DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Dover, December, 2018.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 20 December, 2018.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Barry Smith and Paul Skelton

Earliest 1865

(Name from)

Victoria

Latest 1875

(Name to)

Tower Street

Dover

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 2 February, 1865.

A RIOTOUS LODGER

Robert Crossley, a labourer was charged with doing wilful damage to a window at the "Victoria" public house, Tower Street, Charlton.

William Wright, landlord of the "Victoria" stated that the defendant lodged at his house, and about 6 o'clock last evening he came home very tipsy and abused some men who were at the bar. He told him to go to his room; but some few minutes afterwards he made a disturbance in his house, and on his going out from the back door, he bolted the door against him. The defendant then went round to the front door, and because he refused to let him in, he dashed some dirt from the road through his window, breaking two panes of glass.

The magistrate sent the man to prison for seven days, in default of payment of a fine of 5s. and 6s. costs.

 

 

A beerhouse earliest found date 1865 and it provides an example of punishments being meted out to careless publicans at that time.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 15 September, 1871. Price 1d.

A PUBLIC HOUSE OPEN AT ILLEGAL HOURS

William Hackoff, Stephen Wilson, and John Ballard were charged, on the information of Police-sergeant Stevens, with being in the “Victoria,” public-house, Tower Hamlets, during illegal hours, on Sunday morning, the 3rd of September.

It appeared that the landlord of the “Victoria,” John Hurrin, had been brought before the Magistrates on the previous Friday and convicted on the charge of having his house open for the sale of beer at illegal hours. The three defendants being found drinking in the public-house at the time, they attended before the Magistrates in answer to a summons which had been served on them.

Sergeant Barton gave the following evidence:- John Hurrin, the landlord of the “Victoria” public-house, was convicted on the 8th instant, for having his house open for the sale of beer on Sunday morning, the 3rd of September, during illegal hours. I visited the house on that occasion and found the three defendants there. They had some beer before them, and had apparently been drinking beer.

On being examined by Hackett, he said: You and Stephens were both drunk and asleep when I came in. I was obliged to follow you home, as I was afraid you would make a disturbance in the streets. Ballard tried to escape.

Stephens had nothing to say in his defence; but Hackett said he went to the public-house for the purpose of selling three rabbits which he had taken with him to the landlord. On his arriving there the landlord was not at home, and the landlady refused to buy the rabbits until Hurrin came in. He then went into the parlour for the purpose of waiting for Hurrin, and fell asleep.

Ballard said he had not touched a drop of beer; but admitted that he should have had half-a-pint had not the constable came in.

The Superintendent said he knew all three defendants very well, and there was nothing against them.

Mr. Mowll said he also knew them very well, and was very sorry to see them in so degrading a position. He must leave their case, however, in the hands of the Chairman.

Mr. back said that the good characters which had been given to the prisoners induced the Magistrates to treat the case somewhat leniently, although they could not altogether look over it, it being important that it should be understood that those frequenting public-houses during prohibited hours were equally liable to penalties as the proprietors. They had rendered themselves liable to a fine of 50s., but the bench exercising their leniency would initiate the penalty to 1s. and costs, 9s. 6d.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 21 June, 1872. Price 1d.

TRANSFERS

Mr. Coleman made an application on behalf of Mr. Thomas Casey, who had recently purchased his discharge from the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Buffs, to draw beer until next licensing day at the "Victoria Inn," Tower Hamlets, in place of the present tenant, Mr. Goldsack.

Superintendent Sanders, on being appealed to by the Bench, said he knew nothing whatever of the public-house in question or the applicant.

The Bench, under the circumstances, thought it best to suspend their decision for a week in order that the Superintendent might have an opportunity or making enquiries respecting the way in which the house in question had been conducted and as to the character of the applicant.

Dr. Astley said he thought that, in future, in order to save time and trouble, Mr. Coleman had better communicate with the Police before making these applications to the Bench.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 17 July, 1874. Price 1d.

GOING IN THE BACK WAY

Thomas Casey, of the “Victoria Inn,” Tower Hamlets, was charged with having his house open for the consumption of beer at four o'clock last Sunday afternoon, and two soldiers named Jonathan Swan and Thomas Mills, were charged with being on the premises. The soldiers said they came in through a garden at the back to wait for a friend who was dressing and did not know it was a public house, the soldiers were dismissed with a caution and the publican was fined £2 10s. 6d. and his license endorsed.

 

 

Casey, in July 1874, was caught supplying liquor to two soldiers at four p.m. one Sunday. He was fined two pounds and costs or fourteen days hard labour with licence endorsed.

 

I saw no mention of it after 1875. A "Victoria" pub was reported in Buckland in 1862 and there is always the possibility that the prefix "Queen" has been omitted in both cases.

 

Detective work tells me (Paul Skelton) that no sooner had the "Victoria" closed that the "White Lion" opened, so I am going to make an educated guess here that the two pubs are one and the same, although I do not have proof at this stage that they are under the same roof.

 

From the Dover Express. September 1871.

A Public House open at Illegal Hours - A Caution.

William Hackett, Stephen Wilson, and John Ballard were charged on the information of Police Sergeant Steven's with being in the Victoria Public House, Tower Hamlets during illegal hours on Sunday morning the 3rd of September. It appeared that the landlord of the “Victoria” John Hurrin, had been brought before the magistrates on the previous Friday and convicted on the charge of having his open for sale of beer at illegal hours. The three defendants being found drinking in the public house at the time, they attended before the magistrates in answer to a summons that had been served on them. Sergeant Barton gave the following evidence ---- John Hurrin the landlord of the Victoria Public House was convicted on the 8th inst. for having his house open for the sale of beer on Sunday morning, the 3rd September during illegal hours. I visited the house on that occasion and found the three defendants there. They had some beer before them and had apparently been drinking beer.

On being examined by Hackett he said; you and Stephen's were both drunk and asleep when I came in. I was obliged to follow you home, as I was afraid you would make a disturbance in the streets. Ballard tried to escape. Stephen's had nothing to say in his defence but Hackett said he went to the public house for the purpose of selling three rabbits, which he had taken with him to the landlord. On his arriving there the landlord was not at home, and the landlady refused to buy the rabbits until Hurrin came in. He then went into the parlour for the purpose of waiting for Hurrin and fell asleep.

Ballard said he had not touched a drop of beer but admitted that he should have had half a pint had not the constable come in. The superintendent said he knew all three defendants very well and there was nothing against them. Mr. Mowll said he also knew them very well and was sorry to see them in so degrading a position. He must leave their case however in the hands of the chairman. Mr. Back said that the good characters which had been given to the prisoners induced the magistrates to treat the case somewhat leniently though they could not altogether look over it, it being important that it should be understood that those frequenting public houses during prohibited hours were equally liable to penalties as the proprietors. They had rendered themselves liable to a fine of 50s. but the Bench excising their leniency would mitigate the penalty to 1s and costs 9s 6d. None of the prisoners were able to pay the fine and at their request a fortnight's grace was granted.

 

Information kindly supplied by Joyce Banks.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

WRIGHT William 1865+ Dover Express

HURRIN John to Nov/1871 Dover Express

GOLDSACK John Nov/1871-July/72 Dover Express

CASEY Thomas or John July/1872-Sept/74 Post Office Directory 1874Dover Express

HUNTLEY William Sept/1874-Jan/75 Dover Express (Plasterer of Charlton)

Last pub licensee had ANNETT William Enos Jan/1875 Next pub licensee had Dover Express

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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