman, and when he came back he seized the prisoner by the throat and struggled with him for some time, and then called Sergeant Reynolds to assist him. Reynolds seized him very roughly, and in the struggle they got a chair between them. I did not see prisoner strike or kick the policeman, and I was looking on the whole of the time. Everybody in the room cried “Shame” at the way in which prisoner was used. He did not kick the sergeant, and if he was hurt at all, he was hurt with the chair.

By the Bench: Prisoner was a lodger, but had had notice to quit. He owed two weeks' rent and had been to Dover for the money.

By the prisoner: You were not drunk.

Alderman Boarer: Did your husband assign any reason for turning him out?

Witness: My husband is jealous of him, that's the reason for turning him out, but he has no reason. There is a spite against the young man, although I blame him very much for not going before. He never interfered with anyone.

Prisoner: He turned me out once before, and afterwards asked me to come back again, and treated me and got drunk with me the same day.

Reynolds, re-called, in answer to the Bench, said: When Dawkins came for me I asked him if the man was a lodger, and he replied that he had no right whatever there. I thought there was a row or a riot and went down to quell it accordingly.

The Bench, having expressed their intention to hear the other case before giving their decision on this, prisoner was then charged with assaulting police sergeant John Reynolds while in the execution of his duty.

Pleaded Not Guilty.

The evidence in this case was similar to that given in the former, and prisoner again cross-examined at great length to show he was ill-used, and in his defence stated that both Mr. Morford and Dawkins would prove this if they spoke the truth.

Sergeant Reynolds admitted telling prisoner that it was a lucky thing for him that he had not his staff with him, but again strongly denied that he used more violence than necessary. He said that prisoner began crying “Murder” as loud as he could as soon as he got inside the station door.

Thomas Morford was then called. He said: I am Town Sergeant, and live on these premises. Hearing a great noise on Saturday evening, I went down to the bottom of the stairs to see what was going on. I saw the prisoner, who was crying “Murder” and making a great noise, struggling with Sergeant Reynolds, who was taking him towards the cell. I did not see him strike the prisoner.

By the prisoner: I did not see him strike you. I saw you tussling with him. I saw no blows. When I saw you in the cell, you were standing up and tussling with the sergeant; he did not have you down. I did not hear him say he was “the master of all Folkestone bullies”. There might have been blows struck, but I saw none. I saw you tussling together when you passed the stairs, and more so when in the cell. You appeared to be trying to prevent the sergeant shutting the door.

By the Bench: I heard Reynolds say he was kicked, but I did not see the kick given.

Captain Leith: Was there more violence used than necessary to get him in the cell?

Witness: Not when I was present. There would appear to have been a deal of violence in the office, as I heard the cry of “Murder” two or three times before I went down, but I know nothing about that.

Alderman Boarer: Have you any more witnesses to call?

Prisoner: Yes, sir, if this man will speak the truth for me. Will you (turning to Dawkins) come and speak the truth for me, and say what you saw this man (Sergeant Reynolds) do to me?

Dawkins: If it had been me, I should have done more.

Prisoner: Then you won't come and speak for me?

Dawkins: I have nothing further to say.

The magistrates then told the prisoner that they considered the first case was not proved, but as to the assault on the policeman, he had before been punished for a similar offence, and therefore was aware of the consequences. They had no doubt he was a very violent man, and had committed this assault. He was then fined 5s., and 7s. 6d. costs, in default 14 days' imprisonment with hard labour.

Prisoner said he would go to prison, but he was ultimately released on the money being paid for him.

Harriett Tyas, mother of the former prisoner, was then charged with riotous conduct at the police station on Saturday evening.

Mr. Minter appeared for defendant.

Superintendent Martin said the prisoner came to the station on Saturday evening and made such a disturbance that they were compelled to lock her up. Under the circumstances, however, he did not wish to press the charge, and prisoner was therefore discharged.

 

Folkestone Express 25 July 1868.

Monday, July 20th: Before Alderman Boarer and Captain Leith.

Filmer Tyas, the defendant, was charged with assaulting William Dawkins, the landlord of the Royal Engineer, High Street, and on a second count with making an unmanly attack on Sergeant Reynolds of the Police Force, who was called to take him into custody. The prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Dawkins, having been called, deposed that the defendant came to his house on Saturday evening and called for some beer, and he ordered his wife not to serve him. Upon that the defendant made the assault complained of, at the same time using very foul language. Sergeant Reynolds was then sent for. Upon his arrival the prisoner still refused to leave, so that they had to forcibly eject him, and in doing so he made a very dastardly attack on the sergeant and seriously bruised his leg.

The prisoner here stated that he occupied a room at the Royal Engineer, and paid 2s. per week for it.

Sergeant Reynolds said: On Saturday evening I went to the Engineer public house at the request of Mr. Dawkins and ordered the prisoner to leave the house. He refused. Upon that Mr. Dawkins scuffled with him, and the prisoner turned round and kicked me. I then took him into custody, and with the assistance of P.C. Sharpe succeeded in getting him to the station.

The prisoner cross-examined the sergeant at some length, saying that he had been brutally used by him. He called Mrs. Dawkins, who said she did not see the prisoner kick the policeman, and that her husband was jealous of him.

Sergeant Reynolds, re-called, said he was not aware the prisoner was a lodger in the house; he thought it was a riot, and he went to quell it.

This terminated the case of the assault on Mr. Dawkins.

The evidence in the second case was materially the same. The prisoner pleaded Not Guilty, and tried to prove he was the aggrieved party.

He called Mr. Morford, Town Sergeant, who said that hearing a great noise and cries of “Murder!” proceeding from the police station, he was induced to go there, when he saw Sergeant Reynolds tussling with the prisoner, who was very riotous and made a great uproar. He did not see Tyas kick the sergeant.

Mr. Alderman Boarer said that they had taken great pains investigating this case and allowed the prisoner every facility to answer the charge, but this was not his first offence, as he had been before convicted for committing assaults. However, they did not think the assault on Mr. Dawkins had been proved, so the prisoner would be discharged on that count, but the assault on the police officer was not justified, and they must inflict a fine of 5s. and 7s. 6d. costs, or fourteen days' imprisonment. The fine was paid.

Harriett Tyas, the mother of the last prisoner, was then charged with riotous conduct at the police station, but the magistrates, taking into consideration that she had been locked up, acquitted her.

 

Southeastern Gazette 9 November 1868.

Local News.

At the Borough Police Court, on Saturday, before Capt. Vennicott, R.N., and Mr. Tolputt, William Dawkins, charged with unlawfully permitting and suffering a great noise in his house, the "Engineers," High Street, was fined 5, although the constables who proved the case admitted that defendant was endeavouring to make peace and quietness.

 

Folkestone Observer 14 November 1868.

Saturday, November 7th: Before Capt. Kennicott R.N., and Alderman Tolputt.

William Dawkins was charged with not maintaining good order in his house, the "Royal Engineer."

P.C. Ovenden said: I was on duty in High Street on Saturday last. Between four and five I hear the cry of “Police!” and “Murder!”. I went to the house and found a man and woman struggling together in the passage. They were both drunk and making a great noise. Defendant was sober, and was trying to keep his wife, who was drunk, from going into the street. I left the house quiet, but soon after I left the disturbance began again. When I went into the house the second time the man and woman were both on the floor struggling together. Defendant said he could not attend to their quarrels, as he had enough to do to look to his own.

P.C. Woodland and Mr. F. Ellis also confirmed the evidence of P.C. Ovenden.

A former conviction was proved against the defendant, and the Bench fined him 5, and 19s. costs, or two months imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express 14 November 1868.

Saturday, November 7th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and Alderman Tolputt.

W. Dawkins, of the Royal Engineer, High Street, was charged with disorderly conduct at his house on the 31st. ult. Mr. Minter defended.

P.C. Ovenden said he was on duty that day in High Street. At ten minutes to twelve he was called to the house and the defendant's wife complained of being assaulted by some lodgers. At half past five in the evening he heard cries of “Police!” and “Murder!”. He went there and found a man and woman struggling together, both of them drunk. He also saw Dawkins' wife in another room, drunk. Defendant was sober. He advised them to go upstairs.

.C. Woodland proved that the disturbance was continued till late at night.

Mr. Ellis stated that he lived nearly opposite to the house, and he was annoyed by the cries of “Murder!” and “Police!” at the defendant's house on the previous Saturday.

Mr. Minter said the charge was that the defendant wilfully suffered a disturbance, but if they looked at the circumstances they would find that he did all he could to prevent it.

The Bench considered the charge proved, and as he had been previously fined for the same offence they fined him 5 and 19s. costs, or two months' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 January 1869.

Police Report.

William (sic) Dawkins was summoned for having his beerhouse in High Street open during unlawful hours.

P.S. Reynolds deposed that he was on duty in High Street on Sunday morning, about a quarter past three, and hearing a noise in defendant's house went in, and found three men in the bar with defendant's wife. A quart jug and four glasses of beer was on the table.

P.C. Swain corroborated the sergeant's evidence, and defendant was fined 40s. and costs, or two months' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Observer 16 January 1869.

Wednesday, January 13th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Thomas Dawkins was charged with keeping open house during unlawful hours on Sunday last, the 10th instant.

P.S. Reynolds said he was on duty in High Street at a quarter past three on Sunday morning last, and on hearing some loud talking at the "Royal Engineer" beershop, stood opposite the door, when defendant opened it, and on seeing witness he tried to close it again, but witness pushed the door open and went in. In a room behind the bar he saw three men and defendant's wife. On a table in the room was a quart jug and some glasses containing beer. Called P.C. Swain to witness what was there, and he then left the house. Knew all the men who were there; they were Messrs. Rose, Timson (junior) and Saxby. He knew they were not lodgers, as they had private residences in the town, the two former living in High Street, and the latter in Dover Road.

Cross-examined by Dawkins: Did not know whether they engaged lodgings for that night or not. Could not say that the beer was drawn for them. Did not see them go in or come out of the house.

P.C. Swain said he was in company with P.S. Reynolds on Sunday morning last, and in a room behind the bar of the Royal Engineer he saw the three persons named, with defendant and his wife. On a table in the room there was a quart jug containing beer or ale. He heard the voice of James Rose in the house at four o'clock. Knew they were not lodgers as they lived in High Street and Dover Road. The character of the house was indifferent.

Cross-examined by Dawkins: Was not sure that they did not take lodgings for the night, or that he drew the beer for them.

Dawkins, in defence, said that three gentlemen came to his house on Saturday night and hired lodgings. He locked up his house soon after and went out for about an hour, and on returning he sat in the room talking until between three and four.

In answer to the Bench, Mr. Bradley said the defendant had been before the Bench twice before for offences attached to the house, on the last occasion he being fined 5, with 19s. costs.

The Bench fined defendant 40s, with 11s. costs, or two months imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express 16 January 1869.

Wednesday, January 13th: Before The Mayor and R. W. Boarer Esq.

William Dawkins was summoned for having his house, the "Royal Engineer," High Street, open for the sale of beer on the morning of the 10th inst.

Sergeant Reynolds said: On Sunday last, at a quarter before three in the morning, I heard loud talking in the "Royal Engineer," which is kept by the defendant. I listened outside the door for two minutes, when the defendant opened the door and looked out. He saw me and immediately closed the door again. I said “Dawkins, don't close the door on me. Who have you got in your house?”. He did not answer and closed the door. I stepped up and pushed it open. In a room behind the bar I saw three men and defendant's wife. There was a great jug on the table, and four glasses containing beer. I then called P.C. Swain to witness who was there, and afterwards walked out. Defendant made no reply to my question. I know the men who were in the house; they did not lodge there. Two of them live in High Street, and I am sure they were not lodgers.

By the defendant: I don't know if they had engaged lodgings or not for that night. They were seen in the street the next morning. I can't say if the beer was drawn for them. I did not see them come in or out of the house.

P.C. Swain said: I was on duty in High Street on Sunday morning, the 10th inst. I entered the house with Sergeant Reynolds and went into a room next to the bar, the room the company always resort to. There were three persons in there standing up, and the defendant's wife. He then corroborated the sergeant's statement. I heard some people talking there at four in the morning. I know the parties who were there. They all reside in the town; two in High Street, and one in the Dover Road.

By the defendant: I do not know if they paid for lodgings that night. There are no prostitutes kept at the house at present, that I know of.

The defendant said three gentlemen came to his house on Saturday night for lodgings. In the morning they called him up to let them out. He could not get them to come as witnesses, as two of them were away, and the other was not up, but if the Bench would only adjourn the case, he would summons them as witnesses.

The Bench refused to adjourn the case, as he had plenty of time to call witnesses if he desired to do so; the summons was served on Monday morning.

Superintendent Martin said the defendant had been before them on two previous occasions. He was fined 2 and costs the first time, and 5 and costs the second time.

The Clerk said this was the first offence of this description. Had it been a repetition of either of the other offences, the Bench could fine him 50, and close the house for two years.

The Bench said they would fine him the highest penalty, which was 40s. and 11s. costs, in default two months' hard labour. They would grant no time to pay it in, and ordered the defendant to be detained in custody until the money was paid.

 

Kentish Gazette, Tuesday 19 January 1869.

Folkestone. An old Offender.

On Wednesday William Dawkins, of the "Engineer Inn," High Street, was summoned before the Mayor and Aldermen Boarer, charged with selling beer during the prohibited hours.

Sergeant Reynolds, of the borough police deposed that a quarter before 3 o'clock on the morning of Sunday the 10th inst., he was outside the "Engineer," when he heard of talking. He stood opposite the door for a few minutes, and at length the landlord opened it. Immediately he saw witness, however, he closed it again. Witness said, "Dawkins, don't close the door on we; who have you got in your house?" The defendant again tried to close the door, but witness pushed it open and went in. In a room behind the bar he saw all three men and the defendant's wife. There was a quart jug on the table, and four glasses containing beer.

He called P.C. Swain, who was on duty to witness what was there, and then he walked out. He knew the men in the house; they resided in the town; two resided in High Street and one in Dover Street. They were not lodges in the house.

P.C. Swain was then called, and proved seeing the beer. The defendant said the three gentlemen came for lodgings, stopped there all night, and called him up early in the morning to let them out. Marten said the defendant have been fined twice previously (the first time 2, the last time 5) for other offences; but not for having his house open.

The Bench said they would impose upon him the highest penalty, viz., 40s. and costs, or 2 months' hard labour; for fine to be paid immediately.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869.

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Beer Houses.

The following application was opposed:

William Dawkins, "Royal Engineer," High Street. Mr. Martin said this house had been kept in a most disorderly state. The Magistrates refused to grant a license.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 August 1869.

Local News.

Annual Licensing Day.— A full bench of magistrates attended on Wednesday to grant renewals and hear fresh applications.

Several licenses were suspended owing to the complaints of the public, and the renewal of the licences of the "Bricklayers’ Arms," kept by Mr. William Peel; the "Prince Albert" kept by Henry Stay; and the "Royal Engineer," kept by George Dawkins, was refused altogether.

 

Folkestone Observer 25 September 1869.

Local Intelligence.

R. Mercer, jun., was brought before the magistrates on Saturday last, charged with assaulting Helen Dawkins, wife of George Dawkins, of the "Royal Engineer," High Street. The evidence was of a disgraceful nature, the defendant acknowledging that he was too familiar with plaintiff, and the quarrel was the result of jealousy. He was bound over to keep the peace; himself in 10, and one surety in 10.

 

Folkestone Express 25 September 1869.

Saturday, September 20th: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

R. Mercer, un., was summoned by Helen Dawkins, wife of Dawkins, of the "Engineer," High Street, for an assault. The evidence in support of the case was of the usual character, and the defendant was bound over to keep the peace for three months, herself in 10, and one surety of 10.

 

Folkestone Observer 9 October 1869.

Tuesday, October 5th: Before W. Bateman and James Tolputt Esqs.

William Kelly Sergeant, George Kelly, and Michael Moore, gunners in the 10th Brigade, Royal Artillery, were charged with being drunk and riotous in Dover Street on the night previous. They were also charged with assaulting the police in the execution of their duty.

Prisoners denied both charges, Kelly saying he was knocked down before he was aware of it.

P.C. Swain said: About one o'clock on Monday morning I saw Kelly in company with another artilleryman and two men of the 10th Hussars. They were knocking at the door of the Royal Engineer, High Street. I told them they could not get into the house as it was past closing hours. Kelly was then drunk. They all went away. About two o'clock they were knocking at the Harbour Inn, and I told them to go away, and Kelly became insolent. Shortly after two I saw Kelly in company with the other prisoners, another artilleryman, and two Hussars near Mr. Jordan's, South Foreland. They were then making a great noise. They left there and went up Dover Street. I afterwards saw P.S. Reynolds and reported the circumstances. Some minutes after, P.C. Hills came down, followed by the prisoners. P.S. Reynolds went up to speak with them. They surrounded the sergeant, and P.C. Hills and myself went to his assistance. Moore struck Reynolds at the back of the head, and sent him sprawling. I then took Moore into custody, when he kicked me on the leg, and I hit him on the head with the staff. Prisoner then struck at me and I knocked him down again with my staff. P.C. Hills took Kelly, and the other prisoners ran away, P.S. Reynolds following. When on the first occasion I saw them in High Street they said they were out for a spree.

P.S. Reynolds said: I was on duty at the bottom of the town about three o'clock this morning. P.C. Swain called my attention to some soldiers who were drunk and riotous in Dover Street. There were the three prisoners, two Hussars, and a fourth artilleryman. I cautioned them, and told them not to make any disturbance, and to get out of the town. The whole of the prisoners were drunk and riotous. One of the soldiers had a whip and threatened to strike me with it. They surrounded me, and I put out my hand to keep them off, and Moore hit me with his fist, nearly knocking me down. I said “Don't murder me” and called P.C. Swain to my assistance. Sergeant Kelly then came up to me and caught hold of me by the collar, and I knocked him down with my staff. He got up and ran away down Radnor Street. I caught him and brought him back. They were very violent, and struggled. I saw Swain use his staff when he came up. In High Street Moore kicked and struggled, and I hit him with my staff on his hands and legs.

Mr. Bateman said the police ought never to use their staffs when a man was handcuffed.

P.S. Reynolds said the prisoners were not handcuffed.

P.C. Hills said: I was on duty at the bottom of High Street about three o'clock when Sergeant Reynolds asked me if I had seen any soldiers. I told him I had not, but soon afterwards they came down Dover Street shouting. They were drunk. P.S. Reynolds went up to them, but I could not hear what he said. Shortly after, the sergeant whistled to us, and we went up to him. He had Moore and Kelly in custody. Moore knocked Reynolds backward, and before he could recover himself he told me to take Kelly into custody. The sergeant also told us to draw our staves. I suppose he gave that order because he got knocked down. Prisoners were very violent. When we drew our staves, the prisoners said they could use their whips, and commenced to flourish them about. When I had Kelly in custody he resisted very much, but with the assistance of Mr. Morford I put the handcuffs on with his hands behind him. During this time Sergeant and Kelly ran away. I met the sweep by Mr. Musgrave's in High Street. I did not use my staff.

Cross-examined: The only cause for locking you up was for hallooing and shouting.

John Hubbard, a sweep in sooty uniform, said: I was up this morning a little after three o'clock, and as I was going down High Street I heard a screaming. When I got down by Dover Street I waited and listened to ascertain where the screaming came from. I went up Dover Street and saw P.S. Reynolds, and P.C's Swain and Hills. There were also the three soldiers, now in the dock. Moore was very drunk. Sergeant was in a sober state, and went up civilly; Kelly was also quiet. They were all three in custody, and making a great noise. Moore and Kelly were resisting. Moore had hold of Reynolds' hand, and Reynolds asked him to let go, but he would not, and Reynolds drew his staff. Reynolds used the staff upon Moore's hand and afterwards on his head. He went down when Reynolds hit him. Reynolds then asked him to get up, but he would not, and Reynolds put his hand on his thigh and made Moore moan. Swain then came up and assisted him. Prisoner had not then got up. Before this Hills asked me to assist them in getting the prisoners to the station house. I did so. I did not see that there was any occasion to use the staff. I only saw one policeman use his staff (P.S. Reynolds), and he made good use of it when he was about it. It was when Moore was biting him that he used the staff upon his head. Reynolds did not hit him after he had got his hand at liberty. I saw him hit Moore once in High Street because he would not walk.

Mr. Bateman at this stage of the case came to the dock and examined the prisoner Moore. He said two very heavy blows had been given on his head.

In answer to Kelly, Hubbard said: Although you were handcuffed, Mr. Hills had as much as he could do to get you along.

By Sergeant: I did not hear you make any noise. You were very quiet.

By Moore: You had hold of Reynolds' hand, biting it. This was the only provocation for the policemen to use their staves.

By Mr. Tolputt: I did not see any ill-treatment before Moore bit the sergeant's hand.

The whole of the prisoners denied the charge. Kelly admitted having some ale, but Sergeant and Moore complained butterly of their treatment by the police.

After a consultation, Mr. Bateman said as Sergeant was drunk, and not riotous, they fined him five shillings and costs, and dismissed the charge of assault in his case. He (Mr. Bateman) was very sorry the men had been knocked about, but the policemen had warned the prisoners on several occasions to go home and not make such a noise, and Reynolds had himself walked up to them from the bottom of the town, so as to cause no excitement on the part of the prisoners, and they attacked him. The policemen were strong men, and they should be merciful as well as strong. If it were not for the injury the prisoners had received, they would be more severely punished. The sentence on them would be a month's imprisonment, with hard labour.

The prisoners Moore and Sergeant presented a very bloody appearance. Moore had a deep cut over the left eye, a blow on the head – of the pain of which he complained during the hearing -, also a cut on his right ear. From these wounds the blood had run over the man's face. Sergeant had two cuts above his forehead, and the blood had trickled down his face. Kelly had fortunately come off without any bruises whatever.

 

Folkestone Express 9 October 1869.

Tuesday, October 5th: Before W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.


Michael Moor, 34, William Sergeant, 35, and George Kelly, 31, privates of Royal Artillery, were charged with being drunk and riotous, and assaulting P.S. Reynolds and P.C. Swain of the Borough Police. The two first named prisoners bore evident marks of a struggle, their faces being covered with blood. Moore had a severe gash over the eye, a wound on his head, his ear and chin cut. His clothes were torn and covered with dirt. On being placed in the dock he had to be supplied with water and accommodated with a seat. The three prisoners pleaded Not Guilty to all charges.

P.C. Swain deposed that seeing three soldiers in High Street about one o'clock that morning, making a noise outside the Royal Engineer, he told them to go away. The prisoner Kelly was then drunk. They went towards the lower part of the town. He followed them, and saw them knock at the door of the Harbour Inn. He cautioned them, and ordered them to leave the town. Shortly after two o'clock he saw them again outside the South Foreland Inn with three other soldiers (two Hussars and four of the Royal Artillery). Moor was drunk, and they were all making a great noise. Sergeant was not so drunk as he others. He ordered them off and they went towards Dover Street, still making a disturbance. He informed Sergeant Reynolds of the circumstance, and P.C. Hills, whom he had just met. They then heard the soldiers coming down Dover Street making a noise, and Sergeant Reynolds went to them and wished them to be quiet, when Moor struck him on the back of the head. Witness then took him into custody, and being kicked by him on the leg, he retaliated by striking him on the head with his staff. A scuffle ensued, in which Moor was knocked down in the road, and he cut his head by falling. One of the soldiers had a loaded whip.

A man at the back of the room said there was a civilian present who saw the whole occurrence.

P.S. Reynolds, who had his hand bound up, said: I told the prisoners and the other soldiers to go home and not make a disturbance; they were outside the late Mr. Hughes' shop. All were drunk. One of the Hussars shook a whip over my head. Moor struck me on the back of the head and knocked me up against the wall. I said “Don't murder me”, and told Swain to take them into custody. Sergeant then came up and took hold of my collar. I knocked him down. He then got up and ran away and I caught him in Radnor Street. I did not notice any civilians about. I saw Swain use his staff. I do not know if he used it after the man was a prisoner. I used my staff to Moor because he kicked and struggled. (Witness here showed his hand which had evidently been bit in the struggle)

P.C. Hills said: Sergeant Reynolds went up to the soldiers. Shortly afterwards he whistled to us, and I and Swain went to his assistance. He had Moor and Kelly in custody; Moor nearly knocked Reynolds backwards. He told me to take Kelly into custody and to draw our staffs. The soldiers were drunk and used bad language. I do not know why we drew our staffs except because they knocked him down. All the prisoners resisted, and the Hussars said “If you use your staffs we will use our whips”, and commenced flourishing them about. A man named Richard Morford assisted me in handcuffing Kelly. Other civilians were there. I did not use my staff. The prisoner tried to kick me two or three times.

John Hobart, a sweep, and who appeared in his sables, said: I was going down High Street at three o'clock, and hearing screaming I proceeded to the bottom of the street. I met P.S. Reynolds and P.C.'s Swain and Hills. Hills asked me to assist them. Sergeant went up to the station very quietly; he appeared quite sober. All three were in custody when I met them; Moor and Kelly resisted a little. Moor took hold of Reynolds' hand and put it to his mouth. Reynolds told him to let go several times; he would not, and Reynolds drew his staff and used it on his hand and head; Moor fell. I do not know if it was from the result of the blow. Reynolds asked him to get up, and as he would not he put his foot on Moor's thigh and made him moan. He was taken to the station. I never saw such ill-treatment as that was. Moor was hit once on the leg going up High Street because he would not walk.

Mr. Bateman here came from the Bench and examined the prisoner Moor, and said there were two severe bruises on the head.

Kelly denied making any disturbance; Sergrant said he was knocked down with a staff before he said a word; Moor said he never insulted anyone, and had never been treated so before.

The Bench fined Sergeant 5s. and costs for being drunk, and dismissed the charge of assault. As regards Moor they were sorry he was knocked about as he had been, but no doubt the police struck hard in their own defence, and they sentenced Moor and Kelly to prison for one month.

 

Southeastern Gazette 11 October 1869.

Local News.

George Kelly, William Sergeant, and Michael Moor, belonging to the Royal Artillery, were charged on Tuesday with being drunk and riotous, and assaulting the police in the execution of their duty.

On the charge being read over Moor nearly fainted. He presented a frightful appearance, his face and hair being covered with blood.

P.C. Swain deposed to seeing Kelly about ten o’clock that morning with two other soldiers attempting to get into the "Engineer" beerhouse, High Street. They said they wanted some beer, and witness told them it was past hours, and they had better go home. He followed them to the bottom of the town, where they commenced to knock at the door of the Harbour Inn. He again cautioned them, and they left. The prisoners went to other houses, and repeated the same offence. Several policemen tried to get them away, and a general row was the result.

A witness named John Hobart, a chimney sweep, said he heard screaming at the bottom of High Street, and on going there he saw the prisoners in custody. Moor had P.C. Reynolds’ hand to his mouth, and as he would not let go he knocked him on the hands and head with his staff, and Moor fell. The officer then asked him to get up. He made no answer, and Reynolds stamped on his thigh and made him moan. Witness considered the police were illtreating him.

Dr. Bateman, who was on the bench, examined Moor in the dock. He said he had received, as far as he could see, two severe blows on the head.

The prisoners denied their being drunk and assaulting the police.

The bench fined Sergeant 5s. and costs for being drunk, and sentenced Moor and Kelly to one month’s imprisonment.

 

LICENSEE LIST

BAKER John 1849-50+

BAKER William "Alfred" 1861-1867 Next pub licensee had

Last pub licensee had SPICER Thomas 1867

DAWKINS Thomas 1868-69

 

Royal Engineer, (Old) High Street c1849 – 1869

Licensees

John Baker c1849 c1849
William (Or Alfred) Baker c1861 1867 Later Folkestone Cutter
Thomas Spicer 1867 1868 From Prince Albert
Thomas Dawkins 1868 1869

Kentish Gazette 8 October 1850

Notice is hereby given that by an indenture, dated the 27th day of September, 1850, John Baker, of Folkestone, in Kent, publican, assigned to Edward Hills, of Dover, in Kent, coachbuilder, all his stock-in-trade, debts, and personal estate and effects, in trust for the benefit of himself and the other creditors of the said John Baker, who, by executing the same, shall become parties thereto.

And notice is hereby also given that the said deed of assignment was duly executed by the said John Baker and Edward Hills, on the day of the date thereof, in the presence of, and was attested by, William Sladden, of Folkestone aforesaid, Solicitor.

The said deed of assignment will lie at the offices of Mr. Sladden, at Folkestone, for the inspection of, and execution by, the creditors of the said John Baker, and debtors to the estate are requested to pay me the amounts due from them forthwith.

William Sladden, Folkestone, Kent. Solicitor to the Trustee.
5th October, 1850.

Folkestone Observer 31 October 1863

Saturday October 24th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and R.W. Boarer Esq.

James Casey was charged with being drunk and riotous in the High Street, and also with assaulting P.C. Swain in the execution of his duty.

P.C. Swain said that last evening about 9 o'clock he saw the prisoner in the Royal Engineer, in company with a man called Timothy Daly. He was refused drink, and commenced begging. He used very obscene language and collected a great crowd in the street. Witness told him to go to his lodgings, and offered him a place to sleep for the night. Witness told him he was a police constable. Prisoner told him to go to ----, used very filthy language, shouted and swore. He had a woman and three children with him, and she also was drunk. He said he shouldn't go until he liked. Witness then took him in custody, when he became very violent and kicked him on the leg several times. With the assistance of a civilian and P.C. Sharp he brought him to the station. He had been in custody two or three times before.

Sent to Dover jail for six months' hard labour.

Folkestone Observer 30 September 1865

Wednesday September 27th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and A.M. Leith Esq.

William Baker was charged with opening his house – the Royal Engineer beerhouse – for the sale of liquor, between the hours of three and five on the Sunday afternoon previous.

P.C. Smith proved that about four o'clock on the day mentioned he found several soldiers drinking in the house, and the bench fined defendant 1s., and the costs 9s.

Folkestone Chronicle 17 March 1866

Friday March 16th:- Before J. Tolputt and A.M. Leith Esqs.

William Baker, landlord of the Royal Engineer, in High Street, was summoned for having assaulted Catherine Richardson on Monday last.

Complainant said on the night in question she went out to look for her husband between eleven and twelve at night. Went to the Royal Engineer, where she thought she heard her husband's voice, knocked at the door, and the defendant opened it. Told him she wanted to see her husband, when he “up with his fist and knocked her down”. She got up and he knocked her down a second time, and afterwards a third time. In answer to the defendant, complainant said she did not break the windows of his house. Defendant said her husband was not in the house, but she tried to force her way in.

The wife of Mr. Gloss, professor of music and languages, and a domestic servant who was with complainant corroborated her statement.

Defendant said the Mrs. Richardson had broken three panes of glass in his window, created a disturbance, and tried to force her way into his house, when he pushed her away and she fell down.

He called P.C. Swain, who said he heard a disturbance in High Street on the night in question, and on proceeding to ascertain what was the matter he met the complainant coming down street with her hat and shawl off. She said that Mr. Baker had knocked her down. She went back to defendant's door, and the latter came out with a candle and looked for something, when complainant tried to get into the house, as she said her husband was there. Defendant prevented her and pushed her away, when she fell down.

The magistrates said they considered the assault proved. If the complainant had broken his windows and made a disturbance, there were plenty of people to deal with her, and he had no right to take the law in his own hands. He would have to pay a fine of 1 and 12s costs, in default to be imprisoned for fourteen days, with hard labour.

Folkestone Observer 17 March 1866

Friday March 16th:- Before J. Tolputt and A.M. Leith Esqs.

William Baker, of the Royal Engineer, High Street, was charged with assaulting Catherine Richrdson on Monday the 12th instant.

Catherine Richardson said: I am the wife of Henry Richardson. My husband keeps the Mariner's Home public house in Radnor Street. On Monday the 12th, about ten minutes to twelve o'clock at night I went to Mr. Baker's house, in High Street, to see if my husband was there. He had been out all day. When I got to the door I listened, and heard my husband's voice inside. I rapped at the door and asked them to let me in or else let my husband come out as I wanted him at home. Mr. Baker opened the door, and as soon as he opened it he up with his hand, struck me on the breast and knocked me down. I got up again and said I would go in, for my husband is inside. He then knocked me down a second time. He then shut the door, but opened it and struck me on the arm, and knocked me down a third time. He did not strike me again, and soon afterwards I went away.

Cross-examined: It was after twelve when I came to your house. I wanted to force my way in. You did say my husband was not there and you would not let me come in.

Catherine Floss said: I am the wife of Charles Floss. My husband is a professor of music and languages. I was coming up the High Street a little before twelve o'clock on Monday night. I saw Mrs. Richardson knocking at Mr. Baker's door, asking for admittance, as she said her husband was there. Mr. Baker opened the door, up with his fist and knocked Mrs. Richardson down. There was some abusive language used which is not fit to be mentioned. I could not see where he struck her as I was standing on the Mill Bay steps. When Mrs. Richardson got up he knocked her down again. I saw her try to force her way into the house, and heard her say her husband was there. As far as I am aware Mrs. Richardson was quite sober. I did not see any more blows as I then went away.

Mary Rolfe said: I am a servant at Mrs. Richardson's and went with her to look for her husband. Mrs. Richardson knocked at Mr. Baker's door and asked for her husband. Mr. Baker said her husband was not there, when he knocked her down three times. I am sure I heard my master's voice in the house. I thought it was his voice. My mistress was quite sober.

Defendant said he had not been at home long when Mrs. Richardson knocked at the door, broke two windows, and asked for her husband. He told her he was not there, and as she tried to force herself in he gave her a push and she fell down.

He called P.C. Swain, who said he was on duty on the night in question, and hearing a disturbance in the High Street he went there and met the complainant coming down, when she told him the defendant had struck her. Accompanied her to the defendant's house, and when she got there she tried to force her way in, but defendant would not let her and pushed her back, when she fell to the ground. He could not say whether the complainant was drunk, but she was very excitable.

The magistrates said the defendant's conduct was cowardly and disgraceful to strike a woman in the way that he had done. They would fine him 1 and 12s costs. The fine was paid.

Folkestone Chronicle 4 May 1867

Friday May 3rd: Before R.W. Boarer, A.M. Leith, and J. Kelcey Esqs.

Thomas Spicer, late of the Engineer, High Street, was summoned for one quarter's gas consumed and rent of meter 1 0s. 6d., due to the Gas Company of Folkestone.

Order made for payment within seven days, in default of payment a distress warrant to issue, and in default of distress, two months hard labour.

Note: More Bastions has Spicer at Royal Engineer until 1868

Folkestone Chronicle 23 May 1868

Friday, May 22nd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and R.W. Boarer Esq.

William Dawkins, summoned for keeping a disorderly house on Sunday evening, pleaded guilty.

P.C. Swain said that about half past ten he was on duty in High Street and heard a great noise in the Engineer and defendant's brother asked him to clear the house. A man named Tyas was making the most noise, but the house was full – about twenty people. Defendant's mother, and her husband and others were there, but took no part in the disturbance. There were several prostitutes there who live in the house, which is not conducted well. I told the landlord to shut his house, and he did so directly.

Mr. Pearson complained of the noise and swearing all day on Sunday. Defendant turned them out. The house was well conducted till he got married. The house as now conducted was a great hindrance to him.

Mr. Gates corroborated Mr. Pearson's statement that during the last month the house had been very badly conducted. On Sunday there was a great noise and disturbance, which defendant tried to prevent. Tyas was a great nuisance.

Degendant said Tyas was a lodger, but he had got rid of him. He would try to conduct the house differently in future; it was his marriage that made all the difference; the house was quit before he married.

Fined forty shillings, and costs nine shillings, or one month's imprisonment.

Folkestone Observer 23 May 1868

Friday, May 22nd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Richard Dawkins of the Royal Engineer beerhouse was fined 2, with 9s. costs, for keeping a disorderly house on Sunday.

Folkestone Express 23 May 1868

Friday, May 22nd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and Alderman Boarer

William Dawkins, of the Royal Engineer, High Street, was summoned for keeping a disorderly house on Sunday evening last.

P.C. Swain, who had charge of the case, testified to a disturbance which took place on the night in question, and the bad character of the house generally.

Messrs. Pearson and Gates, who reside opposite the house, also bore testimony to the annoyance they were subjected to in consequence of the bad language and continual uproar that took place.

The defendant said the house was always quiet until he got married, but since there was nothing but quarrelling, but he would endeavour to keep the house respectable for the future.

This being the defendant's first offence, the Bench fined him 2 and costs, or one month's imprisonment, with an intimation that if he was summoned again they would fine him 5.

The fine was paid.

Folkestone Observer 13 June 1868

Wednesday, June 10th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and James Tolputt Esq.

William Dawkins was charged with keeping open, during unlawful hours, the Royal Engineer beerhouse, on Sunday, the 7th instant.

P.C. Swain said that on Sunday afternoon, shortly after three o'clock, he watched defendant's house from a window of a house opposite. About a quarter past three he saw three soldiers knock at the front door of the defendant's house. Defendant opened the door, and after looking up and down the street, let the soldiers in. At ten minutes to four he passed five more in. Saw Dawkins draw something into a pint pot, but could not tell what it was. Could not see the soldiers after they went in. It did not rain when they went in.

Joseph Robert Gates said he kept a fancy repository in High Street. Was at home on Sunday afternoon, and saw eight soldiers go into defendant's house between the hours of three and five. Saw something drawn into a pot between three and four in the afternoon.

The defendant said he did not draw any beer for the soldiers. They came and asked him to allow them to dry their clothes. He did draw some beer for his lodger, which he drank in his own room.

Filmer Tyas said he was a labourer, and lodged with the defendant. Had lodged with him for eight or nine months. Was at home on Sunday afternoon – did not go out all day. Two or three soldiers came in between two and three and had a pot of beer, and went out about a quarter past three. Did not see any more soldiers come in, as he went upstairs afterwards. Did not know whether he had two or three pints of beer.

Captain Kennicott, addressing the defendant, said it was the second time he had been brought before the Bench. He (defendant) knew it was contrary to law to open his house on Sunday between the hours stated in his license, and the next time he appeared before them he would be fined 5, and for a third offence, 10, but as there was a possibility of doubt as toward this case they would dismiss it.

Folkestone Express 13 June 1868

Wednesday, June 10th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., and Alderman Tolputt.

William Dawkins, of the Engineer beerhouse in High Street, was summoned for retailing malt liquor after hours on Sunday afternoon last, contrary to the Act.

P.C. Swaine, acting upon instructions from Superintendent Martin, took up his position on the afternoon in question in a house opposite, commanding a view of the defendant's premises. At about twenty minutes to four o'clock he saw two soldiers enter the house, followed shortly afterwards by others, the defendant soon afterwards drawing a quantity of beer in jugs, hence the summons.

Mr. Gates, a tradesman residing immediately opposite, corroborated the constable's evidence, besides testifying to the general character of the house.

The defendant said he had instructed Mr. Minter to appear for him, but as he was engaged in London, he would like the case adjourned till Friday.

Mr. Bradley said that was no reason for the case being adjourned, and it must go on.

The defendant said the soldiers did not have anything to drink, and only wanted to get sheltered from the rain. The drink was suppied to one of his lodgers, there being three in the house.

Alderman Boarer said that a previous conviction should have deterred the defendant from committing himself again.

The defendant said he did not think he was doing any harm letting the soldiers in.

Filmer Tyas, a lodger in the defendant's house, deposed that he had lodged there nine months, and he was at home all day last Sunday. The soldiers were friends of his; they did not have anything to drink; what beer was drawn was for himself.

Captain Kennicott said it appeared to him the defendant was always in trouble. It was the second time of his coming before him. The first time he was fined 40s. and costs, which should have had the effect of altering his course of conduct. The defendant had no right to open his doors, raining or not raining. He must act according to the law, which says the house shall not be opened between certain hours. He had a very narrow escape of being fined 5, and if brought there again he would be fined 10. Having taken all things into consideration, the Bench would dismiss the case.

The defendant thanked the magistrates, and said he would give up the house altogether.

Alderman Tolputt said it was the best thing he could do.

Folkestone Chronicle 25 July 1868

Monday July 20th: Before R.W. Boarer and A.M. Leith Esqs.

Filmer Tyas, charged with assaulting William Dawkins on the 18th inst., pleaded not guilty.

Wm. Dawkins, landlord of the Engineer beer house deposed: Last Saturday prisoner was in my house about nine o'clock and asked for a pint of beer, and I told my wife not to draw any more for him. I told him to leave my house, but he refused and called me all the foul names he could lay his tongue to. I called P.S. Reynolds to put him out. I was helping to put him out, and he began to wrestle with me, kicked the constable in the thigh, and I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined: You occupy a room in my house, but not with my permission. After a good deal of wrangling you went into your room. You were not interfering with anyone when P.S. Reynolds and I came into the house. You resisted the police when in custody. I did not hear any noise when you went up the street.

By the Bench: Prisoner had been drinking. He was not sober, but he was not drunk, only quarrelsome.

P.C. Reynolds deposed: I was called to the Engineer, High Street, on Saturday evening about half past nine, and prosecutor told Tyas to leave his house. He was then in a back room, and refused to go, using bad language. Dawkins took hold of him to put him out, and they had a scuffle together. I went to help prosecutor, and Tyas kicked me just above the thigh, resisting very violently. P.C. Sharpe came to my assistance, and he then went to the station quietly, except as to shouting. In trying to put him in the cell he was very violent, and tried to kick me twice.

Cross-examined: I did not punch you or threaten to knock your brains out. I did threaten to lock you in the dark cell, but used no more than necessary violence. You kicked me wilfully and spitefully. I did say you might think yourself lucky I had not my staff with me.

By the bench: Prisoner was not drunk.

Prisoner said: At six o'clock he had two glasses of ale in the house with prosecutor. I then went to Dover, and on coming back I went into a back room where four boys were playing cards and asked for a pint of beer and was refused, and Dawkins told me he wanted me out of the house, for he wanted my room for another girl. Prisoner complained very strongly of the violence of the constable and called...

Elizabeth Dawkins, wife of the landlord of the house, who said prisoner, who was a lodger, came into the house very quietly and asked for a pint of beer, which her husband had ordered her not to draw for him. Prisoner went out to her husband to ask why, and he told him to leave the house, which he refused to do until eleven o'clock. Prosecutor put himself in a great passion and got a policeman to put him out. After a struggle prisoner was put out, and he never struck or kicked at either. Several persons cried “Shame” for the way he was treated. My husband took his last week's lodging money. Prisoner was not drunk.

By the bench: My husband was jealous of prisoner.

Reynolds, recalled by the Bench: When Dawkins came for me, I thought there was a riot in the house. He told me Tyas had no business in the house.

After consulting, the bench decided to hear the other charge.

P.S. Reynolds recapitulated his former evidence.

Prisoner called Thomas Morford, the town sergeant, who said he was in the police station on Saturday evening to see what the noise was, and saw prisoner, crying “Murder”, tussling with Reynolds, and he saw no blows struck. He thought there was considerable violence used in the station house, because the cries of “Murder” were heard for some minutes before he went down to see.

The Bench considered the first case not proved, for the first assault was committed on him; but in the second case, he ought to have gone to the station quietly, and if he had not been severely punished he would have been more severely dealt with. As it was, he would be merely fined 5s., and 7s. 6d. costs, or fourteen days' imprisonment. The money was immediately paid by the prisoner's friends in court.

Harriet Tyas, mother of the prisoner in the last case, was then charged with riotous conduct on Saturday evening at the police station.

Mr. Minter appeared for this prisoner, against whom no evidence was offered, and she was accordingly discharged.

Folkestone Observer 25 July 1868

Monday, July 20th: Before Alderman Boarer and Captain Leith

Filmer Tyas was brought up in custody, charged with assaulting William Dawkins, landlord of the Engineer beerhouse, High Street, Folkestone, on the 18th inst.

Pleaded Not Guilty.

Complainant said: I am a labourer, residing at the Engineer beerhouse, High Street, Folkestone. Last Saturday evening the prisoner came to my house between nine and ten o'clock and asked for a pint of beer. I told my wife not to draw him any more beer as I had given him notice to leave, and I wished he should leave. He had been lodging with me. I told hom if he did not leave the house I should fetch a policeman to put him out. He said he should not leave for me or any policeman. He would not go until he chose. I then went for a policeman and got Sergeant Reynolds, in whose presence I told the prisoner to go, but he still refused. I took hold of him and showed him the door, and he then began to wrestle with me. I called to the sergeant to assist me, and when he did so, prisoner kicked him. He took him into custody and he was locked up.

By the prisoner: You did go into the room after a deal of wrangling with me. You did kick the sergeant wilfully, when near the fireplace, and made great resistance. You have no room in the house now.

By the Bench: Prisoner was not sober. He had had just enough to make him quarrel with anyone. Prisoner has been lodging at my house, but he is not a lodger now.

Sergeant Reynolds deposed: I was on duty at the police station about twenty minutes past nine on Saturday evening last, when Dawkins came and complained to me that a man named Tyas was in his house creating a disturbance, and he wished me to go and put a stop to it. I went to the house and saw Dawkins go into the back room, and heard him tell the prisoner to leave the house. I saw the prisoner standing opposite the fireplace as he replied “I shan't go for you, nor yet any ---- in the house”. Dawkins then took hold of him by the arm, turned him round, and said “There's the door. Now go”. Prisoner still said “I shan't”. They began scuffling, and Dawkins called on me for assistance. I went and took hold of the prisoner and turned him round, when he instantly kicked me on the thigh, bruising my leg. The marks are there now. He resisted very violently, but I got him out at last, and, police constable Sharpe coming to my assistance, he walked up the street quietly, except shouting and making a noise. A great number of people followed us up the street. When I got him to the station and was about to put him in the cell again he became very violent, and we had a severe struggle with him to get him in. He made two attemptes to kick me.

Prisoner cross-examined the sergeant at some length with the view of showing he was ill-used at the station, but the sergeant denied that he used more violence than necessary.

The Bench: In your judgement, was the prisoner sober?

Sergeant Reynolds: He might have had some drink, but nothing to speak of.

Prisoner then gave his version of the affair, denying that he assaulted Dawkins in any way whatever. On the other hand he alleged that Sergeant Reynolds assaulted him most unmercifully when at the station, and Mr. Morford, who was present at the time, if he spoke the truth, would say so.

He called Ellen Dawkins, wife of the complainant, who said: The prisoner came to our house on Saturday and called for beer, but I refused to draw him any as my husband had told me not to do so. Prisoner asked me the reason why, and I told him I did not know. He went and asked him, and my husband said he would not draw him any more beer, and told him to leave the house. Prisoner told him he would not go until he thought proper, for he was a lodger, and if he was not allowed to sit in the parlour he would go up into his own room until it was time for him to go, he having had a week's notice. My husband put himself in a great passion and said he should go out, for he would fetch a policeman to put him out. Prisoner said he would not go out for him or any policeman until eleven o'clock. My husband went for a policeman, and when he came back he seized the prisoner by the throat and struggled with him for some time, and then called Sergeant Reynolds to assist him. Reynolds seized him very roughly, and in the struggle they got a chair between them. I did not see prisoner strike or kick the policeman, and I was looking on the whole of the time. Everybody in the room cried “Shame” at the way in which prisoner was used. He did not kick the sergeant, and if he was hurt at all, he was hurt with the chair.

By the Bench: Prisoner was a lodger, but had had notice to quit. He owed two weeks' rent and had been to Dover for the money.

By the prisoner: You were not drunk.

Alderman Boarer: Did your husband assign any reason for turning him out?

Witness: My husband is jealous of him, that's the reason for turning him out, but he has no reason. There is a spite against the young man, although I blame him very much for not going before. He never interfered with anyone.

Prisoner: He turned me out once before, and afterwards asked me to come back again, and treated me and got drunk with me the same day.

Reynolds, re-called, in answer to the Bench, said: When Dawkins came for me I asked him if the man was a lodger, and he replied that he had no right whatever there. I thought there was a row or a riot and went down to quell it accordingly.

The Bench, having expressed their intention to hear the other case before giving their decision on this, prisoner was then charged with assaulting police sergeant John Reynolds while in the execution of his duty.

Pleaded Not Guilty.

The evidence in this case was similar to that given in the former, and prisoner again cross-examined at great length to show he was ill-used, and in his defence stated that both Mr. Morford and Dawkins would prove this if they spoke the truth.

Sergeant Reynolds admitted telling prisoner that it was a lucky thing for him that he had not his staff with him, but again strongly denied that he used more violence than necessary. He said that prisoner began crying “Murder” as loud as he could as soon as he got inside the station door.

Thomas Morford was then called. He said: I am Town Sergeant, and live on these premises. Hearing a great noise on Saturday evening, I went down to the bottom of the stairs to see what was going on. I saw the prisoner, who was crying “Murder” and making a great noise, struggling with Sergeant Reynolds, who was taking him towards the cell. I did not see him strike the prisoner.

By the prisoner: I did not see him strike you. I saw you tussling with him. I saw no blows. When I saw you in the cell, you were standing up and tussling with the sergeant; he did not have you down. I did not hear him say he was “the master of all Folkestone bullies”. There might have been blows struck, but I saw none. I saw you tussling together when you passed the stairs, and more so when in the cell. You appeared to be trying to prevent the sergeant shutting the door.

By the Bench: I heard Reynolds say he was kicked, but I did not see the kick given.

Captain Leith: Was there more violence used than necessary to get him in the cell?

Witness: Not when I was present. There would appear to have been a deal of violence in the office, as I heard the cry of “Murder” two or three times before I went down, but I know nothing about that.

Alderman Boarer: Have you any more witnesses to call?

Prisoner: Yes, sir, if this man will speak the truth for me. Will you (turning to Dawkins) come and speak the truth for me, and say what you saw this man (Sergeant Reynolds) do to me?

Dawkins: If it had been me, I should have done more.

Prisoner: Then you won't come and speak for me?

Dawkins: I have nothing further to say.

The magistrates then told the prisoner that they considered the first case was not proved, but as to the assault on the policeman, he had before been punished for a similar offence, and therefore was aware of the consequences. They had no doubt he was a very violent man, and had committed this assault. He was then fined 5s., and 7s. 6d. costs, in default 14 days' imprisonment with hard labour.

Prisoner said he would go to prison, but he was ultimately released on the money being paid for him.

Harriett Tyas, mother of the former prisoner, was then charged with riotous conduct at the police station on Saturday evening.

Mr. Minter appeared for defendant.

Superintendent Martin said the prisoner came to the station on Saturday evening and made such a disturbance that they were compelled to lock her up. Under the circumstances, however, he did not wish to press the charge, and prisoner was therefore discharged.

Folkestone Express 25 July 1868

Monday, July 20th: Before Alderman Boarer and Captain Leith

Filmer Tyas, the defendant, was charged with assaulting William Dawkins, the landlord of the Royal Engineer, High Street, and on a second count with making an unmanly attack on Sergeant Reynolds of the Police Force, who was called to take him into custody. The prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Dawkins, having been called, deposed that the defendant came to his house on Saturday evening and called for some beer, and he ordered his wife not to serve him. Upon that the defendant made the assault complained of, at the same time using very foul language. Sergeant Reynolds was then sent for. Upon his arrival the prisoner still refused to leave, so that they had to forcibly eject him, and in doing so he made a very dastardly attack on the sergeant and seriously bruised his leg.

The prisoner here stated that he occupied a room at the Royal Engineer, and paid 2s. per week for it.

Sergeant Reynolds said: On Saturday evening I went to the Engineer public house at the request of Mr. Dawkins and ordered the prisoner to leave the house. He refused. Upon that Mr. Dawkins scuffled with him, and the prisoner turned round and kicked me. I then took him into custody, and with the assistance of P.C. Sharpe succeeded in getting him to the station.

The prisoner cross-examined the sergeant at some length, saying that he had been brutally used by him. He called Mrs. Dawkins, who said she did not see the prisoner kick the policeman, and that her husband was jealous of him.

Sergeant Reynolds, re-called, said he was not aware the prisoner was a lodger in the house; he thought it was a riot, and he went to quell it.

This terminated the case of the assault on Mr. Dawkins.

The evidence in the second case was materially the same. The prisoner pleaded Not Guilty, and tried to prove he was the aggrieved party.

He called Mr. Morford, Town Sergeant, who said that hearing a great noise and cries of “Murder!” proceeding from the police station, he was induced to go there, when he saw Sergeant Reynolds tussling with the prisoner, who was very riotous and made a great uproar. He did not see Tyas kick the sergeant.

Mr. Alderman Boarer said that they had taken great pains investigating this case and allowed the prisoner every facility to answer the charge, but this was not his first offence, as he had been before convicted for committing assaults. However, they did not think the assault on Mr. Dawkins had been proved, so the prisoner would be discharged on that count, but the assault on the police officer was not justified, and they must inflict a fine of 5s. and 7s. 6d. costs, or fourteen days' imprisonment. The fine was paid.

Harriett Tyas, the mother of the last prisoner, was then charged with riotous conduct at the police station, but the magistrates, taking into consideration that she had been locked up, acquitted her.

Southeastern Gazette 9 November 1868

Local News

At the Borough Police Court, on Saturday, before Capt. Kennicott, R.N., and Mr. Tolputt, William Dawkins, charged with unlawfully permitting and suffering a great noise in his house, the Engineers, High Street, was fined 5, although the constables who proved the case admitted that defendant was endeavouring to make peace and quietness.

Folkestone Observer 14 November 1868

Saturday, November 7th: Before Capt. Kennicott R.N., and Alderman Tolputt.

William Dawkins was charged with not maintaining good order in his house, the Royal Engineer.

P.C. Ovenden said: I was on duty in High Street on Saturday last. Between four and five I hear the cry of “Police!” and “Murder!”. I went to the house and found a man and woman struggling together in the passage. They were both drunk and making a great noise. Defendant was sober, and was trying to keep his wife, who was drunk, from going into the street. I left the house quiet, but soon after I left the disturbance began again. When I went into the house the second time the man and woman were both on the floor struggling together. Defendant said he could not attend to their quarrels, as he had enough to do to look to his own.

P.C. Woodland and Mr. F. Ellis also confirmed the evidence of P.C. Ovenden.

A former conviction was proved against the defendant, and the Bench fined him 5, and 19s. costs, or two months imprisonment.

Folkestone Express 14 November 1868

Saturday, November 7th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and Alderman Tolputt

W. Dawkins, of the Royal Engineer, High Street, was charged with disorderly conduct at his house on the 31st. ult. Mr. Minter defended.

P.C. Ovenden said he was on duty that day in High Street. At ten minutes to twelve he was called to the house and the defendant's wife complained of being assaulted by some lodgers. At half past five in the evening he heard cries of “Police!” and “Murder!”. He went there and found a man and woman struggling together, both of them drunk. He also saw Dawkins' wife in another room, drunk. Defendant was sober. He advised them to go upstairs.

P.C. Woodland proved that the disturbance was continued till late at night.

Mr. Ellis stated that he lived nearly opposite to the house, and he was annoyed by the cries of “Murder!” and “Police!” at the defendant's house on the previous Saturday.

Mr. Minter said the charge was that the defendant wilfully suffered a disturbance, but if they looked at the circumstances they would find that he did all he could to prevent it.

The Bench considered the charge proved, and as he had been previously fined for the same offence they fined him 5 and 19s. costs, or two months' imprisonment.

Folkestone Chronicle 16 January 1869

Police Report

William Dawkins was summoned for having his beerhouse in High Street open during unlawful hours.

P.S. Reynolds deposed that he was on duty in High Street on Sunday morning, about a quarter past three, and hearing a noise in defendant's house went in, and found three men in the bar with defendant's wife. A quart jug and four glasses of beer was on the table.

P.C. Swain corroborated the sergeant's evidence, and defendant was fined 40s. and costs, or two months' imprisonment.

Note: More Bastions has Thomas Dawkins as licensee.

Folkestone Observer 16 January 1869

Wednesday, January 13th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Thomas Dawkins was charged with keeping open house during unlawful hours on Sunday last, the 10th instant.

P.S. Reynolds said he was on duty in High Street at a quarter past three on Sunday morning last, and on hearing some loud talking at the Royal Engineer beershop, stood opposite the door, when defendant opened it, and on seeing witness he tried to close it again, but witness pushed the door open and went in. In a room behind the bar he saw three men and defendant's wife. On a table in the room was a quart jug and some glasses containing beer. Called P.C. Swain to witness what was there, and he then left the house. Knew all the men who were there; they were Messrs. Rose, Timson (junior) and Saxby. He knew they were not lodgers, as they had private residences in the town, the two former living in High Street, and the latter in Dover Road.

Cross-examined by Dawkins: Did not know whether they engaged lodgings for that night or not. Could not say that the beer was drawn for them. Did not see them go in or come out of the house.

P.C. Swain said he was in company with P.S. Reynolds on Sunday morning last, and in a room behind the bar of the Royal Engineer he saw the three persons named, with defendant and his wife. On a table in the room there was a quart jug containing beer or ale. He heard the voice of James Rose in the house at four o'clock. Knew they were not lodgers as they lived in High Street and Dover Road. The character of the house was indifferent.

Cross-examined by Dawkins: Was not sure that they did not take lodgings for the night, or that he drew the beer for them.

Dawkins, in defence, said that three gentlemen came to his house on Saturday night and hired lodgings. He locked up his house soon after and went out for about an hour, and on returning he sat in the room talking until between three and four.

In answer to the Bench, Mr. Bradley said the defendant had been before the Bench twice before for offences attached to the house, on the last occasion he being fined 5, with 19s. costs.

The Bench fined defendant 40s, with 11s. costs, or two months imprisonment.

Folkestone Express 16 January 1869

Wednesday, January 13th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

William Dawkins was summoned for having his house, the Royal Engineer, High Street, open for the sale of beer on the morning of the 10th inst.

Sergeant Reynolds said: On Sunday last, at a quarter before three in the morning, I heard loud talking in the Royal Engineer, which is kept by the defendant. I listened outside the door for two minutes, when the defendant opened the door and looked out. He saw me and immediately closed the door again. I said “Dawkins, don't close the door on me. Who have you got in your house?”. He did not answer and closed the door. I stepped up and pushed it open. In a room behind the bar I saw three men and defendant's wife. There was a great jug on the table, and four glasses containing beer. I then called P.C. Swain to witness who was there, and afterwards walked out. Defendant made no reply to my question. I know the men who were in the house; they did not lodge there. Two of them live in High Street, and I am sure they were not lodgers.

By the defendant: I don't know if they had engaged lodgings or not for that night. They were seen in the street the next morning. I can't say if the beer was drawn for them. I did not see them come in or out of the house.

P.C. Swain said: I was on duty in High Street on Sunday morning, the 10th inst. I entered the house with Sergeant Reynolds and went into a room next to the bar, the room the company always resort to. There were three persons in there standing up, and the defendant's wife. He then corroborated the sergeant's statement. I heard some people talking there at four in the morning. I know the parties who were there. They all reside in the town; two in High Street, and one in the Dover Road.

By the defendant: I do not know if they paid for lodgings that night. There are no prostitutes kept at the house at present, that I know of.

The defendant said three gentlemen came to his house on Saturday night for lodgings. In the morning they called him up to let them out. He could not get them to come as witnesses, as two of them were away, and the other was not up, but if the Bench would only adjourn the case, he would summons them as witnesses.

The Bench refused to adjourn the case, as he had plenty of time to call witnesses if he desired to do so; the summons was served on Monday morning.

Superintendent Martin said the defendant had been before them on two previous occasions. He was fined 2 and costs the first time, and 5 and costs the second time.

The Clerk said this was the first offence of this description. Had it been a repetition of either of the other offences, the Bench could fine him 50, and close the house for two years.

The Bench said they would fine him the highest penalty, which was 40s. and 11s. costs, in default two months' hard labour. They would grant no time to pay it in, and ordered the defendant to be detained in custody until the money was paid.

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

.Beer Houses

The following application was opposed:

William Dawkins, Royal Engineer, High Street. Mr. Martin said this house had been kept in a most disorderly state. The Magistrates refused to grant a license.

Several other applications were adjourned owing to the applicants not being sufficiently acquainted with the requirements of the New Beerhouse Act, and for the information of those who wish to apply, it was stated that the applicants have to fill up a notice in proper form, and serve a copy on one of the Overseers, and another on the Police Superintendent twenty one days before the application is heard. A duplicate must be produced in Court, and the applicant has to swear to the service of the copies. He must also produce evidence that his house bears a respectable character. A personal attendance of the applicant is necessary.

Southeastern Gazette 30 August 1869

Annual Licensing Day.—A full bench of magistrates attended on Wednesday to grant renewals and hear fresh applications.

Several licenses were suspended owing to the complaints of the public, and the renewal of the licence of the Royal Engineer, kept by George Dawkins, was refused altogether.

Folkestone Observer 25 September 1869

Local Intelligence

R. Mercer, jun., was brought before the magistrates on Saturday last, charged with assaulting Helen Dawkins, wife of George Dawkins, of the Royal Engineer, High Street. The evidence was of a disgraceful nature, the defendant acknowledging that he was too familiar with plaintiff, and the quarrel was the result of jealousy. He was bound over to keep the peace; himself in 10, and one surety in 10.

Folkestone Express 25 September 1869

Saturday, September 20th: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

R. Mercer, jun., was summoned by Helen Dawkins, wife of Dawkins, of the Engineer, High Street, for an assault. The evidence in support of the case was of the usual character, and the defendant was bound over to keep the peace for three months, herself in 10, and one surety of 10.

Folkestone Observer 9 October 1869

Tuesday, October 5th: Before W. Bateman and James Tolputt Esqs.

William Kelly Sergeant, George Kelly, and Michael Moore, gunners in the 10th Brigade, Royal Artillery, were charged with being drunk and riotous in Dover Street on the night previous. They were also charged with assaulting the police in the execution of their duty.

Prisoners denied both charges, Kelly saying he was knocked down before he was aware of it.

P.C. Swain said: About one o'clock on Monday morning I saw Kelly in company with another artilleryman and two men of the 10th Hussars. They were knocking at the door of the Royal Engineer, High Street. I told them they could not get into the house as it was past closing hours. Kelly was then drunk. They all went away. About two o'clock they were knocking at the Harbour Inn, and I told them to go away, and Kelly became insolent. Shortly after two I saw Kelly in company with the other prisoners, another artilleryman, and two Hussars near Mr. Jordan's, South Foreland. They were then making a great noise. They left there and went up Dover Street. I afterwards saw P.S. Reynolds and reported the circumstances. Some minutes after, P.C. Hills came down, followed by the prisoners. P.S. Reynolds went up to speak with them. They surrounded the sergeant, and P.C. Hills and myself went to his assistance. Moore struck Reynolds at the back of the head, and sent him sprawling. I then took Moore into custody, when he kicked me on the leg, and I hit him on the head with the staff. Prisoner then struck at me and I knocked him down again with my staff. P.C. Hills took Kelly, and the other prisoners ran away, P.S. Reynolds following. When on the first occasion I saw them in High Street they said they were out for a spree.

P.S. Reynolds said: I was on duty at the bottom of the town about three o'clock this morning. P.C. Swain called my attention to some soldiers who were drunk and riotous in Dover Street. There were the three prisoners, two Hussars, and a fourth artilleryman. I cautioned them, and told them not to make any disturbance, and to get out of the town. The whole of the prisoners were drunk and riotous. One of the soldiers had a whip and threatened to strike me with it. They surrounded me, and I put out my hand to keep them off, and Moore hit me with his fist, nearly knocking me down. I said “Don't murder me” and called P.C. Swain to my assistance. Sergeant Kelly then came up to me and caught hold of me by the collar, and I knocked him down with my staff. He got up and ran away down Radnor Street. I caught him and brought him back. They were very violent, and struggled. I saw Swain use his staff when he came up. In High Street Moore kicked and struggled, and I hit him with my staff on his hands and legs.

Mr. Bateman said the police ought never to use their staffs when a man was handcuffed.

P.S. Reynolds said the prisoners were not handcuffed.

P.C. Hills said: I was on duty at the bottom of High Street about three o'clock when Sergeant Reynolds asked me if I had seen any soldiers. I told him I had not, but soon afterwards they came down Dover Street shouting. They were drunk. P.S. Reynolds went up to them, but I could not hear what he said. Shortly after, the sergeant whistled to us, and we went up to him. He had Moore and Kelly in custody. Moore knocked Reynolds backward, and before he could recover himself he told me to take Kelly into custody. The sergeant also told us to draw our staves. I suppose he gave that order because he got knocked down. Prisoners were very violent. When we drew our staves, the prisoners said they could use their whips, and commenced to flourish them about. When I had Kelly in custody he resisted very much, but with the assistance of Mr. Morford I put the handcuffs on with his hands behind him. During this time Sergeant and Kelly ran away. I met the sweep by Mr. Musgrave's in High Street. I did not use my staff.

Cross-examined: The only cause for locking you up was for hallooing and shouting.

John Hubbard, a sweep in sooty uniform, said: I was up this morning a little after three o'clock, and as I was going down High Street I heard a screaming. When I got down by Dover Street I waited and listened to ascertain where the screaming came from. I went up Dover Street and saw P.S. Reynolds, and P.Cs Swain and Hills. There were also the three soldiers, now in the dock. Moore was very drunk. Sergeant was in a sober state, and went up civilly; Kelly was also quiet. They were all three in custody, and making a great noise. Moore and Kelly were resisting. Moore had hold of Reynolds' hand, and Reynolds asked him to let go, but he would not, and Reynolds drew his staff. Reynolds used the staff upon Moore's hand and afterwards on his head. He went down when Reynolds hit him. Reynolds then asked him to get up, but he would not, and Reynolds put his hand on his thigh and made Moore moan. Swain then came up and assisted him. Prisoner had not then got up. Before this Hills asked me to assist them in getting the prisoners to the station house. I did so. I did not see that there was any occasion to use the staff. I only saw one policeman use his staff (P.S. Reynolds), and he made good use of it when he was about it. It was when Moore was biting him that he used the staff upon his head. Reynolds did not hit him after he had got his hand at liberty. I saw him hit Moore once in High Street because he would not walk.

Mr. Bateman at this stage of the case came to the dock and examined the prisoner Moore. He said two very heavy blows had been given on his head.

In answer to Kelly, Hubbard said: Although you were handcuffed, Mr. Hills had as much as he could do to get you along.

By Sergeant: I did not hear you make any noise. You were very quiet.

By Moore: You had hold of Reynolds' hand, biting it. This was the only provocation for the policemen to use their staves.

By Mr. Tolputt: I did not see any ill-treatment before Moore bit the sergeant's hand.

The whole of the prisoners denied the charge. Kelly admitted having some ale, but Sergeant and Moore complained butterly of their treatment by the police.

After a consultation, Mr. Bateman said as Sergeant was drunk, and not riotous, they fined him five shillings and costs, and dismissed the charge of assault in his case. He (Mr. Bateman) was very sorry the men had been knocked about, but the policemen had warned the prisoners on several occasions to go home and not make such a noise, and Reynolds had himself walked up to them from the bottom of the town, so as to cause no excitement on the part of the prisoners, and they attacked him. The policemen were strong men, and they should be merciful as well as strong. If it were not for the injury the prisoners had received, they would be more severely punished. The sentence on them would be a month's imprisonment, with hard labour.

The prisoners Moore and Sergeant presented a very bloody appearance. Moore had a deep cut over the left eye, a blow on the head – of the pain of which he complained during the hearing -, also a cut on his right ear. From these wounds the blood had run over the man's face. Sergeant had two cuts above his forehead, and the blood had trickled down his face. Kelly had fortunately come off without any bruises whatever.

Folkestone Express 9 October 1869

Tuesday, October 5th: Before W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Michael Moor, 34, William Sergeant, 35, and George Kelly, 31, privates of Royal Artillery, were charged with being drunk and riotous, and assaulting P.S. Reynolds and P.C. Swain of the Borough Police. The two first named prisoners bore evident marks of a struggle, their faces being covered with blood. Moore had a severe gash over the eye, a wound on his head, his ear and chin cut. His clothes were torn and covered with dirt. On being placed in the dock he had to be supplied with water and accommodated with a seat. The three prisoners pleaded Not Guilty to all charges.

P,C. Swain deposed that seeing three soldiers in High Street about one o'clock that morning, making a noise outside the Royal Engineer, he told them to go away. The prisoner Kelly was then drunk. They went towards the lower part of the town. He followed them, and saw them knock at the door of the Harbour Inn. He cautioned them, and ordered them to leave the town. Shortly after two o'clock he saw them again outside the South Foreland Inn with three other soldiers (two Hussars and four of the Royal Artillery). Moor was drunk, and they were all making a great noise. Sergeant was not so drunk as he others. He ordered them off and they went towards Dover Street, still making a disturbance. He informed Sergeant Reynolds of the circumstance, and P.C. Hills, whom he had just met. They then heard the soldiers coming down Dover Street making a noise, and Sergeant Reynolds went to them and wished them to be quiet, when Moor struck him on the back of the head. Witness then took him into custody, and being kicked by him on the leg, he retaliated by striking him on the head with his staff. A scuffle ensued, in which Moor was knocked down in the road, and he cut his head by falling. One of the soldiers had a loaded whip.

A man at the back of the room said there was a civilian present who saw the whole occurrence.

P.S. Reynolds, who had his hand bound up, said: I told the prisoners and the other soldiers to go home and not make a disturbance; they were outside the late Mr. Hughes' shop. All were drunk. One of the Hussars shook a whip over my head. Moor struck me on the back of the head and knocked me up against the wall. I said “Don't murder me”, and told Swain to take them into custody. Sergeant then came up and took hold of my collar. I knocked him down. He then got up and ran away and I caught him in Radnor Street. I did not notice any civilians about. I saw Swain use his staff. I do not know if he used it after the man was a prisoner. I used my staff to Moor because he kicked and struggled. (Witness here showed his hand which had evidently been bit in the struggle)

P.C. Hills said: Sergeant Reynolds went up to the soldiers. Shortly afterwards he whistled to us, and I and Swain went to his assistance. He had Moor and Kelly in custody; Moor nearly knocked Reynolds backwards. He told me to take Kelly into custody and to draw our staffs. The soldiers were drunk and used bad language. I do not know why we drew our staffs except because they knocked him down. All the prisoners resisted, and the Hussars said “If you use your staffs we will use our whips”, and commenced flourishing them about. A man named Richard Morford assisted me in handcuffing Kelly. Other civilians were there. I did not use my staff. The prisoner tried to kick me two or three times.

John Hobart, a sweep, and who appeared in his sables, said: I was going down High Street at three o'clock, and hearing screaming I proceeded to the bottom of the street. I met P.S. Reynolds and P.C.s Swain and Hills. Hills asked me to assist them. Sergeant went up to the station very quietly; he appeared quite sober. All three were in custody when I met them; Moor and Kelly resisted a little. Moor took hold of Reynolds' hand and put it to his mouth. Reynolds told him to let go several times; he would not, and Reynolds drew his staff and used it on his hand and head; Moor fell. I do not know if it was from the result of the blow. Reynolds asked him to get up, and as he would not he put his foot on Moor's thigh and made him moan. He was taken to the station. I never saw such ill-treatment as that was. Moor was hit once on the leg going up High Street because he would not walk.

Mr. Bateman here came from the Bench and examined the prisoner Moor, and said there were two severe bruises on the head.

Kelly denied making any disturbance; Sergeant said he was knocked down with a staff before he said a word; Moor said he never insulted anyone, and had never been treated so before.

The Bench fined Sergeant 5s. and costs for being drunk, and dismissed the charge of assault. As regards Moor they were sorry he was knocked about as he had been, but no doubt the police struck hard in their own defence, and they sentenced Moor and Kelly to prison for one month.

Southeastern Gazette 11 October 1869

Local News

George Kelly, William Sergeant, and Michael Moor, belonging to the Royal Artillery, were charged on Tuesday with being drunk and riotous, and assaulting the police in the execution of their duty.

On the charge being read over Moor nearly fainted. He presented a frightful appearance, his face and hair being covered with blood.

P.C. Swain deposed to seeing Kelly about ten o’clock that morning with two other soldiers attempting to get into the Engineer beerhouse, High Street. They said they wanted some beer, and witness told them it was past hours, and they had better go home. He followed them to the bottom of the town, where they commenced to knock at the door of the Harbour Inn. He again cautioned them, and they left. The prisoners went to other houses, and repeated the same offence. Several policemen tried to get them away, and a general row was the result.

A witness named John Hobart, a chimney sweep, said he heard screaming at the bottom of High Street, and on going there he saw the prisoners in custody. Moor had P.C. Reynolds’ hand to his mouth, and as he would not let go he knocked him on the hands and head with his staff, and Moor fell. The officer then asked him to get up. He made no answer, and Reynolds stamped on his thigh and made him moan. Witness considered the police were illtreating him.

Dr. Bateman, who was on the bench, examined Moor in the dock. He said he had received, as far as he could see, two severe blows on the head.

The prisoners denied their being drunk and assaulting the police.

The bench fined Sergeant 5s. and costs for being drunk, and sentenced Moor and Kelly to one month’s imprisonment.

 

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