DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Maidstone, April, 2021.

Page Updated Maidstone:- Friday, 02 April, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1798+

Compasses Inn

Latest 1874

(Name to)

120 Week Street

Maidstone

 

The premises exists in the song, "The Maidstone Landlords" in 1798.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 27 March 1838.

DEATH.

March 16, Ann, wife of Mr. R. Pattenden, of the "Compasses Inn," at Maidstone, aged 54.

 

Kentish Gazette, 31 December 1850.

MAIDSTONE. Drawing Extraordinary.

A lottery of poultry for Christmas consumption, has been for some days announced at the "Compasses Inn," Week-street. The drawing was however anticipated by some rogue, who, determined not to have a blank, managed to forestall his chance, by abstracting from the landlord's safe, a turkey, three geese, and a brace of ducks, with which he got clear off.

 

Kentish Gazette, 9 March 1852.

Inquest.

An inquest was held on Saturday in the new Assembly Room, at the "Compasses Inn," before F. F. Dally, Esq., coroner, on the body of a male child named Henry Bow Simmons, aged about one month, son of a brazier, of this town. The child was put in the same bed with its mother and father at about ten o'clock as well as usual, though suffering somewhat from a cold or cough which it had had from its birth. In the morning on taking it up its mother discovered that it was apparently dead; but whether she had lain on it or not she could not tell. She went for assistance, and afterwards on her husband coming home from work, he went for Mr. Sanders, surgeon, who attended and found deceased quite dead, but warm. From appearances which presented themselves, great lividity of countenance and protrusion of the tongue, with discoloration of the left hand, arm, and leg, he formed the opinion that death was caused by suffocation, occasioned most probably from having been accidentally over-lain by the mother.

 

From the Maidstone Telegraph, Rochester and Chatham Gazette, Saturday 7 January,1860. Price 1d.

G. TWITCHELL

"Compasses Inn," Week Street, Maidstone.

Noted for superior Wines, Spirits, and Malt Liquors of every description.

 

Maidstone Telegraph, Rochester and Chatham Gazette, Saturday 22 December 1860.

Maidstone Petty sessions.

Charles Humphrey and John Kelly, on remand, were charged with stealing a box of French plums, value 3s. 6d., from the shop of Mr. Bartlett, grocer, Week Street, and a further charged with stealing a pair of brass candlesticks, and some dominoes, from the "Compasses Inn."

Thomas Holmes, assistant to Mr. Bartlett, identified the box of plums as his master's property. It had been taken from a shelf in the shop near the door.

George Copper, marine store dealer, deposed to purchasing the plums of the prisoner for 1s. The prisoner also offered him a pair of candlesticks and some dominoes, which he (witness) refused to purchase.

Police Sergeant Hill said that in consequence of what Kelly (who was apprehended in the act of selling the candlesticks) told him he went to the shop of the last witness, where he obtained the box of plums now produced. On conveying the prisoners to gaol on the previous Saturday the prisoner Kelly said to Humphrey "after you sold the box of plums, did you not give me the two candlesticks to sell."

Humphrey:- "No."

Kelly:- "Yes you did, you said it was your turn now to go and sell them. I took them to the shop, and you stood outside, and if it had not been for you I should not have got into trouble."

Elisa Beal, servant at the "Compasses Inn," said that she knew the candlesticks to belong to her mistress, as she had been in the habit of cleaning them. She last saw them on Friday the 14th inst. They were then in the kitchen, and missed them about 3 hours afterwards. There were also some dominoes similar to those produced in a box near.

Walter Hodson, potman, at the "Compasses Inn," said, that on the afternoon in question he saw the prisoners in the tap room. He heard Humphrey say to Kelly "It's your turn now," to do something. Kelly immediately went out. On witness proceeding into the kitchen for some coals he saw him standing by the fireplace, and upon his asking him what he was doing there. He said he was "looking for some needles and thread." Witness said there were none there, and ordered him out, and upon turning around he saw him going out with something under his arm, but witness did not know what it was. He walked down the passage and out of the front door, and returned in about a quarter of an hour, when he called out the other prisoner. They left together and witness did not see them afterwards.

P.C. Phipps said that on the above named evening, about 7 o'clock, he was near the gaol, in private clothes, when he saw the prisoners in company together, and from what he overheard was induced to follow them. Kelly went into Mr. Bushnell's, iron monger, and witness follow. He asked Mr. Bushnell whether the prisoner Kelly had offered anything for sale. Mr. Bushnell said he had. Witness observed a candlestick partly concealed under the prisoners coat, and something bulky in one of his pockets. He pulled the candlestick from under the prisoners coat and another from his pocket, asking him how he could account for having them in his possession. Prisoner said "that's my business." Witness, however, informed him he was a constable, and must consider himself in custody. On searching him at the police station he also found in his pocket the dominoes produced.

Kelly pleaded guilty to both charges and Humphrey who had been a soldier, said he was innocent. He had been drinking with the prisoner and he had got into trouble and if convicted would lose his pension.

They were sentenced to 6 weeks' imprisonment with hard labour for each offence.

 

From the Kent and Sussex Courier, 19 September, 1873.

MAIDSTONE. FATAL BOAT ACCIDENT.

On Sunday evening a boat accident occurred on the Medway, between Maidstone and Tovil, which resulted in the death of W. Millen, landlord of the tap at the "Compasses Inn," Week-street. He was in a boat with two companions, named Thomas Shirley and Henry Hart, and a sudden movement on the part of the deceased upset the boat. Shirley and Hart managed to reach the bank, but deceased, who was unable to swim, was drowned. The body was recovered at about half-past eight o’clock, and removed to the "King’s Head Inn," West Borough, where an inquest was held on Tuesday, and a verdict of accidental death recorded.

 

 

When the London, Chatham and Dover Railway opened in 1874, the pub was renamed the "Railway Guard Hotel."

 

LICENSEE LIST

REYNOLDS Thomas 1830+ Kentish Gazette

PATTENDEN R Mr 1838+

TWITCHELL William to May/1860 Whitstable Times

FULLER Margaret Mrs May/1860+ Whitstable Times

MILLEN W to Sept/1873 dec'd

 

Whitstable TimesWhitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald

Kentish GazetteKentish Gazette

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML

 

LINK to http://www.kentphotoarchive.com/